Ten 11+ & 13+ Creative Writing Tips For Excellent Exam Stories

When my students get the hang of these techniques, it makes an enormous difference to their creative writing – but it takes practice.

M y advice for 11 plus stories in this article applies just as well to 8 plus, 13 plus or GCSE … in fact, although I have written with 11 plus creative writing in mind, my suggestions should be relevant at any level.

I’ve been teaching these things to young people for many years, and I hope you also find them useful. Please write a comment if you do!

The creative writing materials offered by 11 Plus Lifeline teach students to use all the techniques explained on this page.

Every writing paper has full example answers, as well as detailed step-by-step discussions, marking guidelines and story-planning advice. Papers are structured to help students develop high-level skills – and just as importantly, to enjoy themselves!

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1 – Before you write, daydream

If you can see your story’s world in your head, you will be able to describe it powerfully.

If you can’t, your descriptions risk being superficial and your writing uninteresting.

After a little daydream, your next step is to turn it into a simple plan:

THE STORY PLANNING PROCESS

1) the main event.

The first thing to write in your plan is the main event in your story (see point 2 , below). Keep this simple for now.

2) Your Main Character

Next, jot down a few notes about your main character (see point 3 ). What is interesting about them? Try to imagine them sitting in the place next to you. See them clearly in your mind. Who are they, really?

3) Getting There

Now note down some ideas for how you will get to the main event. Make this simple too: don’t write more than a couple of lines.

4) … And Getting Out Of There!

Finally, write a few thoughts about what will happen after the event: why does it matter, and – above all else – how does it affect your characters?

The reason I suggest this order of planning is that when you only have a short time to write, there are two important things which will hold your story together: the main event (what it is about ) and your central character (who gives us a reason to care ).

Everything else should be very simple, allowing you to focus on describing beautifully.

In fact, you can probably guess what the next of my 11 plus tips is …

2 – Keep things simple! In an 11 plus exam story, choose  one main plot event & bring it to life.

If there are too many things happening, your descriptive skills may get lost.

What’s more, once there are lots of dramatic events in a story, many students struggle to write about all of them properly.

Look at this example:

As they walked through the forest a tree fell and nearly crushed them. That was close , thought Claudia. Then they sat down to scrutinise the map.

It’s good to describe the small details of life – and especially with an interesting verb like “scrutinise”.

But if you forget to fully describe big events, such as a tree almost killing your characters, the effect is very peculiar. It implies that a near-death experience is no more interesting than reading a map!

Either give dramatic events their due importance, by describing them powerfully and giving a clear sense of your characters’ reactions, or steer clear of them altogether.

This is often a problem in exam stories with too much action, or with too many plot events in general.

It’s best to structure your story around one main event, which isn’t too extreme. Spend the rest of your time building up to it and showing its after-effects.

3 – Focus on one character

Just as it’s best to focus your writing around one main event, it makes sense to have one core character.

You probably won’t have time to make more than one person interesting and believable in a thirty minute writing exam. If you try, you’re at risk of coming unstuck.

(If you feel really confident, you might manage to develop two characters: a brother and sister, for example. But in the exam itself, ask yourself: Is it worth the risk? )

Make your main character really interesting, and only refer to others in passing.

4 – Put a little dialogue in … but don’t write a play script!

“Because writing dialogue is easier than thinking,” he said.

“That makes sense,” I said, “because otherwise I can’t explain why we’ve been chatting pointlessly for two full pages.”

Dialogue is excellent in an exam piece, and you should aim to include some in every story. However, there are risks, demonstrated by the example above!

Don’t let your story turn into a play script.

Use a little dialogue in 11+ creative writing, but focus on your descriptions of the setting, characters and events.

When you do write conversations, don’t stop describing. Avoid repeating “I said”, “she said”, “Mum answered”, and so on.

Instead, add little details which help the reader to imagine the scene as the characters talk.

Describe how people move around between saying things, the expressions on their faces, and so on:

“Because writing dialogue is easier than thinking,” he replied, a hint of a smile twitching like a worm at the edge of his mouth.

A quick note about paragraphing:

Examiners are likely to expect that a new speaker begins on a new line, if somebody else has already spoken in the paragraph.

This doesn’t happen in every book you’ll read, but it’s a convention – a normal way of doing things – which you are supposed to know about.

Look at this way of writing the example at the top, and think about where a sentence should begin a new line :

“Why are we still talking?” I said. “Because writing dialogue is easier than thinking,” he said. “That makes sense,” I said, “because otherwise I can’t explain why we’ve already been talking for two full pages.”

Now check the original again, to see whether you were right!

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It’s perfect for Key Stages 2 and 3 and for 11+ exam preparation, at home or in the classroom. It’s also ideal for anybody aged 9 or above who enjoys writing and wants to do it better.

Click on the covers to learn more and view sample pages from the books:

RSL Creative Writing: Book 1

Rsl creative writing: book 2, rsl creative writing: book 3, the rsl creative writing collection (£40.47), 5 – short stories don’t need an introduction.

Robert was 33. He lived in a small flat with his cat and his wife. One day, he decided to go for a walk to the shops. The shops weren’t very far away: it took about ten minutes to get there. It was a cloudy day. It was the middle of February and it was a bit cold but not cold enough for a scarf. The road was in need of some repairs. He was wearing a blue jumper and black shoes and some fairly old jeans.

You don’t need to introduce your story as though it is a 300 page novel!

The reader doesn’t have to know everything about the main character, and especially not at the start. This way you waste a paragraph, when you might only have time for four or five in your whole story.

Anything that really matters about your characters can be mentioned along the way. In creative writing for 11 plus exams, everything else can be left out.

Get into the main business of your story from the very first line.

6 – Show, don’t tell … Whether you’re writing an 11 plus story, or whether you’re a famous novelist!

In real life, we can’t see what is in other people’s minds.

We have to work it out from what they do – and sometimes from what they say, although this can be very misleading!

For this reason, other people’s creative writing is often most interesting when we have to work out what characters are thinking and feeling.

This makes the characters seem like real people whose thoughts we can’t immediately know.

It also helps to get us – the readers – involved in the story by making us do some thinking for ourselves!

You might initially want to write this:

Simon looked up. He was angry.

But this is much more interesting to read:

As Simon looked up I could see his jaw muscles flexing.

Have a go at re-writing the following paragraph to make it more interesting . You can change things around as much as you like.

I admit: this is the sort of thing which you will sometimes read in a book. It isn’t necessarily  always bad writing, in itself.

However, it is a missed opportunity to bring a character to life. In a time-limited 11-plus exam story, you need to take advantage of such moments.

The rule is:

Where possible,  show me  what a character is feeling … don’t  tell me .

Have a look at my way of re-writing the paragraph above:

All Anna’s thoughts have gone.

Instead, there are some strong clues which steer you towards a particular idea about what she thinks and how she feels: but you still have to decide for yourself.

This forces you to imagine Anna clearly in your own mind.

How does my answer compare to your approach?

7 – Use a range of senses throughout your story

This is good writing. The trees may be “green” (which is a bit dull), but they are “swaying”, which is an effective detail and more than makes up for it.

The simile in the second sentence (“like wisps of cigar smoke”) is vivid and well planned.

The sandwich bag is “crumpled”, and “bag of bacon” is a nice moment of alliteration to emphasise this robust, commonplace item of food.

But imagine a story which continues in the same way, all the way through.

Everything is visual: a sight image.

For the reader, it is like being in a world without the ability to hear, smell, touch or taste.

Furthermore, the narrator seems to be looking around constantly, noticing everything. Is this normal behaviour?

It’s an unrealistic way of seeing the world, and after a while it becomes exhausting to read.

For a student, there are two simple but very useful lessons:

1) Always think about the five senses (sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell).

2) Sometimes avoid the most obvious sense when describing a thing (see point 8 below).

These tips are easy to apply in your creative writing for 11+, but they make a huge difference.

What’s more, unlike a clumsy simile (see point 9 ), a sensory description rarely ends up  harming  your writing. It can be effective or ineffective, but that’s another matter!

Take the example above:

“The trees were green and swaying”  could become:  “The trunks were groaning, and overhead I heard the dull rustle of a thousand fresh leaves slapping against one another.”

There’s nothing startlingly original here, but because it is a slightly less obvious way of describing trees, it creates a much more powerful atmosphere.

If you want a metaphor as well, try turning  “dull rustle”  into  “distant applause” , which makes the leaves seem like a mass of enthusiastic people.

Similarly,  “I looked at the bag of bacon sandwiches crumpled on the seat next to me”  takes on more life like this:

I smelt something like old sick; then I remembered the bag of bacon sandwiches crumpled on the seat next to me.

Notice how easily similes (“like old sick”) and metaphors happen, almost by themselves, when you focus on describing with a range of senses .

This is one of my most important 11 plus writing tips.

8 – Sometimes describe things using a less obvious sense

Using a range of senses, as I discussed in point 7 , is really, really important.

But how can you come up with surprising, powerful descriptions – descriptions to make the marker stop ticking your work for a second, raise their eyebrows and smile?

Imagine that you are just about to write the following sentence:

It was a cold morning.

But you stop yourself, think for a second, and write this:

I could hear the crackle of thawing ice on car windscreens.

This is much more interesting. Rather than using the sense of touch (a “cold” feeling), you are using a sound: “the crackle of thawing ice”.

There’s a good chance that the reader will think:  “Yes! I never considered it before, but you really do hear a sound when ice thaws quickly.”

This version also tells you much more about the weather:

The reader can work out that the night has been exceptionally cold, but also that the temperature is now rising quickly.

The thought process to produce descriptions like this is much simpler than it seems:

1) Think of the sense which is most obvious to describe the thing you are writing about.

3) Think of the second most obvious sense.

4) Ban that too!

5) From the three remaining senses, pick the one which is most useful.

6) Ask yourself how the thing would sound, feel, smell or taste – whichever three of these you have left (you’ve almost certainly banned sight!).

7) Write about it.

9 – Use similes and metaphors carefully in your creative writing

Similes and metaphors are useful (and can be impressive), but they have to make things clearer for the reader, not create confusion.

“She won the sprint like a racing car” asks more questions than it answers.

Was she noisy? Was she travelling at 150 miles per hour?

On the other hand, “She ducked her head and slipped across the line as cleanly as a racing car” helps me to picture the event exactly as intended.

Here’s another simile for speed, which I’ve seen a great many times (you’d hardly believe how many) in 11-plus stories:

Donald wrote like a cheetah.

Does this mean that Donald wrote savagely and meaninglessly, like a wild animal with a pencil jammed between its claws ?

Or perhaps that he wrote largely about the themes of hunting and sleeping ?

