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Yes, you can write: an introduction to creative writing

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The deadline for booking a place on this course has passed. Please use the 'Ask a Question' button to register your interest in future or similar courses.

an introduction to creative writing

Are you itching to write the novel in your head? Do you hope to write a family story that remains untold? Or do you just want to delight in writing for writing’s sake, putting words down that will grip the reader, and give you huge pleasure and satisfaction? No prior experience is needed for this course, given by two experienced authors and tutors. It will focus primarily on telling stories in fiction or non-fiction (including life writing), and will also touch on poetry and writing for performance.

Course delivery and schedule

The course includes 7 x 90-minute sessions with plenty of opportunity for further conversations and networking during breaks and mealtimes.

Aims of the course

  • Help build a positive, joy-filled, fear-free approach to creative writing within a mutually supportive environment
  • Enable you to gain a broad understanding of the various techniques that lift dull prose off the page and make it zing
  • Give you the confidence through stimulating practical exercises to stretch and develop your writing talents, both during the course and beyond

The course sets out to cover some of the basic ingredients that make up creative writing in both fiction and non-fiction. These include description, character, plot structure and narrative voice. You will be encouraged to share your work on the understanding that these are rough drafts and not polished perfection; and everyone can learn from everyone else. Though the emphasis will be on practical exercises and sheer enjoyment of writing, we’ll also scrutinise and critique different types of published writing, gaining insights from an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses.

Presentation of the course

The course will involve a range of practical exercises, study of both fiction and non-fiction, and a good deal of class discussion.

Course programme

Please plan to arrive between 16:30 and 18:30. You can meet other course participants in the Terrace Bar which opens at 18:15. Tea and coffee making facilities are available in the study bedrooms.

Course materials

Course materials include the course syllabus, detailed timetable, reading list and tutor biography. Once these materials are available, you can download them from the Documents section below. 

We will also email these to you before your course starts. Please check your spam folder if you have not received them.

Please note that our weekend courses are non-credit bearing and there is no formal assessment.

About Madingley Hall

This weekend course takes place at Madingley Hall, home to the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Built in the 16th century, Madingley Hall is a Grade 1 listed building, and is set in eight acres of landscaped gardens designed in the 18th century by ‘Capability’ Brown. Madingley is just four miles from the centre of Cambridge, and only 60 minutes from London, with excellent links to London airports.

As a student you will enjoy award-winning cuisine in our elegant Dining Hall and first-rate facilities in an atmospheric and inspiring setting. You can choose to stay at the Hall in comfortable en suite accommodation, or attend as a non-resident.

Accommodation

Accommodation for residential students is provided in single, double or twin study bedrooms, with attractive views over the woods, gardens and courtyard.

Each room has internet access, a digital television and a direct-dial telephone, as well as tea- and coffee-making facilities and a safe for valuables. Rooms are all en suite and centrally heated.

A lift gives access to two bedrooms adapted for wheelchair users, and all areas on the ground floor can be reached once inside the building. If you would like us to make any special provision for your stay, please let us know when booking and we will be happy to discuss your requirements. 

Residential fees cover tuition, accommodation and meals from Friday dinner to Sunday lunch (a total of two breakfasts, two lunches, and two evening meals), as well as morning coffee and afternoon tea during teaching hours. 

Non-residential fees include tuition, lunches, evening meals, morning coffee and afternoon tea during teaching hours. 

Please note: accommodation spaces are limited and priority is given to course attendees. Non-residential places are available for those who live locally or who prefer to stay elsewhere. If space permits, non-student guests may accompany a course attendee for the weekend, paying the rate below for accommodation and meals. 

* where rooms are shared by course attendees, ie, where a partner or family member is also enrolled on a weekend course. 

Extra nights

We may be able to offer accommodation after your course should you wish to extend your stay. Please contact us if you would like to book an additional night. 

Dietary requirements

If you have any specific dietary requirements or allergies please indicate these when booking. 

Bursaries for teachers

Our State School Teacher bursary offers 50% off tuition fees for any teacher with Qualified Teacher Status working in a UK state-funded school or further education institution. 

You will be asked to enter the name and contact details of the school when booking.

Getting to Madingley Hall

The Institute of Continuing Education is based at Madingley Hall (CB23 8AQ) in the village of Madingley, four miles west of Cambridge. It is easily accessible from the M11, A14 and A428. Other gateways include Cambridge Main Railway Station and London airports.  

If you are arriving in Cambridge by train you can take a taxi to Madingley Hall. Please contact Reception to book a taxi for your return journey. 

Free on-site car parking is available and we have a small number of spaces close to the Hall entrance for Blue Badge holders. 

Who can book?

Our weekend courses are open to participants over the age of 18 and courses are taught at approximately first-year undergraduate level. No academic qualifications are required and most courses are suitable for students who are new to the subject. Please ensure that you complete any required reading listed in your course materials before the course starts to enable you to fully participate and get the maximum enjoyment out of your course.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, you will need to satisfy yourself that you have the required near-native command of the language to get the maximum benefit from studying with us.

Accessibility for students with support requirements

We make every effort both to anticipate and to make reasonable adjustments to meet the needs of students with support requirements including those with unseen disabilities, including mental health conditions, and specific learning difficulties, such as dyslexia.

Please ensure you let us know about any support requirements when booking so that we can offer you the support and advice you require before your course starts, enabling a smooth transition to your studies.

If when booking you indicate that you require additional support, you will be sent a Student Additional Requirements Form (SARF) to complete. The form asks for further details about your requirements and support needs, and requests that you submit supporting evidence.

If you have any particular requirements or queries please contact the Disability Liaison team at [email protected]  

Booking a course

To book a weekend course please click the Book Now button at the top of the course page. You will be taken to our secure bookings portal where you can set up an account using your email address, and pay for your course by credit or debit card.

Payment can be made by credit/debit card using our secure online booking system, unless otherwise arranged. You can either pay in full at the time of booking, or pay a 15% registration fee as a deposit; the balance will automatically be taken two weeks before the start of the course. 

Booking deadlines

Bookings close 11 days before the start of the course. If your preferred course is full at the time of booking you can add yourself to a waiting list. You will be notified, by email, if a place becomes available. We recommend that you book early to avoid missing out.

Before booking your course, please ensure that you have read and understood our Booking terms and conditions .

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Course dates

Course duration, accommodation fees.

Single room: £75 per night

Double/Twin room £65 per person, per night (2 people sharing)

Academic Directors, Course Directors and Tutors are subject to change, when necessary.

Qualifications / Credits

Course code.

Institute of Continuing Education Madingley Hall Madingley Cambridge CB23 8AQ

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Melio Full Colour

Academic subjects

10 Nov 2021

Introduction to Creative Writing

New to the world of creative writing? Read our introductory guide to the subject and learn all the techniques you need to master the craft.

by Katie Broadbent · 13 min read

At school and college, much of the writing we’re used to doing is for formal, academic writing. Very rarely do we have the opportunity to learn about and try our hand at ‘ creative writing .’

In its most simplest form, creative writing is a way of writing that encompasses a range of different genres and styles outside the more formal scope of academic writing. And here at Melio , it’s one of the most popular subjects our students choose to study with us online .

With an opportunity to express oneself, defy the rules of writing that you’re constrained to in school, and immerse yourself in a world that’s totally fascinating to you - is it any surprise that it’s such an intriguing subject for so many?

For those of you who are new to the craft, we’ve put together an introduction to creative writing to teach you all about the subject and help you hone your writing skills for creative success.

What is creative writing?

Defining creative writing into a singular sentence or definition is quite difficult. As the name suggests, creative writing is all about using your own creativity - your own imaginative, out-of-the-box, embellished way of thinking to create a piece of text. 

In this way, creative writing can actually be any type of writing that goes beyond the traditional realms of normal, professional, academic or technical forms of writing. It’s constrained by no standard conventions and uses a whole range of elements in its craft to keep it new, fresh and contemporary.

As a mode of writing, it can combine a number of different genres and styles across a whole range of fields of both fictional and non-fiction writing; storytelling, playwriting, poetry, prose, journalistic, and more. 

Although the definition can be quite vague, creative writing can, for the most part, be defined as any type of writing that is original and able to express yourself, your feelings, or an environment (whether physical or imaginative).

When most people think of the term ‘creative writing,’ they think of poetry and prose. And they’re not wrong. Creative writing places an emphasis on narrative craft, focusing on elements such as character development, narrative and plot, while permeating with your own imagination, invention and story. 

If you were to study the subject at university, or during an online course, your learning will probably cover the different elements of creative writing, which usually includes poetry and prose, among others.

What are the different types of creative writing?

As we’ve already established, there are lots of different types of creative writing, which can be categorised either as fiction or nonfiction. You may have already heard about some of the most popular, which include:

Biographies and other non-fiction

Fiction: novels, novellas, short stories, etc. 

Poetry and spoken word

Playwriting/scriptwriting

Personal essays

What makes a good piece of creative writing?

How can I make my work the best it can be? It’s something we all want to know. In fact, it’s innate in all of us; to want to produce the very best work that we can to impress our peers, readers and tutors. 

And when it comes to creative writing, where we are often expressing ourselves or sharing our vulnerabilities, it’s completely understandable to want to portray the things that are so personal to us in the very best light possible.

