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This essay will explore the use of color symbolism in “The Great Gatsby.” It will discuss how Fitzgerald uses colors like green, yellow, and white to represent themes such as wealth, envy, innocence, and moral decay, and how this symbolism contributes to the overall narrative. PapersOwl offers a variety of free essay examples on the topic of Daisy Buchanan.

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, one of the main characters of the novel, Gatsby, tries to win back the already married Daisy Buchanan’s love. After fighting in World War One, a determined Gatsby earns a fortune through illegal channels and purchases a mansion in West Egg, across from East Egg where Tom and Daisy Buchanan live. The novel takes place through the perspective of Nick Carraway, who recently moved to New York as a stockbroker after World War One. Throughout the novel, Fitzgerald uses vivid symbolism by associating colors to certain characters. He uses the color white to describe Jordan Baker, Daisy Buchanan, and Jay Gatsby. For the duration of the novel, the color white represents purity, elegance, and innocence; however, as the novel progresses, the meaning of the color white morphs into inequality, unfairness, and disproportionate wealth. In the beginning of the novel, the color white symbolizes both saintliness and purity.

As the novel progresses, the meaning of the color white evolves into unfairness and injustice. In chapter 4 of the novel, Gatsby invites Nick over for a car ride in order to discuss his past and show his war insignias. Along the way to lunch with Meyer Wolfsheim, Gatsby gets pulled over for speeding. When the officer pulls over the car, Gatsby, [took] a white card from his wallet [and] waved it before the man’s eyes, revealing Gatsby’s influence over others due to his wealth and status (Fitzgerald 68). The white card represents corruption as Gatsby can use the card to get away with crimes ordinary people could not have, revealing the criminal side of Gatsby’s life in contrast to his undying love for Daisy. After meeting Meyer Wolfsheim, Nick goes to tea with Jordan. While talking to Nick, Jordan describes Daisy as, dressed in white, and [she] had a little white roadster, and all day long the telephone rang in her house and excited young officers demanded the privilege of monopolizing her that night, illustrating Daisy’s desire for attention as she displays her wealth through her white clothes and car. Daisy dressing up in white represents unfairness as she falls in love with the materialism of money rather than the personality of men. Once Daisy sees all of Gatsby’s expensive clothes, she weeps into them, demonstrating her excitement over money; however, once Daisy realizes the origin of Gatsby’s money, she quickly withdraws with him, leaving Gatsby’s crushed dreams behind. Daisy leaving Gatsby for money represents both unfairness and disproportionate wealth as well as Daisy’s cruel nature through the symbolism of the color white.

To conclude, the color white represented guiltlessness and saintliness; however, these two meanings are shown to be a facade as the true representation of corruption and unfairness is unveiled. Throughout the novel, almost all the characters keep secrets from others to conceal undesirable qualities. Gatsby has his criminality, Tom his infidelity, and Jordan her mendacious personality. The only character who swears to be honest is Nick Carraway. After talking with Jordan, Nick describes himself as, one of the few honest people that [he] has ever known, setting him apart from other characters in the novel. Nick also often wears white, such as when he wore white flannels when he first visited one of Gatsby’s parties. Although the meaning of white changes throughout the novel, white represents Nick’s honesty, which will always remain the same.

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Connotation, Character, and Color Imagery in The Great Gatsby

color in the great gatsby thesis

  • Resources & Preparation
  • Instructional Plan
  • Related Resources

In this lesson, students explore the connotations of the colors associated with the characters in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby . During pre-reading activities, students first brainstorm other words for the color red, and then compare paint swatches to those color words. Students discuss the meaning of connotation and how word meanings can change based on circumstances. They work in groups to explore the cultural connotations of a particular color and present their findings to the class. Students then apply what they have learned to an analysis of the use of color in Robert Frost's "Nothing Gold Can Stay." As students read The Great Gatsby , they track color imagery using a color log. After they have completed their reading, students review the observations in their color logs and use the information to write an analysis of one of the major characters in the novel.

Featured Resources

  • Color Imagery Journal : Students use this chart to track the use of color imagery in The Great Gatsby.
  • Character Analysis Assignment for The Great Gatsby : This handout explains the goals and requirements for a paper analyzing a character from The Great Gatsby based on one of the colors associated with that character.
  • Rubric for Character Analysis Assignment : Use this rubric to assess students' Character Analysis papers.

From Theory to Practice

For many students, reading literature is like a scavenger hunt for "right" answers. From the perspective of these students, meaning is hidden and locked away, eventually to be revealed by the teacher. The students themselves typically believe that they do not know enough to unlock the meanings, so they wait for the teacher to reveal the secrets. This lesson plan models a process that shows students how to unlock such meaning on their own.

As Judith Burdan explains, we want students "to recognize the play of language with pleasure and to move forward into the analysis of literary conventions with a sense of understanding. As students learn to think about the rhetorical choices that an author makes and about the effect of those choices on them as readers, they become more perceptive and more confident as readers. They increasingly acknowledge themselves as part of the process of creating meaning through language, even the specialized language of literature, and learn to enjoy themselves along the way" (28).

Further Reading

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 1. Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  • 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
  • 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Materials and Technology

Copies of The Great Gatsby

  • Color Imagery Journal
  • Sample of Student Daily Activity Response
  • Character Analysis Assignment for The Great Gatsby
  • Rubric for Character Analysis Assignment

This video, Part 1 of 2, provides students with some help in understanding the major plot lines of The Great Gatsby.

This video, Part 2 of 2, provides students with some help in understanding the major plot lines of The Great Gatsby.  If you watch it on YouTube, take note of the "spoiler alert" for students.