My guess is that Donald wrote quickly , but I’m not sure … because if that’s all you meant, WHY DIDN’T YOU JUST SAY IT?

This sort of thing is not really the fault of a young writer, who after all is (hopefully!) doing their best.

It is the fault of those dastardly teachers who advise children to include, for example, “at least one metaphor and two similes” in each story.

The result of this, for most children, is a succession of poorly chosen descriptive tricks, which add nothing.

Indeed, we’ve seen how these things can end up making a story comical for all the wrong reasons!

The right approach to creative writing doesn’t start with the need to include a simile: it starts with the need to describe effectively .

To me, this means allowing the reader to imagine the situation fully, and helping them care what happens.

Let’s play around with the image of Donald writing “like a cheetah”.

What happens if we just get rid of the simile?

Donald wrote quickly.

OK, but it doesn’t tell us much: did he write quickly because he wanted to finish his story before  Newsnight , or because he was really excited by his work?

Let’s say that it was the first reason: he wanted to get his work out of the way. Perhaps he was feeling annoyed, given that it might interrupt his favourite TV show.

When somebody is writing rapidly while annoyed, what might this look like?

I imagine Donald’s arm wiggling as the pen moves — especially the elbow. The movement is fast and constant because he is worried about getting the work finished, and because in his irritation he doesn’t much care about its quality.

So I ask myself: What moves to and fro constantly, performing a task in an unimaginative way?

And the first thing I think of is a machine in a factory:

Donald hunched over the page, his arm jerking to and fro with the quick, regular movements of a factory robot.

This sentence by itself would go some way to making your story the best in the exam room.

I hope I’ve persuaded you that with a well-organised thought process, a good simile isn’t too difficult to write!

Because children have been taught to work in this way, a story will often contain the required two similes, a metaphor, a personification, even an interesting alliteration …

… but everything in between is lifeless.

What students need is a different sort of checklist, to help them make the rest of their writing interesting .

I hope this article will give you some ideas!

10 – Stephanie was writing a beautiful story in the 11-plus exam hall. Or was she …?

Suspense is good if it’s appropriate to the story, but don’t jack-knife it in clumsily!

“It was a calm, sunny day. Or was it?” doesn’t really make me curious.

It makes me think that you’re trying to pester me into being excited, rather than persuading me to feel that way through your excellent writing.

If you write in a way that builds suspense by making me interested in the characters and events in the story – while keeping some important information hidden from me, just out of sight – this will speak for itself.

However, not every piece of creative writing needs it!

If you found these story writing tips useful or if you have a question, please leave a comment below! I’d love to have your feedback. (Tick the “Receive email updates” box to receive an email when I reply.)

For the most comprehensive range of resources to help with preparation for the 11+ exam,  you might like to try 11 Plus Lifeline (with a money-back guarantee in the first month). Every practice paper has full example solutions, with a detailed discussion and explanation for every question – like being taught by an excellent private tutor. There’s lots of material to help develop creative, high-scoring exam stories!

According to Tutorful, it’s “ the gold standard for independent and grammar school 11-plus preparation ”.

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At the same time, you’ll receive 121 Pages of award-winning RSL practice material, with step-by-step solutions – for free!

I'll also send you some useful information about RSL Educational resources and more advice for exam preparation. You’ll be able to unsubscribe from my emails any time you like.

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89 Comments

If you have any questions, feel free to ask me here. I’ll do my best to help you out!

Hi, I’m preparing my son for 11+. His story ideas are good but he needs to add more details/depth. How can I encourage that? Thanks

That’s a very difficult question to answer, because there is so much that I could say! Many of my suggestions are in the article above. The sample at http://digioh.com/em/27284/164929/84za5s4g4u may offer more ideas. If this is useful, then 11 Plus Lifeline offers many further resources.

What’s the syllabus of creative writing for 11plus. I understand there is no definitive one, it varies with target school as well, but still I’d like to know the min types of writing children should be knowing end of year 6 e.g. story writing, descriptive writing, poetry writing, persuasive writing, diary, reconnect, fiction, non fiction writing, script writing, book/film review, blog writing etc. Really confused with the list of categories and subcategories under each. I just need a good structure with every details. Please help with a detailed table of contents.

Hi Jay. I’m afraid I don’t have such a list – because there isn’t one. Schools can set anything that they like! However, I think getting children used to responding to a range of formats is more important than covering everything. The most common formats are probably: 1) A story based on a title or topic 2) A continuation of a passage (usually the passage already used as a comprehension text) 3) A story based on a picture

You provide excellent tips that we can use to guide our children. Done in a very simple but effective way. Even more – as times are hard and money is tight your generosity shows you truly do wish to help children and not just make money out of them. Thank you

Thank you Alison. I’m glad you found the article useful. Robert

Thank you ever so much for your very useful tips. Would you have some advice (or a sample essay) on writing a descriptive essay based on a given image?

Hi Aparna, There is some relevant content in 11 Plus Lifeline. For more along these lines, keep an eye on the website in the autumn …

Hi Robert, I found the article above very helpful. My daughter is in year 5 and we have just started our 11 plus journey. She seems to be struggling air with creative writing. She has such great ideas and an amazing imaginative mind, however she struggles to express this on paper as compared to her peers also studying for the 11 plus. How can I help her become a better writer?

Speaking as she writes might help: perhaps she will write more fluently if she just thinks of it as a way to record her verbal ideas.

My RSL Creative Writing books might help her to develop her ideas.

What is a good range for the word count for a “continue the story” creative writing task at 10+? I see suggestions of 4-5 paragraphs, but paragraphs vary hugely in length. My son is only writing around 150 words, and I fear this is taking “quality not quantity” to the extreme!

It really depends! Sometimes you’ll be given an 8-10 line answer space, in which case that would be appropriate. On the other hand, if you have 30-40 minutes, you should be pitching for 1 to 1.5 pages. Robert

Thank you so much! Very informative

I’m glad to help!

how much your fees for creative writing, and how many lesson? please let me know [email protected]

Hello Hemang. I’m afraid I don’t work as a tutor these days. However, you might be interested in my creative writing books at https://www.rsleducational.co.uk/rsl-creative-writing . These will take your child through their skills step by step, much as I would if I was teaching them. Good luck! Robert

Hi Sir! Sir, you suggestions are greatly useful. Sir, can you assist me on how to incorporate Strong Verbs in my writings as I do not know many and I struggle on account of it ?

There’s no easy answer, but the best starting point is to look for specific ways of describing things. For instance, instead of “he talked”, you might say “he muttered”, for example. You’ll learn more verbs if you look out for them as you read things, and perhaps note interesting ones down in a book. Good luck!

Dear Robert Hope you are doing well , my son is in year 5 and he is going to set for 11 plus exam for very highly competitive grammar schools , he need help for is creative writing . I advice that you are the best , I’m seeking help from you ,please . Yours sincerely Saha Mcewan

Hello. Have a look at 11 Plus Lifeline , perhaps, and my RSL Creative Writing books. I do intend to release some new things for creative writing in the future: watch this space!

Hi Robert. These are great tips. My question is how to come with effective descriptions that vary. When I do descriptive writing, I describe with only the five senses and often run out of ideas. Also, how can we write in a way that will make a clear image in the readers mind. Thanks for the time

Hi Yatharth! My video at https://youtu.be/LKnvrad6jpw is all about this, so why not have a look at that? If that’s useful, look at https://www.rsleducational.co.uk/product/rsl-creative-writing-1

I completely agree with your article, and as a teacher who prepares children for GCSE and the 11 tests, I employ a lot of the ‘strategies’ you mention. What children need ultimately is time to read, digest and above all enjoy stories and poems and then to talk about what they’ve read and in some ( or maybe a lot of cases) relate the themes and ideas etc in what they have read to their own lives. This I feel, can give a greater sense of ‘reality’ to what they can eventually write; and then we as teachers (and parents) can model how to write ‘good’ creative stories (and include all the SPAG) which can go a long way to ensuring children actually begin to feel that they themselves can be imaginative and write great stories.

Thank you for taking the time to comment, Molly. I very much agree with you.

What children need ultimately is time to read, digest and above all enjoy stories and poems and then to talk about what they’ve read and in some ( or maybe a lot of cases) relate the themes and ideas etc in what they have read to their own lives.

The only thing I’d add to this is that it works both ways: reading informs writing, but the very best way to develop critical reading skills is to become more sophisticated as a writer!

Hi Robert,l am a Creative Writing teacher for 8+ Do you think 6+ can be taught Creative Writing that will yield excellent result? I asked this question from my experience of teaching Creative Writing,I observe that more 6+ struggle with understanding and implementing Creative Writing stages than 8+ Also,I teach Creative Writing easily because I believe I have the skills to teach it but how can I come up with a special syllabus to teach my colleagues how to teach Creative Writing in the class that will be result oriented.

Hello Soremi.

I would not think too much about results, if by that you mean percentage scores, when children are 6 or so and developing their writing. I would focus on their enjoyment and on encouraging them to explore their imagination, creating interestingly described characters and environments. It’s a different situation in 11+ exams, where children must demonstrate certain skills and perform well in comparison with their peers.

However, it is very important to encourage the development of accurate and clear English from an early stage. Creative writing is a good opportunity to uncover and address problems.

I found this very useful and straightforward, and also very funny… The tips will take me flying in my writing!

Thanks Lily-Grace. The work you sent for me to look at this week was very impressive: you’re already flying!

Thanks Robert this description is very helpful

I’m very glad it’s useful. Thanks for commenting!

Hola me gustaria hacer unas infografias mas dinamicas

Thank you for the topic

It’s a pleasure. I hope the advice helps.

I thought that this was a brilliant summary. Thank you very much. Engaging and thoughtful. Very much appreciated.

I’m delighted to hear it. Thank you!

I found your creative writing tips very insightful, a real shame for us it was right at the end of our 11+/13+ preparation.

Thank you Sara. I hope they made some difference, even at a late stage.

Very useful tips! I like the way you have broken down the advice into bite-sized chunks! Thanks Robert

I’m glad you found them helpful! Thanks for commenting.

Great tips, thanks Robert. Do you have tips on non fictional writing as well? E.g. how a child can do a stellar job when asked to write a suggestion letter to the council. My child struggles with writing on everyday things that she deems uninteresting like describing everday things but is flying when writing on imaginary topics. Thanks in advance.

Hi Tolu. I have some resources for less creative subject matter in 11 Plus Lifeline .

I think the best way to add interest to potentially unexciting things, like letters, is with examples. “I think you should do more to reduce bullying, because it discourages children from studying” is not interesting. “Last week, a boy trudged towards me across the playground, clenching and unclenching his fists, with the dead-eyed look of meaningless aggression that I’ve come to know so well. This is happening too often in our school!” is much more impressive.