But, when it comes to creative writing,  it’s important to note that there are no defined rules about what it means to create a ‘good’ piece of creative writing. As the very name suggests, creative writing is an imaginative process, created by the individual with all their quirks and personalities. In fact, what constitutes whether your work is ‘good’ is whether it's authentic and true to the idea you had and the message you wanted to portray.

Creative writing doesn’t fit one set genre and therefore there will never be an umbrella definition to describe the ‘perfect’ piece. Just think about a Gothic short story and then compare it to the features of a great Romantic poem – the two are so very different – it wouldn’t be fair to judge them together. 

However, with that being said, there are a few general principles that you can follow to make your creative writing as strong as it can be - that is, making it authentic to you and therefore believable to your reader.

Know your audience

All the very best stories are created with their target reader in mind throughout the whole process. Why? Because it’s exactly what you need to know in order to really tailor your writing and connect with that ideal person.

Any creative writer should begin their writing by plotting out exactly who they want to read their work - a target persona. How old are they? What are their interests? What creative writing techniques feature in similar works they enjoy? Why would they read your work?

Once you have this in mind, and you continually refer to your persona during the writing process,  your work will naturally begin to take direction and flow in a way that seems appropriate to your target reader.

Write what you know  

Quite often, the best stories are those which we can connect to and relate in one or another way to our own lives. Or, they’re stories which seem so authentic that you could imagine it to be about the writer’s own life. 

Why?  Because they’re real to the writer and their authenticity shines through. And if you really want to connect and make your reader feel your work, it needs to seem real to them.

Now, this doesn’t mean that you quite literally have to write about your life, but drawing on knowledge you have about different elements of our lives to give your story some authenticity and more believability.

Even if you’re touching on topics you’re new to, immersing yourself in that world as much as possible - either by reading, watching, listening, or even meeting the very people that are in it - will ensure that authenticity shines through, and your writing is as authentic as it can be. 

Creativity is key 

Rather un-ironically, creativity is one of the most important elements of creative writing. Having your own ideas, themes, messages, narratives, worlds and characters is what sets you apart from other pieces of writing in your genre. It’s what distinguishes you as a writer.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that if you’re creating a biographical piece that you need to write a tale about a totally fantastical and mythical world with unique creatures that live within it. After all, that would totally eliminate your entire genre. 

But simply use your creativity to think a little outside the box and put a unique twist on things; using literary devices like metaphors, alliteration, and varied sentence structure to make your work unique and interesting.

Challenge your imagination 

One of the great things about creative writing is that there is no definition or rules on ‘how’ to write. It’s an open, expressive platform. One that’s totally unique to you and relies on your own interpretations.

You should take this as an opportunity to challenge your imagination and see where it could take you. Some of the most interesting pieces of literature are thought-provoking or make us question the writing or world around us. Where could your next story take you?

Plot a loose arc

Now, although we have just established how loose the bounds of creative writing can be, it’s still important that you still implement some rules within your writing. And one of those is that you plot a loose story arc for any piece of literature you create. 

Story arcs are critical at giving your writing direction and purpose, helping you to write the whole piece at a good pace, without writing any superfluous content or ‘waffle.’ No matter what genre you’re writing in, you should have a general idea of where your story is going, ensuring you hit all the messages you want it to.

Follow your story arc, and your writing will have a strong structure, pace and direction – keeping the motions flowing and your readers more engaged.

What are some techniques used in creative writing?

Looking for ways to make your writing stand out more? Or shine a new perspective? 

All creative writers implement techniques and tools to keep their writing more entertaining, giving the readers depth and feeling to maintain their interest. 

There are hundreds of creative writing techniques that you can use within your writing (and we certainly aren’t going to make you read through an exhaustive list now). But, to get you thinking about what creative elements you can start to infuse into your writing, take a look at some of the most popularly-used techniques below.

Character development – The process of creating a well-rounded, realistic character with depth, personality, and clear goals or motivations.

Plot development – The story of your piece of writing – how it develops, unfolds, and moves along in time.

Point of view – The perspective from which a narrative is told. It indicates who is telling the story and how the information is conveyed to the reader. Quite often writers will play with the point of view of the central character or protagonist to trick the reader and twist their perspective. 

Dialogue – Refers to the speech and conversations characters use to speak to one another. Dialogue and the language choices a character makes can be pivotal in helping define their personality.

Literary devices – Such as metaphors, similes and alliteration to make creative writing more imaginative and descriptive. These are used in a myriad of ways by writers to make their writing more vivid, interesting and engaging 

How to start creative writing

Now you’ve learned more about creative writing, we’re sure you’re eager to learn more about how you can start creative writing. 

Luckily, it’s much easier to launch into it than you may have first thought, with the rules of how to write creatively and what to include designed entirely around you. In fact, the most difficult part is actually starting writing! 

With that being said, here’s our 3 top tips on where to source inspiration and unleash your creative ideas.

Read at every opportunity

For creative writers, inspiration is all around you. quite literally. .

In the 21st Century, it’s never been easier to access work from some work from some of the most acclaimed writers out there. Whether it’s accessing short articles online that they’ve collaborated on, visiting your local library to check out their latest book, browsing the local charity shop, scrolling through their Twitter feed, or listening to their audiobook on your way to school or university, there are so many different ways to access and seek new ideas and inspiration. 

Now, it’s important to remember that although you may have a favourite reader, you shouldn’t limit yourself to reading only their works. Yes, they can really help to immerse you in that particular genre or style of writing, but you need to read publications from other writers to keep fresh ideas and inspiration coming in.

In fact, be sure to check out works from a whole range of different authors, genres, and styles to diversify your reading, and ensure your work is as well-informed as possible. You never know, you may just pick up a niche character trope from a genre or author you may never have considered before! 

2. Start journaling 

Struggling to get those first few sentences on the page? Or need help to unlock the narrative of a story you’ve been plotting for some time? Starting a journal can really help to unlock your creativity and help your thoughts and writing flow easily. 

Getting into the habit of writing each day is something so small you can do, but one which can have a profound impact on your work. Try it yourself: set a timer for 5 minutes, open your notebook, and tell yourself that you’re going to continually write about literally anything that’s preoccupied you that day. 

The more you let your stream of consciousness flow, the easier you’ll find it to build on your ideas, thoughts, and narrative, and become a better long-form writer. You never know, you could even find your next great idea from something you’ve journaled about!

3. Write, write, write! 

Want to know what’s the one biggest thing you can do to start creative writing? Well, actually start. Pick up your pen or laptop, and put your ideas onto paper. 

Whether you have a single conversation starter for a character, or a complete narrative arc, you will only begin your creative writing journey when you physically do it. And I promise that once you begin to write something, ideas will flow to you more easily, and you’ll find the process much easier.

Even if you have no idea on what to write – look for writing prompt inspiration from all around you and start drafting literally anything that comes to your head. It may not be your next bestseller, but the more you practice unleashing your creativity, the easier you will find it to write over longer periods of time and express your ideas.

Creative writing is an expressive form of contemporary literature; one which allows you to draw on your own self-expression, imagination and ideas to portray a particular message, emotion, or narrative. It defies the traditional bounds of other forms of formal writing and instead follows no generalised set of guidelines, rhythms or routines.

For those looking to get started with creative writing, it’s important to really immerse yourself in the world of literature, reading and writing as much as you can – and even workshopping your work where possible. Creative writing courses and workshops are a great way to meet other like-minded students, share knowledge and feedback, and really upskill yourself.

Study Creative Writing Online

Ready to put pen to paper? Learn tried and tested writing techniques from some of Oxford and Cambridge’s greatest published tutors with our online Creative Writing course.

Whether you’re new to the subject or looking to advance your writing skill, our online Creative Writing course will help develop your own writing voice and style, while learning crucial elements of structure to help your workflow. You’ll learn amongst a small group of passionate writers of similar age and ability as you - where you can share ideas, workshop your writing, and seek inspiration. 

Alternatively, if you prefer to work one-on-one with an experienced writer, you can opt for our Creative Writing Tutorials . Here, you’ll have one-on-one coaching with one of your expert tutors who will teach you more about the fundamentals of the subject, introduce you to new writers and techniques, and have the chance to workshop your writing with a professional. 

It’s the most influential learning environment, with the most inspiring tutor – guaranteed to get your creative juices flowing!

Contact us to find out more or apply today to reserve your place

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Introduction to Creative Writing

English 110s.

ENGLISH 110S.01

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

Faulkner (Carol) Fox Online

This course encourage students to explore and practice four genres of creative writing: creative nonfiction, fiction, playwriting, and poetry. Part of the class will be devoted to peer critique of student work (“workshopping”), and part to discussions of craft as well as close reading of published essays, stories, and poems; and close watching of scenes from plays. There will be weekly writing assignments, and students will also submit a final portfolio of finished work.

ENGLISH 110S.02

Mesha Maren

Introduction to Creative Writing is a hands-on, interactive exploration of nonfiction, poetry, playwriting, and fiction. Students will read examples from each genre and discuss the craft elements demonstrated in each text. We will then go on to try our own hand at drafting and revising essays, poems, plays, and prose. No previous experience is necessary.

ENGLISH 110S.03

Akhil Sharma Hybrid

Learning to write creatively is like learning to sing, in that the writer is similar to a singer in being her own instrument. The writer's specific sensibility and especial competencies determine the range of excellence that the writer can comfortably operate in.

This course will focus on three genres: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. More particularly, the course will focus on the sonnet, the profile, and the short story. Each section will feed into the next: the stanza preparing us for the paragraph, and the interview leading into third person point-of-view.

