college essay requirements checklist

How to Write Your College Essay: The Ultimate Step-by-Step Guide

Getting ready to start your college essay? Your essay is very important to your application — especially if you’re applying to selective colleges.

Become a stronger writer by reviewing your peers’ essays and get your essay reviewed as well for free.

We have regular livestreams during which we walk you through how to write your college essay and review essays live.

College Essay Basics

Just getting started on college essays? This section will guide you through how you should think about your college essays before you start.

  • Why do essays matter in the college application process?
  • What is a college application theme and how do you come up with one?
  • How to format and structure your college essay

Before you move to the next section, make sure you understand:

How a college essay fits into your application

What a strong essay does for your chances

How to create an application theme

Learn the Types of College Essays

Next, let’s make sure you understand the different types of college essays. You’ll most likely be writing a Common App or Coalition App essay, and you can also be asked to write supplemental essays for each school. Each essay has a prompt asking a specific question. Each of these prompts falls into one of a few different types. Understanding the types will help you better answer the prompt and structure your essay.

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  • Tips for Writing a Standout Community Service Essay
  • How to Write the “Why This Major” Essay
  • How to Write a “Why This Major” Essay if You’re Undecided
  • How to write the “Why This College” Essay
  • How to Research a College to Write the “Why This College” Essay
  • Why This College Essay Examples
  • How to Write The Overcoming Challenges Essay
  • Overcoming Challenges Essay Examples

Identify how each prompt fits into an essay type

What each type of essay is really asking of you

How to write each essay effectively

The Common App essay

Almost every student will write a Common App essay, which is why it’s important you get this right.

  • How to Write the Common App Essay
  • Successful Common App Essay Examples
  • 5 Awesome College Essay Topics + Sample Essays
  • 11 Cliché College Essay Topics + How to Fix Them

How to choose which Common App prompts to answer

How to write a successful Common App essay

What to avoid to stand out to admissions officers

Supplemental Essay Guides

Many schools, especially competitive ones, will ask you to write one or more supplemental essays. This allows a school to learn more about you and how you might fit into their culture.

These essays are extremely important in standing out. We’ve written guides for all the top schools. Follow the link below to find your school and read last year’s essay guides to give you a sense of the essay prompts. We’ll update these in August when schools release their prompts.

See last year’s supplemental essay guides to get a sense of the prompts for your schools.

Essay brainstorming and composition

Now that you’re starting to write your essay, let’s dive into the writing process. Below you’ll find our top articles on the craft of writing an amazing college essay.

  • Where to Begin? 3 Personal Essay Brainstorming Exercises
  • Creating the First Draft of Your College Application Essay
  • How to Get the Perfect Hook for Your College Essay
  • What If I Don’t Have Anything Interesting To Write About In My College Essay?
  • 8 Do’s and Don’t for Crafting Your College Essay
  • Stuck on Your College Essay? 8 Tips for Overcoming Writer’s Block

Understand how to write a great hook for your essay

Complete the first drafts of your essay

Editing and polishing your essay

Have a first draft ready? See our top editing tips below. Also, you may want to submit your essay to our free Essay Peer Review to get quick feedback and join a community of other students working on their essays.

  • 11 Tips for Proofreading and Editing Your College Essay
  • Getting Help with Your College Essay
  • 5 DIY Tips for Editing Your College Essay
  • How Long Should Your College Essay Be?
  • Essential Grammar Rules for Your College Apps
  • College Essay Checklist: Are You Ready to Submit?

Proofread and edited your essay.

Had someone else look through your essay — we recommend submitting it for a peer review.

Make sure your essay meets all requirements — consider signing up for a free account to view our per-prompt checklists to help you understand when you’re really ready to submit.

Advanced College Essay Techniques

Let’s take it one step further and see how we can make your college essay really stand out! We recommend reading through these posts when you have a draft to work with.

  • 10 Guidelines for Highly Readable College Essays
  • How to Use Literary Devices to Enhance Your Essay
  • How to Develop a Personalized Metaphor for Your College Applications

Ultimate Guide to Writing Your College Essay

Tips for writing an effective college essay.

College admissions essays are an important part of your college application and gives you the chance to show colleges and universities your character and experiences. This guide will give you tips to write an effective college essay.

Want free help with your college essay?

UPchieve connects you with knowledgeable and friendly college advisors—online, 24/7, and completely free. Get 1:1 help brainstorming topics, outlining your essay, revising a draft, or editing grammar.

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Writing a strong college admissions essay

Learn about the elements of a solid admissions essay.

Avoiding common admissions essay mistakes

Learn some of the most common mistakes made on college essays

Brainstorming tips for your college essay

Stuck on what to write your college essay about? Here are some exercises to help you get started.

How formal should the tone of your college essay be?

Learn how formal your college essay should be and get tips on how to bring out your natural voice.

Taking your college essay to the next level

Hear an admissions expert discuss the appropriate level of depth necessary in your college essay.

Student Stories

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Student Story: Admissions essay about a formative experience

Get the perspective of a current college student on how he approached the admissions essay.

Student Story: Admissions essay about personal identity

Get the perspective of a current college student on how she approached the admissions essay.

Student Story: Admissions essay about community impact

Student story: admissions essay about a past mistake, how to write a college application essay, tips for writing an effective application essay, sample college essay 1 with feedback, sample college essay 2 with feedback.

This content is licensed by Khan Academy and is available for free at www.khanacademy.org.

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Essay Completion Checklist

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If you're returning to class after some time, essay assignments could seem overwhelming. It may have been years since you considered the best way to brainstorm, structure, and write an academic paper, and in the course of your studies you'll have to write plenty!

Don't worry. We've teamed up with the ODU Writing Center to give you an essay checklist. When starting any assignment for class, be sure to review your class syllabus and assignment requirements as outlined by your professor first. There's a good chance your instructor has already addressed any questions you may have.

This checklist, the Writing Center, and online resources are a great place to start, but don't forget your instructor is available as well. If your answer isn't in the syllabus or you still have questions, contact your professor for a phone call or virtual meeting. They are here to help.

When you start writing, the ODU Writing Center is here for you as well, no matter where you are! You can make appointments online, set up tutoring sessions, or send your work for review from their website. You can also access  help documents  about grammar, research, citation, style, and more anytime.  Click here for more details . Organization 

  • Is there a clear introduction,  body , and  conclusion ?
  • Does the introduction provide sufficient background for the reader? Are the "who," "where," "why," "what," and "how" questions addressed?
  • Is there a  thesis sentence ? Is the purpose clear?
  • Does the essay move from general to specific?
  • Are there smooth  transitions  between related ideas?
  • Is the essay clearly organized? 
  • Does every  paragraph  relate back to and reinforce the  thesis ?

Content and Style 

  • Does the essay meet the  assignment  requirements as outlined in the syllabus?
  • Does the essay address the audience clearly?
  • Is the  length sufficient  to cover necessary points and assignment requirements?
  • Are there sufficient examples and detail to make the points clearly?
  • Is the  tone appropriate  to the assignment?
  • Is any aspect of the paper insulting or prejudicial?

Research and Sources  

  • Are all  sources credible  according to the instructor's specifications?
  • Is the research accurate, unbiased, and complete?
  • Is each source used within the essay properly cited?
  • Is the analysis based on the research?
  • Does the analysis contain  sound logic ?
  • Is the documentation in the Works Cited page and body of the essay correct according to assignment style requirements?
  • Have all quotations been checked, introduced, and attributed?
  • If material was paraphrased, are the sources still clearly referenced?
  • Are all facts accurate, or have potential refutations been addressed?

Proofreading 

  • Has the essay been through a grammar and punctuation check?
  • Is the essay spell checked?
  • Are the page numbers correct?
  • Is the title capitalized correctly?
  • Has the writer used the correct margin and font according to assignment guidelines?
  • Has the essay been submitted to any necessary  plagiarism  software required by the instructor?
  • Will the essay be submitted on time?

Great writing is part of being a successful student in most college classes, but don't be intimidated! The writing center and your instructors are here to help. 

For help throughout your online student journey, please visit our student support page to find out all the resources ready to assist you as you earn your degree online. 

Have questions? Contact us.

Important Addresses

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Application Requirements

We look forward to learning about you through your application.

Here you'll find a detailed explanation of each admission application requirement. Most of the information here applies to both first-year and transfer applicants, and requirements are the same for domestic and international applicants.  

Don't forget to reference our Application Tips for guidance on filling out the Common Application.

Application

We accept the Common Application  and the Coalition Application by Scoir . Both are treated equally by the Admissions Committee. Complete and submit your materials as soon as possible to ensure full and timely consideration of your application. Your portions of the application are due by the application deadlines (November 1 for Restrictive Early Action and January 1 for Regular Decision); high school counselors are given an additional week to submit materials on your behalf. 

If you use the Common Application , you must submit your application before your supporting materials (Secondary School Report, Teacher Recommendations, etc.) can be released to a college. Until you submit your own application sections, no part of your application will be transmitted to the Harvard Admissions Office.

If you use the Coalition Application , remember you must submit the separate Harvard supplement in addition to the application by the application deadline for your application to be considered complete. 

Submitting Your Application

Receiving confirmation of your application.

After you submit your application, we will send an email confirmation with a PIN to access the Applicant Portal. We begin sending these daily application confirmation emails in mid-September each year. Most applicant receive their confirmation email the day after they submit their application online. Applications sent in the mail will take up to two weeks to process.

If you have not received your confirmation email, please check your spam/junk folder for messages from [email protected] or [email protected]

If have searched your inbox and still cannot find your confirmation email, we encourage you to check the application system you used and ensure you clicked "Submit" and not just "Save".

If you still cannot locate your application confirmation email, please contact us . Choose the category “Admissions” and then the subject “Applicant Questions (if you've already submitted your application)” in the drop-down menu, or call 617-495-1551.

Paying the application fee or requesting a fee waiver

You may pay your application fee online with a credit card via the Common Application or Coalition Application, Powered by Scoir websites.

You may also send a check or money order to Harvard College Admissions, 86 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. Please include the applicant’s name with the payment.

Fee waivers: We are committed to making the application process accessible for all students. If the admissions application fee presents a hardship for you or your family and you plan on applying for financial aid, the fee will be waived. Please follow these instructions to request your fee waiver . Requesting a fee waiver will not disadvantage your application in any way.

Completing the Harvard supplement questions

Complete the Harvard Questions with the Common Application or Coalition Application, Powered by Scoir*. This includes the following five required short-answer questions, each with a 200 word limit. 

  • Harvard has long recognized the importance of enrolling a diverse student body. How will the life experiences that shape who you are today enable you to contribute to Harvard?
  • Briefly describe an intellectual experience that was important to you. 
  • Briefly describe any of your extracurricular activities, employment experience, travel, or family responsibilities that have shaped who you are.
  • How do you hope to use your Harvard education in the future?
  • Top 3 things your roommates might like to know about you. 

*Please note that the Harvard supplement is separate for the Coalition Application, so you must submit both the application AND supplement for your application to be considered complete. 

Additional application questions

What if i am homeschooled.

Each applicant to Harvard College is considered with great care and homeschooled applicants are treated the same as all other applicants. There is no special process, but all relevant information about your educational and personal background is welcome. In addition to the application, all applicants are required to submit a transcript (which can be created by the family member or agency overseeing your schooling), and recommendations. If the application fee presents a hardship for your family,  simply request a fee waiver .

Hear from Harvard students who were homeschooled, in the Harvard Gazette article ‘ Homeschooled en route to Harvard .’

What if I need to make updates to my application after I submit it?

Do not resend your application in order to make updates. If you need to update your identification or contact information, or send updates, additional information, or corrections, please do so via the  Applicant Portal .

Misrepresentation of Credentials

Be completely accurate in your application materials. If we discover a misrepresentation during the admissions process, you will be denied admission. If you have already been admitted, your offer will typically be withdrawn. If you have already registered, your admission will normally be revoked, and we will require you to leave the College. Harvard rescinds degrees if misrepresentations in application materials are discovered.

The determination that an application is inaccurate or contains misrepresentations rests solely with the Admissions Office and will be resolved outside the student disciplinary process.

School Reports and Teacher Recommendations

Secondary school report.

The secondary school report is a required form that is submitted by your school counselor or another school leader. This form gives an overview of the student's academic record. It includes the applicant's academic transcript(s), a letter of recommendation, and a school profile (if available). If a counselor is unable to submit a letter of recommendation for the applicant, another teacher or school leader may submit an additional recommendation letter. 

Midyear School Report

When you apply, your school counselor will often send your transcript with few or no senior year course grades included. That is why the midyear school report is required - to allow us to review your performance in the first half of your senior year coursework .  The midyear school report must be completed by your school counselor or other school official. Please request that the midyear school report is completed and returned to our office as soon as possible. 

Midyear School Report FAQs

What if i'm applying restrictive early action and i don't have my midyear grades yet.

Restrictive Early Action applicants are not required to submit the midyear report by the November 1 deadline. If you applied Restrictive Early Action and are deferred to Regular Decision, please submit the midyear report and transcript in February, or as soon as your midyear grades are available.

I'm an international student and my academic year is different. Do I still need to submit the midyear report?

If you study the IB curriculum or the A-level curriculum, then we expect that your school will send predicted grades, based on your current classroom work and the results of any internal or mock exams you have taken up to that point. If your school does not issue official or predicted midyear grades for your final year of school, then you do not need to submit the midyear report form, although the item may remain on your checklist.

What if I have already graduated from high school?

If you have already graduated from high school, you should ignore the midyear report requirement (though the item may remain on your Checklist in the Applicant Portal) and simply ask your school to send a final school report if you have not already done so.

Teacher Evaluations

Ask two teachers in different academic subjects who know you well to complete the Teacher Recommendation forms (which includes an evaluation form and a letter of recommendation). If you wish to submit additional letters of recommendation, you can do so after you submit your application. In your application confirmation email, there will be a personalized link to send to your recommenders.

What courses should I take to prepare for applying to Harvard?

There is no “one size fits all” rule about which curriculum to study during secondary school years. Students should challenge themselves by taking courses deemed appropriate by their teachers and counselors. But some students believe that “more is always better” when it comes to AP, IB or other advanced courses.

While some students prosper academically and personally by taking large numbers of such courses, others benefit from a more balanced approach that allows them additional time for extracurricular and personal development. Even the best students can be negatively affected by taking too many courses at once, and might benefit instead from writing, reading or research projects on subjects of great interest to them.

To learn more, read our Guide to Preparing for College. To avoid the “burnout” often seen among secondary school students, please refer to our article, Time Out or Burn Out for the Next Generation .

Is there a specific math requirement?

Applicants to Harvard should excel in a challenging high school math sequence corresponding to their educational interests and aspirations. We recommend that applicants take four years of math courses in high school. Ideally, these math courses will focus on conceptual understanding, promote higher-order thinking, and encourage students to use mathematical reasoning to critically examine the world. Examples include rigorous and relevant courses in computer science, statistics and its subfields, mathematical modeling, calculus, and other advanced math subjects.