Thanks for these tips . Would you suggest any topics for DS to practice .

There are a great many writing topics with fully explained example answers in 11 Plus Lifeline . I might add a blog post with some suggested topics in the coming months. Robert

These SPECTACULAR tips helped me a lot when I was planning and writing a story. I think that these AMAZING tips will help me a lot when I am doing the exam. THANKS Robert!!!!

Thanks Raon! I hope you’ll share the link. Good luck in your exam. Robert

Thanks for the tips to improve the writing skill for the content writers and the students.

Thank you Nihal – I’m glad my advice is useful.

What can I Say?

My son is about to take the 11 + and part of the material is creative writing,

Can you recommend any good material please?

The key is reading and I don’t think he reads as much as he should do

Please advise

Hi Fazal. I would of course recommend my own creative writing material in 11 Plus Lifeline . There’s a free sample here .

Reading is certainly important, but it won’t do any magic without good writing practice alongside it.

If your son isn’t keen on reading, trying to push him to read more may not work. However, you can help to improve the quality of the reading he does do, by discussing it whenever possible in a way that encourages him to think about it in more depth. You can also introduce new vocabulary into your conversations, and so on.

Also, the reading list here may help him to find books that he does want to read!

Hi, my son 11, is really struggling with creative writing, the main problem being he can’t think of anything to write about. he’s a clever boy but more into science and computers. He thinks he can’t do it and I’m worried he’s going to freeze in the exam. how can i get him to access his imagination and not panic. Thanks

Practice is certainly the main thing. If he can start to “access his imagination” (a nice phrase) without exam pressure, he is more likely to be able to do so in the test.

When you say that he can’t think of anything to write about, you’re describing a problem that I can relate to. However, it should not be a big concern at 11+, for the simple reason that the best stories tend to be about very little! If he can construct a simple plot, focused on one event – even something very ordinary and apparently dull – then he has what he needs. From that point, all his effort should be focused on describing well, so that the story creates atmosphere and has a believable main character.

The real problem at 11+ is when children have too many creative ideas. They construct complex, overwhelming plots, about which it is impossible to write well – or even plausibly – in the time available.

Hi Robert Have you got any tips for the CSSE style quick 10 mins Continuous Writing tasks please. These have included instructions, descriptions and this year the exam paper included a picture to write about- what’s happening- story /description?

Many thanks for your help.

This is very difficult to answer in a brief comment. I do have some specially designed resources for these CSSE writing tasks in 11 Plus Lifeline , if that is of interest.

If writing creatively, keep the plot to an absolute minimum. Imagine that you are describing a ten second scene from a movie – not writing the plot for a whole film. Focus on effective use of the senses, in particular – very much as I outline in this article. Don’t waste any space introducing your writing.

If describing a picture, the same applies. Focus on details from it, and try to find a logical structure. For example, a character might move around the image, finding things; or you might imagine the scene changing over a period of time.

For instructions, try to visualise the activity as precisely as you can, then use words to convey your thoughts exactly. This will lead to good vocabulary. Rather than saying “Screw the lightbulb into the socket”, say something like this: “Steadying the socket with your spare hand, twist the bulb gently in a clockwise direction until you encounter resistance.” This doesn’t come from trying to be fancy: it comes from very clearly imagining the action before I write.

There is a great deal more to be said, but I hope these pointers are useful.

Great tips and advice here. I have 4 boys, all at different levels of education. This has helped me to help them. Thanks!

That makes me very happy. Good luck to your sons!

Anybody who found this useful might like to read more of my creative advice at https://www.rsleducational.co.uk/creative-writing-less-is-more .

This article is very helpful. Thank you.

Thanks for taking the time to say so!

I found this very helpful, thank you

I’m glad!

Hello Good Afternoon and thank you very much for my help. I am a young child preparing the eleven plus. I don’t necessarily have any questions i just don’t have any questions. Good luck on your educative journey.

Good luck to you, Lukas! Well done for taking the initiative and researching your exams.

I am a 8 years old child and I am doing your 11+ RSL comprehension, do you have any tips that might help me improve my writing? Thank you for your help!

Hi Kate! I’d like to help, but I’m not sure how to. You’ve written this under an article about improving your writing, and you’re working on a book that also helps with this. I don’t know what tips to add here. If you could be more specific, perhaps I’ll be able to say something. Good luck with your work! Robert

Hi Robert! I really like your tips and they did improve my daughter’s writing! Thank you so much!

I’m so glad! Well done to her.

Hi Richard, Does cursive or printed handwriting affect the writing score a 11+ level? Thanks in advance.

No, it shouldn’t make any difference. All that matters is that the writing should be easy to read, and that the student can write reasonably quickly.

Hi there, I am doing 13+, My tutor says that I should not use metaphors or similes, but I think I should. Do you have any advice for me on descriptive writing? And can you explain what a metaphor is?

I think you are probably misinterpreting your tutor. A good simile or metaphor, in the right place, is a good thing, but I would guess that your tutor is concerned that you are over-using these things and that this is distracting you from simply writing well. An alternative is that you haven’t quite understood how to use them effectively. A misjudged simile can look odd: using no simile (or metaphor) is better than using a bad one!

For a good explanation of what a metaphor is, see https://www.grammarly.com/blog/metaphor/ .

Hi, I’m currently helping a student prepare for entrance exams, and I just wondered if you could help me with a question. He was struggling with the timed element of creative writing and wanted to know if he DID run out of time, what would a marker prefer? To just leave the piece unfinished, or to quickly make an ending for the story, even if it meant it was quite an abrupt ending that didn’t necessarily do the story justice?

I think it depends on the marker. I’d prefer an unfinished piece to one with something actively bad in it, like a bad ending. However, can they leave an unfinished ending that nonetheless has something final about it: for instance, zoom out and describe the trees swaying in the distance, or the waves, so that there’s a sense of the world rolling on, despite the events in the story? If this is done well, it might even appear that they intended to finish this way.

great work, keep it up.

Amazing website! The content is wonderful. Highly informative indeed.

That’s brilliant to hear. Thank you!

Do you have to pay to get your work marked?

Yes, that’s right. Most people do it via an 11 Plus Lifeline Platinum subscription .

My daughter is not good at creative writing and I am apprehensive as she writes her pre-tests on 11th November . How do I help her with the following formats?

1) A story based on a title or topic 2) A continuation of a passage (usually the passage already used as a comprehension text) 3) A story based on a picture

Hello! I cover all these things in my RSL Creative Writing books – see https://www.rsleducational.co.uk/rsl-creative-writing You will also find creative writing videos covering these things at https://go.easy11plus.org/VIDEOLIST Good luck! Robert

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11 Plus creative writing tips and examples

english creative writing 11

Preparing for your  11 Plus creative writing  exam doesn’t have to be a worry. We help you here with 11 Plus creative writing tips and examples to prepare you for the exam. We're here to help you practice and improve your writing techniques and creative writing skills so you’re ready for your 11 Plus exams . 

Creative writing can be really fun – you can explore something you really want to and write about something that means a lot to you. Although, we know it can be a little bit worrying for some students that don’t enjoy writing as much or don’t feel confident in their writing skills. 

So, ahead of your  11 Plus exams  we want to help you prepare with these 11 Plus creative writing tips and strategies.

What Is 11 Plus Creative Writing?

The 11 Plus creative writing exam assesses a child’s ability to compose structured and engaging pieces of written work. It’s designed to evaluate a student’s fluency, imaginative capabilities, grammar, punctuation and overall ability to write creatively.

What does the 11 Plus creative writing exam include?

The 11 Plus creative writing exam is usually 25-30 minutes and could involve the continuation of a storyline that you’ll be provided with. Alternatively you might be asked to write a short piece of your own in response to a visual stimulus – this could be describing a character or writing something from their perspective, like a diary entry. 

Here are some the potential writing tasks you could be given for your 11 Plus creative writing exam: 

Descriptive task – continuing on a short story that you’ll be provided with, or describing a place or situation that your character finds themselves in. 

Persuasive task – you could be asked to write a letter or an article with the goal to persuade the reader to feel or act in a certain way after reading it by using emotive language. 

Narrative task – this would usually involve writing your own short story. 

Expository task – this could involve writing an article or set of instructions designed to inform the reader how to go about doing something properly. 

What are the 11 Plus creative writing topics?

Prior to starting your creative writing piece, you’ll need to have a topic. It’s important that the topic remains at the centre of everything you’re writing, as it will shape the direction of the story and the characters

You can think of a topic as a theme for your story. This can be really simple, as a simple theme will really help write a story in your own way. 

For your 11 plus creative writing exam, you’ll likely be presented with a topic that you then have to write about. Often these topics will have you writing about: 

Being lost or scared, capturing the feeling of being alone and writing a story about overcoming it.

Doing something exciting or achieving something impressive, the best day of your life so far. 

A holiday or an adventure

Travelling to the city or countryside and what you might experience there.

Writing a short story on each of the topics above can be a great way to familiarise yourself with creative writing.

What do examiners look for in creative writing?

Successfully passing your creative writing 11 Plus creative writing exam is a lot less daunting if you know what the examiners are looking for in your creative writing. 

Unlike other exams, it can be difficult to prepare the exact answers. It’s not like a sum in maths, where there’s only one correct answer after your working out. That doesn’t mean there aren’t specific things that examiners are looking for. Let’s take a look at those:

A well planned piece of writing

Strong creativity and good imagination

A fluent writing style

Good and correct use of punctuation 

Good use of English grammar

Complex sentences that are broken in an easy-to-read way with commas

Good spelling

Good and exciting vocabulary

Neat, easy-to-read handwriting

You can use those things as a checklist for your creative writing. When you write practice pieces, read them back and see if you can check off everything on the list of things that examiners are looking for. This will not only highlight areas needing improvement but will also act as a confidence-building tool.

11 Plus creative writing marking scheme

Your creative writing task will be worth 50% of your  English 11 plus exam  paper. So, you’ll want to make sure you’re well prepared!

Part of preparing for the creative writing task is ensuring you know how the exam will be marked. Here’s what your examiner will look at when they mark your work: 

The plot – you need to write a piece that’s got an engaging plot, but more importantly it needs to follow a strong beginning, middle and end structure. We’ll be getting more detail about that further on. Make sure you plan your story to ensure you have a well-structured and easy-to-follow plot. 

Vocabulary – Make sure you’re using a wide range of adjectives, nouns and adverbs. Rather than describing everything the same way, come up with some other engaging ways to write something. Use a good amount of complex words that you normally wouldn’t use (and make sure you understand what they mean so you use them correctly). 