Preparation

  • Make copies of the Color Imagery Journal , Character Analysis Assignment , and Rubric for Character Analysis Assignment . Students will need multiple copies of the Color Imagery Journal handout if they are to track colors throughout the entire novel. Alternately, you might have students draw columns in their journals or notebooks, rather than using copies of the handout.
  • Make overhead transparencies of the  Sample of Student Daily Activity Response (or arrange for an LCD projector to project the example).
  • If desired, collect red paint swatches from local hardware stores to use in the pre-reading session. Online paint swatches are also available at the Resene or the Glidden site. Alternately, crayons that students identify as red will work for this activity as well. Just be sure that the crayons have their name indicated on the labels. You can also make copies of a list of Crayola crayon colors or make an overhead transparency of the list to display in class.
  • Explore the American Masters' Website on F. Scott Fitzgerald , to find additional resources that you can use to introduce the writer. The site includes video clips that may provide a useful supplement. Be sure to check that your classroom machines have the Real Player plug-in that is required to play the video files.
  • Determine the number of sessions that students will need to read and discuss the novel itself. Adjust the number of required sessions for the full unit based on the amount of time that your class will need to cover the novel fully.
  • Test the Exploring Cultural Connotations of Color web page and F. Scott Fitzgerald: Career Timeline on your computers to familiarize yourself with the tools and ensure that you have the Flash plug-in installed. You can download the plug-in from the technical support page.

Student Objectives

Students will

  • explore the concepts of connotation and denotation.
  • research and discuss cultural connotations of colors.
  • track color imagery in The Great Gatsby .
  • analyze a character from The Great Gatsby , based on their observations of related color imagery.

Session One

BEFORE READING THE BOOK

  • Write the word Red at the top of the board or a sheet of white paper.
  • Ask students to brainstorm other words for the color red and write their responses on the board or chart paper. Possible responses include burgundy, cardinal, carmine, cerise, cherry, cranberry, crimson, garnet, maroon, pink, rose, ruby, scarlet, vermilion, and wine. Students may also include compound words such as brick-red or blood-red. Allow students to explore the range of possible words. If students have difficulty thinking of options, suggest that they think about names for paint colors, crayon colors, or even fingernail polish.
  • Share paint swatches or crayon names that you gathered before the session. Ask students to look for swatches or list of names for colors that they would identify as a shade of red.
  • Compare the names for the paint swatches to the list of words for the color red that students brainstormed.
  • How would readers or listeners react to these color names?
  • What associations will they make?
  • What would you expect from a can of paint named after these colors?
  • Why would a paint company use one of these names for their products? What kind of buyer would they be trying to attract?
  • Connotations and Denotations, from the University of Ottawa
  • Definition of Connotation and Denotation, from Bedford/St. Martin's
More Practice If your students need more information to understand connotation, share the What Does the Word Chicken Mean? sheet as an overhead or handout to demonstrate the many connotations of the word. You can either explore the various meanings of the word in whole class discussion or divide your class into small groups that consider one or more of the images each then share their findings with the class before proceeding. Once students have completed this practice, you might return to your discussion of paint or crayon colors, perhaps asking students to think of a new name for a particular shade and to support their choice by explaining the connotations associated with their selection.
  • Once you've defined connotation and you're satisfied that students understand the concept, divide students into eight small groups. Each group will be assigned a color to research, so eight groups are needed to cover the range of colors.
  • Assign a different color to each group, so that you have a group for each of the following: red, blue, green, yellow, purple, orange, white, and black. If you have any students who have difficulties differentiating among certain colors, be sure to assign them to a color that they are able to distinguish.
  • Explain that each group will research and compile information about the cultural connotations of the particular color they have been assigned during the next class session. After they complete their research, the group will create a presentation for the class that explains the connotations of their color. If desired, you may also ask students to create a handout for the class on their color.
  • For homework, ask students to log places where they have seen their color in their journals. For instance, someone in the red group might write down "stop sign," and someone in the yellow group might write down "school bus."

Session Two

  • Remind students that during this session they will research and compile information about the cultural connotations of the particular color they have been assigned. After they complete their research, the group will create a 3 to 5 minute presentation for the class that explains the connotations of their color. If desired, you may also ask students to create a handout for the class on their color.
  • Share the Exploring Cultural Connotations of Color page, which asks students to visit four Websites and gather details on the associations and connotations for their group's color. Be sure to show students how to print out or save their research using the online notetaking tool of your choice.
  • Give students the rest of the session to research and work on their presentations.
  • As groups finish their online research, ask them to look through their lists of color examples from their homework and think about how the information on connotations relates to the examples that they have gathered. Encourage students to incorporate examples in their presentations.
  • As students shift from research to creating their presentations, provide chart paper and markers or other supplies that will help them with their work. If computer access is adequate, you might ask groups to create PowerPoint presentation.
  • Circulate among students as they work, providing feedback and support.
  • At the end of the session, remind students that they will present the research on their group's color at the beginning of the next session.

Session Three

  • Give students five to ten minutes to make last-minute preparations and to practice their presentations.
  • Have groups present their color research to the entire class, allowing about five minutes per group.
  • Encourage class discussion about the research, especially sharing of examples of color use that now seem meaningful in ways that they didn't previously. For instance, ask students to think about why fast-food restaurants use the colors that they do in their logos and designs.
  • After you've discussed the general connotations of individual colors, spend a few minutes talking about what happens when colors are combined—Do their meanings complement one another? Do they mean something else? A simple, but likely obvious example to use is a combination of the colors red, white, and blue. What happens when those three colors are used together? How do their connotations change from those that each suggested when considered in isolation?
  • Ask students to predict how the information about colors that they have explored will affect a work of literature. If students have recently read works that featured color imagery, you might refer to the examples as part of students' discussion of the issue.
  • Ask student to read Robert Frost's short poem " Nothing Gold Can Stay " for homework, and write in their journals about the poet's use of color imagery and how the imagery relates to the color research the class has conducted. Encourage students to use the terms connotation and denotation as part of their entry.

Session Four

  • Read Frost's " Nothing Gold Can Stay " to the class, and ask students to share their comments and observations on the poem's use of color. You can have students read their journal entries to the class, or ask students to discuss generally based on their entries. Provide reinforcement for correct use of the terms connotation and denotation as well as for concrete connections between imagery in the poem and the class's color research.
  • Once you're satisfied that students understand the idea, explain that the class will be tracking color imagery through the novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • Use the F. Scott Fitzgerald: Career Timeline , from PBS' American Masters, to introduce biographical information on Fitzgerald's life (or ask students to explore the interactive timeline individually at computers).
  • If desired, share additional resources from the F. Scott Fitzgerald Centenary site, which includes biographical material, photographs, texts, and critical essays.
  • Explain that Fitzgerald relies on color imagery to reveal details about the character, plot, and setting in his novel.
  • Pass out copies of the Color Imagery Journals and explain that students will use the form to track the novelist's use of color imagery as they read. Alternately, display an overhead of the Color Imagery Journals and ask students to copy the 4-column format into their journals, and explain that students will track the color imagery by recording it in their journals as they read.
  • Demonstrate the process of filling out the Color Journal form—either fill out a blank form as a class, or display an overhead of the sample color journal .
  • Stress that students are not expected to find and list every single reference, especially if looking for colors disrupts their reading.
  • Answer any questions that students have about the process.
  • Ask students to begin reading the book and tracking its color imagery for homework.