Students’ math records are viewed holistically, and no specific course is required. Specifically, calculus is not a requirement for admission to Harvard. We understand that applicants do not have the same opportunities and course offerings in their high schools. Moreover, many programs of study at Harvard do not require knowledge of calculus. We encourage applicants to take the courses that are available to them and aligned with their interests and goals.

Students intending to study engineering, computer science, physics, mathematics, statistics or other fields where calculus is needed may benefit from taking calculus in high school. However, students at Harvard can still pursue such fields by starting with one of our introductory calculus classes that has no high school calculus prerequisite. On balance, we encourage all students to master foundational mathematical material instead of rushing through any of the more advanced courses.

Final School Report and Transcripts

All admitted students who choose to enroll are required to send a Final School Report and transcript as soon as their final grades become available – no later than July 1. The Final School Report and transcript should be completed and sent by a school counselor or other school official through Parchment/Docufide or Scrip-Safe International, if your school has access to these submission options.

IB students should send their final results as soon as they are released in mid-July. We will expect to see final A levels results by mid-August.

Standardized Test Scores

For the College Classes of 2027-2030, students may apply for admission without standardized test scores. Please read our announcement for more details on the application changes for the upcoming cycles. 

If you choose to submit standardized tests, you may submit the SAT or ACT (with or without the writing component). While the College Board no longer offers Subject Tests and they are not a requirement for applying, you may submit Subject Tests taken in the last 5 years. If you choose to submit Subject Tests, it is more useful to choose only one mathematics test rather than two. Similarly, if your first language is not English, a Subject Test in your first language may be less helpful.

Standardized Testing FAQs

How do i let harvard know whether i would like my application reviewed with or without test scores.

When you apply for admission, you can choose whether or not our review of your application will include your standardized test scores (SAT and ACT).

  • If your scores already are on file before you apply and you choose at the time of your application to proceed without scores, we will not consider those scores. 
  • If you initially chose an application review without scores and would now like to include scores in your file, you may make this request by submitting the "Change to consideration of test scores" form on your Applicant Portal. 
  • If you ask that our review includes your scores, either at the time of application or after you apply by submitting the form in the Applicant Portal, they will be part of your application throughout the admissions process.

Can I self-report my test scores?

Yes. Applicants may provide self-reported SAT and ACT test scores (including Subject Tests, Advanced Placement, IB, etc.). Admitted students who decide to enroll at Harvard College will be required to submit official test scores.

How do I send my test scores?

You are free to use the College Board Score Choice option or the similar option offered by the ACT. Our official codes are 3434 for the College Board SAT Reasoning Tests and 1840 for the ACT if you are submitting official test scores as part of your application.

  • How to send your SAT scores
  • How to send your ACT scores

Are there test score "cutoffs"?

There are no score cutoffs, and we do not admit “by the numbers.” For the ACT, we will evaluate your highest composite score and any other scores you choose to share with us. We take into account your educational background when reviewing your scores.

Should I prepare for standardized tests?

Opportunities to prepare for standardized tests vary greatly for students of different socioeconomic backgrounds. Research indicates that short term test preparation usually has little effect, but the free “test prep” now offered by the SAT and the ACT might make a significant difference for students who follow their programs for extended periods of time. Such free programs could help to level the playing field for students from under-resourced schools by providing the academic skills that will serve them well on standardized tests and also in college. Students can also do well by studying widely and deeply over a long period of time on their own with the help of family, school, or community organizations.

What do standardized tests and grades indicate about academic preparation for college?

Standardized tests provide a rough yardstick of what a student has learned over time and how that student might perform academically in college - but they are only one of many factors considered. High school grades in a rigorous academic program can also be helpful in assessing readiness for college courses, but the thousands of secondary schools around the country and the world employ various high school curricula and a wide range of grading systems - and some have no grades at all. Other students have been homeschooled or prepared for college by taking part in multiple schooling opportunities both in person and electronic.

Given the wide variation in how students prepare for Harvard – as well as the fact that most applicants and admitted students have outstanding academic records – it is difficult for high school grades to differentiate individual applications. That does not mean that high school grades are unimportant. Students who come to Harvard have done well day to day in their high school studies, providing a crucial foundation for academic success in college, including a 97% - 98% graduation rate.

SAT and ACT tests are better predictors of Harvard grades than high school grades, but this can vary greatly for any individual. Students who have not attended well-resourced schools throughout their lives, who come from modest economic backgrounds or first-generation college families have generally had fewer opportunities to prepare for standardized tests. Each application to Harvard is read with great care, keeping in mind that talent is everywhere, but opportunity and access are not.

Does Harvard accept SAT Subject Test scores?

As announced by the College Board, Subject Tests and the essay portion of the SAT have been terminated, except in certain special circumstances. See the  College Board's announcement for more details. Harvard admission officers review all material that an applicant submits, so if you have already taken Subject Tests or the essay portion of the SAT, you may still submit it along with your other application materials.

How do I choose whether to submit my standardized test score?

Choosing whether or not to submit test scores is a personal decision for every applicant. There are many reasons why students do not submit test scores, including expense. In general, though, anything that might give a more complete or positive picture of an applicant can be helpful. Even if you feel your test scores do not fully represent your strengths, perhaps because of a lack of resources at your school or limited opportunities to prepare for or take the tests, you could note this fact in your application to provide context. There are no score cutoffs and we do not admit “by the numbers.”

Why can't I view my standardized test scores in the Common Application?

Since Harvard College is not requiring applicants to submit standardized test scores for the 2022-2026 application cycles , your standardized scores will not display in the Common Application PDF preview, even if you have chosen to submit them. However, if you entered your test score information and would like it to be considered, that data will still be transmitted to us with your application and we will review it. You can verify this by viewing the Application Checklist in your Applicant Portal. You will see a green check mark if we have received your standardized test scores.

How will Harvard evaluate the new digital SAT?

The College Board's shift to a digital delivery of the SAT will not impact the way in which Harvard reviews test scores within applications. For the College Classes of 2027-2030, students may apply for admission without standardized test scores. Students who do not submit standardized test scores will not be disadvantaged in their application process. Please  visit the College Board FAQs  for more information.  

Supplemental Materials

Our standard application materials typically give us ample information for making admission decisions. However, we recognize you may have truly exceptional talents or achievements you wish to share, and we want you to have every opportunity to best represent yourself.

At the discretion of the Admissions Committee, supplementary materials—such as music recordings, artwork, or selected samples of academic work—may be evaluated by faculty. These materials are entirely optional.

Material Types

How to submit documents and articles.

Scholarly articles, research, creative writing or other documents of which you are the primary author should be submitted in the Upload Materials section of the Applicant Portal . This is the most efficient and direct method of submitting these materials, because they will be added directly to your official application. All submissions should include a list of any individuals with whom you collaborated in the production of the work. If appropriate, please identify your research sponsor, mentor, and/or laboratory or research group leader and provide a short description of your particular contribution to the work.

How to submit media (video, audio, or images)

You may submit optional supplementary media materials (e.g. videos, audio recordings, or images) electronically via Slideroom . Details for submissions in art, dance or choreography, musical performance or composition, will be found on the Slideroom website. There is a small submission fee, but if this fee causes you economic hardship, you may request a fee waiver at the point of submission. You may also contact us to request a fee waiver.

If you encounter technical difficulties on Slideroom, you may submit a document via your portal with YouTube video links. Our team may follow up to request a Slideroom submission at a later time. 

Should I submit other academic materials?

Harvard accepts other standardized tests or other academic credentials if you choose to submit them. In any admissions process, additional information can be helpful. For example, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, A-levels, national leaving examinations, national or international contests, early high school assessment scores such as the PSAT or pre-ACT, or courses taken outside your school during the school year or summer are just some examples of information that could be submitted. Subject Tests and the essay portion of the SAT have been terminated, except in certain special circumstances. Harvard admission officers review all materials that an applicant submits, so if you’ve already taken Subject Tests or the essay portion of the SAT, you may still submit them along with your other application materials.

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Related Topics

Not sure how to fill out the admissions application to Harvard? Here are some helpful tips from our admissions committee.

First-Year Applicants

Here's everything you need to know about applying to Harvard College as a first-year applicant.

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  • Application Materials

Required, Supplemental, and Optional Application Elements

Completing Your Northwestern Application

A quick checklist of application components can be found on our main  Apply page . Below, you can find help related to application components, such as your letters of recommendation or personal statements, and answers to common questions.

Standardized Test Scores

Northwestern will remain test-optional for the 2023–24 admissions cycle. We will not require ACT or SAT scores from first-year or transfer candidates applying for fall 2024 entry.

If students choose to take an SAT or ACT, there is no preference for either exam—and will review a “superscore” for both tests. For students who take the SAT or ACT more than once, this means that our system will combine the highest section scores across multiple test dates and calculate a “superscore” that will override the high score from a single sitting in our database. Applicants are not obligated to report scores from all test dates, though are welcome to do so.

  • For students who take the ACT section tests, we will factor any individual section scores into your ACT superscore. You may utilize ACT’s new superscore reporting option to report an official superscore.
  • Students may self-report all SAT and ACT scores, but   please do not calculate your own ACT superscore —report your highest ACT section scores and your highest composite score from a single test date, and our system will calculate the ACT superscore. Admitted students who choose to enroll will be required to submit official SAT or ACT test scores that confirm highest self-reported section/composite scores prior to matriculation.

Letters of Recommendation

TIP: Letters of recommendation should be from individuals who can best speak to the range of your strengths and abilities.

We require two letters of recommendation.

One letter should come from your high school counselor. This could be your college counselor, guidance counselor, academic advisor, career center specialist or whoever can to best speak to your overall high school curriculum and involvement within the context of your high school. The second letter should come from one of your teachers who can address your strengths as a student in the classroom; this recommender should most likely be a teacher from one of your core subject areas, in your junior or senior year.

If you have an additional reference who would like to submit a letter on your behalf, we will accept supplemental letters of recommendation. It is in your best interest that each letter provides new or different information about you.

Personal Statement and Supplemental Essay(s)

Northwestern 2023–24 first-year writing supplements.

We have designed these writing supplements to help us understand your experiences throughout high school and imagine what kind of Northwestern student you may become. The supplemental questions below touch on areas we see as important for building Northwestern’s Class of 2028, but you should feel free to repurpose essays you’ve written for other applications (including the Common/Coalition Application personal essay, which we no longer require) if they tell the story you’d most like to share.   

We also know there may be information or qualities not covered in our supplemental questions that  you  see as important to your application. To that end, we welcome—but by no means expect—your submission of a personal essay or additional information in the Common Application.

The following question is required for all Common Application and Coalition with Scoir applicants (optional for QuestBridge applicants). Please respond in 300 words or fewer:

  • We want to be sure we’re considering your application in the context of your personal experiences: What aspects of your background, your identity, or your school, community, and/or household settings have most shaped how you see yourself engaging in Northwestern’s community, be it academically, extracurricularly, culturally, politically, socially, or otherwise?

The following questions are optional, but we encourage you to answer at least one and no more than two. Please respond in fewer than 200 words per question:

  • Painting “The Rock” is a tradition at Northwestern that invites all forms of expression—students promote campus events or extracurricular groups, support social or activist causes, show their Wildcat spirit (what we call “Purple Pride”), celebrate their culture, and more. What would you paint on The Rock, and why?
  • Northwestern fosters a distinctively interdisciplinary culture. We believe discovery and innovation thrive at the intersection of diverse ideas, perspectives, and academic interests. Within this setting, if you could dream up an undergraduate class, research project, or creative effort (a start-up, a design prototype, a performance, etc.), what would it be? Who might be some ideal classmates or collaborators?
  • Community and belonging matter at Northwestern. Tell us about one or more communities, networks, or student groups you see yourself connecting with on campus.
  • Northwestern’s location is special: on the shore of Lake Michigan, steps from downtown Evanston, just a few miles from Chicago. What aspects of our location are most compelling to you, and why?
  • Northwestern is a place where people with diverse backgrounds from all over the world can study, live, and talk with one another. This range of experiences and viewpoints immeasurably enriches learning. How might your individual background contribute to this diversity of perspectives in Northwestern’s classrooms and around our campus?

Northwestern 2023–24 Transfer Writing Supplements

We have designed our writing supplements to help us understand your experiences in school and imagine what kind of Northwestern student you may become. Our supplemental questions touch on areas we see as important for shaping our incoming transfer cohort, but you should feel free to repurpose essays you’ve written for other applications (including the personal essay, which we no longer require) if they tell the story you’d most like to share. 

We also know there may be information or qualities not covered in our supplemental questions that you see as important to your application. To that end, we welcome—but by no means expect—your submission of a personal essay or additional information, which you can upload via your Northwestern portal. 

The following questions are required for all applicants. Please respond in 300 words or fewer:

  •  We want to be sure we’re considering your application in the context of your personal experiences: What aspects of your background, your identity, or your school, community, and/or household settings have most shaped how you see yourself engaging in Northwestern’s community, be it academically, extracurricularly, culturally, politically, socially, or otherwise?
  • Please share with us why you would like to transfer to Northwestern.

Activity Chart

TIP: The activity chart is your opportunity to be thorough about the depth and range of your involvement, whatever it may be.

The activity chart is your chance to explain any and all activities in which you’ve been involved outside of your high school classes. Provide as much detail as you can, explaining any abbreviations or acronyms that may be unique to your school. If you have held any leadership positions or received any awards, honors or distinctions, be sure to include that information on the activities chart as well. There’s no “right answer” to what kind of activities we like to see: Northwestern has over 500 different clubs and activities on campus, so we appreciate a very wide range of activities and value diversity of student interests.

Alumni Interviews

Alumni Interviews are an optional component of the application process, available on a limited basis. Alumni feedback is included in your file, but not participating in an interview has no negative effect on your chance of admission. Alumni interviews allow applicants to ask questions, and are primarily informational.

Interviews offer the admissions committee additional context about your potential fit for Northwestern beyond what we read in your application, and allows you to learn more about the university in the process. That said, an interview is not a required part of your Northwestern application. Please read the paragraphs below carefully to understand our interview process./p>

Who conducts interviews?

Regional alumni volunteers on our Alumni Admission Council (AAC) conduct all interviews off campus, which means our ability to offer interviews depends entirely on alumni geography, availability, and capacity. All AAC interviewers complete a comprehensive training program and sign a Volunteer Code of Conduct prior to meeting with students.

Interview format

For the 2023–24 academic year, Northwestern has adopted a hybrid interview policy. Interviews will be conducted virtually by default, but students will have the option to indicate on their request form whether they are comfortable meeting in-person. Depending on their interviewer’s comfort/availability, some interviews may then be conducted in-person.  Please note that Northwestern assigns no higher value to either virtual or in-person interviews; equal consideration will be given to reports from both interview formats.  

How can I schedule an interview?