Writing devices – no, your examiner isn’t looking at what pen you used to write the exam. Writing devices refer to things like metaphors, similes, tension building short sentences, alliteration and irony. Try sentences like “he was as fast as a runaway train,” for a simile example. See if you can write a few sentences that each use a different writing device to practice.

Grammar – now is a good time to start practising your grammar skills. Make sure you’re using commas correctly when you write long sentences, and that you format your character dialogue properly. There are a few common grammar mistakes that may catch you out, so keep practising. 

Spelling – While avoiding spelling mistakes is good, to get great marks on your exams you’ll want to use complicated words and spell them correctly. It might be tempting to avoid complicated words if you’re not sure how to spell them but it’s actually not a bad idea to use one or two complicated words and spell them so they’re recognisable than to use no complicated words at all.

11 Plus creative writing tips and techniques

Every great writer has one thing in common – writing techniques! Everyone can develop their creative writing skills by practising these creative writing tasks.

Getting creative 

If you want to write a story this should be your starting point! Have a good think about the topic for your story and the character you’ll be writing about. Take a minute to sit back, close your eyes and think about the world of your story. Can you see it? 

If you can visualise the world of your story, then you’ve got a good idea to work with! Get creative about the story and think about directions that it can go, and the characters you can work with. 

Planning and structure

Once you’ve got your theme in place you need to have a think about the direction of your story. Think about how your story starts, how you want it to end and then think about how you want your main character to get there. 

Remember the classic story structure of beginning, middle and end:

Use the beginning of your story to introduce your character, where they are and maybe one of two of their friends. Maybe even try to set them a goal at this point, what’s something they really, really want? 

Introduce the middle of your story with a problem or an obstacle for your main character to overcome. This is going to be the longest section of your story, so make sure you don’t spend too long with the opening! Think about how your character would overcome the problem you’ve introduced for them. 

In the end your main character overcomes the problem that you introduced for them. Think about what they would feel, the relief they’d experience and how you can sum that up in a paragraph or two. 

There are lots of different ways to write a story, but following the beginning, middle and end structure like this will really help you plan. Try to just write a few short sentences from the beginning, middle and end, then expand it out from there. 

If you need more inspiration to improve your writing skills, why not see David Walliam’s top ten writing tips ?

Creative writing examples: using the senses

Remember – writing descriptively helps your ideas to really come across in what you’re writing. The person reading your creative writing piece can’t read your mind!

A great way to really set a scene in your creative writing is to use the senses:

Sight – what can your character see? Describe how the scene around them looks, and be sure to use some good adjectives.

Sound – can your character hear anything? Even if your character can’t hear anything, that can sometimes be a great way to set a scene. Or maybe your character can hear lots of noise? Either way, make sure the reader knows that.

Smell – what does the place your character’s in smell like? You can make a disgusting, murky bog seem even filthier by describing how smelly it is to the reader. We all react strongly to smells, good or bad, so make sure you’re describing them to your reader.

Touch – what can your character feel? Are they sitting on a really soft sofa? Is the cat they’re stroking extra fluffy? Describe everything your character feels!

Taste – is your character tasting anything? Of course, if your character’s eating you need to describe it. How sweet are the sweets they’re eating? How bitter is the medicine they had to take? You could even get creative and describe a smell so bad that your character can almost taste it!

Get creative when you write about senses. You don’t have to cover every sense in order, you can mix things up in a paragraph or two, and sometimes you only need to cover two or three senses in a particular scene. Make sure you’re always telling your audience what your character is experiencing so the reader can put themselves in your character’s shoes. Utilising this technique ensures the reader engages with your creative writing piece.

Fluent writing

Practice makes perfect when it comes to fluent writing. To practice fluent writing, set yourself a creative writing task as if you were taking your 11 Plus creative writing test.

Try keeping the stories short. Just a few paragraphs so you can do a few attempts. When you’re finished, read them back to yourself out loud. See if the sentences are easy to read out loud. If they’re not, it might be good to rewrite them in a way that makes them easier to say. Try doing this out loud too, rephrase the sentence so it means the same thing but is easier to say. 

Reading out loud is not something you will be doing at the exam, so practicing your fluency at home is the key. Never be scared to do a few practice stories before your 11 Plus creative writing exam.

Proofreading Your Creative Writing

Finally, once you’ve finished writing and you’re happy with how fluent your piece sounds you’ve got to proofread it! That means checking your grammar, your punctuation and spelling. 

Make sure you’ve only used capital letters where they need to be used – the start of sentences and the names of people and places. 

Make sure you’ve used quotation marks correctly – start a new paragraph for when a character starts speaking, open with a quotation mark and then write what they said before closing with a quotation mark. Make sure you carry on writing after they’ve finished speaking with a new paragraph!

Have you checked the tenses? Make sure you’re not mixing up  past, present and future tenses !

Have you used enough punctuation? Make sure all your sentences end with full stops, but also that questions end with a question mark. Space out long sentences with a well-placed comma and make sure if a character says something loudly or is surprised that you’re using exclamation marks. 

Check your spelling! Are there any words you struggle with? Go back and check them to make sure they look right. If you’re really struggling to spell a word, maybe use a different one for your creative writing piece – lots of writers do this! If you do this a lot, then it might be worth doing some spelling practice. 

How do I prepare for creative writing? 

When it comes to 11 Plus creative writing exams it’s difficult to find something specific to revise – unlike exams in maths or English spelling, creative writing exams don’t have a right or wrong answer. So, don’t get overwhelmed by reading countless creative writing books.

The best way to prepare for a creative writing test is to practice all the key points we mentioned above. Set yourself some small creative writing tasks, practice your spelling and get some help fromyour teachers. You could also ask your parents or guardians about tuition to help you prepare for your creative writing .

We also have some creative writing book suggestions and worksheets that could help you prepare. 

11 Plus creative writing examples books

If you’re looking for some books to help you prepare for your 11 Plus creative writing exam or want to find some creative writing examples, here are some of our favourites:

11+ Essentials Creative Writing Examples Book 1 (First Past the Post)

11+ Essentials Creative Writing Examples Book 2 (First Past the Post)

Bond 11+: English Focus on Writing: 9-11 years

RSL Creative Writing, Book 1: KS2, KS3, 11 Plus & 13 Plus – Workbook For Ages 9 Upwards

11+ Creative Writing

Remember to always ask a parent or guardian before buying anything online.

11 Plus creative writing tasks and worksheets

Here are some of our own worksheets that’ll help you prepare and improve your creative writing skills: 

Creating characters

Creating dilemmas

Creating settings

My favourite author

Try an 11 plus creative writing tutor

If you’re worried about your 11 plus creative writing exam, that’s okay. There are numerous ways you can prepare without getting yourself overwhelmed. We’ve already covered how practice makes perfect when it comes to writing, so creative writing courses could be a great way for you to improve your confidence.

11 Plus tuition  will also help with your creative writing. Explore Learning’s expert tutors can help you work on your story planning and structure, grammar, writing fluency and vocabulary. 

Don’t let yourself get overwhelmed about your 11 Plus creative writing task, we’re here to help you do your best.  

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11 Plus creative writing FAQs

How to prepare for 11 plus creative writing.

Prepare by understanding the 11 Plus creative writing requirements. Engage in regular practice on various topics like adventures, challenges and feelings. Focus on grammar, punctuation, fluency, spelling and vocabulary. Always proofread and consider getting feedback.

Is there creative writing in the 11 Plus exam?

The 11 Plus exam may include a creative writing component, often lasting 25-30 minutes, where a student demonstrates their narrative and language skills.

What are the different types of creative writing 11+?

The 11 Plus creative writing includes descriptive, persuasive and narrative tasks. Studentsmay be asked to craft or add to stories, describe scenarios, write persuasive letters or informative pieces.

How do I study for a creative writing exam?

Study by practising various creative writing tasks regularly. Focus on language proficiency, structure your narratives and proofread. For tailoredsupport, consider 11 Plus tuition .

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How to prepare for Creative Writing

This article provides advice for students about the creative writing task in the 11 plus / selective school entrance examinations.

  • 1 How is creative writing tested?
  • 2 What is the examiner looking for?
  • 4.1 1. Planning
  • 4.2 2. Using you creativity/imagination
  • 4.3 3. Fluent writing style
  • 4.4 4. Punctuation
  • 4.5 5. Grammar
  • 4.6 6. Spellings
  • 4.7 7. Vocabulary
  • 4.8 8. Structure
  • 5 Checking your work
  • 6 Can your handwriting be read?
  • 7 Practise your ideas

How is creative writing tested?

Creative writing for the 11+ may require you to write either an original story or complete a continuous prose exercise in the same style of writing (when you are given the start of a story/piece of writing and you continue it). Both types of task will examine your ability to plan, create and then write in a structured manner.

You may be given just one title/opening paragraph to write from or you could be given a set of options from which you choose your preferred one. A few schools may present the creative writing task at the end of a comprehension exercise where you are asked to continue writing the comprehension text or creative a piece of work about the comprehension text/information.

Some entrance examinations, for selective schools, will assess the creative writing task only as part of a borderline check in the review process if you have fallen marginally short or only just passed the given pass mark for that entrance exam.

Unlike creative writing lessons in school, there will no time allowed to do all the usual planning, drafting and revising required to produce a final piece of writing; the 11+ creative writing task is completed in a very short time, in one sitting, with no time allowed for any drafts.

What is the examiner looking for?

Creative writing skills include the following components:

  • Effective planning
  • Creativity/imagination
  • A ‘fluent’ and interesting writing style
  • Correct use of punctuation including the use of some ‘advanced’ types
  • Correct use of English grammar
  • Correct spellings
  • An extensive and interesting vocabulary
  • A well-structured piece of writing

There will be a specified time given for the writing task. The length of this will vary between schools. Ensure that you know what this is and keep an eye on your progress in order to be able to finish in time and include a check of your work.

Skills to practise

1. planning.

Never just start writing. Planning will help you to organise your thoughts and this will give your writing structure. It really does not need to take long but is always 5 minutes well spent. This planning time may form part of the whole time given to write or it may be an extra 5 minutes provided at the start before the writing is timed. Use a planning technique that works well for you e.g. flow-chart, mind map, spider diagram, chart. If you do run out of writing time you can ask the examiner to refer to your plan to see how you would have continued/ended your work.

2. Using you creativity/imagination

Some people are naturally creative with words, story-lines etc. and find this skill easy. However, your imagination can be greatly improved by reading a variety of books.

See this suggested reading book list .

3. Fluent writing style

Your writing style is unique to you. It should demonstrate ‘joined-up thinking’ and an ability to write in an entertaining manner that creates such an interest for the reader that they want to continue reading.