Because learning to write creatively involves developing a form of muscle memory, there will be almost daily writing exercises. There will also be, and equally importantly, a daily writer's diary of the experience of performing the exercise.

The end goal of the course is to develop both a suppleness with language and an awareness as to our particular responses to specific subjects and technical challenges.

Requirements: Almost daily writing exercises. Grades: Writing assignments 50%; Participation 50%.

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Typically offered.

  • Duke English Administration
  • Learning Objectives
  • Resources for Faculty
  • Best Practices
  • English Minor
  • Creative Writing Minor
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Student Spotlight
  • Global Education
  • Thesis & Distinction
  • Creative Writing Contest
  • Critical Essay Contest
  • Scholarships & Awards
  • 2023 Award Winners
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  • Resources & Forms
  • 2023-2024 English Department Ambassadors
  • Undergraduate Alumni
  • Collective Standards of Conduct and Values
  • Timeline and Deadlines
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  • Best Practices Exams & Reading Lists
  • Graduate Courses
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  • Gateway Courses
  • Area I: Medieval & Early Modern
  • Area II: 18th & 19th Century
  • Area III: Modern & Contemporary
  • Criticism, Theory or Methodology Courses
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  • Primary Faculty
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  • David L. Paletz Creative Writing Guest Series
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an introduction to creative writing

The Writers Bureau

An introduction to creative writing.

Come and explore the exciting world of creative writing to discover what you can do to take your writing forward and become a successful writer.

Find out what sort of writer you want to be

Welcome to the wonderful world of writing.  If you like the idea of being a writer, then you’re in the right place. This mini course has been designed to help you explore what being a writer is all about, and introduce you to the major forms of creative writing.

Working through the six lessons, you’ll look at who can be a writer and what skills you’ll need. You’ll be shown many different types of writing, so you can begin to think about what you really want to write, and in what form.

Throughout the course there are short exercises that will help you reflect on why you want to write, what your aims and ambitions are, and how you’re going to achieve them. Understanding your own motivation is an important part of the writing journey.

Once you enrol, you'll be taking the first steps on that journey; a journey where you’ll start to develop into a writer. It will be fun. It will be exciting. And, at times it will be challenging. But ultimately, we hope you’ll find it satisfying and extremely rewarding.

The course finishes by looking at a number of options available to help you start your writing life, support you along the way, and help develop your craft. 

Once you’ve worked your way through all the lessons, you should have gained a good understanding of what to expect as a writer, which type of writing you want to explore, what you hope to gain from it, and how best to move forward.

 So, enrol now and let’s get started.

Enrol Now For Free

Click here to start on your writing journey.

See What Others Say

Great course for self reflection.

A well thought out course which has helped me explore the type of writing I want to do. I will be signing up for the Comprehensive Creative Writing course

Provoking Thoughts and Ideas

Michael overington.

After reading through and digesting the content of this mini course, I realised that becoming a writer could be an achievable goal by following the systemati...

After reading through and digesting the content of this mini course, I realised that becoming a writer could be an achievable goal by following the systematic and logical advice offered by the Writers Bureau, and I especially liked the common sense approach in making a choice as to what genre of writing may suit in order to get started.

A Refreshing and Encouraging Start

Shannon wilton.

I really enjoyed completing the 'Introduction to Creative Writing' course. It was a useful and simple start to the daunting world of writing. For me, who is ...

I really enjoyed completing the 'Introduction to Creative Writing' course. It was a useful and simple start to the daunting world of writing. For me, who is now in their twenties, it was a nice guide for pointing me in the right direction and educating me in all the different ways I could incorporate writing into my daily life. It is a great and refreshing beginning for those who are interested in writing, yet don't know where to start. For a free course, it was great!

Excellent course

Emma pettit.

This course gave me a lovely insight into what it would be like to pursue writing on a more serious level. It helped me reflect on my motivations to write an...

This course gave me a lovely insight into what it would be like to pursue writing on a more serious level. It helped me reflect on my motivations to write and narrow down my ideas . Thank you!

Mandy Clarke

Loved this course. Reminded me of my ambition. Just what I needed. Thank you 😊

Course curriculum

Welcome To Your Course

Lesson One: Your Motivation

Why Do You Want To Write?

Exercise One

Lesson Two: Who Can Be A Writer?

Who Can Be A Writer?

Walks Of Life

Does Age Matter?

Qualifications And Skills

Exercise Two

Lesson Three: Types Of Writing

Types Of Writing

Non-Fiction Writing

Exercise Three

Fiction Writing

Exercise Four

Lesson Four: Choosing What To Write

Where To Start

Exercise Five:

Lesson Five: Finding Time To Write

Finding Time To Write

Keeping A Time Diary

Exercise Six

Lesson Six: Developing Your Craft

Where To Find Help

Next Steps With The Writers Bureau

Exercise Seven

an introduction to creative writing

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Writers' Treasure

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An Introduction to Creative Writing

  • Creative Writing Tips
“Creative writing is considered to be any writing, fiction, poetry, or non-fiction, that goes outside the bounds of normal professional, journalistic, academic, and technical forms of literature. Works which fall into this category include novels, epics, short stories, and poems. Writing for the screen and stage, screenwriting and playwriting respectively, typically have their own programs of study, but fit under the creative writing category as well.

It’s clear that Wikipedia does not give a clear definition but only says that it is considered any writing which is outside the bounds. To rephrase that:

In any subject, concepts can only be understood by examples. Fiction, poetry and non-fiction are all examples of creative writing. We’ll look at them in detail in future instalments of this series. For now, let’s see what constitutes creative writing.

The Work Which You Can Recognise as Creative Writing

As said before, fiction, poetry and non-fiction are the examples of creative writing. They are examples because they are obviously creative and not necessarily true (with the exception of non-fiction). Fiction is written to entertain and educate. We love reading stories. Although there are some true stories, most stories are nothing but fiction. Then there is poetry, of which there are many forms. Poetry books, sonnets, haikus, pantoums, etc.

The above examples are obviously creative writing. But now we come to more subjective material. Ever heard of an autobiography or a biography ? I’m sure you have. Then there is its distant cousin the memoir . Famous people make millions by publishing memoirs, and some of them are popular reading material. Famous personalities also write autobiographies or pay someone to write their biography. This is also constituted under creative writing.

The fact is that these types of writing are not written to entertain (and personally I’m bored to sleep by them) but to educate (in some cases) and to inform (in most cases). In bookstores, biographies and autobiographies are sold along with stories. If I may be honest, I have never seen people buy them. Then again, this may be because I’m too busy checking out the latest novels.

And so that is what constitutes creative writing in a nutshell. Now let’s look at the work which you can recognise as not creative writing, and to use its technical term, technical writing.

The Work Which You Can Recognise as Other Professional Forms of Writing

Most of the writing written in the world falls under this category, technical writing. Advertisements. Web copy. Copywriting. Product descriptions. Textbooks. Reference material such as encyclopaedias. Letters (such as formal letters to get an interview etc).

Words which appear everywhere, on your TV screen, on the computer and on the paper. All technical writing. Technical writing is in some ways easier to write than creative writing. But it too is governed by rules, and has its own do’s and don’ts.

A further comparison of creative writing and technical writing will be made in a future post.

Writers which compose the material of books are called authors regardless of the content and style of the material. This is one area where creative writing and technical writing share a similarity.

It goes without saying that technical writing is not written to entertain therefore I find it rather boring to read and so do other people. Surely you’ve read the Terms & Conditions of some website. How boring it is to read. Though you see words that make sense, you are not moved by them. Whereas in creative writing… if it’s really good… you can’t put it down.

Creative Writing Means What You Believe It Means

Is creative writing an art or a craft? Of course, the debate will never finish. But I do believe that it is both. Therefore it is something special of an art and a craft. Forget about definitions. Use your own creativity and find your very own meaning of creative writing. Somebody said that writers have a gift. Especially creative writers. Creative writers have the power to entertain someone, to make someone laugh, to make someone cry. To make someone think .

And so we see that creative writing does not deserve a clear definition, but attention and a special meaning. I love creative writing. I love reading it and I love writing it. Are you like me? If you are, then what are you waiting for? Open that word processor, and start typing. You never know, you might find a hidden masterpiece.

To read more about creative writing, go to Creative Writing 101 , or get free updates to Writers’ Treasure today.

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Further reading:.

  • Creative Writing vs. Technical Writing
  • How to Get Started in Creative Writing in Just Three Steps
  • Creative writing in 2015: here’s what you need to know
  • Creative Non-Fiction: What is it?
  • Four Top-Notch Ways to Polish Your Writing Skills with Creative Writing

29 thoughts on “An Introduction to Creative Writing”

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I really found this site helpful to me during my studies today in my online class. It was a great help with ideas and guidance.Thanks.

I want to join your class

Thanks for the nice introduction to creative writing! I always thought that autobiography is a form of creative writing. Blogging too is a form of creative writing because it is undisciplined and inspiration-driven.

Of course autobiography is also a form of creative writing. And as for blogging… it depends.

Arę You a writer blogger or autobiographer

Sentence : (wrong)

Of course autobiography is also a form of creative writing. ( dont start a sentence with a conjunction especially AND) And as for blogging… it depends.

Correction: (right)

Of course ( include— an ) an autobiography is also a form of creative writing. As for Blogging, it varies. ( you do not start a sentence with a conjunction cardinal rule my fine english speaking friend )

If you are going to teach me English please take time to understand it yourself . Thank you

This piece was very helpful thanks.