The Admissions Office will contact all Early and Regular Decision applicants who attend high school in regions with active alumni interviewers—look for an email with instructions for making a scheduling request. Our alumni interview coordinators accommodate scheduling requests on a space-available basis.

Please add   [email protected]   to your contacts, so that our messages do not get caught in a spam folder.

If I choose to interview, what should I expect?

Interview requests are accommodated on a space-available basis. Alumni interview coordinators will match students requesting an interview with an alumni volunteer if space permits.

Your alumni interviewer will contact you via email or phone to coordinate an interview at a mutually agreeable time. If you have concerns about technology access or internet connectivity, you may share that with your interviewer. You may also contact   [email protected]   if you need assistance with interview coordination.

You can expect a conversational setting where you can relax, be yourself, and ask questions in addition to answering them. You do not need to send a resume or other documents to your interviewer or prepare any other materials prior to the conversation.

If you can’t interview, no problem—we promise.

While we have a vibrant alumni volunteer team across the United States and abroad,   it is not possible for us to offer interviews to all applicants .   W e encourage you to   request an interview once you receive an invitation , but it is very important to understand the following:

  • We extend interview invitations based solely on alumni geography, availability, and capacity— not based on the strength of an application.  
  • Your application will be at  no disadvantage  if you are unable to interview.  

If geography or capacity prevent you from interviewing, rest assured that will not be held against you as we review your application. Your involvement, writing samples, and letters of recommendation lend a great deal of insight into who you are and what makes you tick. Plenty of students have gained admission in years past without an interview.

And if you were hoping to learn more about Northwestern by way of an interview, there are other great ways to explore our campus and community: take our virtual tour, head over to our   YouTube channel ,  connect with our student teams , or send questions to   [email protected] .

International Interviews via InitialView

For international students who do not have the opportunity to interview with our alumni volunteers, Northwestern will accept interviews from  InitialView . Similar to alumni interviews, InitialView interviews are not required and a student is not a disadvantage without one. InitialView does not review or rate the interviews. Evaluation is done  only  by members of the admissions committee and provides an additional source of information and perspective about your English language proficiency, personality, academic interests and potential fit for Northwestern.

All InitialView interviews for the 2023-24 cycle must be completed by  November 1  for Early Decision or January 3 for Regular Decision.

Questions concerning international interviews may be directed to  [email protected]

Selecting Early or Regular Decision

TIP: If Northwestern is a school that, if admitted, you would attend without hesitation, applying Early Decision best positions you within a competitive applicant pool. If you’re applying for financial aid, we use the same need-based process for financial aid awards for early decision and regular decision; your aid package will be the same regardless of when you apply.

If Northwestern is a top choice, and you feel comfortable applying through the Early Decision process, you are strongly encouraged to consider applying Early Decision. We use the same review criteria for both early and regular decision. Applicants in both cycles are very competitive. Last year we enrolled approximately 50% of our incoming freshman class from early decision. To learn more, please visit our   Application Options   page.

Northwestern allocates financial aid on the basis of demonstrated financial need. Should you receive an offer of admission, your financial aid (including scholarships) will not differ whether you apply under the early decision or regular decision time frame. Please use our  Net Price Calculator  to determine your expected family contribution. Northwestern guarantees to meet 100% of the demonstrated need between your expected family contribution and the total cost of attendance.

Applications That May Require Additional Materials

Some applications may require materials in addition to an application for undergraduate admission. Below, you will find a list of requirements for Bienen School of Music, Integrated Science Program (ISP), Mathematical Methods in Social Sciences (MMSS) and School of Communication's Musical Theater Program. For questions pertaining to the content of submission of supplemental application material, please contact the corresponding office directly. 

Bienen School of Music

In addition to an application for undergraduate admission,  all   undergraduate applicants to the Bienen School of Music must submit a   Bienen School Supplement.   Submitting the Supplement ensures that the Bienen School of Music is aware that you are applying for a music major, and provides a portal to submit music application materials. Bienen School applicants also register for auditions via the Supplement.

Supplement materials:

  • Music   prescreening and/or portfolio materials
  • Music teacher recommendation letter (required, submit via  Bienen School Supplement )

See instructions and deadlines for submitting the supplement.   Please note that many supplement deadlines fall prior to those of the general application for admission. 

Integrated Science Program (ISP)

Students who wish to apply to the Integrated Science Program must also complete an ISP application using the  online application .

The application processes to Northwestern and to ISP are separate. Admission to Northwestern is not a guarantee of admission to the ISP and the status of your ISP application will not affect your Northwestern general acceptance decision. 

  • For an updated list of required materials, please see the   ISP website .

ISP application considerations:

  • Your high school preparation should include four years of mathematics, including one year of calculus, and four years of science, including chemistry and physics. Taking AP Physics and Chemistry is highly recommended.
  • You should complete the study of one-variable differential and integral calculus before enrolling in ISP. If you will not complete this study in high school, we will ask you to outline how you plan to fulfill this requirement. 

See instructions and deadlines for submitting the supplement. 

Mathematical Methods in the Social Sciences (MMSS)

Students who wish to apply to the Mathematical Methods in the Social Sciences program must also complete an MMSS application using the  online application . 

The application processes to Northwestern and to MMSS are separate. Admission to Northwestern is not a guarantee of admission to the MMSS and the status of your MMSS application will not affect your Northwestern general acceptance decision. 

MMSS application considerations:

  • A strong high school curriculum, including a year of calculus, is required for admission. 

School of Communication Applicants to the Music Theatre Certificate Program

Students applying to the Northwestern University School of Communication Theatre Major who are interested in pursuing admittance to the Northwestern University Music Theatre Certificate Program are encouraged to submit an   optional   Music Theatre Supplement.

Students who are interested in Music Theatre and are applying to the Bienen School of Music   do   not   need to submit this Music Theatre Supplement. Bienen School of Music Voice Majors   must   audition for the program after their first quarter of study. 

Supplement materials include:

  • How do you see yourself contributing to the future of music theatre as a field?
  • How can a liberal arts education in music theatre at Northwestern bring you closer to your specific goals?
  • Please prepare two contrasting musical selections that you love to sing. 
  • Video of a monologue, dance, instrumental skills, etc.

Visit the School of Communication for Music Theatre Supplement instructions and deadlines, including a complete list of requirements.

Special Circumstances

TIP: Use the “Additional Information” section of the Common Application to share any information that may have significantly impacted your academic performance or other involvement.

If you have experienced any special or outstanding circumstances that may have interrupted or significantly affected your academic performance in high school, you may write about those in the “additional information” section of the Common Application. If your high school counselor is aware of these circumstances, he or she may also use the Counselor Recommendation to explain this information. Should you have additional circumstances that need to be addressed, you can email a brief summary to  [email protected] .

Confidentiality and Mandated Reporting

While we treat the information in your application with utmost confidentiality, we feel it’s important to share with our applicants that all Northwestern employees, including our Undergraduate Admissions staff, are Mandated Reporters, which means we are responsible for reporting to the Office of Civil Rights and Title IX Compliance all allegations of sexual misconduct (including sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, and sexual harassment), discrimination based on a protected category, and harassment based on a protected category of which we become aware in the scope of our work for the University. We are also responsible for reporting suspected cases of child abuse and/or neglect . Should we come across any such allegations or evidence of child abuse and/or neglect in application materials, we are required to report that information to the appropriate office/entity.

Once You’ve Hit “Submit”

TIP: Once you’ve submitted your application, keep an eye on your email account associated with your Common Application or Coalition Application – that’s where we’ll send any important updates regarding your application status.

Congratulations! You’ve completed your application. Sit back and relax. Keep your eye on the email address associated with your Common Application or Coalition Application. If we are missing any of your application materials, you will receive an email from  [email protected] . Otherwise, you’ll hear from us with an admission decision by mid-December for Early Decision applicants, by the end of March for Regular Decision applicants, or by the end of June for transfer applicants.

Need to submit an update or want to check on the status of your application? Once your application has been submitted, we will email a personalized link with instructions on how to access the Applicant Status Portal, which can be used to monitor the progress of your application.

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Application Checklist

Undergraduate admission.

Explore this Section

Make sure you're on track

Use our application checklist to make sure you have everything you need. If you have questions, you can always contact Undergraduate Admission by email at  [email protected]  or phone at  303-871-2036 . You can also request additional information from your  admission counselor .

Submit Your Application

  • Choose a deadline

Fill out your application

Submit the application fee

Choose a Deadline

  • Nov. 1 for Early Decision I and Early Action
  • Jan. 15 for Early Decision II and Regular Decision
  • Visit the financial aid website to learn more about the priority deadlines to apply for need-based aid.

What's the difference between the deadline options?

  • Early Decision  is a binding agreement between you and the University that you will attend DU if you're accepted.
  • Students admitted during Early Decision rounds of admission receive an additional $5,000 merit aid award, and top academic performers will have their full demonstrated financial need met. Early Decision applicants enjoy stronger consideration for admission, and benefit from earlier admission and financial aid notifications.
  • Athletes receiving athletic aid as well as music majors are welcome to apply Early Decision but are not eligible for the financial incentives. International students are eligible for the additional merit aid but not for need-based aid.
  • You can only apply Early Decision to one school, and if you're accepted to DU via Early Decision, you must withdraw your applications from other institutions. You should only apply Early Decision if you're committed to joining our community and enrolling at DU.
  • Early Action and Regular Decision are non-binding applications, and you can apply to as many schools as you like for these deadlines.
  • We accept the Common Application .
  • The application includes an essay requirement.
  • Log into your Common Application account and pay at time of application submission to University of Denver.
  • If you're facing financial hardship, you can indicate on the application you qualify for a fee waiver in the Profile area of the Common Application.
  • DU participates in CO Free App Days - if you reside in Colorado and submit your application October 17-19, use code COFreeAppDay24 in DU’s Member Questions area of the application.

Submit Your Supporting Materials

Test scores (Optional)

Send your transcript

Send your letters of recommendation

  • Academic performance is the most important factor in our admission process. However, we are a test-optional university, and submitting test scores is your choice. If you choose to submit your SAT and/or ACT scores, they will be considered along with your other application materials for both admission and merit scholarships. To be considered, test scores must be received directly from the testing agency. We cannot consider self-reported test scores entered on the Common Application.
  • SAT Code: 4842
  • ACT Code: 0534
  • We do not consider subject test or writing sections.
  • Super score: If you’ve taken either test more than once, we’ll combine the best sub-scores to create your best possible composite result. If the testing agency generates a composite of your best sub-scores, we will also accept that super score from the agency.
  • If you receive an application fee waiver you have the option to upload ACT and/or SAT test scores to your application status page. Simply log into your account to choose the "Student Submitted Test Score" material upload type and then upload a PDF of your student score report. You may also email us at [email protected] . Once we verify the score report, we will complete the test score requirement for your application. Please note this process may take 24-48 hours to complete.
  • Send your official high school transcript or verification of a GED.
  • Your high school counselor can send your transcript electronically through Parchment , Naviance , or the Common Application.

Alternatively, your counselor can mail your transcript to this address: Undergraduate Admission University of Denver University Hall 2197 S. University Blvd. Denver, CO 80208-9401

  • We require a recommendation from your school counselor. Counselors need to submit either the Common App School Report , the Common App Counselor Recommendation or a personal letter.
  • You're also welcome to submit additional letters from those that know you best and can speak to your academic abilities and personal qualities (a teacher, a coach, etc.), but these letters are optional.

Additional Steps

Apply for need-based aid

Check your application status

Pay your deposit

  • Complete the CSS Profile . Our school code is 4842.
  • Request a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID . Both the student and at least one parent should have an FSA ID.
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Our school code is 001371.

Learn more about the process to apply for need-based aid on the Financial Aid website .

You can use our online tool to check the status of your application.

If you've been accepted to DU and you want to join us as a student, submit your deposit online to confirm your spot.

Extra Steps

Submit your  Early Decision Agreement Form .

If you've been out of high school for three or more years and you don't have any previous college credit, you can apply through the  Common Application . You also have the option of submitting a letter of recommendation from an employer.

If you're a home schooled student, you can use the application process listed above and you may apply to DU with or without SAT and/or ACT standardized test scores. However, you will need to submit a letter of recommendation from a non-family member.

If you are a student attending a non-graded high school that does not provide a letter or numerical grade, you can be considered for admission without submitting an official SAT or ACT. However, in order to be considered for merit scholarships, you will need to submit an official SAT or ACT score.

Please submit a copy of your high school transcript that shows all completed coursework. You need to submit one letter of recommendation, preferably from a former teacher or counselor.

If you're applying to be a music student, you'll need to submit a supplemental application from the Lamont School of Music. You'll receive this after you've submitted your Common Application. You will also be required to submit an audition or portfolio. Please  contact the Lamont School of Music  for audition dates and options or with any questions you might have.

If you're applying to a BFA program, you must submit a portfolio.  Contact the Art Department  if you have questions.

The majority of students interested in attending our Daniels College of Business will be directly admitted to the program of their choice. Some students will be asked to start at DU as a pre-business student, and to apply to the Daniels College after the completion of their first year on campus.

Follow Undergraduate Admission

  • [email protected]
  • 303-871-2036
  • 303-871-3301
  • www.du.edu/admission-aid/undergraduate/
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The application process for future freshmen

We’re excited that you’re interested in attending IU Bloomington and are here to help you throughout the application and admissions process.

Use the following step-by-step instructions to learn what you need to do before you start your application , when you are ready to apply , and after you have submitted your application .

International applicants should visit the Office of International Services for information about applying.

Download our booklet

Check out the IU Admissions Viewbook and learn more about our majors, inspiring academic opportunities, and the IU family.

Ready to become a Hoosier?

There are two options to choose from, but you should submit only one application for admission to IU Bloomington.

Start your Apply IU Application

Use the Apply IU Application to apply to IU Bloomington—and apply to more than one Indiana University campus.

Start your Common Application

Use the Common Application to apply to any of over 900 schools.

Watch our video to see how to apply

To make things as easy as possible, we’ve broken the application process into step-by-step instructions. Watch our video to learn the steps to apply to IU.

Before you apply

Before you begin the application process, learn what you need to do to get ready to apply.

Know our deadlines

The Indiana University Bloomington early action (non-binding) deadline is November 1. This is also the deadline for highest admission and scholarship consideration. Your complete application for admission, including official transcript, essay, and SAT and/or ACT test scores ( if applicable *) must be submitted electronically by November 1 or postmarked on or before November 1 to be considered for the early action (non-binding) deadline. The regular decision deadline is February 1.

See all deadlines

*IU is test-optional. To learn more, please visit go.iu.edu/test-optional .

Review admission standards

Admission to IU is selective, and we consider factors that emphasize academic performance and preparation, such as the level and rigor of your coursework, the individual grades and cumulative GPA you have earned through these courses, your SAT and/or ACT scores ( if applicable ), and the additional insights offered through your application essay.

Review the information in this section to understand IU’s admission standards. You can also view the class profile to see stats on our most recent freshman class.