4. Punctuation

You will be expected to use all the correct punctuation marks in a piece of creative writing. The correct use of punctuation is required to make your writing clear and avoid confusion. Apart from the standard simple forms of punctuation you will already be familiar with, it is best to also demonstrate your knowledge and correct use of some of the less commonly used punctuation marks e.g. ellipses(…), brackets( ), colons(:), semi-colons(;), hyphens(–) and apostrophes(‘).

English Grammar follows rules and you will be expected to use them correctly in your writing. Speaking and writing use different accepted forms of grammar. It is therefore important that you do not write as you may speak or as you communicate in a text message. Your writing should use the word groups i.e. nouns, verbs, pronouns, adverbs, adjectives, connectives, prepositions and articles correctly and in the right order within your sentences. All sentences should be complete and make entire sense on their own, using the correct word endings as appropriate for the number of items and the correct form of the verb for the tense used. Use a variety of sentence structures, in addition to simple sentences, including compound and complex sentences to showcase your abilities.

6. Spellings

The use of correct spelling is essential in any form of writing. Some people are naturally good at spelling and others need to work at learning them. You will probably have been taught some spelling rules in English lessons, revise these and practise them however some awkward or irregular words just have to be learnt. Reading a lot will improve your spelling ability as will playing some word games e.g. Scrabble, Boggle and Hangman. Although a dictionary will not be allowed to be used in a test, make looking up spellings in a dictionary part of your 11+ preparation.

7. Vocabulary

An extensive and interesting vocabulary takes years to develop. Some tutors/parents like to use vocabulary lists LINK to extend a child’s vocabulary but the best method is to read numerous books and look out for new words that you can use in your writing. Keeping a word list of new words is useful and this can be added to when reading books, watching TV or out and about. When you are practising your writing skills use a thesaurus to improve and extend your vocabulary and make an effort to include lots of interesting adjectives and adverbs.

8. Structure

It is important to demonstrate that your writing has structure in the form of clearly demarcated paragraphs that organised by characters, topic and time. Ensure that you have a good opening paragraph, if this is not supplied, to draw the reader in and then a suitable closing paragraph to conclude your writing.

Checking your work

Always leave enough time at the end of your writing to check:

  • Punctuation
  • Consistent use of the same tense
  • Good vocabulary

You have to become your own spelling and grammar checker. Read through carefully with a critical eye and carefully, neatly correct any errors or omissions.

Can your handwriting be read?

There is no point in writing a stunning piece of work if the examiner cannot read it. Although your handwriting is not usually included in the creative writing mark/grade it will certainly influence decisions made about your work. Additionally, punctuation errors may be assumed if it is difficult to differentiate your capital letters from the lower-case letters.

It is never too late to improve, try using a different pen and practise writing at speed.

Practise your ideas

It is a good idea to have a few ‘stock’ essays and/or ideas already practised and prepared that you are able to use, altering as required, for the examination task. Creative writing for 11+/selective school exams tends to follow some fairly predictable themes and styles that can be practised in advance.

Try Chuckra’s  Writing Feedback Service for tailored guidance on how to improve.

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A Fussy Parent , a Tiger Mum , an Exocet Missile , a Give it a go Parent ...

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3 comments on “ How to prepare for Creative Writing ”

Thank you for this useful and informative post. Writing is an essential part of a college education. Having become accustomed to short essays and articles, you may be afraid of such responsible work – it is a long work based on facts. The time limit is another problem. You need help for student , consultations with your teacher to resolve issues.

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Creative Writing 101: Everything You Need to Get Started

Lindsay Kramer

Creative writing: You can take classes in it, you can earn a degree in it, but the only things you really need to do it are your creative thinking and writing tools. Creative writing is the act of putting your imagination on a page. It’s artistic expression in words; it’s writing without the constraints that come with other kinds of writing like persuasive or expository. 

Write with originality Grammarly helps you refine your word choice Write with Grammarly

What is creative writing?

Creative writing is writing meant to evoke emotion in a reader by communicating a theme. In storytelling (including literature, movies, graphic novels, creative nonfiction, and many video games), the theme is the central meaning the work communicates. 

Take the movie (and the novel upon which it’s based) Jaws , for instance. The story is about a shark that terrorizes a beach community and the men tasked with killing the shark. But the film’s themes include humanity’s desire to control nature, tradition vs. innovation, and how potential profit can drive people in power to make dangerous, even fatal, decisions. 

A theme isn’t the only factor that defines creative writing. Here are other components usually found in creative writing:

  • Connecting, or at least attempting to connect, with the reader’s emotions
  • Writing from a specific point of view
  • A narrative structure can be complex or simple and serves to shape how the reader interacts with the content.
  • Using imaginative and/or descriptive language

Creative writing typically uses literary devices like metaphors and foreshadowing to build a narrative and express the theme, but this isn’t a requirement. Neither is dialogue, though you’ll find it used in most works of fiction. Creative writing doesn’t have to be fictional, either. Dramatized presentations of true stories, memoirs, and observational humor pieces are all types of creative writing. 

What isn’t creative writing?

In contrast, research papers aren’t creative writing. Neither are analytical essays, persuasive essays , or other kinds of academic writing . Similarly, personal and professional communications aren’t considered creative writing—so your emails, social media posts, and official company statements are all firmly in the realm of non-creative writing. These kinds of writing convey messages, but they don’t express themes. Their goals are to inform and educate, and in some cases collect information from, readers. But even though they can evoke emotion in readers, that isn’t their primary goal. 

But what about things like blog posts? Or personal essays? These are broad categories, and specific pieces in these categories can be considered creative writing if they meet the criteria listed above. This blog post, for example, is not a piece of creative writing as it aims to inform, but a blog post that walks its reader through a first-person narrative of an event could be deemed creative writing. 

Types of creative writing

Creative writing comes in many forms. These are the most common:

Novels originated in the eighteenth century . Today, when people think of books, most think of novels. 

A novel is a fictional story that’s generally told in 60,000 to 100,000 words, though they can be as short as 40,000 words or go beyond 100,000. 

Stories that are too short to be novels, but can’t accurately be called short stories, are often referred to as novellas. Generally, a story between 10,000 and 40,000 words is considered a novella. You might also run into the term “ novelette ,” which is used to refer to stories that clock in between 7,500 and 19,000 words. 

Short stories

Short stories are fictional stories that fall generally between 5,000 and 10,000 words. Like novels, they tell complete stories and have at least one character, some sort of conflict, and at least one theme. 

When a story is less than 1,000 words, it’s categorized as a work of flash fiction.

Poetry can be hard to define because as a genre, it’s so open-ended. A poem doesn’t have to be any specific length. It doesn’t have to rhyme. There are many different kinds of poems from cultures all over the world, like sonnets, haikus, sestinas, blank verse, limericks, and free verse. 

The rules of poetry are generally flexible . . . unless you’re writing a specific type of poem, like a haiku , that has specific rules around the number of lines or structure. But while a poem isn’t required to conform to a specific length or formatting, or use perfect grammar , it does need to evoke its reader’s emotions, come from a specific point of view, and express a theme. 

And when you set a poem to music, you’ve got a song. 

Plays, TV scripts, and screenplays

Plays are meant to be performed on stage. Screenplays are meant to be made into films, and TV scripts are meant to be made into television programs. Scripts for videos produced for other platforms fit into this category as well. 

Plays, TV scripts, and screenplays have a lot in common with novels and short stories. They tell stories that evoke emotion and express themes. The difference is that they’re meant to be performed rather than read and as such, they tend to rely much more on dialogue because they don’t have the luxury of lengthy descriptive passages. But scriptwriters have more than just dialogue to work with; writing a play or script also involves writing stage or scene directions.

Each type of script has its own specific formatting requirements. 

Creative nonfiction

Creative nonfiction covers all the kinds of creative writing that aren’t fiction. Here are some examples:

  • Personal essays: A personal essay is a true story told through a narrative framework. Often, recollections of events are interspersed with insights about those events and your personal interpretations and feelings about them in this kind of essay. 
  • Literary journalism: Think of literary journalism as journalism enhanced by creative writing techniques. These are the kinds of stories often published in outlets like The New Yorker and Salon. Literary journalism pieces report on factual events but do so in a way that makes them feel like personal essays and short stories. 
  • Memoirs: Memoirs are to personal essays what novels are to short stories. In other words, a memoir is a book-length collection of personal memories, often centering around a specific story, that often works opinions, epiphanies, and emotional insights into the narrative. 
  • Autobiographies: An autobiography is a book you write about yourself and your life. Often, autobiographies highlight key events and may focus on one particular aspect of the author’s life, like her role as a tech innovator or his career as a professional athlete. Autobiographies are often similar in style to memoirs, but instead of being a collection of memories anchored to specific events, they tend to tell the author’s entire life story in a linear narrative. 
  • Humor writing: Humor writing comes in many forms, like standup comedy routines, political cartoons, and humorous essays. 
  • Lyric essays: In a lyric essay, the writer breaks conventional grammar and stylistic rules when writing about a concept, event, place, or feeling. In this way, lyric essays are like essay-length poems. The reason they’re considered essays, and not long poems, is that they generally provide more direct analysis of the subject matter than a poem would. 

Tips for writing creatively

Give yourself time and space for creative writing.

It’s hard to write a poem during your lunch break or work on your memoir between calls. Don’t make writing more difficult for yourself by trying to squeeze it into your day. Instead, block off time to focus solely on creative writing, ideally in a distraction-free environment like your bedroom or a coffee shop. 

>>Read More: How to Create Your Very Own Writing Retreat

Get to know yourself as a writer

The more you write, the more in tune you’ll become with your strengths and weaknesses as a writer. You’ll identify the kinds of characters, scenes, language, and pieces you like writing best and determine where you struggle the most. Understanding what kind of writer you are can help you decide which kinds of projects to pursue. 

Challenge yourself 

Once you know which kinds of writing you struggle with, do those kinds of writing. If you only focus on what you’re good at, you’ll never grow as a writer. Challenge yourself to write in a different genre or try a completely new type of writing. For example, if you’re a short story writer, give poetry or personal essays a try. 

Need help getting started? Give one (or all!) of these 20 fun writing prompts a try .

Learn from other writers

There are lots of resources out there about creative writing. Read and watch them. If there’s a particular writer whose work you enjoy, seek out interviews with them and personal essays they’ve written about their creative processes. 

>>Read More: How to Be a Master Storyteller—Tips from 5 Experts 

Don’t limit yourself to big-name writers, either. Get involved in online forums, social media groups, and if possible, in-person groups for creative writers. By doing this, you’re positioning yourself to learn from writers from all different walks of life . . . and help other writers, too. 

I wrote something. Where do I go from here?