I am a beginner and I want to learn creative writing, can anyone please guide me in this regard. Can you please let me know about any good online course for creative writing?

I know that groupon us a course for $39 that helps you to write an actual novel upon completion.

You cant learn creative writing. It comes from your heart, your soul, at least that’s what I think it is. I am not a very good creative writer but I dont think any kind of course will help you. Creative writing is within you and the only way to improve it is to write. Just get a book and start writing.

If you really want help you can contact me about it, I do write books, unpublished yet but on wattpad, and even though you can’t really teach someone, I can give you tips and guidance. Contact me at [email protected] , [email protected] , or on instagram at halo.universe.

forget about a course and give birth to a creative writer. one day, he will become a great writer. carry on.

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Hello. Love your blogging. I just have one question: what should the structure of creative writing be like?

As the blogger has mentioned that anything written or any literary genre as the product of creative mind is creative writing. There is no specific structure for writing. But especially for writing literary genres the writer should learn it’s features , techniques, acquire command over the language .

Hi Idrees I am a mom I love the explanation of creative writing the reason that I am writing u I need some advice I have a 9yr old son he don’t like writing nor reading but it’s a requirement for school he prefers to watch TV sometimes I feel he has no sense of imagination but I have try classes and everything not one on one but regularly classes can u give me some tips to get him more interested in doing creative writing it very important to me I am not on twitter but facebook Kavita chotilal

It’s important to consider that a 9-year-old still is very young and has a lot of time left to develop creative writing skills. When I was 9-years old, I too had no interest whatsoever in creative writing, and I did not even read books. You have to encourage him step by step, gradually, to read first and then learn the creative writing skills. Adventure and mystery stories are generally preferred by that age group. You can try reading aloud if he doesn’t want to read by himself. Also, don’t forget to be patient – a mindset doesn’t change quickly.

Great stuff man… Very informative. Keep up the great work

Such a simple and clear article to understand what Creative Writing is. ThankYou Sir!

So educative keep on . I enjoyed the teaching on creative writing

Thanks a lot

“Terms & Conditions of some website…” are not written by technical writers. They are written by lawyers. And as a very experienced technical writer, I take exception to your claim that, “Technical writing is in some ways easier to write than creative writing.” Both types of writing are subject to specific skills. Technical writers provide a service for users who would be unable to operate their hardware or sofware application without guidance from a user manual. As most technical manuals deal with hi-tech products, the technical writer is required to have a full grasp of the technology and to be able to explain and instruct users in the use of the product in language that complies with the user’s level of understanding. I also have experience in creative writing, which is the antithesis of technical writing in terms of using rich, vivid language to excite and capture the reader. Please don’t be dismissive of technical writing. It is not something a writer with experience in different authoring fields, would be able to do without training.

thanks a lot

We should enhance creative writing and reading books to develops our public speaking

This website is very helpful for me, durimg my online classes. And I want to learn more about creative writing.

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Tips and tricks to improve your creative writing tips and tricks to improve your creative writing.

  • 1. Why reading up on grammar, spelling and punctuation is the sign of a good writer 2. The myth of proof reading and editing, and how to debunk it 3. Why your first draft won’t be up to scratch, and why revising works 4. And why getting rid of flowery prose, adverbs and unnecessary adjectives is good

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Why You Should Write Like You Talk (And How I Defeated Writers’ Block) Why You Should Write Like You Talk (And How I Defeated Writers’ Block)

For a whole week, I was struck with writers’ block. I couldn’t write blog posts. Only blog posts. I could write fiction well. I could write essays and letters well. But blog posts and articles? No. I tried, tried and tried some more. And nothing happened.

I had about five post drafts waiting, each of them filled up with only three paragraphs. I had great ideas. I had great inspiration. The post was so good that I couldn’t wait to write it. However, when I opened that blank document and started to write, I got a feeling.

A vague feeling.

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Creative Writing Skills: Do You Have Them All? Creative Writing Skills: Do You Have Them All?

Do you know that creative writing isn’t easy?

Silly question, I know. But do you know that there are a certain set of skills which you need to master if you want to be an expert in it?

And the questions that comes out of this are: what are these skills? And are they important?

Read on for the first question. As for the second, of course you already know that the answer is going to be:

“Of course!”

  • Who Else Wants to Master the Creative Writing Skills?

Library Home

Write or Left

(6 reviews)

an introduction to creative writing

Sybil Priebe, North Dakota State College of Science

Copyright Year: 2016

Last Update: 2022

ISBN 13: 9798783934094

Publisher: Sybil Priebe

Language: English

Formats Available

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an introduction to creative writing

Reviewed by Corinne Ehrfurth, CE Instructor, Rochester Community & Technical College on 2/10/23

Priebe's book evocatively pushes the definition of "creative writing" to teach beyond the typical genres and modes. read more

Comprehensiveness rating: 5 see less

Priebe's book evocatively pushes the definition of "creative writing" to teach beyond the typical genres and modes.

Content Accuracy rating: 5

All the content looks accurate as well as engaging and thought-provoking.

Relevance/Longevity rating: 4

Leading with tweets could easily be replaced if this social media platform goes under after all the hullabaloo with Musk at the helm.

Clarity rating: 5

While Priebe's book plays off older texts with the ABCs, theses notes--such as the B, "inclusivity" (pg. 12), frames the textbook on a progressive scale that reaches outside notions of the pre-1980s literary canon. This textbook would not fit instructors concerned with a legacy and historical approach to creative writing.

Consistency rating: 5

The pattern of exercises, student examples, questions, tips or feedback continues throughout the entire textbook to provide modeling of habits, reasoning, and qualities of the genres of creative writing while also inviting classes of students to push the boundaries.

Modularity rating: 5

Hyper-modular with sound-bite like inclusions of tweets, call-out quotes, and other breaks in the text itself. The table of contents subdivides the last chapter into subheadings that the rest of the chapters could also be split into right away. Since the author cites herself (see a blog post on pg. 24 for example), some self-referential moments occur.

Organization/Structure/Flow rating: 5

The genre-based chapters provide a familiarity to long-time instructors of creative writing while also being student-friendly for writers who want to dive right away into something particular.

Interface rating: 4

The primary font choice becomes increasingly distracting the longer one reads, as it looks as if it's from a typewriter. Students with dyslexia might have greater issues reading this text when compared with other options.

Grammatical Errors rating: 4

Chapter titles and subtitles are not capitalized, which personally bothers me but fits the trendy style that might draw in younger students and less mature writers.

Cultural Relevance rating: 3

The more one reads this textbook, the less it makes good on its promise to include diverse voices since it features Walt Whitman and other typical canonical writers' excerpts as well as white people's or organization's tweets.

I especially enjoy how interactive this textbook would feel for writing students who want to hone and practice their craft.

Reviewed by Rachele Salvini, Emerging Writer Lecturer, Gettysburg College on 11/7/22

I decided to adopt Write or Left: an OER Book for Creative Writing Classes for my Introduction to Creative Writing classes for multiple reasons. The clarity and conciseness of the textbook makes it an excellent tool for college students who are... read more

I decided to adopt Write or Left: an OER Book for Creative Writing Classes for my Introduction to Creative Writing classes for multiple reasons. The clarity and conciseness of the textbook makes it an excellent tool for college students who are approaching writing creatively for the first time. I have used a few commercial textbooks and anthologies throughout the years, and while I found them to be extremely detailed and exhaustive, students seem to struggle with theoretical sections and they expressed difficulty understanding some of the anthologized readings. While most creative writing textbooks and anthologies might be extremely helpful for teachers, some of the selected readings might not be particularly accessible for students who are approaching reading literature as writers for the first time. However, the editors of Write or Left chose readings that seem to align with the taste and aesthetic that young writers find enjoyable or at least approachable.

Content Accuracy rating: 4

Introduction to Creative Writing is a class mostly based on workshops and lively discussions, but the students also need a foundational element — they need to familiarize themselves with a vocabulary that allows them to discuss writing. Write or Left provides brief and concise definitions that help the students navigate the vocabulary surrounding the particularities of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and dramatic writing.

Relevance/Longevity rating: 3

While the book does not provide a wide or particularly updated range of readings for each genre, it covers the main concepts that students need to know to start talking about writing and workshopping each other’s work — which is, I think, the main purpose of the basic Introduction to Creative Writing course.

Write or Left is an excellent tool for students who are approaching creative writing for the first time and need to familiarize themselves with the most important terms to use during reading discussion and workshop. Notably, this book also covers more innovative aspects of creative writing — flash fiction and multimodal writing — to avoid a banal and cut-and-dry institutionalization of the four main genres, and show once again the fluid, regenerating, and ever-shifting nature of creative writing.

The textbook offers very clear and consistent definitions of terms that students of creative writing should get familiar with during an introductory course.

I am very excited with the briefness of the "theoretical" chapters, as students usually struggle with long chapters that break down the elements of craft in the four genres of creative writing. I would be happy to assign a whole chapter for the introductory class of each genre (each module).

I found it hard to make most commercial textbooks approachable for the students, who seem often confused by the readings or bored with the lengthy theoretical explanations of creative writing terms. This textbook might be implemented with readings chosen by the instructor, allowing the course to benefit from a personalized, unique approach to creative writing, which might feel more dynamic and adventurous than following a textbook or an anthology page by page. Write or Left might be a great tool for sections of Introduction to Creative Writing with a high student count, as instructors might struggle to find the time to workshop every student in each genre, and also cover the readings from a commercial textbook to make it worthwhile for students who spent a lot of money on it. In fact, a lot of Introduction to Creative Writing students might have to take Creative Writing as a requirement and not an elective course, so having them buy expensive textbooks that they might not really use throughout the semester and then ever again might be a waste.