Sessions Five to Ten

WHILE READING THE BOOK

  • Cover the novel in your class sessions as you would any other reading, completing any comprehension and discussion activities that are appropriate for your students. Discuss color imagery as the issues come up during your conversations about the various sections of the novel.
  • The "Secret Society" and Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby , from EDSITEment
  • Murder and Mayhem—The Great Gatsby: The Facts Behind the Fiction , from the Library of Congress's American Memory Project

Session Eleven

AFTER READING THE BOOK

  • After you have finished reading the novel, ask students to review their Color Imagery Journal entries. Ask students to choose a particular color to track through the novel, noting how Fitzgerald uses the color and the character(s) that it relates to. You might share an example with students to be sure that they understand the expectations. For instance, Fitzgerald often mentions shades of red when Tom is in a scene. Explain that students' job is to think about why Fitzgerald has made this association between color and character.
  • Have students freewrite for ten minutes about the character who is most often associated with the chosen color and what they noticed as they reviewed their journals.
  • Arrange students in random groups of two or three members each—there is no need to group them based on the colors they have written about. In fact, it's desirable for the groups to discuss a range of colors and characters.
  • In these groups, ask students to share and discuss their observations and freewriting. Encourage students to talk about the color, character, general conclusions, and questions.
  • If student groups have not brought up the topic on their own, ask the groups to draw direct connections to their research on color connotations from the earlier sessions in the unit.
  • Bring the class together, and divide the board into five sections, one each for Daisy, Tom, Jordan, Gatsby, and Others (or post a piece of chart paper for each character).
  • As an entire class, list the colors associated with each of the characters along with the possible symbolic meanings based on students' presentations on the colors.
  • Once all the characters have been labeled, discuss the results. Students may disagree about what a particular color tells readers about the characters. Encourage students to point to evidence in the novel that supports their interpretations.
  • For homework, ask students to gather their conclusions about the character and color they wrote about at the beginning of the session.

Session Twelve

  • Invite students to share any comments from their homework or reflections on the color imagery in the novel.
  • Explain that students will use their Color Imagery Journals and research on color associations to write a final paper that explains their analysis of a specific character from the novel.
  • Pass out copies of the character analysis assignment and character analysis rubric . Explain the assignment and answer any questions that students have about the activity.
  • Point out the resources that students can use as they work on their character analysis papers. Specifically talk about how to use notes in the Color Imagery Journals and the presentation information from earlier sessions on color associations. Additionally, remind students that their notes from the previous class session and that they wrote for homework include details that they can use in their drafting process.
  • Students may be concerned that they missed important references to the colors that they are researching. If you find this situation in your class, visit the online version of The Great Gatsby , and show to use the Find command in their Web browser to locate particular color references in the book.
  • Allow students to begin work on their drafts during the time remaining in class. Students can share drafts as the session progresses.
  • At the end of the session, remind students when the final draft of their work will be due.
  • Continue the lesson by allowing additional class sessions for students to write, share their drafts with small groups, and compare their work to the rubric .
  • Since students' work will include quotations from the novel, the class may benefit from a minilesson on how to punctuate sentences using quotation marks. During the editing process for drafts of the character analysis, use the ReadWriteThink lesson Inside or Outside? A Minilesson on Quotation Marks and More to discuss the punctuation conventions; then have students apply the minilesson to their drafts.

Student Assessment / Reflections

  • Monitor student interaction and progress during group work and research sessions to assess social skills and assist any students having problems with the project.
  • Check students’ Color Imagery Journals for completion and detail. If possible, monitor entries informally while students are reading so that you can provide advice and feedback before students finish reading the novel. Since the color journals will be resources for students’ character analysis papers, it’s ideal to ensure that their notes will be helpful in later sessions.
  • Use the rubric to assess students’ final drafts.
  • Calendar Activities
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Students explore The Great Gatsby's allusion to art and its use of visual imagery and conclude their study by designing their own cover for the novel.

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All Things Green

Innocence lost, gold standards...and turkeys, awash in ash, examples of the symbolism of colors in "the great gatsby".

From its first few pages, it is clear that the symbolism of color plays an essential role in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s renowned novel "The Great Gatsby." Throughout the novel, Fitzgerald employs a rainbow of different hues to symbolize the limitations of social class, the innocence and moral decay of certain characters, and the hope and desire of the Jay Gatsby himself.

The color green is probably the most recognizable use of color as a symbol in the novel. Not only does green symbolize new money and greed, but it is also prominent throughout the novel as the green light at the end of the Buchanan dock -- the one for which Gatsby yearns -- symbolizing his quest for an “orgastic future” with Daisy. Green also describes the Long Island Sound. And, while Fitzgerald uses it to describe George Wilson’s face after he discovers that his wife is having an affair, Fitzgerald rarely uses the color as a description of jealousy. Rather, he uses green as a symbol of Gatsby's hope of a future with Daisy.

When the narrator Nick Carraway first arrives at the home of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, the home – and the characters -- are bathed in white. The Buchanan home is white and red; Daisy and her cousin Jordan are both wearing white dresses and the windows are described as “gleaming white.” Daisy is described as having a white girlhood and a white neck. Later, Gatsby is dressed in a white flannel suit and flashes a white card at a police officer to get out a speeding ticket. In literature, the color white typically symbolizes innocence and purity, as in Nick’s struggle to remain innocent and detached from the self-indulgent and destructive lifestyles of his cohorts.