Give yourself a pat on the back: You did it! You finished a piece of creative writing—something many attempt, but not quite as many achieve. 

What comes next is up to you. You can share it with your friends and family, but you don’t have to. You can post it online or bring it to an in-person writing group for constructive critique. You can even submit it to a literary journal or an agent to potentially have it published, but if you decide to take this route, we recommend working with an editor first to make it as polished as possible. 

Some writers are initially hesitant to share their work with others because they’re afraid their work will be stolen. Although this is a possibility, keep in mind that you automatically hold the copyright for any piece you write. If you’d like, you can apply for copyright protection to give yourself additional legal protection against plagiarizers, but this is by no means a requirement. 

Write with originality

Grammarly can’t help you be more creative, but we can help you hone your writing so your creativity shines as brightly as possible. Once you’ve written your piece, Grammarly can catch any mistakes you made and suggest strong word choices that accurately express your message. 

english creative writing 11

This covers 11 plus descriptive, story and letter writing for all schools / levels

Creative writing, list of 11 plus creative writing topics, story titles, story template, story plan example - things to include, example of a good story, example of a bad story, example of a good letter, example of a good description, bad description, 11+ creative writing questions from real exams—non-fiction prompts, checklists for creative writing.

Vishal

This article contains useful information that will help you to write good stories, description and letter in your 11 plus exam.

When it comes to developing creative writing topics and tasks, it's helpful to focus on core themes and emotions that often appear in stories. Here are some areas to consider when building your descriptions:

  • Animals - You can use literary devices like personification, exaggeration, and similes to bring your descriptions of pets or favorite animals to life, or even animals that frighten you.
  • Emotions and feelings - Many stories require descriptions of emotions like fear, joy, or the experience of being lost or alone. Titles like "My Brilliant Day" or "Lost!" and "Alone!" can provide a clear direction for your writing.
  • Enjoyable activities - Describing the activities you love, from mountaineering to gardening, is an opportunity to convey both the activity itself and the emotions it elicits.
  • The natural world - Whether it's hills, mountains, rivers, streams, or weather phenomena like lightning, rain, and sunshine, describing the natural world can add depth and richness to your writing.
  • The built environment - From houses and office blocks to cottages, castles, roads, bridges, churches, and sheds, it's useful to develop a vocabulary for describing the built environment.

Some examples of story titles are given below:

  • The Day Trip
  • The Broken Window
  • The Abandoned House
  • The Voice in the Darkness
  • Alone - Craft a story with the title "Alone," where you suddenly realize that you are on your own. Your story can be true or entirely made up. Ensure that it includes your thoughts and feelings, as well as what happened.
  • Visiting Relatives - Write a story, whether true or made up, about a visit you make to some of your relatives.
  • Cousin's Visit - Compose a letter to a cousin inviting them to stay with you. In the letter, try to interest them in some of the varied and unusual activities they can participate in.
  • Magical Moment - Describe a situation you've experienced that might be considered a "Magical Moment." Show what your thoughts and feelings were during that experience.
  • Animal Description - Provide a detailed description of an animal you know well. Be sure to include what it does, how it behaves, and what it looks like.
  • I prefer Winter to Spring
  • The door and what was behind it.
  • Ash on an old man’s sleeve.
  • The Prince of Darkness is a Gentleman.
  • Write a story that begins with the phrase – I had been waiting for such a long time for this to happen.
  • Write a description of someone you admire.  (You may choose someone you actually know, or someone you have never met.  Describe them and explain why you admire them).

It was a calm day as I ______

The sun was smiling in the ______________

I felt ______________ because ___________

After I ________, I _________

The ____ was like  a _________ because _______

There was an atmosphere of __________

Suddenly, _____________

My heart was filled with _________

Unless I ________, I would surely _________

Thankfully, ________

I managed to _______ because _______

After ________, I ______

I learned that ___________

In future I would be more careful of ________

Happily, I went off to ________

onomatopoeia

sense language

personification

parentheses

exclamation mark

check SPAG - spelling, punctuation and grammar

Write a story where a character goes into a shop and finds something unexpected

Rosie strolled happily into the pristine store; today was her birthday and her heart was bursting with expectation. It was time to receive the gift her parents had promised her: a new phone. The atmosphere in the store was bustling as the Saturday shoppers streamed in out of the sunshine.

As Rosie was browsing she noticed an odd looking man lingering near the back of the store. She didn’t pay him much attention but this discovery was soon to have devastating consequences. Rosie was gleefully talking to one of the staff members when caught a movement out of the corner of her eye….

“Everyone get down!” screamed the man, his face red with fury. “I want everyone’s phones and valuables on the floor. If you refuse you will regret it!’ Everyone scattered through the shop, tripping in panic. The man was a stealthy lion prowling among his prey. Rosie’s heart was filled with fear and horror - she would have to relinquish the phone she had just paid for. The cruelty of the situation twisted her stomach like a razor ripping into her flesh. The man had begun to grab the valuables in a dirty looking backpack and was about to confidently exit the store…..

Suddenly there was an explosion of movement outside the shop on the busy street. Fortunately, a local police car had been patrolling outside and the officers had caught a glimpse of the man’s odd behaviour. They had sprung into action! Grabbing the man boisterously, they took him to the floor and confiscated the precise valuables. Rosie breathed a sigh of relief - her phone was saved.

Eventually, order was restored as the sun smiled overhead. Shocked onlookers relayed the story to one another. Everyone graciously thanked the police for their brave intervention. Rosie now knew to expect the unexpected after her unpleasant discovery….

Write a story about a childhood experience 

The pensive sky was filled with rushing grey clouds, illuminated by the lights of the fun fair below. I stood wearily in the bitter cold, flanked by my shivering parents as we stood in the cramped queue.

Winter Wonderland was the highlight of the festive season; families and tourists flocked eagerly from all over London, sampling the seasonal delights and treats, marvelling at the whirling dervish of colours and excitement. This year, 1999, was bigger than ever – it seemed as if the fair was engulfing the whole of Hyde Park, growing onwards as if greedily consuming the whole city in celebration.

Finally, we crossed the threshold. The murmuring of the masses filled my ears like chanting. My nose was smothered with the sweet smells of candy floss and waffles. Drunken tourists stumbled blindly from bar to bar, eagerly gulping down glass after glass of beer and blood red mulled wine.

I tugged at my mother’s arm and pointed. Past the roller coasters and cafes the lake shone like an icy lance of steel, cutting cleanly through the park. Jubilant children rushed backwards and forwards, skimming over its surface like polished stones.

“Are you sure, dear?” enquired my mother. “The lake looks very cold. We wouldn’t want you to fall in or have an accident”. She frowned nervously but could see the resolute expression on my face; my mind was made up! Moments later I was in the queue, looking out over the vast tapestry of the lake, framed by trees and illuminated by the faint moon.

My breath fogged like steam around me as the lake attendant fixed my boots on. They sternly clamped my feet; all of a sudden my limbs became turgid lumps of rock, pulling me into the ground. My mother and father laughed at my fumbling.

“We’ll be watching dear. Try not to fall over!” said my father. He tried to smile but a hint of nervousness crept into his face. After all, I was being pushed out into the great unknown of the lake, with only my fellow skaters for company.

Once I was on the lake, my stiff limbs scampered with short, awkward steps. I briefly lost my balance, grasped at the empty air and then corrected myself. In a few moments I was gliding effortlessly through the darkness, faster and faster, the children around me brief shadows that flitted from side to side. As I flew through the night the chilled air stung my face but I couldn’t help grinning.

A noise distracted me. I was far from the shore now – the dark of the park and surrounding trees had swallowed me, the twinkling beacons of the fair were a distant memory. It sounded like a shout but it was muffled by the piercing wind. I could see the faint outline of two figures. Were they my mother and father? I couldn’t see in the gloom, but their faces wore an expression of panic, for the ice had begun to crack near the shore. Within a few moments all the skaters might be plunged hopelessly into the icy depths, with no hope of rescue. At this stage I knew nothing of the danger, and continued to loop and spin through the air.

It was only when I got closer to the shore that I heard another sound. This was definitely one of fear. A young blond child was crying, tears streaming down her red face. Her mother was hugging her and shouting violently at the members of staff. I now knew something was terribly wrong.

It was then that I heard the first sound, like a faint clicking or scratching. Then through the gloom, I could see a faint line growing beneath me, tracing its way between me and the shore. The ice was breaking! I had no time to think and so just reacted, making my way to the nearest section of shore, stumbling spasmodically. With relief I grasped the rough branches of the hedge and could see, through sweat drenched eyes, my parents rushing along the bank side.

“That was a lucky escape, son” gasped my father. A few more seconds and we might have lost you.

“You’re never going skating again!” screamed my mother.

We made our way solemnly back along the banks of the river, eyeing the contrite staff who were being questioned by security.

As the gloom darkened into thick night, I looked back on the pristine lake and marvelled on how lucky I was to escape with my life……….

The Accident 

I woke up. I walked down the road to get some food. I was tired.

I was hungry so I went to a Mcdonald’s. The queue was very very very big.

I didn’t want to wait so I went to the toilet. Inside the toilet it smelled very very bad. When I flushed the toilet the water came out and I was sucked into the toilet. I was being sucked into the toilet! I was sad.

A couple of hours later, someone heard me crying from in the sewer and helped me out. I smelled bad.

In future, I learned not to be flushed down the toilet.

Ealing High School

Uxbridge Road

23rd June 2012

Dear Head teacher,

I am writing this letter because I believe that more equipment is needed for the school gym. I hope you will consider my point of view. The most important items we need are running machines and a trampoline.

The first reason I believe this is because exercise makes a big difference to the way that people feel. 80% of students have said that exercise makes them happier and gives them more energy. Surely you can see why more equipment is a good idea?

The second reason I believe this is because lots of young people are overweight these days. For example, 1 in 4 young people in the UK are obese. This is a clearly a disgrace - getting more exercise at school would be an ideal way of tackling this problem.

It is true that some people disagree with me. They say that the new equipment will cost a lot of money, and that the school could use this money to buy more computers or books. However, this is not correct. If the students aren’t feeling happy and healthy then it doesn’t matter what other resources they have. They won’t be motivated to use them – that’s why the gym equipment is more important!

In conclusion, gym equipment is a priority for the school. I know that many other students feel the same. I hope that you will consider this letter when you look at the spending budget for the school.

Yours sincerely,

(Student name)

Carefully choosing their places among the sea of sunbathers, the new arrivals to the beach lay down their towels on the glistening sand as a red-faced toddler chants, "I want ice cream, I want ice cream!" as he passes the multicoloured van with his already exasperated mother.