Interface rating: 5

The textbook is extremely easy to access. I think the students will be very happy to access their book online for free.

Grammatical Errors rating: 5

I haven't found any grammatical errors.

Cultural Relevance rating: 4

The readings used as example might represent a wider range of experiences and identities, but overall I'm satisfied.

Reviewed by Yelizaveta Renfro, Assistant Professor of English, Saint Mary's College on 5/5/22

This book’s ambitious attempt to cover so much ground—fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, experimental fiction, and specialized genres like fantasy, science fiction, horror, and romance—is ultimately its biggest weakness. There is no way a single... read more

Comprehensiveness rating: 3 see less

This book’s ambitious attempt to cover so much ground—fiction, poetry, nonfiction, drama, experimental fiction, and specialized genres like fantasy, science fiction, horror, and romance—is ultimately its biggest weakness. There is no way a single textbook can adequately cover all of these areas (and especially a slim volume like this one). As a result, the book is only the most cursory exploration of these multiple creative forms, barely scratching the surface of the field of creative writing. I could not imagine assigning this book in any course that I teach at the college level. Even my introduction to creative course—which covers fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction in one semester—requires a text that goes more deeply into these genres and that offers more substantial content.

I would like to see more precision and thoughtful wording, especially in defining terms. For example, the glossary definition of “fantasy” that is offered at the end of the book is, “the kind of writing that cannot take place in real life.” This is imprecise and even potentially confusing; doing the simplest internet search will yield a much a better definition. For much of the book, the information is not so much inaccurate as it is general and incomplete.

The general topics included in the book are certainly relevant, but an instructor using this text would need to supplement every step along the way. Not only are the explanations in some of the chapters too basic and brief, but the examples (when they exist at all) leave much to be desired, being limited mostly to older texts (nineteenth-century texts like an excerpt from Frankenstein or a story by Kate Chopin) or texts written by the instructor’s students (which are very typical of works produced by beginning creative writers). What students need most are high-quality, recent models for their own work. There are thousands of such works available online. While I understand that Priebe cannot reproduce these texts in her book, readers could still be pointed towards online literary journals that publish excellent creative writing.

Clarity rating: 4

The writing is generally clear, though as I noted elsewhere, definitions of terms could be more precise. The tone of the book is informal and friendly, making it easy to follow. I think that most student would find the book clear and accessible.

Consistency rating: 3

The book seems somewhat inconsistent in the depth of treatment it gives to different genres. For example, in the chapter on drama, there is an exhaustive discussion of the proper way to format a screenplay (the correct font and margins, rendering action and dialogue, and so forth), which makes up the majority of the chapter and strikes me as an unnecessary level of detail for beginning students (and the student example that is offered at the end of the chapter does not even adhere to these “proper formatting” rules). Meanwhile, other chapters are woefully lacking in necessary content. In the poetry chapter, for example, the poetic “forms” that are included seem arbitrary, and there is no real discussion of poetic meter. An introduction to poetry is incomplete without a basic overview of metrical feet.

Modularity rating: 4

In principle, it would be possible to use any of the chapters in this book as stand-alone readings for a course. Instructors could easily switch the order of the chapters around to suit their own progression through genres. The most useful chapter, in my option, is Chapter 10: Assignment and Project ideas, which offers a sizable collection of writing prompts, reading response activities, and portfolio ideas. While these are of varying usefulness and I would not offer them all as options for my students, some do stand out as excellent exercises.

Organization/Structure/Flow rating: 3

I did question the order of some of the chapters. For example, why does the chapter on flash fiction (a sub-genre of fiction) come before the general fiction chapter? And why does flash fiction have a chapter of its own, when there is barely any content? (The chapter is all of two and a half pages long.)

Interface rating: 3

The font in the pdf version that I read is not at all reader friendly and is hard on the eyes, in my opinion. I also found the screenshots of Tweets that lead off most chapters to be distracting and confusing, and the text offers no explanation or discussion of these, which adds to the impression that the book is a superficial hodgepodge, dropping in content without engaging with it.

Grammatical Errors rating: 3

While Priebe’s portion of the text is largely free of errors, the student texts that she includes do sometimes contain grammatical errors. While I understand the urge to present student writing as it is written, in a textbook I would expect writing that has been proofread.

This is a book that is at least aware of diversity/and inclusivity. In the opening chapter, Priebe lists the steps she has taken: “Most of the he/she pronouns have been flipped for they/them pronouns,” “‘White-sounding’ names have been replaced by more diverse ones,” “‘Husband’ or ‘wife’ have been replaced by ‘partner,’” and “The majority of examples in this book, by students or otherwise, are not written by white, heterosexual, cisgender men.” While I commend Priebe for her efforts, some of these moves strike me as cosmetic fixes, and the example published and student-written texts do not obviously reflect diverse perspectives (that is, they don’t explicitly tackle issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, etc.). I would imagine that as Priebe continues to gather more information for future editions of this book, the diversity of voices represented will increase.

While I would not use this book in my college courses in its present form, I do think that is has a lot of potential and that future iterations of the book are likely to have enhanced content. As Priebe collects more student writing samples and as students fill in the numerous empty “Questions/Activities” sections that occur at the end of many chapters, this book may very well grow into a rich resource for creative writing instructors. I am planning to revisit this book in future editions to see what new material it has to offer.

Reviewed by Megan Green, Assistant Teaching Professor, Bowling Green State University on 4/25/22

This book offers a useful, concise guide for beginning creative writers. While many of the topics could be expanded upon, it fulfills its promise to offer only condensed snapshots of each subject. It would make a helpful addition to readings... read more

This book offers a useful, concise guide for beginning creative writers. While many of the topics could be expanded upon, it fulfills its promise to offer only condensed snapshots of each subject. It would make a helpful addition to readings chosen by a professor and to selective texts about elements that may require more insightful approaches and in-depth discussions. Chapters that may require additional readings for most introductory classes include the chapters about flash fiction and drama.

The content offers accurate, up-to-date information about creative writing.

Relevance/Longevity rating: 5

The chapter topics are highly relevant and up-to-date. I particularly enjoyed that the author chose to incorporate a chapter on multimodal works, which is something I have found numerous authors either glance over or fail to explore. Likewise, the choice to conclude with a section about how to get published offers relevant and significant points that students should be made aware of at an early stage.

Priebe implements small doses of humor throughout the book that are engaging (I do wish there were more, though!) and utilizes Plain Language to make the reading accessible.

Each chapter is structured identically, beginning with readings about the chapter's topics and ending with exercises.

Each chapter is short and could, in itself, be an easy reading assignment. However, chapters have smaller reading sections that can be assigned. Instructors should be aware that many exercises are written as thoughts to instructors rather than students and, thus, may require editing.

Each chapter offers concise readings over topics followed by exercises. Multiple exercises are listed so teachers can find one or two they would like to employ, and many are creative and effective at reiterating learning objectives.

The book is offered in multiple formats, including PDF, Word, and Google Doc. In the PDF version I perused, there were no interface issues.

There are a very few small mechanical and/or grammatical mistakes.

Cultural Relevance rating: 5

The author makes it a point to offer a variety of works in this textbook rather than canonical works that are oftentimes the labor of White male authors. Non-binary language also makes the text more inclusive.

The strongest element of this work is its suggested exercises, many of which may be used as in-class activities to further explore topics.

Reviewed by Clifford Buttram, Assistant Professor of Management, University of Saint Francis on 3/22/22

The discussion of key writing areas is organized in a smoothly flowing manner. From Poetry to Experimental and Children's Literature, the content was well organized and indexed efficiently for understanding and analysis. The book is neither too... read more

The discussion of key writing areas is organized in a smoothly flowing manner. From Poetry to Experimental and Children's Literature, the content was well organized and indexed efficiently for understanding and analysis. The book is neither too long or too short (page length) to still be quite effective.

While I'm not a Creative Writing expert, I found the book quite accurate regarding the elements of idea formation and flow from an author or writer's perspective. I've written three historical fiction books and am currently working on a ten novella set in the same category. In choosing to review this book, I found it's accuracy in how an author thinks, organizes, and creates scenarios to be very helpful. The many quotes and references helped me greatly in forming new ideas and writing strategies, even in one chapter or sub chapter of my current book. I found no bias in any chapters, however, the informative proved was both relevant and useful.

I feel this book is not only relevant, but highly useful as a handbook companion piece. Although the title refers to a textbook, I found its organization to be formatted in a more usable sense as a handbook. A reader could focus on one chapter, a few chapters, or the entire book as a strong and handy reference. Although I read the entire book, a particular focus for me were the Fiction, Drama, and Flash Fiction chapters. Each provided much needed guidance and advice for idea creation and tips to improve elemental writing.

The chapter organization was clear throughout the book. Each chapter utilized an introduction of the key topic, self-questions, reading strategies, and exercises. I also enjoyed the dispersed quotes throughout the chapters that helped to support the key points within the chapter.

As noted above, the consistency of each chapter (organization) helped ensure a stronger understanding and immersion into the specific area of writing by chapter. The author cleverly injects quotes, references, and definitions to combine an effort to improve the reader's ability to apply these concepts. Additionally, this allows for a more even flow of information, even in chapters that may not be in the reader's interest.