Another color that is weaved throughout the novel is gold – the color of “old money” and class. From the sheen of the Buchanan’s house when Nick first arrives (“glowing with reflected gold”) to the turkeys at a Gatsby party (“bewitched to a dark gold”) to Jordan’s golden arms and shoulders, the use of gold in the novel indicates prosperity and wealth. On the contrary, the use of yellow indicates the vulgar tastes and lack of refinement of the “nouveau riche:” Gatsby’s ostentatious car, which he buys only to impress Daisy, is yellow, and the girls dressed in “twin yellow dresses” at Gatsby’s party are painted in stark contrast to the “golden” Jordan. Further cementing the color yellow as symbolic of the lower class, the windows in the apartment Tom shares with Myrtle Wilson are yellow, as are the glasses on the eyes of the T.J. Eckleberg billboard, which stands as “big brother” over the downtrodden Valley of Ashes.

The pervasive use of grey in the novel further illustrates the separation of classes as well as the lack of realization of dreams for Gatsby’s future with Daisy. The most notable use of grey relates to the Valley of Ashes, which symbolizes the poverty and hopelessness of the lower class: “a line of grey cars crawls along an invisible track,” and “ash-grey men swarm up with leaden spades.” In addition, the taxi that takes Myrtle and Tom to their love nest has grey upholstery, and the vendor who sells Myrtle her puppy is described as a “grey old man.”

As a mother, wife and recovering English teacher, Jennifer Brozak is passionate about all things parenting and education. A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh and St. Vincent College, Jennifer writes features for the IN Community magazine network and shares her daily escapades on her blog, One Committed Mama.

Color Meanings

Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

Francis Scott Fitzgerald author of The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby , F. Scott Fitzgerald’s famous novel, is one of the greatest pieces of literature out there. But, perhaps, it is best remembered and spoken about for its color symbolism.

For example, at the end of the novel, green color symbolism is used to depict the limitless promises of an unachievable dream that the main character, Gatsby, pursues until the very end.

The main reason why color symbolism in The Great Gatsby is a highly studied topic is due to the fact that the writer also happens to be a painter. Naturally, he has used various colors to make this literary work extremely visual .

Let us study some of the most symbolic representations of different colors in The Great Gatsby.

Almost every chapter of Fitzgerald’s novel uses colors in their purest shades to give readers an insight into the different characters’ lives. Naturally, to fully fathom these colors mentioned, readers must also first understand the situations within which they are used.

Green grass letters spelling the word envy

Green has been mentioned around 18 times in the novel. Traditionally, green is associated with wealth, growth, and spring. It is also used to convey envy. Thus, Gatsby is shown to be an envious character as he is jealous that Daisy belongs to another man (Tom).

Green is also used to represent the power of money which Gatsby has plenty of. Until the end, Gatsby is hopeful that he can win Daisy with this power of money.

Another area depicting green color symbolism in The Great Gatsby is the  green car  which is called the “death car’. Michaelis describes the car that kills Myrtle as light green, though it’s yellow. The witness of the tragic accident towards the end of the novel is actually not even sure whether the ‘death car is indeed green or yellow in color’ – so experts believe this to be representative of the fact that only  money brings death .

Perhaps the greatest and most important representation of green color in The Great Gatsby is the green light mentioned at the end of the novel, which is used to depict that Gatsby remains a dreamer throughout. This color represents an orgastic future or  romantic reunion  which Gatsby continues to believe in. Sentences such as ‘tomorrow we will run faster and stretch our arms wider’ also reinforce this belief.

Gold nugget on a dark surface

Golden, brass, or gold is used nearly 15 times in the novel. Traditionally, these colors symbolize wealth and riches, particularly old wealth. So gold and green used in the book contrastingly symbolize  old wealth and new riches  (gold for Daisy and her husband Tom’s old wealth and green for newly acquired Gatsby’s wealth). Tom himself is also believed to be gold, while Gatsby is green.

Jordan, another character in the story, is also represented with gold (‘I rested my arm on Jordan’s golden shoulder’ or ‘with Jordan’s golden arm’). The color is again used to represent old money.

In chapter 7, golden tea is served at the grey tea hour, which indicates the turning light. Gold turning to yellow is often used through sentences like yellow press or yellow cocktail music to symbolize beauty, old money, and sometimes, negativity .

White flower symbolizing purity and innocence

Daisy is, of course, the golden girl, but the author has also used white (49 times) to show the  fairness and innocence  of her character. In fact, Fitzgerald used white color symbolism very effectively to portray Daisy‘s character.

Experts who have studied the novel in depth use the example of an egg (white on the outside, yellow inside) to explain the Daisy character. She seems pure and innocent on the outside, but inside, she is yellow and corrupt.

White is also vital to the novel as it is used to portray beauty, cleanliness, wealth, laziness, purity, and virginity .

Red danger skull warning sign

Red color symbolism is also to be found in The Great Gatsby.

Red and gold books, a wine-colored rug, a crimson room, a pink suit, a red circle on water, etc., are used to depict richness, elegance, danger, tastelessness, and death , respectively.

Gloomy black skies representing impending doom

In The Great Gatsby, black wheels represent mourning , black wreaths show nervousness , and black rivulets mean sorrow .

Black is also used to symbolize injury and gloomy settings.  Words like black  morning and black beach show gloominess or impending doom , and Tom’s black eyes are used to represent hostility and anger .

In Conclusion

The Great Gatsby is one of the most visual pieces of literature , and many different colors are used repeatedly for its different characters. For example, white is used for Daisy as Gatsby continues to think of her as his innocent bride, whereas she is actually yellow or corrupted. Gatsby, on the other hand, is mostly linked with green, representing envy and money, but there is also blue, representing Gatsby’s hopes and illusions.

Fitzgerald has used color symbolism in The Great Gatsby to literally paint a vivid canvas that will be discussed, appreciated, and remembered for centuries.

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Themes, Motifs, and Symbols in The Great Gatsby

  • The Albert Team
  • Last Updated On: March 1, 2022

color in the great gatsby thesis

One of the most commonly taught novels, The Great Gatsby is rich with opportunities for thematic analysis and broader real-world discussion. Gatsby is a fantastic opportunity to challenge students to see past the money, fancy clothes, and fancy cars and into what brings them lasting joy and purpose. In this post, we’ll break down the biggest themes , motifs, and symbols in The Great Gatsby .