View the class profile

High school graduation

You must earn a diploma from an accredited high school (or must have completed the Indiana High School Equivalency Diploma) to be eligible for admission consideration. Students who are homeschooled or attend an alternative school should submit credentials that demonstrate equivalent levels of achievement and ability.

Additional information for homeschooled students

Academic preparation

Applicants should complete at least 34 credits of college-preparatory courses, including:

  • 8 credits (semesters) of English , such as literature, grammar, or composition
  • 7 credits (semesters) of mathematics , including 4 credits of algebra and 2 credits of geometry (or an equivalent 6 credits of integrated algebra and geometry), and 1 credit of precalculus, trigonometry, statistics, finite, or calculus or an alternative course demonstrating advanced math preparation. *NOTE: Discrete mathematics and quantitative reasoning are not approved alternative courses and will not meet the math requirements outlined above.
  • 6 credits (semesters) of social sciences , including 2 credits of U.S. history; 2 credits of world history/civilization/geography; and 2 additional credits in government, economics, sociology, history, or similar topics
  • 6 credits (semesters) of sciences , including at least 4 credits of laboratory sciences: biology, chemistry, or physics
  • 4 credits (semesters) of world languages
  • 3 or more credits (semesters) of additional college-preparatory courses ; additional mathematics credits are recommended for students intending to pursue a science degree and additional world language credits are recommended for all students

If your high school does not offer the courses needed to meet one or more of the course requirements noted above, alternative college-preparatory courses may be substituted for those that are not available. Contact your  IU admission counselor  to discuss course substitutions.

When available and appropriate, we encourage students to enroll in a challenging curriculum that includes dual credit,  Advanced Placement (AP) ,  International Baccalaureate (IB) , and/or Advance College Project (ACP) courses.

Grades in academic classes

Your cumulative GPA, as well as the grades you have earned in the 34 courses required for admission, will be an important part of the application review process. If your school computes a weighted GPA and includes this GPA on your transcript, we will consider it as part of our review for both the admission and scholarship processes.

For fall 2022, the middle 50 percent range for GPA for admitted freshmen was 3.72–4.00.

Standardized test scores

IU's  test-optional admissions policy  allows you to choose whether to have your SAT and/or ACT test scores considered as part of your application review—letting you decide how best to tell your academic story. Research indicates that for most students, high school GPA paired with test scores provides the best prediction of academic success at Indiana University. However, for some students a standardized test score may not show all that they are capable of or tell the full story of their potential.

While you will decide whether your scores will be considered, resources and guidance are available through our office or your personal admission counselor .

We superscore, which means that if you choose to have test scores considered as part of your application review, we'll consider your best test scores. For the SAT, we’ll consider the highest Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. For the ACT, we’ll combine the highest scores for each subtest from different exams for a new ACT Composite.

Other decision-making factors

As part of our holistic review process, we may consider supplemental information—when provided—such as leadership experience, extracurricular activities, community service, work experience, and counselor or teacher recommendations. Please note, however, that letters of recommendation are not required. If you do choose to submit them, we will accept one counselor recommendation and one teacher recommendation.

Self-reported race or ethnicity information will not be made available to individuals responsible for reviewing admission applications and/or making admission decisions.

Research majors

Before you apply, make sure you spend some time exploring our different schools and 200+ majors .

When you fill out your application, you’ll be asked to choose an intended major.

If you don’t know what you want to major in, that’s okay! IU students who have not yet chosen a major are considered exploratory students. Indiana University promotes academic exploration and encourages students to spend time discovering the path that’s right for them. In fact, over 40 percent of IU freshmen begin their studies in University Division (UD) , where they fulfill the general requirements needed to certify into a degree-granting school or college.

Learn more about being an exploratory student

Learn about University Division

Over 40% of new students at IU begin their studies at University Division—it is one of two ways to begin your academic journey. Students may enter through University Division (UD) as a pre-program UD student if they selected a major on their application for admission, and as an exploratory UD student if they chose exploratory on their application. As a UD student, you’ll work with UD academic advisors to complete the general requirements needed to certify into a degree-granting major or school.

Learn more about University Division

Learn about direct admission to academic programs

Students who select a major on their application for admission may be eligible for direct admission to that academic program and degree-granting school.

All of IU Bloomington's twelve schools offer direct admission to academic programs. The eligibility requirements for direct admission are different for each school or college. To learn more about direct admission, including how to request review for direct admission, select the school(s) you are interested in:

  • College of Arts + Sciences
  • Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture + Design
  • Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies
  • Jacobs School of Music
  • Kelley School of Business
  • Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering
  • The Media School
  • O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs
  • School of Education
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Public Health
  • School of Social Work

Students who are directly admitted to their academic program still have the opportunity to explore and add additional majors and minors, both within and outside of their school or college. They can even change their academic direction as their interests evolve. You will find your perfect combination!

Learn about scholarships

Merit scholarships

IU Academic Scholarships are awarded based on the academic information you provide through your application for admission. The assessment of a student’s academic performance is based on a number of factors, including high school GPA, grades received in coursework required by the Office of Admissions, and rigor and performance in advanced courses (AP, IB, Honors, etc.).

For highest scholarship consideration—including consideration for the IU Academic Scholarships and the Selective Scholarship Application (SSA)—you must submit a complete application for admission, including official transcript, IU-specific essay, and self-reported or official test scores ( if applicable ) by November 1 .

Learn more about this scholarship deadline

Additional scholarships

You can also look for additional scholarship opportunities within your community and at your high school.

Get more information about scholarships

Review AP, IB, and other credit guides

IU awards AP and college credit that can help you get a head start on your degree program.

Read more about advanced placement, credit, and exemptions

Calculate any transfer credits

If you took a college class while you were in high school, you might be able to transfer that credit to IU Bloomington.

To be considered for credit at IU, the course you took in high school must be from a regionally accredited institution and must correspond to a course in our curriculum—in content and credit value. You must earn a grade of C or better in the course.

If you are admitted to IU, we will evaluate your transcript(s) and supply you with a detailed Credit Transfer Report showing how previous college coursework will transfer. You can access your Credit Transfer Report via One.IU . Please be aware that it may take four to six weeks to process and evaluate the transcript once it arrives in our office.

Learn more about our Credit Transfer Service

Find Jacobs School of Music requirements

If you’re interested in the Jacobs School of Music, you may apply using Apply IU or the Common Application. After submitting one of these applications, you must also complete the Jacobs School of Music supplemental application and submit an additional fee.

Please Note:  The deadline to submit the Jacobs School of Music supplemental application is December 1.

Learn more about Jacobs School of Music requirements

When you apply

Find out what to do right before—and right after—you apply.

Submit your complete application

Even though there are two options to choose from, you should submit only one application for admission to IU Bloomington.

You will need to submit the following materials to apply for admission:

  • Apply IU Application
  • Common Application
  • IU-specific essay : In 200–400 words, you’ll be asked to describe your academic and career plans and any special interest (for example, undergraduate research, academic interests, leadership opportunities, etc.) that you are eager to pursue as an undergraduate at Indiana University. If you encountered any unusual circumstances, challenges, or obstacles in pursuit of your education, you may share those experiences and how you overcame them. Please note that this essay may be used for scholarship consideration. Find more information about completing your essay on our FAQ page .
  • The $65 application fee. The application fee is non-refundable. If you experience any payment issues, please contact us at [email protected] or 812-855-0661 .
  • Your high school transcript and full senior year schedule (not just fall courses), which must come directly from your high school or may be uploaded and submitted as part of your application.
  • SAT and/or ACT scores ( if applicable ). Admission to IU is test-optional . If you took the ACT and/or SAT and would like to have your scores considered, you may share either official or self-reported scores during the application process. If you are offered admission and have self-reported test scores in your application, you must have your official test scores sent from the testing agencies before you can enroll at IU. Your offer of admission and any awarded scholarships that referenced your self-reported scores are contingent on us receiving your official test scores before enrollment. Additionally, the scores we receive from the official testing agencies must match or be higher than the scores you self-reported during the application process.

Make sure you allow pop-ups and enable third-party cookies to ensure that your application and fee payment will be submitted correctly. If you experience any payment issues, please contact us at [email protected] or 812-855-0661 .

Make sure you read the information on this page and our FAQ page before you get started.

Pay the application fee or request a waiver

When you submit your application, you must pay a $65 nonrefundable application fee.

We accept multiple different fee waiver forms. Please see the different options below. The application fee, or fee waiver request, must be submitted when completing your application.

  • If you are submitting the Apply IU Application , you will need to submit a completed ACT , SAT , or NACAC fee waiver form that has been verified by your high school counselor.
  • If you are submitting the Common Application , you will need to complete the fee waiver section on your profile and your counselor will need to verify your eligibility.

We will not process your application or make an admission decision until we receive a completed fee waiver or the non-refundable $65 application fee.

If you are a 21st Century Scholar or a Balfour Scholar, the application fee will be waived if you indicate you participate in one of these programs when you complete your application.

Send your test scores (if applicable)

IU's  test-optional admissions policy allows you to choose whether to have your SAT and/or ACT test scores considered as part of your application review.

If you choose to have your test scores considered, you may share either official or self-reported scores. If you choose to self-report your scores, you can do so on your application. You may also self-report additional scores after submitting your application. If you are offered admission and have self-reported test scores in your application, you must have your official test scores sent from the testing agencies before you can enroll at IU. Your offer of admission and any awarded scholarships that referenced your self-reported scores are contingent on us receiving your official test scores before enrollment. Additionally, the scores we receive from the official testing agencies must match or be higher than the scores you self-reported during the application process.

When you have the testing agencies send your official scores, use the codes listed below for Indiana University Bloomington.

  • Our SAT code is 1324.
  • Our ACT code is 1210.

Request to have your high school transcript sent

To complete your application for admission, we require an official high school transcript and a full senior year schedule (not just fall courses). The transcript and full senior year schedule may be sent directly from your high school, or uploaded by your counselor as part of your application if you are applying with the Common Application. If your school sends transcripts electronically and the transcript vendor requires an email address for delivery, please use [email protected] . You can also have your transcript mailed to the following address:

Office of Admissions Indiana University Bloomington 940 E. Seventh Street Bloomington, IN 47405

Your offer of admission is contingent upon the successful completion of the academic coursework outlined in your transcript and/or admission application. We expect you to maintain your high level of academic performance. Please note that if you are admitted and choose IU, we will require a copy of your high school transcript with final grades and graduation date as soon as it is available.

Transcripts for college courses taken in high school

If you are enrolled in any college courses in high school, you’ll need to send those transcripts as well. You may be able to earn college credit to IU Bloomington. College transcripts may be mailed to the address above or sent electronically to [email protected] .

Learn more about transferring credits

If you applied by the November 1 early action (non-binding) deadline, you can expect a response by January 15 . If you applied by the February 1 regular decision deadline, you will receive a response by March 15 .

After you apply

To check your application status, you will need to create an IU computing account. Read below for instructions and to learn more about what you can do after you apply.

Create your IU computing account

About two weeks after we receive your application, you should receive an email containing your university ID number. Use your university ID number to create your IU computing account, which you need to check the status of your application. Please note: The computing account is different than the account you created to apply.

Steps to create your IU computing account:

  • Open Create My First IU Account in One.IU .
  • Read and agree to the Guidelines for Appropriate Usage.
  • Enroll in the Passphrase Self-Service Reset System . If you forget your passphrase, this tool will let you reset it yourself without having to visit a UITS Support Center location in person.
  • Save or record your account information in a secure place. You will need this information each time you log in to your IU computing account.
  • It may take up to 24 hours before you can log in to some services.

What to do if you have forgotten your ID or other information:

  • Forgot your 10-digit university ID number? If you are an ACP student, use the Information Recovery Form . All other students should first try the Student Self-Service University Lookup Form . If you still need assistance, please email the Office of Admissions at [email protected] . (In order to help you, we will request additional information.)
  • Forgot your username? Contact the UITS Support Center .
  • Forgot your passphrase? Reset it here .

Please note that if you have previously been enrolled in or participated in a program at any IU campus and were given a 10-digit university ID number and username, you will use the same university ID number and username to access (or set up) your IU computing account.

Check your application status and To Do List

Now that you’ve created your IU computing account, you’ll be able to check the status of your application and view your To Do List in One.IU .

Your To Do List will tell you when our office has received each of your application materials. Please be aware that after your items are received, it may take up to four weeks for them to be updated in your To Do List. Please be patient and check back frequently.

If you receive an email from us asking you to complete your application but you just sent the missing materials, assume that the email was sent before we received your materials or that they have not been processed yet.

To check the status of your application

  • Go to Application Status in One.IU and click “Start.”
  • Log in using your IU username and passphrase to see the status of your application.

To find your To Do List

  • Go to To Do List in One.IU and click “Start.”
  • Log in using your IU username and passphrase to see your To Do List.

If you have any outstanding items listed, your application will be considered incomplete and will not be reviewed. Please send all outstanding To Do List items to our office or contact us if you have questions.

Self-report your scores

If you chose at the point of application to have your SAT and/or ACT test scores considered as part of your application review, you can self-report your scores by completing the form below.

PLEASE NOTE: Self-reporting your scores will not change your selection regarding whether or not you want to have your test scores considered as a part of your application review. If you would like to update your test-optional selection, please review the instructions under "Change your test-optional selection."

Change your test-optional selection

If you want to update your selection of whether or not to have test scores included in your application review, please complete the form below.

PLEASE NOTE: Only complete this form if you have already submitted your application and need to  change your test-optional selection . If you don't want to change the test-optional selection you made on your application,  do not complete this form . If you opt to have your test scores considered and have not yet submitted test scores, you will also need to  self-report or send your official scores .

Make other changes to your application

To learn how to make changes to your application, visit the Make a Change to Your Application page . Please note that if you change your intended major, your application for admission will be reviewed again, even if you already received a decision.

Contact us with any questions

Cancel your application

If you’d like to cancel your application after you’ve applied, send a message using our contact form. Select "Application" as the topic, then choose "Cancellation" in the drop down menu and put your cancellation request in the comment box.

Just for Hoosier Link students

Hoosier Link is a guaranteed transfer admission program in cooperative partnership between Indiana University Bloomington and Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington.

The program allows a select group of Indiana residents who are high school graduates (and who have never attended a college institution full time) the opportunity to gain transfer admission to IU Bloomington upon reaching specific academic benchmarks.

Learn more about the Hoosier Link program

Admitted students

If you’re admitted to IU Bloomington, you’ll need to reserve your space by indicating your intent to enroll by May 1 May 15.

Reserve your space

Campus safety and security reports

Indiana University’s annual security reports , which contain policy statements as well as crime and fire statistics for Indiana University campuses, are available online. You may also request a physical copy by emailing IU Public Safety at [email protected] .