Each chapter is distinct, however, the coordination and organization of the entire book creates a crescendo effect for the reader. Although each chapter is specific, it can be both compartmentalized and utilized as a complete handbook. This modularity further enables a reader to use the book as a specific reference or a complete handbook/guide.

The book was well organized and logical. The reading was made easier by the flow of information and the combination of data, quotes, and references used throughout the book.

I did not note any interface issues.

I did not note any grammatical errors.

The text is neither culturally insensitive or offensive. I noted that the character/third person student examples were mostly benign which helped to decipher the author's intent. In Chapter 2, a section noted as 'Your Voice' spoke to holes in diversity when writing. I found this helpful for students to understand that not all areas of writing interest are not interesting to everyone. However, one should write to increase the value to the audience and the writer. I found this to be excellent advice and guidance.

I found the book to be an excellent resource for a creative writer. The final chapter discussed Children's Literature and how the previous chapters were applicable to this specific genre. The final chapter (Assignment and Project Ideas) was quite useful for a writer experiencing a block or one simply working a new idea. One recommendation would be to title the book as a Handbook or Reference Guide as the Table of Contents and structure is formatted to provide specific and detailed information on specific creative writing elements. At 168 pages, it has the length for a small textbook, but a better fit as a Handbook for creative writers of all genres. There are many ideas, strategies, and helpful tips throughout the book to help most writers think and write more clearly and effectively.

Reviewed by Justine Jackson Stone, Special Purpose Faculty, Radford University on 3/8/22

The book’s overall intention is to present condensed chapters on the various genres of creative writing, and while condensed, the content is too terse. Chapters one through eight are generalized approaches that provide basic information with some... read more

Comprehensiveness rating: 2 see less

The book’s overall intention is to present condensed chapters on the various genres of creative writing, and while condensed, the content is too terse. Chapters one through eight are generalized approaches that provide basic information with some examples few and far between. The chapter on flash fiction is brief, only lasting from pages 53-57. The textbook also appears to be incomplete, missing student writing examples in addition to other literary recommendations. In chapter nine, the large overview of different genres such as horror, young adult, etc. provides some recommended writers for students, but this is not consistent throughout the textbook. In order for students to improve their creative writing skills, they need to read. A recommended reading list would make this textbook more effective. The index is well-done and easy to read. The glossary could benefit from additional terms added, but it’s a good start for students to grasp the terminology.

The content is accurate. For a college-level course, however, some of the content is quite juvenile. For example, a writing prompt on page 100 asks the writer to “Tell the story of a dragon who owns a jelly bean factory in an experimental way.” This prompt seems far more appropriate for elementary and middle school students. If the author suggested this prompt as an activity for how to write a children’s book, I could understand its inclusion.

The content of the book is expansive but basic. Overall, the textbook will remain relevant, though a teacher using this book would need to find supplemental material to increase student understanding of the different categories of creative writing. In addition, chapter nine briefly discusses publication opportunities and includes instructions on how to publish directly through Amazon. I found this to be an odd inclusion and question if it is necessary.

Clarity rating: 3

The author uses a conversational and informal tone throughout, which students tend to appreciate. Terms are well-defined for a basic understanding, though more context or examples would deepen student learning. The author tends to share more of her own personal experiences with writing rather than those of her students, which I think misses the mark for her intended audience. In addition, her humor ranges from childish to lewd, which I found at times to be off-putting.

Consistency rating: 4

Terminology is included in each chapter, though due to the condescending nature of the textbook, instructors may consider using supplemental material. In chapter two, the author covers a few fundamentals of creative writing such as point of view, character, setting, etc. For an introduction to creative writing class, it may be necessary to expand these definitions as some students may not have prior knowledge of understanding of these terms. The framework is fairly solid though lacking in student examples. I do appreciate the ample inclusion of creative writing prompts as students tend to find these useful and fun.

Modularity rating: 3

The author effectively uses subheadings to organize information. Information was well-displayed, avoiding larger blocks of text. Each chapter was clearly laid out, and the index was easy to follow. The text is very self-referential to the author. In example 2 of chapter zero, one of the activities states the following: “When we write, we’re using the alphabet. Duh. Yet, how many times have we used these letters to organize or brainstorm? Try using the alphabet to brainstorm different things characters could say in different pieces of fiction and drama and nonfiction.” The author uses herself in this example, including statements such things as, ‘J = “Jeezus Marth and Mary… will you please hurry up?’ (p. 16). I think the exercise would have been more effective if a character bio was given and then examples were provided rather than assuming the reader knows anything about the author. In addition, phrases like ‘Duh’ and other slang can be confusing for students who do not speak English as a first language.

I do not think the chapters are effectively organized. The fiction chapter should come before the flash fiction chapter, and I would personally place nonfiction after fiction instead of drama coming next. In chapter two of the review of the elements, I would personally discuss character first before point of view. I also ponder if it would be better to know these terms first before doing creative exercises to have a basic foundation before students start writing.

Interface rating: 1

The inclusion of Twitter screen captures at the beginning of each chapter is grossly unnecessary. They do not add anything to the chapter context and do not fit well into the design. Without a caption to explain these pictures' inclusion, I do think students could find them confusing. As far as I can tell, there’s no text over the image or note that the images are decorative. The charts included in chapter zero may be useful to some, but I did not find them overly beneficial. Finally, I found the textbook fonts to be hard on the eyes while reading.

The text was mostly free of grammatical errors. The author sometimes uses internet text speech or ALL CAPS, which I find to be inappropriate for a college textbook. In one of the dialogue examples, the author writes, “’Oh.My.God. For real?’” (p. 16). In another example, the author writes, “Writer’s block can happen to ANYONE” (p. 22). There are other ways to create emphasis, and if we want students to be published, they should know how to emphasize their work without gimmicks.

The book does contain adult language which may not be appropriate for all readers. As far as inclusion goes, the author has made a point to be inclusive, stating on page 12: “'White-sounding’ names have been replaced by more diverse ones … ‘husband’ or ‘wife’ have been replaced by ‘partner’ … and ‘the majority of examples in this book, by students or otherwise, are not written by white, heterosexual, cisgender men.’” In addition, the author discusses “holes in diversity” in chapter two, which is an incredibly important topic to address.

Write or Left: an OER textbook for creative writing classes is the kitchen sink of creative writing books, and unfortunately, is too broad in scope to be effective. While the author clearly states this is an introductory textbook for creative writing classes “with condensed chapters,” the notion that a student should learn poetry, flash fiction, fiction, drama, nonfiction, and experimental writing in a single semester is haphazard. Rather than developing a solid foundation of each type of creative writing, students and teachers alike are expected to blitz through each chapter, complete some creative writing prompts, and miraculously be competent. Combine this with the notion that students shouldn’t be assigned grades for their creative writing (p. 13), and it’s no wonder academia often sneers at creative writing as a field of study. While I do applaud the author’s efforts to make this textbook more diverse and inclusive in its examples, I found the overall book greatly lacking in content to be effective in the classroom.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Intro to Creative Writing
  • Chapter 2: Review of Elements
  • Chapter 3: Poetry 
  • Chapter 4: Flash Fiction
  • Chapter 5: Fiction 
  • Chapter 6: Drama 
  • Chapter 7: Nonfiction   
  • Chapter 8: Experimental Literature
  • Chapter 9: Final Chapter
  • Chapter 10: Assignment and Project Ideas

Ancillary Material

About the book.

In this book, we'll go over some of the general principles of writing practices as well as advice and tips on how to write creatively, but mainly, you’ll be introduced to as many genres and categories as possible. We won’t get bogged down in doing the writing process “perfectly” or creating “perfect literature.” The goal is to learn about as many genres as possible, practice writing in those genres, and get feedback.

About the Contributors

Sybil Priebe lives in the upper Midwest with her partner-in-crime and crabby old cat. She teaches various composition courses at the North Dakota State College of Science in Wahpeton, ND. She likes books, bicycles, and blasphemy.

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An Introduction to Creative Writing

Undergraduate | MAQ-ENGX1021 | 2024

Previously MAQ-ENGX121

Play with narrative and time as you develop adventurous creative writing pieces. Reflect on your creative process and the approaches adopted by other writers. Experiment with creative writing styles. Place value on the drafting and revision processes.

Upfront cost

HECS-HELP and FEE-HELP available Learn more about financial options

About this subject

What you'll learn.

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • Achieve creative writing and reading skills in relation to concepts, topics, craft, technique and voice
  • Evaluate creative writing processes
  • Identify, engage with and apply concepts of narrative form and poetry
  • Analyse and discuss the work of others in group discussions

Topics covered

  • A week-by-week guide to the topics you will explore in this subject will be provided in your study materials.

Description

Creative writing involves expression and skills. It also involves reading. This practical unit introduces students to different approaches and ways of thinking about creative writing. Students engage in a series of lectures and workshops, learning a range of creative writing skills and topics. Students are encouraged to be experimental and adventurous in their writing. Seminars address different creative writing topics and readings so that students can learn about various genres, methods and approaches. The workshops are interactive; they aim to increase understanding of the process of creative writing. The aim of this unit is for students to learn, achieve and realise their creativity and writing skills in their creative work, engaging with lecture and reading content and participating in writing workshops, on-course writing exercises, and doing set assignments.