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Major Themes in The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby lends itself to many themes , but the primary purpose of the novel is to provide a sharp criticism of the American Dream as defined during the 1920s. Other themes — such as obsession with the past or dysfunctional relationships — all tie in with this singular idea of the vanity of pursuing wealth as the only means to true happiness and success.

Pursuit of the American Dream

A person holds an American Flag.

One very evident theme in Fitzgerald’s novel is the Pursuit of the American Dream during the 1920s. Then, as now,  many Americans believed that “anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, [could] attain their own version of success in a society where upward mobility is possible for everyone” (Barone). Born penniless, James Gatz, or Jay Gatsby, was determined to achieve his own American Dream the only way he knew how: by attaining massive wealth by whatever means necessary. However, even after seemingly fulfilling his dream by becoming filthy rich, those who inherited their wealth still treat Gatsby as an outsider —namely, the Buchanans. Fitzgerald uses Gatsby’s devastating realization to criticize people’s perception of the American Dream as simply the “culmination of wealth” (Pumphrey).

To paint a picture for the reader, Nick personifies Gatsby’s pursuit of the American Dream in the green light at the end of the Buchanans’ dock, calling it the “orgastic future that year by year recedes before us” (Fitzgerald 180). Much like Gatsby, Americans still today work their entire lives to achieve their idea of the American dream, only for some to meet an untimely end before reaching this dream. One of the most poignant quotes of the entire novel is at the end where Nick states in reference to this unattainable dream that “We beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past,” showing the vanity and utter pointlessness, in his eyes, of this “American Dream” (Fitzgerald 180). 

Failure to Live in the Present; Obsession with the Past and Future

Gatsby is the clearest example of a character stuck in the past due to his obsession with Daisy. Nick observes him “stretch[ing] out his arms toward the dark water” (Fitzgerald 21). The reader soon learns that Gatsby is continuously reaching for a green light at the end of the Buchanans’ dock, signifying his continual pursuit of Daisy, who is always just out of his reach. Gatsby is so overcome with visions of his past that he is shackled by his own imagination and kept from forming a genuine connection with the real Daisy.

The past also consumes Tom Buchanan, his one claim to fame being his football career in New Haven. Nick recognizes this immediately, feeling that Tom would “drift on forever seeking, a little wistfully, for the dramatic turbulence of some irrecoverable football game” (Fitzgerald 6). Tom’s mistress, Myrtle, is always rhapsodizing what she and Tom will do once they are married to one another, something Tom clearly does not see in his future. Even in casual conversation, the Buchanans, particularly Daisy, reminisce about the past or plan for the future, always planning trips to the city or recollecting old acquaintances. Whenever Daisy is forced into the present, she is visibly uncomfortable and anxious.

The Destructive Nature of Dysfunctional Relationships

color in the great gatsby thesis

Fitzgerald’s novel is littered with questionable characters and suspicious situations. Characters constantly act and speak behind each other’s back, making it difficult to trust or predict anyone’s motives in the novel. Tom and Daisy’s relationship is the most obvious example of secrecy leading to conflict regarding Tom’s “woman in New York” and Daisy’s long-lasting infatuation with Gatsby. Tom isn’t even truthful with Myrtle, his mistress, and tells her he cannot marry her because Daisy is Catholic and will not file for divorce. 

Miss Baker’s friendship with Daisy is just as secretive and manipulative. When she speaks to Nick behind Daisy’s back, she makes Daisy out to be a fool. She manipulates situations between Daisy and Gatsby behind Nick’s back, even when she knows nothing good can come from their secret romance. Daisy does not even have a functioning relationship with her own daughter; when Nick asks about her, all Daisy has to say is, “I suppose she talks, and eats, and everything” (Fitzgerald 16). We do not witness her daughter’s growth into adulthood, but we can only imagine the damage this separation from her parents has caused her. 

The parties that Gatsby hosts in his mansions are not filled with his closest friends; rather, complete strangers flood his halls to spill rumors about their host and leave without a word the next day. 

Gatsby, the only person who seems remotely interested in forming functional relationships, still lies to Nick about his upbringing immediately after asking Nick his opinion of him, as if to save himself preemptively. Throughout the novel, Gatsby attempts to form a real relationship with Daisy, which proves impossible because she can never live up to the Daisy of his imagination. 

Motifs and Symbols in The Great Gatsby

Fitzgerald’s novel is rich with symbolism, whether it be through color, setting, or objects. Each detail, no matter how small, enforces the tone of the scene. Many colors and settings are used in stark contrast with one another; for example, the white and gold Buchanan mansion and Daisy are vastly different from the bleak and gray Valley of Ashes. Gatsby’s car is both gold and green, signifying both his achievement of wealth and his continual pursuit of rich things, including Daisy Buchanan.

Color 

There are four distinct colors repeated throughout the novel that each carry meaning beyond the surface. These colors are white, gray, green, and gold.

Daisy and Jordan are both dressed in white at the start of the novel, and the open windows cause the white curtains to float in the air. Both the curtains and the women in white represent both innocence and superficiality of these characters who float through life lacking depth of personality. Nick Carraway describes Daisy as being “high in a white palace”, calling her both “king’s daughter” and “the golden girl” (Fitzgerald 120). In this instance, Nick characterizes her as this lofty, worshiped being, which mirrors Gatsby’s perspective and reinforces the fact that Gatsby will never be good enough for her. 

color in the great gatsby thesis

By name, The Valley of Ashes is represented by the color gray, which symbolizes the harsh conditions of the working class and overall lack of joy or hope in this place. George Wilson’s garage naturally resides in this desolate place, described as “unprosperous and bare” (Fitzgerald 25). Words such as “foul”, “solemn”, and “wasteland” are used to describe the place constantly under the watch of T.J. Eckleburg’s gold-rimmed eyes (Fitzgerald 24).