  • Contact us / Join the mailing list

FUTURE FRESHMEN

  • See admission requirements
  • Learn how to apply
  • Learn about AP credit
  • Check your status
  • Correct your application

FUTURE TRANSFERS

  • Learn about transfer credit

ADMITTED STUDENTS

  • Learn how to enroll
  • Declare your intent to enroll
  • Set up your computing account
  • Explore housing
  • Learn about orientation

Required Materials

Every avenue to Northeastern is unique. Please take a moment to find the required application documents and deadlines for your path.

You are considered a first-year applicant if:

  • You are still in high school
  • You graduated from high school or earned your GED, but did not enroll in a degree-seeking program at a college or university

If you took college courses in high school, plan to attend a college summer session immediately after you graduate from high school, or are in a dual-enrollment program (receiving your high school diploma and an Associate’s degree at the same time), you would still apply as a first-year.

Northeastern University has a long-standing commitment to the city of Boston, including Boston Public High School students and graduates. If you are a current Boston Public High School student or recent graduate, please view our  Northeastern University and the City of Boston pamphlet  for more information.

First-Year Application Requirements

Application.

  • You may submit either the Common Application  or  Coalition Application
  • Your application must be submitted by the  deadline , along with either the application fee ($75) or a fee waiver request.
  • Transcripts

All first-year applicants are required to submit the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR) . Once your application is submitted and processed, you will be able to access your SRAR through the Application Status Check portal. For additional information on the SRAR, please review Self-Reported Academic Record subsection.

Additionally, your Official High School Transcript must be submitted to Northeastern by your counselor or another school official. Transcripts should include any final grades from grades 9, 10, and 11; first trimester or first semester grades should be sent when they become available.

  • Your high school should submit the Mid-Year Report if you were deferred to Regular Decision.
  • You will need to provide an official translation for any transcripts which are not provided in English.
  • If you are applying from a high school with non-traditional grading policies or narrative evaluations instead of traditional grades, you are required to submit your narrative reports in order for your application to be complete.
  • If you have been out of high school for more than one year, you are still required to submit your most recent transcript.
  • If you earned your GED, you must submit an official GED score report, along with your high school transcript through the final year you completed.

Advanced Credits

  • Freshman are eligible to receive credit from Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) examinations, or from certain international maturity certificate examinations. Learn more  here .
  • If you received credit for any courses completed at a college or university, you must request for an official college or university transcript to be sent directly to Northeastern.

Standardized Tests

Through 2026, Northeastern University is test-optional and does not require applicants to submit standardized testing to be considered for admission.

  • All complete applications will be fully considered for admission to Northeastern.
  • If you choose to apply without standardized testing, you will not be penalized or disadvantaged.
  • If you choose to submit standardized testing, you may submit the SAT (CEEB Code 3667) ACT (College Code 1880) or both. Northeastern super-scores and will only consider your best score between the two types of tests.
  • Non-native English-speaking applicants must continue to submit official results from an approved English Language Test or request a waiver through the  Application Status Check . For additional information, continue reading or visit the  International Applicants page  for our English Language Proficiency policy.

Counselor Recommendation and Teacher Evaluation

We require one teacher recommendation and one school counselor recommendation. If someone else has written on your behalf and offers a different viewpoint, you may submit 1-2 additional recommendations if you would like, but please know that due to the number of applications we receive we may not be able to consider all of them as part of our evaluation. Please ask your recommender to send their letter as a PDF to [email protected] .

Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR)

Northeastern requires all first-year applicants to submit the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR).

What is the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR)? An online platform that permits students to self-report their coursework and grades directly to the university without requiring information to instead be sent by their high school/secondary school. Completing the SRAR will take you less than one hour once you have collected copies of your academic records, and the SRAR is free for students to submit.

How do I submit the SRAR?

  • Once your application is successfully submitted and processed, you will receive access to your Application Status Check .
  • Log in to your Application Status Check .
  • Locate the SRAR section (under the Required Application Checklist Items ).
  • Log in to the SRAR.
  • Create an account or link an account that you have already created.
  • Before beginning the SRAR, review Northeastern’s “How to Complete the SRAR” guide or instructional video .
  • Complete the SRAR by adding your high school, coursework, and if applicable, any external exam information.
  • Upload any supporting documentation.

If you have questions about entering coursework or grades in the SRAR, or completing and submitting the SRAR, you should contact SRAR directly, either using the support widget in your SRAR account or visiting the SRAR Support Center .

English Proficiency

All first-year and transfer applicants, regardless of citizenship, must demonstrate proficiency in English to be considered for admission to Northeastern. You can complete the requirement in the following ways:

  • You are a native English speaker.
  • C1 Advanced  or  C2 Proficiency (Cambridge English)
  • Duolingo English Test (DET)
  • IELTS Academic
  • PTE Academic
  • TOEFL Internet-based Test (Northeastern will accept either the in-person iBT completed in a test center, or the online iBT Home Edition. Northeastern’s TOEFL Code is 3667.)
  • You are a non-native English speaker, and immediately before enrolling at Northeastern, you will complete 4 consecutive, full-time academic years in high schools and universities where native English was the primary instructional language for all courses except foreign language acquisition courses. All waiver requests must be submitted through your Application Status Check . For additional information and to determine whether you are eligible for a waiver, please see the International Students page for more information on waiving the English proficiency requirement.

Please note: Northeastern’s Admissions Committee reserves the right to request proof of English language proficiency from any applicant, regardless of citizenship or first language, at any time during the evaluation process.

Other Requirements

  • If you are applying to the  College of Arts, Media and Design , you can submit a portfolio under your Application Status Check after applying to Northeastern. Applicants are encouraged to complete all forms, including Academic Profile, Media Uploads, and Personal Statement (500-word limit). Please only submit one portfolio. Additional submissions will not be reviewed.  Click here for more information and deadlines.
  • If you are a U.S. Citizen, U.S. Permanent Resident or eligible noncitizen  applying for need-based financial aid , you must submit the  FAFSA  and  CSS Profile .
  • If you are an international student, you must submit the  Declaration and Certification of Finances  (DCF). Please read the  International Applicants  page for more information.

You should review the information found below if:

  • You are a non-U.S. Citizen applying to Northeastern from a high school or university in any country around the world, even the U.S.
  • You are a U.S. Citizen applying from a high school or university outside of the U.S.

You will find application information under Applying, enrollment information under Admitted Students, and additional details about services available for students, under Support.

International application requirements

When reviewing your application, Northeastern’s Admissions Committee will initially focus on your academic records, which include your high school transcript; final or predicted results from any national, regional, or international examinations; any university transcripts; and for first-year applicants who will graduate from a high school which is located outside of the United States, the Self-Reported Academic Record (SRAR). Provided below are additional details on the academic records which Northeastern requires from all first-year and transfer applicants.

High School Transcripts

Before you enroll at Northeastern, you will be expected to complete a pre-university education program, earning a graduation certificate or diploma which will enable you to apply to a bachelor’s degree-seeking program at a university in your home country. Examples include your High School Diploma, International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma, General Certificate of Education (GCE) Advanced Levels (A-Levels), Attestat o Srednem Obshchem Obrazovanii, Baccalauréat, Bachillerato, General Secondary Education Certificate, Indian Standard XII Higher Secondary School Certificate, or West African Senior School Certificate.

  • All high school transcripts must be sent directly to Northeastern by your high school by the application deadline. Any transcripts sent by you, your family or an independent educational consultant will not be accepted.
  • If 9th Grade in your education system is considered middle school, please exclude 9th Grade.
  • If you apply for Regular Decision, or if you are deferred to Regular Decision from an earlier round, your high school should send the Mid-Year Report with an updated high school transcript.
  • If you’ve graduated from high school or will graduate before admissions decisions are released, your high school should send your final high school transcript (with date of graduation).
  • Transfer applicants must provide a final high school transcript (with date of graduation) which can be sent directly from your high school to Northeastern.
  • If your education system does not issue transcripts, your high school must provide the academic records which detail the courses you’ve taken throughout high school, and the grades which you’ve received. Examples include internal grade reports, term or semester reports, mark sheets, or promotional or provisional examination results.

University Transcripts

If you are applying as a transfer student from an international university and wish to have courses evaluated for transfer credit after admittance, you will need to provide a certified transcript evaluation completed by a recognized credentialing agency, such as the  Center for Educational Documentation  (CED),  SpanTran ,  World Education Services  (WES), or another recognized credentialing agency and the credentialed evaluation must include the following:

  • An indication that the institution is accredited in US terms
  • A course-by-course credit and grade conversion

National Exams

If progression or promotion in your country or education system requires you to complete any externally assessed examinations, please read the following section, as Northeastern will require you to submit your final results (or predicted grades, if your final results are not available until after admissions decisions are released).

  • If promotion into your pre-university education requires externally assessed exams, your high school must send a copy of your final results certificate to Northeastern. Examples include your GCSE/IGCSE/GCE O-Level exam results, Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) exam results, Malaysian SPM exam results, or Indian Standard X board exam results.
  • For students who will graduate before admissions decisions are released: final results must be submitted by the exam board, or as a certified copy by your high school.
  • If you will not receive your final results until after admissions decisions are released: predicted grades should instead be submitted by your high school should.
  • Furthermore, all enrolling students will be required to submit final exam results, even students who applied “test-optional” to Northeastern, as final exams also serve as proof of high school graduation.
  • If you are applying from a high school in the United States, submitting predicted grades is not required but entirely optional. Instead, you are encouraged to submit your first semester or first trimester grades once they become available, and your mid-year grades if you applied for Regular Decision or were deferred to Regular Decision from an earlier round.

Predicted results should be submitted with the High School Transcript, Secondary School Report, or Counselor Recommendation; or submitted by a designated school official from a verifiable school email address, using either Northeastern’s Predicted Grades Request Form or your high school’s own predicted grades statement. If your final test scores are not within an acceptable range of your predicted results, Northeastern reserves the right to rescind any offers of admission.

Application Requirements for Common International Education Systems

While Northeastern’s application requirements are largely identical for all first-year applicants and all transfer applicants – the application with Northeastern-specific questions, your academic records, secondary school report or college report, recommendation letters, standardized testing (optional), and English proficiency – the documents which ultimately satisfy those requirements, specifically for the academic records, will sometimes vary by education system. Below are the application requirements for common international education systems. If you do not see your education system listed below, contact [email protected] .

  • American Overseas High Schools
  • IB Diploma Program
  • British A-Levels
  • Chinese National High Schools
  • French Baccalauréat
  • Indian Standard XII

Standardized Testing

Optional Standardized Testing: For the 2022-2023 academic year, Northeastern University is test-optional and does not require applicants to submit standardized testing to be considered for admission.

  • All complete applications will be fully considered for admission to Northeastern, invitation to the University Honors Program, and any merit scholarships.
  • If you choose to submit standardized testing, you may submit the SAT(CEEB Code 3667), ACT (College Code 1880), or both.
  • Northeastern super-scores and will only consider your best score between the two types of tests.
  • All applicants from U.S. and international high schools will be able to choose to submit standardized testing (SAT or ACT) or not. Non-native English-speaking applicants must continue to submit official results from an approved English Language Test or request a waiver through the  Application Status Check . For additional information, please read the English Language Proficiency section below.

English Language Proficiency

Northeastern students will be exposed to not only a rigorous academic environment but also a fast-paced experiential one. In order to be successful in both, all first-year and transfer applicants, regardless of citizenship, must demonstrate proficiency in English to be considered for admission to Northeastern.

Requirement

Once your application is submitted, received, and processed, you will be able to access your  Application Status Check . If you are required to provide further information regarding your proficiency in English, you will be able to complete the requirement in several ways, depending on your familiarity with English, and the frequency with which you use English each and every day:

  • TOEFL Internet-based Test ( CEEB  Code: 3667) – Northeastern will accept results from either the in-person iBT completed in a test center or the online iBT Home Edition. Northeastern does not accept results from the iBT Paper Test.
  • However, based on your academic environment and the primary instructional language in either your high school or university, you may be eligible for a waiver. All waivers must be submitted through your Application Status Check . For additional information and to determine whether you are eligible for a waiver, please read the section below on waiving the English proficiency requirement.

English Language Testing

Northeastern will consider your official results (sent directly from the testing agency or exam board to Northeastern) from any valid test (i.e. no more than 2 years old from the test date) for one of the approved English Language Tests indicated on this page.

Northeastern does not have minimum score requirements. Instead, we publish the middle 50% range for enrolling students, which means 25% of the enrolling students received a higher score, and 25% of the enrolling students received a lower score.

Please note: the scores provided are not cut-off scores, but for estimating purposes, and in no way represent a promise or guarantee of admission.

  • 190 to 202 on either C1 Advanced  (CAE) or  C2 Proficiency  (CPE)
  • 130 to 145 on the Duolingo English Test  (DET)
  • 7.0 to 8.0 on the  IELTS Academic
  • 68 to 81 on the PTE Academic
  • 99 to 112 on TOEFL Internet-Based Test (Northeastern will accept either the in-person iBT completed in a test center, or the online iBT Home Edition. Northeastern’s TOEFL Code is 3667.)
  • Northeastern does not accept results from the following tests: IELTS Indicator, PTE Academic Online, TOEFL Essentials, TOEFL iBT Paper Test, or TOEFL ITP.

Additional Information

  • Results should be submitted to Northeastern by the application deadline. If you plan to take an English Language Test for a first or additional time, once the application is submitted or the application deadline has passed, please indicate planned future test dates on your application. Results will still be accepted after the deadline, but we cannot guarantee we will be able to wait for your results before making an admissions decision. Northeastern will focus on your most recent English Language Test results, and does not superscore results or consider MyBest scores from applicants who choose to submit the TOEFL iBT.
  • If your English Language Testing indicates a need for additional study and support, but you otherwise meet the academic requirements for the degree-seeking program to which you applied, you may be considered for admission through  NU Immerse , a one-year transitional acculturation and English language support program.

Waiving Your English Proficiency Requirement

  • You submit a waiver request through your Application Status Check portal. (Your waiver request will typically be reviewed within 3-5 business days, once your application is otherwise complete.)
  • Immediately before enrolling at Northeastern, you will complete 4 consecutive, full-time academic years at institutions where native English was the primary instructional language for all courses except foreign language acquisition courses.
  • 4 or 5 on AP English Language & Composition
  • 4 or 5 on AP English Literature & Composition
  • 5 or higher on IB English A: Language & Literature (HL or SL)
  • 5 or higher on IB English A: Literature (HL or SL)
  • 6 or higher on IB English B HL
  • 7 on IB English B SL
  • B or higher on A-Level or AS-Level English Language
  • B or higher on A-Level or AS-Level English Literature
  • B/6 or higher on GCSE/International GCSE/IGCSE English Language (including First Language English)
  • B/6 or higher on GCSE/International GCSE/IGCSE English Literature (including Literature in English)
  • B or higher in a university course (completed on a university campus, with other university students, and taught by university faculty) which is considered as an equivalent to Northeastern’s First Year Writing (ENGW 1111). Review the Transfer Equivalency Database to learn whether your course is considered as an equivalent course.