Lounging on their luxurious houseboats, the wealthy residents of the marina gaze out to sea, watching the gentle waves move against weathered rocky outcrops.  On one of the larger houseboats, a family of five dine on a bronzed lobster talking happily to each other.

Scuttling along the sea-stained sand, crabs of all shapes and sizes frantically make their escape from determined rock poolers.

Wielding her flimsy pink net, a young girl of around five perches on a boulder, laughing joyously as she scatters shrimp and prawns alike. Staring happily at his collection of shells, a young boy laughs as the waves lap at his feet.

Ice cream in hand, his mother watches him lazily from under the cheap, colourful umbrella.  As if on a mission, a younger boy of around three digs at the sand, sweating as the sun beats down on him.

On a cliff, high above the beach, stands an aged man, grimacing at the inferior beings below.  Clad in a huge overcoat, heavy black boots and a scarf wrapped around his neck, the greying individual turns and begins his journey home. Carelessly floating on a pair of lilos, two teenagers talk ceaselessly - breaking out in laughter and falling off their bright pink lilos every so often.  The scent of hotdogs makes them hungry as they drag their lilos to the shore, intent on coercing their parents into

opening their wallets. Rain begins to fall on the beach, awakening sunbathers and scattering beach goers.   As people start to pack up and leave, the rain grows heavier, causing bikini-clad girls to scream and take cover under umbrellas and food stalls.  Engines roar in to life, and the beach is completely empty.

A busy airport 

Shops and cafes filled everywhere. People were very busy and noisy. I was hungry but didn’t know where to go. A woman was running around screaming, saying I want a burger!  Outside a plane roared by, like a fish. The toilets were full of people. In a cafe some children were playing football and annoying everyone. Outside the plane crashed - boom! The woman came to talk to me saying she was lost, but she still needed a burger. The day was hot and sticky. Lots of flashing lights lit up the departure gate like a christmas tree. There was the smell of smelly chickens and burning burgers.

  • Write a thank you letter for a present you didn’t want.
  • Write a thank you letter for a holiday you didn’t enjoy.
  • Describe a person who is important to you.
  • Describe your pet or an animal you know well.
  • Write a letter of complaint to the vet after an unfortunate incident in the waiting room.
  • Write a set of instructions explaining how to make toast.
  • You are about to interview someone for a job. Write a list of questions you would like to ask the applicant.
  • Write a letter to complain about the uniform at your school.
  • Write a leaflet to advertise your home town.
  • Describe the room you are in.

Checklist for story writing

  • SAMOSAP BBUPRE
  • make sure you answer the question

Checklist for letter writing 

  • Letter heading
  • complex sentences
  • ESCAPE Paragraphs
  • formal tone / language

Checklist for descriptive writing 

Checklist for continuing the story 

Did you like this article? Rate it!

Emma

I am passionate about travelling and currently live and work in Paris. I like to spend my time reading, gardening, running, learning languages and exploring new places.

AQA/WJEC GCSE Poetry

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11 Plus Creative Writing Help: How to Ace the Exam

  • May 23, 2021
  • Posted by: Tutor Rise
  • Category: 11 English 11 plus Creative Writing 11 Plus Preparation How to pass 11 Plus exam

The 11 Plus exams are meant to test children’s understanding of subjects, such as; Maths, English, Verbal Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning. In some 11 Plus English exam papers, children will be asked to complete a creative writing test – an important component that, unfortunately, many students fear.

At Tutor Rise , we are dedicated to helping your child succeed. In this article, we have prepared a comprehensive guide for your child to help them with their 11 Plus Creative Writing component.

11 Plus Creative Writing: Complete Guide

Creative writing for the 11 Plus Exam can last anywhere between 20 and 50 minutes. It may require you to either complete a continuous prose exercise (where you have to continue the start of a story) or write an original story from scratch. With either task, the goal is to examine your ability to plan and write in a structured and engaging way.

Below, you can find some tips that will help you to unleash your creativity and convey your writing abilities.

Free Your Imagination

Before you start to write (or even plan), take a little time to daydream and let your imagination do the work. If you can clearly see your story in your head, you will be able to describe it in a powerful way, with deep descriptions and engaging writing.

Create a Plan

Your next step is to create a simple plan. When you have a short time to write, there are two crucial things that will hold your story together: the main event and your central character. As such, your plan should include:

  • The main event
  • Your main character
  • Where and when the story is set
  • Getting there or how you will get to the main event
  • The ending or what will happen after the event

Choose One Main Event

For an 11 Plus Exam creative writing story, we recommend choosing a single main plot event – if there is too much happening, your descriptive skills may simply get lost. If there is a dramatic event, make sure to describe it powerfully and give a clear sense of the reactions of your characters.

Focus on a Single Main Character

Similarly, it is best to focus on only one core character. You likely won’t have enough time to make more than one person believable and interesting in a short thirty-minute exam. Therefore, make your main character stand out and only refer to others in passing.

Don’t Be Afraid to Skip the Intro

If you are writing a short story, it does not need the same introduction as a 300-page novel would. You do not have to give a full background on your character, and especially not in the beginning of the story.

Writing a full introduction will waste a paragraph, when you might only have enough time to write three or four five paragraphs in your entire story. Instead, you can mention any important information about your characters somewhere along the way.

Include a Little Dialogue

Including a dialogue in your exam story is an excellent way to showcase your punctuation knowledge and make your piece a little different. However, be careful not to turn your story into a script. Include a little dialogue for your 11 Plus creative writing test, but keep the main focus on your description of the characters, settings, and events.

Be Descriptive

Many creative stories have core themes or emotions embedded within them. To give you a better idea of what to expect, below are some common topics and tasks that have come up in 11 Plus writing exams:

  • You may be asked to write a story about your favourite animal, an animal you are afraid of, or your pet.
  • Activities you like. This is an opportunity to describe the activity itself, as well as how it makes you feel.
  • Emotions and feelings. Many times, stories include a requirement to describe a specific emotion like joy or fear that you have experienced in a certain situation.
  • The built environment. You may need to describe a build environment, such as office blocks or houses, castles or cottages, roads, churches, and more.
  • The natural world. Finally, another popular topic includes the description of the natural world. Think mountains and hills, streams and rivers, rain and sunshine.

To help you prepare, think about how you would describe any of these themes well before your exam. Show, not tell! Use a range of senses throughout your story and do not forget to include similes and metaphors where appropriate.

How is 11 Plus Creative Writing Evaluated?

Creative writing skills evaluated in the 11 Plus Creative Writing exercise include the following components:

  • Creativity and imagination. Some people are naturally creative, but do not be desperate if you are not. You can improve your imagination over time by reading a variety of books.
  • Effective planning. Never jump to writing right away. Creating a plan will help you organize your thoughts and give a structure to your story.
  • Correct use of English grammar . You will be expected to correctly apply the rules of grammar throughout your writing. All sentences should be complete and make sense, all word groups should be used correctly, and correct forms of verbs should be applied.
  • Correct use of punctuation. It is important to use all the correct punctuation marks in your writing piece. Review the standard simple forms of punctuation, along with less common punctuation marks like ellipses, brackets, hyphens, apostrophes, colons, and semicolons.
  • Correct spellings. Needless to say, correct spelling is essential in any type of writing. Review and practice spelling rules, as well as the spelling of irregular words.
  • An interesting and “fluent” writing style. Each person has an absolutely unique writing style. Aim to demonstrate your ability to write in an entertaining way that will keep your reader engaged.
  • A good structure of your text. Make sure to demonstrate that your text has structure with clear paragraphs that are organized by topic, characters, and time.
  • An interesting and extensive vocabulary. It may take years to develop an extensive vocabulary, but a proven method is to read numerous books and search for new words that you can use in your own writing.

Get Ready for 11 Plus Creative Writing Exam with Tutor Rise

Without a doubt, passing the 11 Plus Creative Writing aspect of the exam is no easy task. From use of advanced punctuation and grammar rules, to correct spelling and interesting vocabulary, there is a lot to keep in mind.

Fortunately, you and your child are not alone in this. At Tutor Rise , our 11 Plus Writing Course was created by 11 Plus exam specialists who have years of teaching experience. We are truly dedicated to using innovative strategies and tools to help your child progress quickly and truly excel in their exams and beyond.

Contact us today to learn more.

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Class 11 English Creative Writing Format, Examples, Topics, Exercises

Creative writing is an important skill that allows individuals to express their thoughts, emotions, and ideas in a unique and imaginative way. In the context of English studies for Class 11 students, creative writing plays a crucial role in developing language proficiency and fostering creativity. This article aims to provide a comprehensive guide to the format, examples, topics, and exercises related to Class 11 English creative writing.

Understanding Class 11 English Creative Writing:

Definition and Importance Creative writing can be defined as the art of using words to create original and engaging narratives, poems, or essays. It goes beyond the realm of factual or expository writing and encourages students to explore their imagination, thoughts, and emotions. By engaging in creative writing, students can develop their linguistic skills, critical thinking abilities, and self-expression.

Benefits of Creative Writing Creative writing offers numerous benefits to Class 11 students. Firstly, it helps them improve their language proficiency and vocabulary by encouraging them to experiment with different words, phrases, and literary devices. Secondly, it enhances their ability to think critically and develop coherent arguments through the construction of well-structured narratives or essays. Lastly, creative writing nurtures creativity and imagination, allowing students to express themselves in unique and innovative ways.

Also Read: Creative Writing Skills Class 10

Format Of Class 11 English Creative Writing:

To create a well-structured and coherent piece of creative writing, it is essential to follow a format that includes an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Introduction The introduction sets the tone and introduces the readers to the main ideas or themes that will be explored in the creative piece. It should capture the readers’ attention and provide a glimpse of what is to come.

Body The body of the creative writing piece contains the main narrative, events, or arguments. It develops the plot, introduces the characters, and explores the chosen theme. The body should be organized logically and flow smoothly from one idea to another.

Conclusion The conclusion provides a check to the creative piece. It wraps up the narrative, reflects on the main ideas or themes, and leaves the compendiums with a sense of satisfaction or reflection. A strong conclusion can leave a lasting print on the compendiums.

Examples Of Class 11 English Creative Writing:

Creative writing encompasses various forms and genres, including short stories, poetry, and personal essays.

Short Stories Short stories are concise narratives that focus on a specific event, character, or theme. They often have a clear plot structure and limited word count, making them an excellent medium for practicing storytelling skills.

Poetry Poetry allows for the expression of emotions, thoughts, and ideas in a condensed and rhythmic manner. It employs literary devices such as metaphors, similes, and imagery to evoke feelings and create vivid mental images.