Green symbolizes two primary things: money and lust. The leather seats in Gatsby’s car are a lush green color, implying that perhaps the bright yellow paint did not declare his wealth loudly enough. Tom forces himself into the driver’s seat of Gatsby’s car, emphasizing that he believes Gatsby to be undeserving of such luxury. The most prominent green object (other than money) is the green lantern at the end of the Buchanans’ dock. While this green light represents Gatsby’s dream to be with Daisy, it also more characteristically represents envy as Gatsby desires to have another man’s wife.

color in the great gatsby thesis

Gatsby’s Rolls Royce, later known as “The Death Car,” symbolizes money and the pompous lifestyle of the rich. Nick describes Daisy as a  “golden girl”, Gatsby dons a gold tie for one of his many parties, and even the eyes of Dr. T. J. Eckleberg are rimmed in gold frames. In every instance, gold is both synonymous with wealth and “otherness”. Whether it is Daisy, Gatsby’s car, or even Dr. T.J. Eckleberg, each golden person or object is completely detached from the rest of society and feeling any sort of social responsibility. For example, Dr. T.J. Eckelberg’s looming presence over the Valley of Ashes 

Valley of Ashes

color in the great gatsby thesis

George Wilson’s garage naturally resides in the Valley of Ashes, described as “unprosperous and bare” (Fitzgerald 25). Words such as “foul”, “solemn”, and “wasteland” are used to describe the place constantly under the watch of T.J. Eckleburg’s gold-rimmed eyes (Fitzgerald 24). Myrtle Wilson’s brightly-dressed, sensual persona stands out in stark contrast to her colorless background. Even though her character doesn’t “fit” the setting she lives in, she is permanently bound to live and eventually die in this hopeless place. George even attempts to leave, but the thoughtless actions of the rich quickly tear apart his dream of a better life.

West Egg and Gatsby’s Mansion

While similar in appearance, East Egg and West Egg are drastically different from one another in status. West Egg, where Gatsby’s mansion resides, is “less fashionable” than East Egg and represents “new money” (Fitzgerald 5). Nick describes Gatsby’s mansion ironically as an “imitation”, further supporting the idea that Gatsby is an imposter in the realm of the rich and famous. West Egg residents are more inclined to hold extravagant and wild parties than their East Egg neighbors, even though East Eggers have no problem attending these parties held by their “less fashionable” neighbors. 

East Egg and the Buchanan’s Mansion

color in the great gatsby thesis

The mansions across the bay in East Egg are described as “white palaces”, further supporting that the color white implies something untouchable (Fitzgerald 4). The French windows reflected gold; vast gardens framed the property; “frosted wedding cake ceilings” hovered above every room, and “wine-colored” rugs sprawled across the floors (Fitzgerald 8). The author spares no detail to ensure the reader understands the exquisite luxury of the Buchanans’ home. East Egg residents also live at a slower and calmer pace than their neighbors, likely because they don’t feel the need to indulge in the luxuries offered at parties that are already at their fingertips.

Objects 

Doctor T. J. Eckleberg’s eyes 

Dr. T.J. Eckelberg’s eyes are painted onto a fading billboard that overlooks the Valley of Ashes. The eyes float independently of a face or even a nose and are framed in a pair of gold eyeglasses. Not much is known about Dr. Eckelberg; the narrator assumes that he either “sank down himself into eternal blindness” or simply forgot about his billboard and moved to a different city (Fitzgerald 24). Either way, the enormous eyes have a looming presence over the Valley of Ashes; constantly “brood[ing]” over this desolate place. You can define Fitzgerald’s choice of the word “brood” in two very different ways. These eyes could be “brooding” and watching over the city like a worried mother hen wishing to care for her chicks. Or, these eyes could be “brooding” because they are thinking deeply about everything they see that makes them continually unhappy.

Green Light

A green light shines on top of a structure in the distance

The green light at the end of the Buchanans’ dock represents Daisy in Gatsby’s eyes. Every time he sees it, he thinks of her and desires to have her. He finds hope in this light; as long as he can see it, Daisy is still just within his grasp. However, Nick sees this green light through much more critical eyes by the end of the novel. He refers to it instead as the “orgastic future that year by year recedes before us” (Fitzgerald 180).

Two important words are used to critique Gatsby’s dream, or more broadly, the American Dream. The first word, orgastic, has sexual connotations and pairs with this lustful desire Gatsby has for Daisy; she is his dream: she fascinates, entices, and overwhelms every part of his being. Likewise, the American Dream can become so consuming of an obsession that it takes on this euphoric or intoxicating appeal. The other crucial word is “recede”: as we pursue our version of the American Dream year after year, it doesn’t get any closer; it only “recedes” or moves farther and farther out of reach. Gatsby’s dream, personified in the green light, is the primary symbol of the novel and ties into Fitzgerald’s overwhelming critique of the American Dream throughout the novel.

Gatsby’s Car

Gatsby’s car has many roles throughout the novel, so much so, it could even be considered a secondary character. First, his car is used as a shuttle to bring people to his lavish parties; then, the car is used to impress Nick and convince him to do Gatsby a favor. Later in the novel, however, things take a dark turn. Tom forces himself into Gatsby’s car for their trip to the city. It is unclear why he does this other than to simply assert his own power over Gatsby. Finally, the car, driven by Daisy, murders Myrtle Wilson and is renamed the “Death Car”. A vivid picture of luxurious living with green leather interior and a bright yellowish gold paint job, Gatsby’s car is yet another failed attempt at reaching his American Dream through the accumulation of flashy and expensive things.

Wrapping Up 

Although a relatively brief read, Fitzgerald’s novel is jam-packed with rich opportunities for thematic analysis and tracking motifs and symbols. Drawing on the text For quick assignment ideas, check out our  200+ Great Gatsby review questions , and check out our pre-made chapter quizzes , designed to track your students’ reading progress and comprehension before moving on to a new section of the text.

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby . Scribner, 2018.

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The Grapes of Wrath

The use of color throughout the great gatsby and the grapes of wrath anonymous college.

In both The Great Gatsby and The Grapes of Wrath, color is used in order to reflect the atmosphere or mood. This allows Fitzgerald and Steinbeck to illustrate the events in a more sophisticated style and intensify the clarity of actions; therefore allowing the audience to envisage the episodes in a very refined manner. Whilst the use color is equally effective in both novels, it’s function in ‘The Great Gatsby’ tends to be mainly for materialistic features - in order to reinforce the theme of conspicuous consumption throughout the book, yet in ‘The Grapes Of Wrath’ color is used more to describe the atmosphere or the time of day, rather than objects. Nevertheless, certain colors (notably white and grey) still have alike connotations and create a similar mood in both of the novels.