Assessments

  • Online discussions and participation (25%)
  • Creative Work (Minor) (25%)
  • Creative Work and a Reflective Essay (50%)

For textbook details check your university's handbook, website or learning management system (LMS).

About Macquarie University

This research-intensive university in north-western Sydney offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. With over 44,000 current students, Macquarie has a strong reputation for welcoming international students and embracing flexible and convenient study options, including its partnership with Open Universities Australia.

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Equivalent subjects.

You should not enrol in this subject if you have successfully completed any of the following subject(s) because they are considered academically equivalent:

MAQ-ENGX201 (Not currently available)

MAQ-ENG210 (Not currently available)

MAQ-ENGX121 (Not currently available)

NCCW (pre-2020 units): ENG210, ENGX201, ENGL121, ENGL201, ENGL218, ENGX121

Additional requirements

  • Other requirements - Students who have an Academic Standing of Suspension or Exclusion under Macquarie University's Academic Progression Policy are not permitted to enrol in OUA units offered by Macquarie University. Students with an Academic Standing of Suspension or Exclusion who have enrolled in units through OUA will be withdrawn.

Equivalent full time study load (EFTSL) is one way to calculate your study load. One (1.0) EFTSL is equivalent to a full-time study load for one year.

Find out more information on Commonwealth Loans to understand what this means to your eligibility for financial support.

What to study next?

Once you’ve completed this subject it can be credited towards one of the following courses

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Bachelor of Arts

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ENGX1021 – An Introduction to Creative Writing

2021 – session 2, fully online/virtual.

Session 2 Learning and Teaching Update

The decision has been made to conduct study online for the remainder of Session 2 for all units WITHOUT mandatory on-campus learning activities. Exams for Session 2 will also be online where possible to do so.

This is due to the extension of the lockdown orders and to provide certainty around arrangements for the remainder of Session 2. We hope to return to campus beyond Session 2 as soon as it is safe and appropriate to do so.

Some classes/teaching activities cannot be moved online and must be taught on campus. You should already know if you are in one of these classes/teaching activities and your unit convenor will provide you with more information via iLearn. If you want to confirm, see the list of units with mandatory on-campus classes/teaching activities .

Visit the MQ COVID-19 information page for more detail.

General Information

an introduction to creative writing

Important Academic Dates

Information about important academic dates including deadlines for withdrawing from units are available at https://www.mq.edu.au/study/calendar-of-dates

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to:

  • ULO1: Achieve creative writing and reading skills in relation to concepts, topics, craft, technique and voice
  • ULO2: Evaluate creative writing processes
  • ULO3: Identify, engage with and apply concepts of narrative form and poetry
  • ULO4: Analyse and discuss the work of others in group discussions

General Assessment Information

  • Written assignments are submitted via Turnitin links in iLearn.
  • Participatory tasks include four quizzes on unit readings which must be completed, and an online Workshop Activity (See schedule).  

Important: It is a requirement of this unit that all creative work handed in for workshops or as assignments is new, original work written for and during this unit. It must must engage with the unit topics and content. Work from a concurrent unit or previous units or studies must not be presented for workshops or assessments. Creative writing written prior to the unit commencing cannot be presented either. 

Late submission of Assignments

Please note that the University and the Faculty of Arts have launched a new assessment policy effective as of 1 July 2021. This new policy particularly affects  LATE SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENTS . 

The Faculty policy in relation to late assessment submissions is as follows: 

Unless a Special Consideration request has been submitted and approved, (a) a penalty for lateness will apply – 10 marks out of 100 credit will be deducted per day for assignments submitted after the due date – and (b) no assignment will be accepted seven days (incl. weekends) after the original submission deadline. No late submissions will be accepted for timed assessments – e.g. quizzes, online tests, etc. 

To be very clear:

  • Unless you have applied for special consideration and had your application approved, for each day your assignment is late, 10 marks will be deducted. For example, if you submit your assignment 7 days late, 70 marks will be deducted, which means you will fail that assignment.
  • If your assignment is more than 7 days late (including weekends), you will get 0 for your assignment.

These are serious penalties that will substantially alter your final grade and even determine whether you pass or fail this unit. Please make every effort to submit your assignment by the due date.

If you find you cannot submit your assignment on time, please apply for Special Consideration through AskMQ. Make sure you read Macquarie University's policy regarding Special Consideration requests before you apply: 

https://students.mq.edu.au/study/assessment-exams/special-consideration

Requirements for Presentation of Assignments

  • Proof-read your assignment before submitting it, preferably by printing it out and reading it on the page.
  • Use double or 1.5 spacing, single spacing is not permitted.
  • Use 12 point font and leave sufficient side margins (the standard 2.54 cm is fine).
  • Left justification
  • No fancy fonts – use only Times, Arial, Cambria, Verdana or other plain font.
  • Insert page numbering and the word count at the end of the creative work and the reflective essay.
  • Marks are deducted for failure to comply with these presentation requirements.

Assessment Tasks

Online discussions and participation.

Assessment Type 1 : Participatory task Indicative Time on Task 2 : 35 hours Due: Ongoing Weighting: 25%

- Read assigned readings in preparation for online discussions each week. - Read class peers’ submitted creative writing and provide written feedback in online workshop discussion forums.

  • Achieve creative writing and reading skills in relation to concepts, topics, craft, technique and voice
  • Evaluate creative writing processes
  • Identify, engage with and apply concepts of narrative form and poetry
  • Analyse and discuss the work of others in group discussions

Creative Work (Minor)

Assessment Type 1 : Creative work Indicative Time on Task 2 : 24 hours Due: 12/09/2021 Weighting: 25%

Creative writing: narrative prose or poetry. Scaffolded task.

Creative Work and a Reflective Essay

Assessment Type 1 : Creative work Indicative Time on Task 2 : 35 hours Due: 31/10/2021 Weighting: 50%

Creative writing consisting of prose, or poetry, and a reflective essay

1 If you need help with your assignment, please contact:

  • the academic teaching staff in your unit for guidance in understanding or completing this type of assessment
  • the Writing Centre for academic skills support.

2 Indicative time-on-task is an estimate of the time required for completion of the assessment task and is subject to individual variation

Delivery and Resources

The unit is delivered using asynchronous online delivery within a weekly schedule. Lectures and tutorial discussions begin in Week 1.

Lectures are pre-recorded and available in Echo via the unit iLearn website.

Tutorial discussions are conducted using online forums.

All prescribed readings and a number of the recommended texts are available online from the library, via the Leganto link in iLearn.

The Participatory task includes periodic quizzes on the readings, and an online Workshop Activity during Week 9.

Unit Schedule

Week 1 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Week 2 - Prompt to draft: process and reflection

Week 3 - Approaches to writing 1

Week 4 - Approaches to writing 2

Week 5 - Story and narrative

Week 6 - Time in narrative

Week 7 - Focalisation

Week 8 - Language - dialogue and register

Week 9 - Workshop week

Week 10 - Writing place, writing culture

Week 11 - Memory

Week 12 - Creativity and Writing, reflecting on the unit.

Policies and Procedures

Macquarie University policies and procedures are accessible from Policy Central  ( https://policies.mq.edu.au ). Students should be aware of the following policies in particular with regard to Learning and Teaching:

  • Academic Appeals Policy
  • Academic Integrity Policy
  • Academic Progression Policy
  • Assessment Policy
  • Fitness to Practice Procedure
  • Grade Appeal Policy
  • Complaint Management Procedure for Students and Members of the Public
  • Special Consideration Policy

Students seeking more policy resources can visit Student Policies  ( https://students.mq.edu.au/support/study/policies ). It is your one-stop-shop for the key policies you need to know about throughout your undergraduate student journey.

To find other policies relating to Teaching and Learning, visit Policy Central  ( https://policies.mq.edu.au ) and use the search tool .

Student Code of Conduct

Macquarie University students have a responsibility to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct:  https://students.mq.edu.au/admin/other-resources/student-conduct

Results published on platform other than eStudent , (eg. iLearn, Coursera etc.) or released directly by your Unit Convenor, are not confirmed as they are subject to final approval by the University. Once approved, final results will be sent to your student email address and will be made available in eStudent . For more information visit ask.mq.edu.au or if you are a Global MBA student contact [email protected]

Student Support

Macquarie University provides a range of support services for students. For details, visit  http://students.mq.edu.au/support/

Learning Skills

Learning Skills ( mq.edu.au/learningskills ) provides academic writing resources and study strategies to help you improve your marks and take control of your study.

  • Getting help with your assignment
  • Academic Integrity Module

The Library provides online and face to face support to help you find and use relevant information resources. 

  • Subject and Research Guides
  • Ask a Librarian

Student Services and Support

Students with a disability are encouraged to contact the Disability Service  who can provide appropriate help with any issues that arise during their studies.

Student Enquiries

For all student enquiries, visit Student Connect at ask.mq.edu.au

If you are a Global MBA student contact  [email protected]

For help with University computer systems and technology, visit  http://www.mq.edu.au/about_us/offices_and_units/information_technology/help/ . 

When using the University's IT, you must adhere to the Acceptable Use of IT Resources Policy . The policy applies to all who connect to the MQ network including students.