Please note: If you were enrolled in courses which were designed for English Language Learners (such as any ESL courses) for more than one academic year (during the 4 years being reviewed for your waiver request), you are strongly encouraged to submit either final results from one of the English exams indicated above – AP English, IB English, (I)GCSE English or A-Level/AS-Level English – or official results from an approved English Language Test.

Northeastern does not offer alumni or on-campus interviews, but we will consider and evaluate third-party, unscripted video interviews submitted through InitialView  and  Vericant , which will allow you to personally discuss your academic and personal background. Neither will replace English language testing however, when testing is required.

While there is no deadline for submitting any virtual third-party interview, you must submit your InitialView or Vericant interview by the following dates, if you would like either interview evaluated by the Admissions Committee:

  • Early Decision I: November 15
  • Early Action: December 1
  • Early Decision II: January 15
  • Regular Decision: February 1

Declaration and Certification of Finances (DCF)

All international students applying to Northeastern are required to complete and submit the Declaration and Certification of Finances (DCF), which is designed to assist the Admissions Committee in obtaining complete and accurate information about each applicant’s anticipated financial support. Each applicant must verify your ability to fully finance your Northeastern education, including tuition and fees, room and board, and personal living expenses. Information is necessary as the financial support for international students at Northeastern is limited:

  • International students are not eligible for financial aid at Northeastern which includes both institutional need-based grants and federal student financial aid. Additional information for international students is available  here .
  • International students are eligible for merit scholarships which range from $10,000 to $28,000 per year. No additional application is necessary, as your application for admission serves as your scholarship application. Merit scholarships are extremely competitive, however, and do not cover the full cost of attendance.

Once your application is submitted, and processed by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, you will be given access to your Application Status Check . You can access the DCF through your Application Status Check.  Instructions are provided here .

Sending Documents

Documents should be submitted online through the  Common Application  or  Coalition Application . Documents not submitted through an application can be sent from a high school or university email address to  [email protected]  or mailed. Mailing instructions are also available below.

  • Test results must be sent directly to Northeastern from the testing agency or examination board.
  • Transcripts must be sent directly from your high school or university.
  • Results from national examinations, which are only released to the student, can either be scanned and sent to Northeastern from a verifiable high school email address, or a certified copy can also be mailed to Northeastern.
  • Official English translations will be required for documents which are provided in languages other than English. A school official or a translation agency accredited in the country of the educational institution can issue the translation.

You can send your application fee or fee waiver requests (if being sent separately from the application) as well as FedEx, UPS, or Priority Mail packages to:

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions 1o1 Belvidere, 3rd Floor Northeastern University 360 Huntington Ave. Boston, MA 02115-5000 USA

  Transcripts and recommendations which were not submitted online can be mailed to:

Northeastern University Application Processing Center P.O. Box 8210 Portsmouth, NH 03802 USA

You are considered a transfer applicant if:

  • You will have completed at least 12 semester hours of college-level coursework (after your high school graduation).
  • You have attempted at least one semester of full-time coursework and maintained enrollment through the add/drop period.
  • You already received your bachelor’s degree from another college or university but you are choosing to apply for a second bachelor’s degree.

If you are currently in a dual-enrollment program, earning your high school diploma and an Associate’s degree at the same time, you should apply as a first-year student. Dual-enrollment courses can be considered for transfer credit.

If you’re an international student or are applying from a college or university located outside of the United States, you should also read the  International Applicants  page.

Transfer application requirements

Academic records.

  • Your College Report must be submitted by the Registrar’s office or Dean’s office at your current or most recent college/university.
  • Your college or university transcripts must be submitted directly to Northeastern from all colleges and universities which you previously attended.
  • Transcripts can be emailed from a verifiable school email address, mailed directly from your high school, or uploaded with the Final Report which is available through the Common Application or Coalition Application.
  • If you are currently enrolled as a degree-seeking student or are taking classes as a non-degree seeking student, you should either submit the Mid-Term Report available through the Common Application or Coalition Application, or upload a list of your current college courses through your App Status Check.
  • If you earned credits at an international institution, you will need to provide a certified transcript evaluation completed by a recognized credentialing agency, such as the  Center for Educational Documentation
  • Veterans or active duty military should submit either their Joint Services Transcript (JST), or a transcript from the Community College of the Air Force.

Academic Evaluation

An  Academic Evaluation  must be sent by a college professor, academic advisor, or employer.

  • Optional Standardized Testing: For applicants applying for the 2022-2023 academic year, Northeastern University is test-optional and does not require standardized testing to complete an application for admission. Please review our Testing Policy tab for more information.
  • In recent years, Northeastern has required standardized testing from transfer applicants who have not completed more than one year of full-time college coursework (24 or more college credits) following high school graduation. Standardized testing was not required from transfer applicants who’ve either completed more than one year of full-time college coursework (24 or more college credits) following high school graduation or graduated from high school more than 5 years ago.

At Northeastern, we understand that  homeschool applicants come from a variety of academic backgrounds and structures, and carefully consider every element of the application through our holistic review. In order to best consider our homeschool applicants, we require additional documents that provide an in-depth look at your individual homeschool experience. Please see a list of these additional requirements below.

If you have specific questions regarding the application process as a homeschooled student, please direct them to [email protected] .

Application Forms

  • Completed  Homeschool Application Form
  • Please provide grading rubric alongside transcript

School Counselor and Teacher Recommendations

  • Your counselor recommendation may come from a parent or a primary instructor
  • Teacher recommendations may come from a  tutor, online teacher, or teacher from a course taken outside the home . We are flexible based on the structure of your homeschool experience
  • *if your teacher and counselor are the same person, an additional letter of recommendation is required.
  • Additional recommendations can come from an art teacher, an employer, a coach, etc.
  • If you choose to submit standardized testing, you may submit the SAT (CEEB Code 3667) ACT (College Code 1880) or both. Northeastern super-scores and will only consider your best score between the two types of tests.
  • If you choose to submit standardized testing, scores that you would like considered may be self-reported through the Application Status Check or sent officially by the testing center.
  • All applicants from US and international high schools will be able to choose to submit standardized testing (SAT or ACT) or not.
  • Non-native English-speaking applicants must continue to submit official results from an approved English Language Test or request a waiver through the Application Status Check. For additional information, continue reading or please visit the  International Applicants page  for our English Language Proficiency policy.

Please review  frequently asked questions  regarding our standardized testing policy.

Are your ACT/SAT test scores a strong representation of your academic abilities?

  • If yes, send officially or self-report them through your Application Status Check .  
  • If no, hold off.  

Are you deciding between scores from different test dates and wondering if sending more is better?

No problem! The admissions committee superscores the SAT or ACT, and will always consider your best combined score. Do not worry about sending multiple or going back to clear out prior scores, we will look at the strongest score from each subject area.

Do you believe your ACT/SAT scores will help to solidify and complement your application?

  • If yes, send officially or self-report them through your Application Status Check .
  • If no, hold off.

Would you like to send scores, but doing so will cause financial hardship?

If yes, choose to self-report your test scores through the Application Status Check . Remember—if you are admitted and decide to enroll, you’ll be required to submit the official scores directly from the testing agency next summer.  

Do you still have questions after reviewing the information above?

Explore our Test-Optional FAQ or reach out to [email protected] .  

Early Decision I

Decisions released by January 1

Early Action

Decisions released by February 15

Early Decision II

Decisions released by March 1

Regular Decision

Decisions released by April 1

Mailing Instructions

We prefer most credentials are submitted online via The Common Application or the Coalition Application or to [email protected] . Credentials not submitted online should be mailed to the address below.

  • Application fees
  • Application fee waiver requests (being sent separately from the application)
  • FedEx, UPS, or Priority Mail packages

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions 101 Belvidere, 3rd Floor Northeastern University Boston, MA 02115-5000 USA

  • Recommendations (if not submitted online)

Request information

Visit northeastern.

college essay requirements checklist

Application Checklist

Below you'll find the list of components that comprise the Princeton first-year application. In an effort to simplify all that is required of you, we frame the process in three action steps: 1) Submit, 2) Request and 3) Report.

More information about optional components of the application is available at the base of the page. 

First-Year Application Checklist

A Completed Application. You must submit your application online through the Coalition Application or  Common Application . Princeton's CEEB Code: 2672

Princeton-specific Questions. In addition to the questions provided by the Coalition Application or Common Application, all applicants must submit the Princeton-specific Questions . You should submit the Princeton-specific Questions online through the Coalition Application or Common Application website. 

Application Fee or Fee Waiver. You may submit a fee waiver one of two ways: 1) Select the fee waiver option on the Coalition Application or Common Application. Your school counselor must approve your fee waiver request online or submit your fee waiver form by mail or fax. 2) Select one of the following fee waiver options on the application: Princeton-specific,  ACT ,  College Board  or  NACAC . All low-income students are eligible for the Princeton-specific fee waiver. In addition, all applicants who are serving or have served in the U.S. military are eligible for the Princeton-specific fee waiver. If you use the Princeton-specific fee waiver, you do not need to get approval from your college counselor or academic adviser.

  • Graded Written Paper. A graded written paper  is required, preferably in the subjects of English or history.

Transcript. An official transcript must be sent by a school counselor or school official.

  • School Report (SR) . The SR form is available from the Coalition Application or Common Application website. Please ask your school counselor or other school official to complete and submit the SR form.   
  • Counselor Recommendation.  Please note that the SR and the Counselor Recommendation are separate items. Be sure to “invite ”  your school counselor or academic adviser to complete both items.  
  • Two (2) Teacher Recommendations. Please ask two of your teachers who have taught you in higher level courses (e.g., AP, IB Higher/Standard Level, A-Levels, etc.) in different academic areas of study to complete and send the teacher recommendation forms, available on the Coalition Application or Common Application website. The subjects should be in core academic areas, such as English, language, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences or math.  
  • Midyear School Report. Please ask your school counselor or other school official to complete and submit this form when your midyear grades are available. 

We are extending our test optional policy for first-year and transfer applicants for the next three admission cycles (that is, for applications due in the falls of 2023, 2024, and 2025).

  • SAT or ACT . If you choose to submit testing, applicants should take the SAT or the ACT by the October test date for single-choice early action and the December date for regular decision. When registering for the SAT or ACT, use the following codes to ensure your scores are sent to Princeton: SAT: 2672 and ACT: 2588 .  
  • SAT Subject Tests. Princeton does not require SAT Subject Tests. If you chose to sit for a Subject Test (prior to January/June 2021 when the College Board eliminated the test) and wish to submit the score, you may do so.  
  • TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic scores . If English is not your native language and you are attending a school where English is not the language of instruction, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) , the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic) . You are not required to take the TOEFL, IELTS or PTE Academic if English is your native language or if you have spent at least three years at a secondary school where English is the primary language of instruction. Please have your scores sent directly to Princeton: TOEFL: 2672

Optional Application Components  

Arts Supplement, if applicable.  If you've excelled in  architecture, creative writing, dance, music, music theater, theater  or  visual arts , and would like us to consider your talent, you are welcome to submit an  optional Arts Supplement . Early action applicants must submit digital arts materials by Nov. 6 and regular decision applicants by Jan. 8. On the Coalition, Common or QuestBridge Application, please indicate your intention to submit an Arts Supplement in Princeton’s member questions. You will be able to submit an Arts Supplement through your Princeton Applicant Status Portal. Please keep in mind that you need to submit your application to Princeton University before you can submit your Arts Supplement. Given the timeline, students who are participating in the  QuestBridge National College Match  will be unable to submit an Arts Supplement.

  • Interview.  Princeton offers optional alumni interviews. Interviews take place after the Admission Office has received your application. You may choose to opt out of the interview in the Princeton Supplement, and this choice will not put you at any disadvantage in the admission process. If you do not opt out, you may receive an email inviting you to interview with a member of our Princeton Alumni Schools Committee. If so, we encourage you to take advantage of this opportunity. The interviews are 30-45 minute informal conversations, where you can discuss the things that are important to you and also ask questions to someone who attended Princeton. We cannot guarantee that every applicant will receive an interview. This will depend on the availability of alumni in your area. Our dedicated alumni do manage to contact the vast majority of our applicants every year; however, if you do not receive an interview for any reason, it will not put you at a disadvantage since the interview is optional. We do not offer on-campus interviews. These interviews must not be recorded in any way, either by the interviewer or the applicant. Given the timeline, students who are participating in the QuestBridge National College Match will be unable to complete an interview.

Application Confirmation

You may log in to Princeton's Applicant Portal  to verify whether we have received all your required application materials. You will receive a confirmation notice when we have received your application. The confirmation notice will arrive approximately 24-48 hours after you submit your admission application. If your application is incomplete, we will let you know which pieces are missing. Beginning in mid-October, you also may track the completeness of your application online through the Applicant Portal. Please note: You cannot apply for financial aid until you apply for admission. Please review our application dates and deadlines .

If a student has submitted an application on three separate occasions, the Office of Admission generally will not review subsequent applications. In these instances, if an application fee was submitted, it will be returned.

The University's admission process involves a holistic review of each applicant's entire file. No particular factor is assigned a fixed weight; rather, the process involves a highly individualized assessment of the applicant's talents, achievements and his or her potential to contribute to learning at Princeton. Please see the Joint Statement on Common Ivy Group Admission Procedures for more information about admission policies.

Princeton-specific Questions

Review the additional essay questions of our application.

Graded Written Paper

The graded written paper will help the Office of Admission assess the student’s written expression in an academic setting.

Optional Arts Supplement

The optional Arts Supplement is for students who have devoted a significant amount of time and energy to one or more art forms and who wish to have their work considered as part of their application.

From the Blog

Prefrosh, curious about academics start here, poets should come ready to move/yell/play/discover, my favorite place on campus: chancellor green.

As part of the application process, Princeton University collects from its applicants certain demographic information covered by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This information may be collected through graduate and undergraduate application materials, including the Common Application. You are not required to provide this information. If you choose to provide this information, it will not be shared with any University faculty members, administrators, or others who are involved in evaluating your application for admission and will not be considered in the admissions process. In addition, your refusal to provide any of this information will not subject you to any adverse treatment.

The University uses this information to help prepare certain disclosures regarding students required by state and federal law, and to enable the University’s Institutional Research Office to conduct analytical and policy studies that support University planning and decision-making. Aggregate applicant data may be shared with academic departments or admissions officers only after the admissions process has concluded to facilitate analysis. Any information that you share is subject to the University’s Data Privacy policies (available at https://registrar.princeton.edu/student-and-alumni-services/policies/data-privacy ).  

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College Application – A Complete Guide With Tips And Checklists

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College-Application-Definition

To gain entry into colleges, you have to make an application. This guide will walk you through the entire college application process.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

  • 1 College Application – In a Nutshell
  • 2 Definition: College application
  • 3 College application: Requirements
  • 4 Before applying for college
  • 5 College application: Step-by-step process
  • 6 College application: Timeline
  • 7 College application: Checklist

College Application – In a Nutshell

  • it is important to research colleges thoroughly before making applications.
  • You must go through the application checklist before submitting the documents.
  • The personal essay should be reviewed thoroughly.