The purpose of color in ‘The Great Gatsby’ is often for describing objects and highlighting certain aspects of their appearance. The use of color in this way strengthens the theme of materialism and highlights the shallow nature of the characters and particularly Nick - as it is he who narrates the tale and constantly uses color in his descriptions. One of the key examples is the use of the colors gold and silver, which often represent wealth and...

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color in the great gatsby thesis

Study Like a Boss

The Great Gatsby: Imagery of Colors

F. Scott Fitzgerald used the imagery of colors in his masterpiece The Great Gatsby. The colors are used very frequently as symbols, and the hues create atmosphere in different scenes of the book. White is a clean and fresh color, but the author shows how it can be tainted as well. Next, yellow illustrates the downfall of moral standards of the people of West Egg. Lastly, green, the most dominant color in the book, symbolizes wealth and Gatsby’s unattainable dream .

To Gatsby, Daisy represents innocence and purity; however, Fitzgerald uses different shades of white to veil her corruption. Daisy is solely described as “dressed in white”, she powders her face white, and she mentions her “white girlhood”. The millionaire describes this perfect princess figure to be “high in a white palace the king’s daughter, the golden girl.”

On the other hand, Fitzgerald portrays the way of life in West Egg as a wretched place when “four solemn men dressed in suits are walking along the sidewalk with a stretcher on which lies a drunken woman in a white evening dress. Her hand, which dangles over the side, sparkles cold with jewels. Gravely the men turn it at a house – the wrong house. But no one knows the woman’s name , and no one cares.”

Yellow stands out as a symbol of corruption and decay. Materialism has corrupted the citizens of East and West Egg because they center everything on money. When Gatsby entertains this wealthy class, the orchestra plays “yellow cocktail music” “. Even Gatsby believes that he can win Daisy back with his money – thus he is described as wearing a “caramel-colored suit” when he lies about his past to Nick. The most important symbol , however, is Gatsby’s car. The car becomes the main topic of conversation among the townspeople after it kills Myrtle and a witness specified this “death car” to be yellow.

Fitzgerald used green most frequently to symbolize Gatsby’s love for Daisy Buchanan. Daisy rejected Gatsby because “rich girls don’t marry poor boys”, so her philosophy compelled him to become wealthy. Gatsby described Daisy’s voice as “full of money” and he acquired millions of green dollars in the hope that Daisy would love him again. Also, Gatsby moved into his mansion so that he could live near the Buchanans, and at night the millionaire watches “a single green light , minute and far away, that might have been at the end of a dock.” To Gatsby, this green light at Daisy’s house symbolized hope and a chance to relive the past with his dream girl.

In The Great Gatsby, colors are employed throughout the pages to convey impressionistic, but important, images to the reader. White changes from an honest and sinless color to represent the corruption of the wealthy. Yellow symbolizes the unethical standards and death of this class as well. However, the most important color in this book, green, is the embodiment of hope and the American dream Gatsby hopes to attain with money.

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Home — Essay Samples — Literature — The Great Gatsby — The Specific Role of Colors in The Great Gatsby

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The Specific Role of Colors in The Great Gatsby

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color in the great gatsby thesis

How to Write a Thesis Statement for "The Great Gatsby"

Shelia odak.

Learn more about the classic American novel,

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel “The Great Gatsby” is a classic of American fiction and a staple in the literature classroom. The tragic story of Jay Gatsby plays out against the opulence of the 1920s. The text offers a range of subjects from which to create a thesis statement, including the book’s symbolism, the pursuit of the American dream, the clash of social classes and even the novel’s title. By learning why these ideas are important components of the book and understanding the purpose of a thesis statement, you can create the foundation for a successful essay.

Know that a thesis statement announces the topic and viewpoint of your paper in a succinct, direct manner. Place it at the end of the introduction in a single sentence.

Understand the meaning and purpose behind the book's symbolism. Concentrate on the purpose of the symbolism, not just one or two examples. If, for instance, several of the novel’s symbols deal with problems of materialism, determine why Fitzgerald would want to highlight materialism in his novel.

Know how the book deals with the American dream, through the character of Gatsby or the other characters in the novel. As above, determine how Fitzgerald feels the American dream through the imagery he employs.

Understand Fitzgerald's point of view about the various social classes that the characters in the novel represent. To narrow the topic, choose to write about how Fitzgerald deals with one class.

Decide what is meant by the novel’s title, "The Great Gatsby," and tailor your thesis statement around the adjective “great.” Be sure to consider if the title is ironic.

  • The thesis can alert you when you go off track during the writing process: If anything in the body of your paper does not support the thesis, it should be deleted.

About the Author

Shelia Odak has over 10 years writing and editing experience for consumer and trade publications including "Radio/TV Interview Report." She has worked for over nine years in education and holds a Ph.D. from Georgia State University. Odak writes on a range of topics including education, literature and frugal living.

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color in the great gatsby thesis

  • Art and Performance Letters
  • Vol 4, Issue 7, 2023

The Symbolic Meaning of Color in the Great Gatsby

color in the great gatsby thesis

DOI: 10.23977/artpl.2023.040701 | Downloads: 91 | Views: 479

Yiran Sun 1

Affiliation(s)

1 Harin University of Commerce, Harbin, China

Corresponding Author

In The Great Gatsby, the author makes full use of various color symbols to deepen the theme of his works. The purpose of this paper is to explain why the color symbol is called the unique literary and artistic technique of The Great Gatsby by analyzing the significance of different colors in the novel. The symbolic meaning of color mainly includes shaping the character, promoting the plot development, reflecting the characteristics of the times, deepening and enriching the theme connotation of the novel. The colors studied are: green, blue, white, yellow, red and grey. These colors reflect the growth and collapse of the American dream in Fitzgerald's works. With the disillusionment of the American dream, the protagonist and the main characters of the novel fall into a tragic ending. The analysis of the protagonist's tragedy in The Great Gatsby also reflects the abolition and unreality of the American dream in the 1920s. It is a kind of satire to the valueless problem of "American Dream" and the blindness of enterprise pursuers.

CITE THIS PAPER

Yiran Sun, The Symbolic Meaning of Color in the Great Gatsby. Art and Performance Letters (2023) Vol. 4: 1-8. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.23977/artpl.2023.040701.