Unit information based on version 2021.01 of the Handbook

ENG 205 - An Introduction to Creative Writing

an introduction to creative writing

Image & Memory: An Introduction to Creative Writing

At the center of everything we call ‘the arts,’ and children call “play,’ is something which seems somehow alive. It’s not alive in the way you and I are alive, but it’s certainly not dead. It’s alive in the way our memory is alive. Alive in the way the ocean is alive and able to transport us and contain us. Alive in the way thinking is not, but experiencing is, made of both memory and imagination, this is the thing we mean by ‘an image.” ~ Lynda Barry Image & Memory is a multi-genre workshop for writers who are just starting out or who need a fresh way to bring forth their stories and poems. Using writing strategies developed by writer Lynda Barry, we will explore the connection between memory and image, learn ways to sidestep our internal critics, and generate a portfolio of authentic stories and poems. In her work and teaching, Barry tells us that images are “the soul’s immune system.” They are how we bring what is outside of us in, and how we bring what is inside of us out. They integrate experience and knowledge. Participants in Image & Memory will experience a supportive writing process and draft many short narratives and poems. --- Details: Image & Memory: An Introduction to Creative Writing takes place Tuesdays from July 2 through August 6, 2024 from 6:30-8:30pm remotely online via Zoom. Prerequisites : None Genre : Fiction, nonfiction, and poetry Level : Emerging Format : Generative multigenre workshop   Location : This class takes place remotely online via Zoom. Size : Limited to 12 participants (including scholarships). Scholarships : Two scholarship spots are available for this class for writers in Northeast Ohio. Apply by April 24 . Cancellations & Refunds : Cancel at least 48 hours in advance of the first class meeting to receive a full refund. Email [email protected] .

Work with the best...

Cynthia Larsen is Lake Erie Ink’s co-founder and Education Director. Cynthia taught in Jersey City, Oakland, and Cleveland before attending graduate school at the University of Arizona for her MFA in creative writing. Ms. Larsen has facilitated project-based creative writing in collaboration with teachers for over fifteen years, combining her experience in education with her passion for and knowledge of the craft of creative writing.

This class takes place online via Zoom

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Introduction to Creative Writing

Takeaways (weds).

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One response to “Takeaways (Weds)”

I wanted to recognize the grace and openness with which everyone who had work workshopped this week took so much feedback. I’ve been in an era in my life recently that I’ve been affectionately referring to as “middle-schooler-level of self conscious,” so I was very impressed and inspired by everyone’s professionalism and willingness to engage.

I have also been reflecting more on how I personally interact with visual and written media. I am a double major in English & FMT (Film, Media, and Theatre,) and oddly, I’ve not done much reflecting in recent memory about how these things overlap for me. I know my English background makes me the sort of person who loves to talk about “the text” and be over-prepared, but I’m also a lover of movie adaptations. There’s something deeper here but I’m not at my best today. I’m sure I’ll be returning to this thought, at some point.

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IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing

    Chapter 1 - Introducing creative writing. pp 1-35. Get access. Export citation. Chapter 2 - Creative writing in the world. pp 36-63. Get access. Export citation. Chapter 3 - Challenges of creative writing.

  2. PDF Creative Writing

    The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing This pioneering book introduces students to the practice and art of creative writing and creative reading. It offers a fresh, distinctive and beautifully written synthesis of the discipline. David Morley discusses where creative writing comes from, the various forms and camouflages

  3. PDF Introduction to Creative Writing

    Introduction to Creative Writing . The creative self is fundamental to the way we find meaning and purpose in the world. The best fiction, poetry, and drama draw on everyday habits of imagination that make interaction with others possible and fruitful. At the same time, literature and creative writing develop basic skills of the imagination ...

  4. Creative Writing 101: A Beginner's Guide to Creative Writing

    Creative Writing 101. Creative writing is any form of writing which is written with the creativity of mind: fiction writing, poetry writing, creative nonfiction writing and more. The purpose is to express something, whether it be feelings, thoughts, or emotions. Rather than only giving information or inciting the reader to make an action ...

  5. Yes, you can write: an introduction to creative writing

    Give you the confidence through stimulating practical exercises to stretch and develop your writing talents, both during the course and beyond; Content. The course sets out to cover some of the basic ingredients that make up creative writing in both fiction and non-fiction. These include description, character, plot structure and narrative voice.

  6. The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing

    Accessible, entertaining and groundbreaking, The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing is not only a useful textbook for students and teachers of writing, but also an inspiring read in its own right. Aspiring authors and teachers of writing will find much to discover and enjoy. 'No writer-teacher is better qualified than David Morley to ...

  7. Preface

    As this is an introduction to a discipline, we discuss where creative writing comes from, the various forms and camouflages it has taken and why we teach and learn it. I do not present you with an anatomy of the various histories of creative writing in higher education; there are fine examples available in print (Dawson, 2005; Myers, 1995).

  8. PDF Chapter 1 Introducing creative writing

    Writing a poem, a story or a piece of creative nonfiction, is to catalyse the creation of a four-dimensional fabric that is the result when space and time become one. Every event in the universe can be located in the four-dimensional plane of space and time. Writing can create personal universes in which this system of events within space-time ...

  9. Introduction to Creative Writing

    As the name suggests, creative writing is all about using your own creativity - your own imaginative, out-of-the-box, embellished way of thinking to create a piece of text. In this way, creative writing can actually be any type of writing that goes beyond the traditional realms of normal, professional, academic or technical forms of writing.

  10. Introduction to Creative Writing

    Introduction to Creative Writing is a hands-on, interactive exploration of nonfiction, poetry, playwriting, and fiction. Students will read examples from each genre and discuss the craft elements demonstrated in each text. We will then go on to try our own hand at drafting and revising essays, poems, plays, and prose.

  11. An Introduction To Creative Writing Course

    I really enjoyed completing the 'Introduction to Creative Writing' course. It was a useful and simple start to the daunting world of writing. For me, who is now in their twenties, it was a nice guide for pointing me in the right direction and educating me in all the different ways I could incorporate writing into my daily life.

  12. An Introduction to Creative Writing

    The Work Which You Can Recognise as Creative Writing. As said before, fiction, poetry and non-fiction are the examples of creative writing. They are examples because they are obviously creative and not necessarily true (with the exception of non-fiction). Fiction is written to entertain and educate. We love reading stories.

  13. An Introduction to Creative Writing Literary Devices and Elements

    Literary devices, or literary terms, are tools of language used by authors to deliver their message more effectively. These tools also give writing a more rich and more vivid feeling. This means that instead of delivering plain, boring, tasteless text, authors give us interesting and compelling stories adorned with these tools.

  14. Write or Left

    Introduction to Creative Writing is a class mostly based on workshops and lively discussions, but the students also need a foundational element — they need to familiarize themselves with a vocabulary that allows them to discuss writing. Write or Left provides brief and concise definitions that help the students navigate the vocabulary ...

  15. PDF ENG 205, SEC 990: INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING

    • Creative Writing Assignments: We will work mostly in the genres of personal narrative, short fiction, and poetry. Your work will initially receive comments rather than a grade. ... • read my introduction and posts yours in the folder labeled "Introductions" • read Burroway, Chapter 1: Invitation to the Writer (p. 1-14)

  16. PDF An Introduction to Creative Writing

    On successful completion of this unit, you will be able to: ULO1:Achieve creative writing and reading skills in relation to concepts, topics, craft, technique and voice. ULO2:Evaluate creative writing processes. ULO3:Identify, engage with and apply concepts of narrative form and poetry.

  17. An Introduction to Creative Writing

    Description. Creative writing involves expression and skills. It also involves reading. This practical unit introduces students to different approaches and ways of thinking about creative writing. Students engage in a series of lectures and workshops, learning a range of creative writing skills and topics.

  18. ENGX1021

    ULO1: Achieve creative writing and reading skills in relation to concepts, topics, craft, technique and voice. ULO2: Evaluate creative writing processes. ULO3: Identify, engage with and apply concepts of narrative form and poetry. ULO4: Analyse and discuss the work of others in group discussions.

  19. ENG 205

    ENG 205 - An Introduction to Creative Writing. Offers students experience in writing in three major forms: autobiographical narrative, fiction, and poetry. General Education Requirements: Artistic and Creative Expression and Writing Intensive. Prerequisites: ENG 101 is strongly recommended. Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

  20. PDF Creative Writing

    The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing This pioneering book introduces students to the practice and art of creative writing and creative reading. It offers a fresh, distinctive and beautifully written synthesis of the discipline. David Morley discusses where creative writing comes from, the various forms and camouflages

  21. Image & Memory: An Introduction to Creative Writing

    They integrate experience and knowledge. Participants in Image & Memory will experience a supportive writing process and draft many short narratives and poems.---Details: Image & Memory: An Introduction to Creative Writing takes place Tuesdays from July 2 through August 6, 2024 from 6:30-8:30pm remotely online via Zoom.

  22. Creative Writing

    Creative Writing . 351:306 Creative Writing Poetry . B1 5/30-7/7 05284 10:30 AM-12:25 ONLINE LAWLESS. In this poetry workshop, you will develop two sometimes conflicting skills: creativity and restraint. ... 351:211 Introduction to Creative Writing . B6 5/30-7/7 01212 MW 6:00-10:00PM ONLINE REHILL. 351:209 Intro to Multimedia Composition ...

  23. Takeaways (Weds)

    I wanted to recognize the grace and openness with which everyone who had work workshopped this week took so much feedback. I've been in an era in my life recently that I've been affectionately referring to as "middle-schooler-level of self conscious," so I was very impressed and inspired by everyone's professionalism and willingness to engage.

  24. Creative Writing: The Art of the Story is a fun, fast-paced

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