Definition: College application

Once you finish high school or secondary school, you will need to make a college application. This process involves sending certain documents to the institution. Depending on the college you intend to join, these documents may include: 1

  • An application form
  • Your high school transcripts
  • Test scores from the SAT or ACT
  • Recommendation letters

Most schools will stop taking applications in November or January. 2

Ireland

College application: Requirements

Let’s look at some requirements to make a college application.

1. An application form

2. test scores, 3. letters of recommendation, 4. personal essays, 5. transcript, 6. application fee.

The application form can be completed online or on paper. If you’re planning to apply to many colleges, you can consider using the Common Application. 3

Before making your college application, you should take the SAT or ACT test. Some colleges accept both tests, while others may only need one. 3

This is a short document that is usually written by a teacher, counselor, or mentor. It is meant to highlight your strengths and possible contributions to the institution. 3

Colleges will also need a personal essay, usually between 300 and 500 words. This step is crucial and should be approached carefully. You should get a teacher to review your essay as this piece needs to be perfect. 3

The procedure of sending transcripts will vary from one college to another. Some will require the school to send the transcripts directly, while others allow students to mail in the documents. 5

For your college application to be processed, you will have to pay a fee. This ranges around $60 and rarely goes above $77. 6

Before applying for college

Let’s look at the steps you need to take before applying for college.

Researching colleges

You can follow these tips when researching colleges:

  • Start by checking the courses offered and learn more about the professors in the college.
  • Evaluate the internship opportunities available in the school
  • Check the structure of the courses
  • Check the average class size
  • Consider social factors like the available clubs 5

Financial aid

Before sending in your college application, you also need to apply for financial aid. This can be given as a scholarship, federal grant, federal loan, or work-study program. To get FAFSA aid, you can send an application to studentaid.gov. 6

College application: Step-by-step process

This section will outline the steps you should take to complete your college application.

 Application deadlines

Your college application could take the form of early decision, early action, or regular decision. 7 8

Signing up for standardized testing

Standardized tests are administered in a consistent manner and measure the knowledge and skills of the students. The most popular ones are the SAT and ACT. You will usually have to take these tests in your junior or senior year. 9

Personal statements

A strong personal statement will give the college an idea of who you are and why you should be admitted to the school. When writing a personal statement for your college application, you should focus on your strengths. 10

Letters of recommendation

Your college application should also include a letter of recommendation. This is issued by a teacher or other staff members of your high school.

Submitting your transcripts

Your transcript will show the academic courses you attempted in high school. In most cases, the college will need the document four weeks before the college application deadline.

Filling out the application

The college application form features basic details about you and your application. You will need to provide personal information like your name, age, and contact details. You also have to indicate the course you want to take, as well as the semester you intend to join. The college application form also includes information on your high school experience.

Double-checking & submitting the application

Before you submit your college application, you should ensure that all the documents are there. You can then send the files and pay the college application fee.

College application: Timeline

Use the college application timeline to make sure you don’t miss any important steps on your way to applying to college.

Admission Plans

Standardized tests, financial aid, college research and planning, college application.

College-Application-Admission-plans

College application: Checklist

  • Create a list of suitable colleges
  • Take note of the deadline
  • Request high school transcripts
  • Send your SAT scores
  • Take any other required tests
  • Request letters of recommendation
  • Draft your essay
  • Proofread your essay
  • Have two or more teachers go through the essay
  • Revise the essay
  • Submit FAFSA application
  • Make copies of all college application materials
  • Pay the application fee
  • Fill out the application form
  • Send an email to colleges that you won’t attend

How do you begin with the college application process?

To start the college application process, you should get the necessary documents. These include your transcript and personal essay.

Which tests should I take for the college application?

Most colleges check your SAT or ACT scores before admission.

Who should send the high school transcript to the college?

This document is usually sent by high school officials.

How many letters of recommendation should I get?

It is advisable to get at least 2 recommendation letters.

1 New Visions for Public Schools. “Components of the College Application.” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://www.newvisions.org/pages/components-of-the-college-application .

2 Safier, Rebecca. “Colleges With Late Application Deadlines: Complete List.” PrepScholar. December 4, 2022. https://blog.prepscholar.com/colleges-with-late-application-deadlines-complete-list .

3 CollegeChoice. “How to Apply for College.” January 31, 2023. https://www.collegechoice.net/choosing-a-college/admissions/college-application-requirements/ .

4 Khan Academy. “College Application Checklist.” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://www.khanacademy.org/college-careers-more/college-admissions/applying-to-college/college-application-process/a/college-application-checklist .

5 Ivy Wise. “How to Research a College Effectively.” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://www.ivywise.com/ivywise-knowledgebase/resources/article/how-to-research-a-college-effectively/ .

6 Federal Student Aid. “How do I Apply for a Federal Student Loan?” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://studentaid.gov/help-center/answers/article/how-to-apply-for-federal-student-loan .

7 Boston College. “Early Decision vs. Regular Decision.” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/admission/apply/early-decision.html .

8 Ngo, Chinh. “Early Action vs. Early Decision: How to Choose.” Best Colleges. May 6, 2022. https://www.bestcolleges.com/blog/early-action-vs-early-decision/ .

9 Big Future. “College Application Checklist,” Accessed February 16, 2023. https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/plan-for-college/applying-to-college/tests/8-things-to-know-about-how-colleges-use-admission-tests .

10 Olah, Dora. “10 Tips for Writing a Personal Statement for University Applications.” Top Universities. April 19, 2021. https://www.topuniversities.com/blog/10-tips-writing-personal-statement-university-applications .

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First-Year Applicants

It's never too early to start preparing for your future, and we are here to help. If you're graduating from high school or have never enrolled in college, you will apply as a first-year applicant. If you've already graduated from high school and begun your college education at another institution, you will need to apply as a transfer applicant . If you are not a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, you'll need to apply as an international applicant .

How To Apply

Apply online.

Choose to apply through one of our two applications – we do not have a preference which application you choose.

Pay the Fee

A non-refundable application fee of $85 is required. If you think you may qualify for a fee waiver, view fee waiver eligibility requirements and learn how to submit documentation here .

Select a Major

On the application, you’ll be asked to select up to two majors based on your interests. We encourage you to select two different majors because if we determine you’re not competitive for your first-choice major, you’ll be reviewed for your second-choice major.

Students interested in a studio-based major (Architecture, Art + Design, Fashion and Textile Design, Graphic & Experience Design, Industrial Design) must apply by November 1 in addition to submitting a 10-piece portfolio and design essay.

  • 100+ Majors Options
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Self-Report Your Test Scores (optional)

As a part of the UNC System, NC State will be test-optional for 2024 spring and fall first-year applicants.

A determination as to whether or not NC State will remain test-optional beyond the 2024 application cycle has not yet been made by the UNC System.  We recommend that prospective students take a standardized test as part of their college application preparation. However, as long as NC State remains test-optional, standardized test scores are not required to be submitted as part of a complete application.

On the admission application you will be required to indicate whether or not you plan to submit SAT or ACT scores for consideration in the admission review process. You will not be disadvantaged if you indicate you do not want scores to be considered in your application review. Learn more about test score consideration in the review process here .

  • If you choose to submit your test scores, you should self-report them on your application. We encourage you to submit all scores, and we will consider your highest sub-score from each section across your test dates to create a super-score .
  • We can not guarantee scores received after the application materials deadline will be used in our review. See which test dates we accept for our application deadlines here .
  • SAT Essay or ACT Writing scores are not required.
  • After you have applied, any additional test scores can be added on your wolfPAW account. We will not accept standardized test scores on your high school transcript.
  • If you choose to enroll at NC State and opted for test scores to be considered during your application review, official SAT (code: 5496) or ACT (code: 3164) test scores will be required prior to enrollment.

Complete the Essay Prompts

You’ll choose an essay prompt from the list provided by Common App or Coalition App so you can share your story with us in 650 words or less. We also have some additional short answer questions to help us get to know you better. These responses will be included in your application.

If you want to leverage an AI tool like ChatGPT for help writing your college essay, we encourage you to use it as a learning experience that can help brainstorm ideas and structure thoughts. In the end, we want to hear about your experience in your own unique voice.

Required Short Answer Questions

  • Explain why you selected the academic program(s) above and why you are interested in studying these at NC State.

University Honors Program

If you are interested in being considered for NC State’s University Honors Program , there is an additional question required with a response of no more than 600 words available on the admissions application or on your wolfPAW account after you apply. Learn more about admissions criteria for these programs here .

Submit Your Transcript

To complete your application, you must send an official high school transcript to our office . Your high school counselor can submit your transcript through Common App, Coalition App, slate.org or another secure sending service such as Naviance or Parchment. Students studying at participating public high schools in North Carolina can request official transcripts be sent to our office using CFNC .

How To Be Competitive

Learn what factors we take into consideration during application review and how to be a competitive first-year applicant. 

See how you may be provided college credit for courses and exams completed in high school using our transfer credit database. 

Early College Students

View application options for North Carolina high school students studying at an early college.  

Already applied? Log in to wolfPAW to check your application status.  

High School Counselors and Community-Based Organizations

High school counselors and CBO’s play a vital role in a student’s college selection and application processes. We are here to do everything we can to support you.

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After You Apply

Check your email.

After you submit your application to NC State, you will receive an email with credentials to log in to wolfPAW , your applicant portal. Please note: it may take up to 24 hours after you submit your application for you to receive wolfPAW log in credentials . Here, you can check for missing items and stay up-to-date on the status of your application.

We encourage you to check your email often , as we may email you about additional items needed to complete your application. Using your school-assigned email address? Sometimes our emails may be blocked by the server, so we recommend using a non-school email to receive our communications.

Submit the FAFSA

You don’t need to wait for an official admission decision to submit your FAFSA , and we encourage students to apply as soon as possible .

  • Priority filing date for NC State: March 1
  • NC State school code: 002972

View Your Decision

You will be notified of your admission decision on your wolfPAW account. If you completed your application on time and submitted all required materials by the deadline, you will receive a decision on the notification date corresponding to the application deadline for the semester you applied for.

Types of Decisions

  • Admit – Some students we are able to admit right away. Head to our admitted student page to learn about next steps for joining the Wolfpack family, a view the New Student Checklist here .
  • Defer – When we review applications, we find some applicants who may benefit from the opportunity to provide improved fall grades before receiving a final decision in March.
  • Waitlist – We are unable to admit all qualified students into our class. Some applicants are placed on the waitlist who we believe would be successful at NC State if space is available.
  • Deny – Unfortunately, some students will not be considered competitive for first-year admission. We encourage denied applicants to consider applying to NC State in the future as a transfer applicant .

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Prepare to Apply

Many factors go into choosing the right college for you. It’s never too early to start thinking about your future and creating a plan for success. We consider your academic record beginning with the ninth grade and encourage you to make the most of your time in high school by doing the following.

  • Identify your academic interests – NC State offers 100+ majors and minors in a wide variety of academic fields.
  • Explore your personal interests – Many times, your personal and academic interests influence each other. NC State is home to more than 600 student organizations to help you find your Wolfpack.
  • Challenge yourself in the classroom – Schools offer a variety of curricula. In addition to taking at least the  UNC minimum course requirements , we recommend students take challenging courses. For students applying to STEM or business majors, this usually means taking precalculus as one of their mathematics courses. When given the opportunity we encourage students to take calculus. While first year students applying to NC State for fall 2024 or a later semester are no longer required to take two units of world language, the completion of two sequential world language courses is recommended to satisfy the NC State General Education Program’s Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement.   If a student does not take two sequential units of a world language in high school those two additional courses must come from English, mathematics, science, social studies or computer science.

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We offer pre-college programs to help you prepare for college while also experiencing life at NC State.

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Your journey to college begins in high school. Use this college road map to navigate your road to success.

Plan it out 

Application Checklist

Use this handy checklist to make sure you’ve fulfilled all requirements necessary for the Admissions Team to review your file. Applications will not be reviewed until all requirements are fulfilled.

A Complete Application Includes:

All applicants must complete and submit an application form, through which many application components are also submitted.

You will be required to submit a 250 to 500 word essay responding to one of the following prompts:

  • At Brown Pre-College, students often experience a new environment, study a new subject and meet new friends from around the world. Describe a time when you learned, tried something new or stepped out of your comfort zone. What did you learn from this that will help you thrive at Brown Pre-College?
  • Please describe something you've learned from someone you've met, been inspired by or learned about. How will you apply what you have learned from them to your Pre-College experience?

You may choose to submit a supplementary essay to address something not covered in other parts of the application. (For example, to provide information about your extracurricular activities, an explanation for inconsistent grades or other circumstances you’d like the Admissions Team to consider.)

This nonrefundable fee must be paid by credit card within the secure application form:

  • Application fee when submitted by April 7, 2024: $65
  • Application fee when submitted on or after April 8, 2024: $100

If you would like to apply for an application fee waiver, please visit the application fee waiver page to learn more.

Your academic records must be submitted with your application.

Please note: official transcripts are not required, and academic records do not need to be submitted by a school guidance counselor. 

You must submit your complete grades from the current academic year in addition to all grades from the previous academic year . Grade submissions must be in English and contain your full name as well as the academic term represented. 

Acceptable submissions may include, but are not limited to:

  • Unofficial transcript
  • Report card
  • Progress report
  • Screenshot of grades from a school portal (it must contain your full name)
  • Narrative assessment

Please include an explanation of the grading scale used by the school(s) if different from the U.S. grading system. Failure to submit all requested documents will leave an application incomplete, and the application will not be reviewed.

Within the application, you may provide the name and email address of a teacher, counselor, community leader or employer who can attest to your social maturity and academic performance. We strongly suggest you submit a recommendation if any of the criteria below pertain to you:

  • Interest in Summer@Brown, or a specific course offering within Summer@Brown, and will be under the age of 15 as of June 16, 2024
  • Interest in STEM for Rising 9th and 10th Graders program, or a specific course offering, and will be under the age of 14 as of June 16, 2024
  • Interest in the Brown Environmental Leadership Lab (BELL) offerings
  • Interest in the Brown Experiential Education (BEE) offerings
  • Inconsistent grades—any grades of C or below

Please note that a recommendation is required to accompany all Pre-Baccalaureate Program applications .

Upon entering this information into the application form, an email containing a recommendation form will be sent to the recommender. 

Please note: If you indicate you will be submitting a recommendation, we will only accept our recommendation form. Applications will not be considered complete until we receive the recommendation.

Applicants for whom English is not their primary language, should give serious consideration to their level of English language proficiency. Brown University's Pre-College Program provides both academic challenges typical of college-level study and opportunities to experience the social aspects of college life in the United States. A high degree of proficiency in English—equivalent to what would be expected of a first-year undergraduate—is crucial to having a successful experience. 