[1] Bloom Harlod, ed. F Scott Fitzgerald [M]. New York: Chelsea House, 1985. [2] US History.org. The Declaration of Independence. Retrieved on June 20, 2009. [3] Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph, Some Sort of Epic Grandeur: The Life of F. Scott 2nd rev [M]. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 2002. [4] Fitzgerald. F. Scott. The Great Gatsby Beijing Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press, 1992. [5] Barnet. Sylvan, et al. Literature for Composition [M]. 5th Edition. Longman, 2000:195. [6] Houndmills, Bashingshoke, Hampshire: Mac- millan, 1990:26. [7] Brucoli Mathew J. New Essays on the Great Gatsby[C]. Beijing: Peking University Press, 2007:87. [8] Ian Osby. 50 American novels. Heineman Education Co., Ltd., 1981.218 [9] Vanity Fair, April 2009. Rethinking the American Dream. Retrieved on June 20, 2009.

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Silver & Gold: Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby Essay

Introduction.

Color symbolism plays an important role in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925). The author uses various colors to accentuate different aspects of life in the United States in the 1920s. In particular, a great deal of attention is paid to representing differences in social status while emphasizing richness and prosperity with the help of gold and silver. Although the color palette presented in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is rich, the problem of differing social status is most vividly described in the novel through the use of golden and silver colors that stand for wealth, success, the Golden Age, and the American Dream.

Symbols of Wealth in The Great Gatsby

From his first days in the city, Nick Carraway begins to associate life in New York with gold and money. Carraway plans to spend his time reading on “banking and credit and investment securities,” and these books stand on his shelf “in red and gold like new money from the mint, promising to unfold the shining secrets” (Fitzgerald 4).

When Carraway comes to Tom Buchanan’s house, he also associates the mansion with prosperity and success while noting that its French windows glow with “reflected gold” (Fitzgerald 6). Thus, Fitzgerald represents Carraway as a person of lower social status than Buchanan but also as someone who wants to achieve success in his life and learn the secrets of the bond business.

When Fitzgerald tells the reader about Jay Gatsby, the use of gold and silver adds to Gatsby’s image as a prosperous man and a person who represents the wealthiest class of the Golden Age in the United States. Indeed, when Carraway sees a silhouette of his neighbor for the first time, Gatsby is “standing with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars” (Fitzgerald 15).

Silver is also used in the novel to accentuate the unique sparkle of the moon in New York: “A silver curve of the moon hovered already in the western sky” (Fitzgerald 120). The silver shining of the moon and stars is also associated with the sparkling jewelry worn by women from upper classes of society and only dreamt of by poorer people.

Gatsby uses silver and gold in order to emphasize his status and add gloss to his image and appearance. When he prepares for his date with Daisy, he chooses “a white flannel suit, silver shirt, and gold-colored tie” (Fitzgerald 54). He wants to draw Daisy’s and the public’s attention to his wealth. This intention can be observed even in Gatsby’s parties, which are so glamorous and showy that turkeys are “bewitched to a dark gold” (Fitzgerald 26).

Moreover, the author describes Gatsby’s house as a luxurious mansion, and the man’s bedroom, though the “simplest” in the house, is also full of gold. From this point, gold and money help Gatsby distinguish himself from the other people around him. His wealth is accentuated so vividly that no one can doubt Gatsby’s success and status in New York.

However, not only Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby are represented as having a high social status; Jordan Baker and Daisy Buchanan are other characters who have wealth and status in line with these two men. Fitzgerald refers to Jordan as having a “slender golden arm” (28) and a “golden shoulder” (51).

The accentuation of this color is important to demonstrate her status as a rich professional golfer and celebrity in New York social circles. It is significant to note that Fitzgerald uses both silver and gold to present his visions of Jordan and Daisy. In this way, both women are associated with “silver idols” (Fitzgerald 79). At the same time, these rich women seem to shine in their high social circles like gold.

From this perspective, much attention is paid to accentuating the difference between other women and Daisy, who is “the golden girl” with a voice “full of money” (Fitzgerald 84). Thus, Daisy’s high status is presented as an inherited feature that is reflected in her appearance and all of her actions, as well as in her voice. These details are important because they highlight a key difference between Daisy and Gatsby: even though Gatsby has a high social status today, he has no such voice, and his silver shirts are only outer covers that are typical of the Golden Age. The conflict between Daisy’s and Gatsby’s statuses is also observed with reference to Fitzgerald’s representation of Daisy’s memories about the sounds of saxophones.

When the characters return from their thoughts to reality, they observe that the house becomes filled with “gray-turning, gold-turning light” (Fitzgerald 96). This combination of gray and gold, as well as dust and shining, demonstrates the contrast between the glamorous cover of Gatsby’s life and reality.

Despite the fact that Fitzgerald uses many colors in his writing, gold and silver seem to play a unique role in the author’s palette. The distance between the rich and the poor in 1920s America is accentuated with the help of some colorful strokes. Indeed, Fitzgerald uses the expressive combination of colors to demonstrate differences in the characters’ statuses, as gold and silver represent both their real wealth and their attempts to give off an impression of success.

Fitzgerald, Francis Scott. The Great Gatsby. Wordsworth Publishing, 2013.

  • Short Summary
  • Summary (Chapter 1)
  • Summary (Chapter 2)
  • Summary (Chapter 3)
  • Summary (Chapter 4)
  • Summary (Chapter 5)
  • Summary (Chapter 6)
  • Summary (Chapter 7)
  • Summary (Chapter 8)
  • Summary (Chapter 9)
  • Symbolism & Style
  • Quotes Explained
  • Essay Topics
  • Essay Samples
  • Questions & Answers
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Biography
  • Chicago (A-D)
  • Chicago (N-B)

IvyPanda. (2023, October 29). Silver & Gold: Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby. https://ivypanda.com/essays/silver-gold-color-symbolism-in-the-great-gatsby/

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IvyPanda . 2023. "Silver & Gold: Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby." October 29, 2023. https://ivypanda.com/essays/silver-gold-color-symbolism-in-the-great-gatsby/.

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Bibliography

IvyPanda . "Silver & Gold: Color Symbolism in The Great Gatsby." October 29, 2023. https://ivypanda.com/essays/silver-gold-color-symbolism-in-the-great-gatsby/.

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