Students who participate in Brown University's Pre-College Program must have a strong command of the English language in order to succeed in academic study, involving the ability to:

  • Speak clearly and coherently on a variety of topics
  • Write clearly on a range of topics
  • Listen and understand complex topics
  • Read and understand detailed and lengthy texts on academic subjects
  • Independently navigate a college campus in an urban environment
  • Communicate effectively with peers in social settings

International students who do not speak English as their primary language will be asked to submit one of the following:

  • Duolingo English Test
  • InitialView

Important: Be sure to share your results with Brown University’s Division of Pre-College and Undergraduate Programs , not Brown University Undergraduate Admission. It may take up to three business days after you have shared your results with us for it to be reflected on your application checklist in your portal. Students may take the Duolingo English Test or participate in an InitialView Interview prior to beginning an application or after submitting an application. 

TOEFL and IELTS scores will not satisfy the evidence of language proficiency requirement.

Please Note:

  • In some cases, supplemental application materials — transcripts, essays, English proficiency materials or recommendations — may be requested. You will be notified by email if any additional information is required.
  • Applicants are expected to abide by the Pre-College Code of Conduct , which includes an expectation of academic integrity. All application materials submitted must be the original work of the applicant. Plagiarism in any part of an application (completed by anyone other than the student) is grounds for denial.
  • A.1. Act as good citizens by showing respect and courtesy to all members of the University community, including fellow participants, students, staff, instructors, campus neighbors and affiliates.
  • A.2. Contribute to a healthy and safe community environment. Use methods of expression that are appropriate for a healthy living-learning environment. Obscene, derogatory and/or abusive language is prohibited.
  • Admission to Brown University’s Pre-College Program does not guarantee enrollment in a specific course or academic program. Enrollment in a course or program is a separate action that must be completed once an applicant is admitted to Brown University’s Pre-College Program.
  • Courses may be canceled at any time due to unforeseen circumstances. If this situation occurs, Program staff will work with students to find a suitable course substitution.
  • Students must submit a new application each year. Returning students can log in to precollege.brown.edu with the email and password they originally used to create their account.

Get started

Start your application today!

Roanoke College

  • Orientation
  • Events Calendar
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Email">Email &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Inquire">Inquire &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Self Service">Self Service &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Forms">Forms &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="RC Today">RC Today &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">

ACADEMIC SCHEDULES

  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Academic Calendar">Academic Calendar &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Academic Catalog">Academic Catalog &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Courses">Courses &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Registrar">Registrar &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Dining Menu">Dining Menu &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Cregger Center">Cregger Center &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Colket Campus Center">Colket Campus Center &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Fintel Library">Fintel Library &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Olin Hall Galleries">Olin Hall Galleries &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="A-Z">A-Z &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="People Directory">People Directory &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="Events Calendar">Events Calendar &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">
  • &]:text-lg [.small>&]:leading-tight [.large>&]:text-[calc(22rem/16)] ml-[calc(-1*var(--pl))] pl-[var(--pl)] [.no-arrow>&]:ml-0 after:hidden [.lock-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.lock-icon>&]:after:mask-lock [.lock-icon>&]:after:bg-current [.museum-icon>&]:after:inline-block [.museum-icon>&]:after:mask-museum [.museum-icon>&]:after:bg-roanoke-maroon-500 relative after:pointer-events-none after:relative after:top-1 after:left-7 after:-ml-4 after:w-4 after:h-4 after:scale-125 after:origin-bottom-right [.small>&]:after:scale-100 [.small>&]:after:left-6 [.small>&]:after:top-[calc(3rem/16)]" title="News">News &]:hidden absolute mask-right-arrowhead-2-by-3 pointer-events-none w-2 h-3 top-1.5 [.small>&]:scale-75 [.large>&]:scale-110 origin-top left-0 peer-hocus:left-1 sm:peer-hocus:left-1.5 motion-reduce:!left-0 bg-theme-fancy-link-color peer-hocus:bg-theme-fancy-link-hocus-color theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:bg-black theme-dogwood-bloom-400:peer-aria-current:peer-hocus:bg-dogwood-bloom-900 transition-[left,background-color] ease-linear">

Application Checklist

Roanoke students do much more than excel academically — they also contribute to their community, are actively engaged in extracurriculars, and challenge themselves to push further for the betterment of themselves and others. Therefore, we read applications holistically and encourage you to highlight your strengths both inside and outside the classroom. 

Successful candidates will complete a minimum of 18 academic courses in high school, including four in English, two in social studies, two in lab sciences and at least two recommended foreign language courses. Additionally, there are three required courses in math, including Geometry and Algebra I and II.

What We Consider

Your high school transcript : We are looking not only at your GPA; we are also looking to see that you have enriched your curriculum with honors, AP or IB courses. Our average accepted student has received a 3.6 GPA in high school.

Your test scores (unless applying test-optional) : We have no preference between the SAT or ACT. We will consider your highest single test date for the ACT and will consider your superscored SAT. Our average accepted student received an 1170 on the SAT and a 26 on the ACT. Have your SAT or ACT scores sent directly to the Admissions Office by the testing center or your high school. Our school code is 5571 for the SAT and 4392 for the ACT. You may also have SAT II, AP, CLEP and/or IB exam scores forwarded, when available. They may be used for placement, awarding of credit or granting course competency. Our school code is 5571 for SAT and AP scores.

If you believe that your test scores are an underrepresentation of your academic caliber, you may consider applying test-optional. Please discuss with your counselor before deciding to apply test-optional.

Disclaimer: International and homeschooled students still need to submit test scores with their application.

Your interest in Roanoke : Roanoke considers demonstrated interest as a factor in our decision-making process, and therefore we encourage students to express their interest in several of the following ways:

  • Apply Early Decision: This binding application is the best way to express your interest.
  • Visit Campus (virtually or in person): Take a private tour and meet with an admissions counselor, an information session and tour, or one of our major visit days. Visitors also receive our $1,000 per year Roanoke College Visit Grant.
  • A virtual meet-up conversation
  • A virtual visit to your high school
  • At a virtual college fair
  • Chat with your counselor: If you are unable to visit or meet us on the road, we have phone appointments available.
  • Filing your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA): Families can start filing out the FAFSA on October 1 . If you and/or your family are not planning to file, let us know at [email protected] so we can consider this interest.

Your resume : Roanoke students are highly engaged outside the classroom. We like to see that our applicants have a similar penchant for community service, extracurriculars and taking on leadership roles.

Your essay : Tell us about yourself. Highlight an experience, activity or character trait that lets us better know who you are and what makes you the person you have become. This is your opportunity to show a uniqueness and differentiate yourself from other applicants. We accept all Common Application topics or invite you to discuss a topic of your own choosing.

Your letters of recommendation : We generally encourage students to submit between one and three letters of recommendation. We prefer to see at least one recommendation that comes from a person who knows your academic abilities, such as a teacher or school counselor.

  Apply to Roanoke

Roanoke College believes that commitment to principles of fairness and respect for all is favorable to the free and open exchange of ideas, and the College seeks to reach out as widely as possible in order to attract the ablest individuals as students, faculty and staff. In applying this policy, the College is committed to nondiscrimination on the basis of personal beliefs or characteristics such as political views, religion, national or ethnic origin, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, pregnancy, age, marital or domestic partnership status, veteran status, disability, genetic information and/or other characteristics protected by applicable law in any phase of its education or employment programs or activities. See College’s full EEO policy

In addition, pursuant to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and supporting regulations, Roanoke College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in the education programs or activities that it operates; this extends to admission and employment. Inquiries about the application of Title IX and its supporting regulations may be directed to the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education or to the College’s Title IX Coordinator: Amy Perkins – [email protected] or 540-375-2597 .

Undergraduate Admission

Undergraduate admission requirements, your application checklist.

Students outdoor on CMU's campus studying and walking

Required Application Materials for Undergraduate Admission

Common application, $75 application fee*, official high school transcript**.

Please review our Academic Requirements .

  Standardized Testing Scores  

If English is not your native language, this includes the TOEFL, IELTS or Duolingo English Test .

Secondary School Counselor Evaluation

Teacher recommendation, common application essay, common application writing supplement.

This includes three short-answer questions

*Carnegie Mellon accepts fee waivers from students who meet one of the indicators of economic need as outlined on the Common Application.

**Transcript and graduation requirements: A high school diploma or equivalent is required for admission to Carnegie Mellon (for applicants who are 17 and over). Applicants should submit official transcripts from all secondary schools attended, and enrolling students are required to submit an official final transcript as well. Applicants who have received a high school equivalency diploma are required to have their official High School Equivalency Examination (GED) scores sent to the Office of Admission in addition to official transcripts from all high schools attended.

Additional Requirements

For all applicants.

If admitted, you must provide proof of meeting all requirements for an official high school diploma by the end of May of the year of graduation. You must also submit an official final transcript, GED or certificate of completion from your local school district or state board of education by the end of July of the year of matriculation.

For Home-Schooled Applicants

You should submit an academic portfolio or transcript that’s consistent with your state’s guidelines and a list of all textbooks used.

For College of Fine Arts Applicants:

For the School of Drama or the School of Music, you must arrange a  required pre-screen, audition or portfolio review . For the Schools of Architecture, the School of Art or the School of Design, you must submit the  required portfolio and creative materials .

Supporting Documents and Supplemental Information

Carnegie Mellon doesn’t accept supplemental submissions, such as resumes, artwork, portfolios, recording or websites. We encourage you to use the Common Application, along with the Carnegie Mellon Supplemental Essays, to highlight experiences or activities that have enhanced or defined your personal growth during high school. Carnegie Mellon won’t accept updates from applicants after January 15 but will continue to accept documents and updates from high school counselors after that point.

Please note that mid-semester grades or transcript updates should be reported by your high school counselor throughout the admission process. For applicants to the College of Fine Arts, please refer to our  information for College of Fine Arts applicants .

Where Am I in the Process? Portal

Applicants, please note that you'll need to register for the Where Am I in the Process? portal in order to receive your admission decision and financial aid offer, so please review the  Terms of Service  prior to applying. The Where Am I in the Process? portal service is intended for individuals at least 13 years old; if you intend to apply and are not at least 13, please  contact the Office of Admission .

Instructions for DACA, Home-Schooled, Cyber and Non-Traditional Applicants

Applying as a deferred action for childhood arrivals (daca) student.

Carnegie Mellon welcomes applications from Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students. Follow the instructions for either first-year or transfer applicants and review the admission requirements noted at the top of this page. We accept College Board and NACAC fee waivers for the nonrefundable application fee. If you need an application fee waiver, you should contact the Office of Admission.

Please also be aware of this additional information:

  • When completing the Common Application, you should apply for either first-year or transfer admission as an international student. You’ll do so by selecting “Other (non-US)” as your citizenship status.
  • You may be eligible for institutional financial aid and must apply for financial aid in order to be considered.
  • To apply for institutional financial aid, you must complete the CSS Profile and provide either federal tax returns or documentation of household income to College Board IDOC. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) isn’t required for DACA students. If you need a CSS Profile fee waiver, you should contact the Office of Admission.
  • At the time of admission, Carnegie Mellon may request DACA documentation to confirm your status in order to process your financial aid accordingly.

If you have any questions or concerns about the application process, please contact the Office of Admission .

Applying as a Home-Schooled or Cyber Student

Carnegie Mellon welcomes applications from students who have been schooled at home or online. In addition to the information below, please be sure to follow the instructions for first-year applicants and review the admission requirements noted at the top of this page.

To apply to the university, you must:

  • Submit a completed Common Application.
  • Submit a syllabus or course descriptions of the work you’ve completed prior to applying. This should include a list of all textbooks used for your coursework.
  • Submit a transcript of grades and/or evaluation of your work that’s consistent with state guidelines.
  • Submit a recommendation from a counselor, a representative of your state board of education, your home school association or other person of authority.
  • Follow the instructions for required testing based on the college and program you’re applying to.
  • Provide proof that you'll have met, by the end of May of the year of graduation, all requirements for an official high school diploma.

If admitted, you will also need to submit an official final transcript, GED or certificate of completion from your local school district or state board of education by the end of July of the year of matriculation.

Applying as a Non-Traditional Student

Carnegie Mellon welcomes applications from students with non-traditional academic backgrounds, including prospective students who are seeking a second bachelor’s degree, and those who are interested in a first bachelor’s degree several years after graduating from high school.

To apply for a second bachelor’s degree if your first degree is from Carnegie Mellon:

  • Complete the Common Application.
  • Arrange to have a copy of your Carnegie Mellon transcript sent to the Office of Admission by February 15, if you’re applying as a transfer, or by January 1, if you’re applying as a first-year student.

To apply for a second bachelor’s degree if your first degree is from another college or university:

  • Follow the instructions for transfer applicants .

To apply for a first bachelor’s degree if you’re from a nontraditional background:

  • Submit an essay explaining what you have been doing since graduating from high school.
  • Submit a recommendation from a counselor, teacher, colleague or advisor who can speak of your potential for success at Carnegie Mellon.
  • Note that campus housing is only available for traditional-age college students.

Applicants from the Veterans & Military Community and ROTC Applicants

Carnegie Mellon provides services to veterans and their dependents who are eligible for Veterans Education Benefits under the Montgomery G.I. Bill, the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, and the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment program. Visit the Veterans and Military Community website  for more information.

For questions and additional information regarding military and veteran applicants, please contact Mike Danko, ROTC Veterans Affairs Coordinator, at @email  or 412.268.8747.

Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship information:

  • Naval ROTC — hosted by Carnegie Mellon
  • Air Force ROTC — hosted by University of Pittsburgh
  • Army ROTC — hosted by Three Rivers Battalion

Before you can rush to the edge of what’s known, you’ve got some paperwork to do.

Take a look at what’s required and make note of important deadlines for applying. For detailed guidance, download the 2024 Carnegie Mellon Application Instructions Booklet (PDF) (opens in new window) .

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  • Knowledge Base
  • Academic writing

Checklist: Academic writing

Published on October 16, 2020 by Shona McCombes . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Academic writing is a formal style of writing used in universities and scholarly publications. When writing an essay , research paper , research proposal , thesis , or dissertation , you have to use academic style.

Use this checklist to make sure you’ve followed academic conventions in style, tone, and structure.

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Table of contents

Other interesting articles.

I avoid informal terms and contractions .

I avoid second-person pronouns (“you”).

I avoid emotive or exaggerated language.

I avoid redundant words and phrases.

I avoid unnecessary jargon and define terms where needed.

I present information as precisely and accurately as possible.

I use appropriate transitions to show the connections between my ideas.

My text is logically organized using paragraphs .

Each paragraph is focused on a single idea, expressed in a clear topic sentence .

Every part of the text relates to my central thesis or research question .

I support my claims with evidence.

I use the appropriate verb tenses in each section.

I consistently use either UK or US English .

I format numbers consistently.

I cite my sources using a consistent citation style .

Your text follows the most important rules of academic style. Make sure it's perfect with the help of a Scribbr editor!

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

If you want to know more about AI for academic writing, AI tools, or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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