Personal Essays Personal essays offer a platform for individuals to share their personal experiences, opinions, or reflections. They blend elements of storytelling with the author’s own insights and perspectives, creating a unique and engaging narrative.

Choosing Topics For Class 11 English Creative Writing:

Selecting the right topic is crucial for an engaging and successful creative writing piece.

Personal Experiences Drawing inspiration from personal experiences can add authenticity and emotional depth to the writing. Reflecting on significant moments, challenges, or achievements can provide rich material for creative exploration.

Observations Observing the world around you and paying attention to the details can lead to fascinating creative writing topics. Everyday encounters, nature, or interactions with others can serve as inspiration for unique narratives or poems.

Imaginary Scenarios Letting your imagination run wild and creating fictional scenarios can be an exciting way to generate creative writing ideas. Building new worlds, characters, or situations allows for unlimited creative possibilities.

Exercises To Improve Class 11 English Creative Writing:

To enhance their creative writing skills, Class 11 students can engage in various exercises and techniques.

Freewriting Freewriting involves writing continuously for a set amount of time without worrying about grammar, punctuation, or coherence. It helps unleash creativity, overcome self-censorship, and generate ideas.

Writing Prompts Writing prompts provide specific topics, scenarios, or sentences to stimulate creative thinking and writing. Students can use prompts to kickstart their imagination and explore different writing styles or genres.

Editing and Revising Editing and revising are essential steps in the creative writing process. Students should review their work, check for clarity and coherence, and make necessary improvements to refine their writing.

Conclusion On The Class 11 English Creative Writing:

Creative writing is an integral part of English studies for Class 11 students. It enables them to develop their language skills, express their thoughts and emotions, and cultivate creativity. By understanding the elements of creative writing, following a structured format, exploring different examples and topics, and engaging in exercises to improve their skills, students can enhance their creative writing abilities and create compelling narratives, poems, or essays.

english creative writing 11

Creative Writing

We pride ourselves on the detailed feedback we give to pupils on their creative writing papers. At school, teachers simply do not have the time to go over a pupil's work with such attention to detail. We receive very positive comments from parents and pupils as to how helpful our creative writing paper is. Our creative writing expert is Karen Francis.

She has an English degree, has worked in a school for twelve years, assisting pupils with their writing skills and has won a prize for a short story she has written. Karen has been marking our papers for seven years. Such experience means she is able to give very sound advice as to how a pupil can improve their writing skills. We approached Karen to see if she would be willing to offer a creative writing paper monthly. We feel that many pupils would benefit from this. Karen agreed and said: "I think it would be great for pupils to be able to practise their creative writing on a regular basis and get feedback each time. This would really focus a pupil on areas that can be improved upon." Therefore, at the beginning of each month we have set a creative writing task.

The cost will be £12 per paper, payable by cheque or electronically, which we believe is excellent value for money as each paper will receive extensive feedback.

You can use this service as a one-off, or regularly as a means to further creative writing experience and skills.

You may choose a title from any month to submit, and you are also welcome to submit a creative writing piece of your own.

Download the first creative writing task Creating Writing 1 .

Download the second creative writing task Creating Writing 2 .

Download the third creative writing task Creating Writing 3 .

Download the fourth creative writing task Creating Writing 4 .

Download the fifth creative writing task Creating Writing 5 .

Download the sixth creative writing task Creating Writing 6 .

Download the seventh creative writing task Creating Writing 7 .

Download an assortment of creative writing tasks for use at any time Creative Writing Assortment .

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  • CEM Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Independent School NVR
  • Preparation mistakes NVR
  • Exam mistakes NVR
  • Pressure and Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Year three NVR preparation
  • Year four NVR preparation
  • Year five NVR preparation
  • Classic Books Vocabulary
  • How Children Develop Vocabulary
  • Vocabulary Development Plan
  • 11 Plus Vocabulary Books and Reviews
  • 11 Plus Vocabulary Development
  • 11 Plus Vocabulary List
  • Commonly Misspelt Words – 11 Plus
  • Homophones for the 11 Plus
  • KS2 Statutory Spelling Words
  • When to double letters in spelling
  • 11 Plus Creative Writing – Example Topics and Tasks

11 Plus Creative Writing – Essay writing guidance

Helping children with creative writing.

Most tuition centres are not set up to help children effectively because they don’t have the time to mark a whole classroom of scripts and sometimes don’t employ staff who can mark work. Equally its very difficult for parents to know where to start as to a large degree the books that are available don’t deliver a step by step process.

For more information about the creative writing aspect of 11 Plus exams please continue reading. For more general information on 11 Plus exams, including the types of exam and their structures,  please follow this link . If you want more information about the English aspect of the 11 Plus please follow this link .

There are some core guidelines that will help children to improve

Practice and revision of work is very important. Whenever children write a piece they must then, a couple of days later, revisit it critically and think about how they could improve it. This process of self-criticism and correction allows children to naturally develop their skills. Their stories naturally become better first time out.

Creative writing books and resources for 11 Plus preparation

It is really difficult to find the right resources to help children at home. Our guidance below will help you to understand what you could focus but even then it is a difficult task. There are also very few books out there which attempt to do the job and even fewer that we would recommend.

Descriptosaurus- supporting creative writing ages 8-14

What areas of creative writing should children focus on?

The common areas where most children could improve are as follows:

1/ Spelling and punctuation – Getting the basics right is very important. Children should read through their work critically and correct errors. The better an impression they can make (few mistakes) the greater their scores will be. It is also the case that demonstrating their knowledge of punctuation also helps (e.g. Correct use of direct speech).

2/ Simplicity of plot –   Children often have a limited amount of time to write. Examiners do not expect them to come up with a complicated plot with numerous characters and lots of action- children who attempt this always fail. Simplicity is essential, children need to get used to the idea that a very simple plot with a limited amount of action and very few characters is the right way forward. They will then find they have something they can deliver properly in the time that they have.

3/ Descriptions, descriptions, descriptions – Having grasped the idea that simple plots with limited action work best children will then find that most marks can be gained by describing characters and action well. Children who think through a number of descriptions as a sort of descriptions bank often do very well in these test. They automatically have some good vocabulary or turns of phrase to describe people or situations or emotions or the environment and they can use these naturally as they tell their story.

4/ Using accurate language – Naturally as part of developing their descriptions children will think about interesting vocabulary and turns of phrase and also about using literary devices ( such as similes). Additionally though they should steer clear of obvious such as like or said or good- they will find more accurate vocabulary exists should they give it some thought.

5/ A sensible ending – Children sometimes fall foul of this by using endings such as ‘and then I woke up’ . Examiners will be marking lots of scripts and so this sort of ending will naturally attract poor marks. Children will find that if they develop a simple story and describe it well then they will have the time to naturally bring a story to its conclusion without needing to revert to odd endings.

A  final word – handwriting – With increasing screen time sometimes children lack well developed handwriting skills. Children either write illegibly or cannot write quickly enough to get a story out in the time available. There’s no easy way to resolve this other than practice. If children are writing practice stories and revising them then they will find this allows them to naturally develop their handwriting.

11 Plus Creative writing example topics and tasks

Tasks vary by area. In Essex for instance currently they ask for circa ten sentences on two topics. One tends to be more factual, the other more descriptive. Other areas like Kent or schools like St Olaves or Henrietta Barnet ask for more extensive writing- while tasks can change year to year this could be a creative writing task lasting 40 minutes.

Whatever the task or length children will benefit from focussing on the six areas (above) that we have identified above.

We have developed a list of sample creative writing topics and tasks which you could you to start writing at home.

11 Plus areas asking for creative writing, essays or extended writing

Kent – set a  40 minute creative writing task for all pupils but it is only marked where they need to decide on the last few students to take.

Kent Medway  – As Kent, 40 minute creative writing task but only marked in a few cases.

Essex (all schools apart from Chelmsford county high school for girls)  – 2 Extended writing tasks. One factual – how to make toast as an example and one more creative  such as describe your pet or your favourite animal. They ask for a few sentences on each.

Devon –  The following schools ask for creative writing as part of their 11 Plus test- Colyton, Torquay Boys, Torquay Girls, Churston Ferrers, Devonport Girls

Surrey –  Tiffin Boys and Girls schools, Wilsons and Sutton Grammar school, Nonsuch and Wallington schools

St Olaves School

Henrietta Barnet School

Trafford  – Altrincham Grammar School for boys

Wirral – St Anselm’s College

Yorkshire – Crossley Heath and North Halifax School

To review the books that we suggest you use during your preparation, then try some of these links:

  • CEM 11+ Verbal Reasoning Resources and Preparation
  • CEM 11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning Resources and Preparation
  • CEM 11+ Numerical Reasoning Resources and Preparation
  • 11+ English Resources and Preparation
  • 11+ Maths Resources and Preparation
  • 11+ Verbal Reasoning Resources and Preparation
  • 11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning Resources and Preparation

Recommended

11 Plus Books and Papers

Forum Feature

The 11 plus forum - answers to common questions about the 11 plus exam, favourites links, independent school past papers.

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11 Plus Exam Format by Region

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The questions asked in an 11+  English exam paper vary depending on the school, area, or exam board that has prepared the test. As a general guide, the 11+ English exam typically covers subjects from the KS2 English syllabus, including subjects taught at the beginning of Year 6.

Practice 11+ English past papers within the prescribed time. Concentrate on 11+ reading comprehension by revising the past papers of the schools you are applying to. Read challenging books to improve vocabulary and literacy skills.

English online subscriptions are “ Non-Refundable “.  No refunds  can be issued for any reason. This is because of the nature of digital products.

You should, therefore, make sure that the English online subscriptions fulfil your needs before you subscribe.

As these are digital products, we advise parents to go through our Free Past Papers provided on our website and once decided they can buy subscriptions.

11+ Sample Paper with comprehension and creative writing answers

11+ English exams are extremely competitive. Top Grammar schools like Henrietta Barnett School can receive up to 30 applications for each available slot. We recommend you start preparing for the 11+ English exam at least one year in advance. You can follow a structured preparation plan using the 11+ English exam planner . With regular practice of 11+ English past papers , you will pass the exam with a high score.

The school you want to attend will determine what constitutes a "good" score. The national average in 11 Plus test scores, which are standardized, is approximately 100. Some regions' averages can reach a maximum of 111. The lowest scores would be in the range of 60 to 70, and the best scores would typically be in the range of 130 to 140. You can practice  11+ English past papers to get high scores in 11+ English exams.

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english creative writing 11

Free 11+ English Practice Papers

A complete list of 11 plus english practice papers.

Below is the most complete and up-to-date list of all free 11 Plus English practice papers available on the internet. All of these 11+ English practice papers are in pdf format and we have provided the answers where possible.

Click here to access our FREE 11+ English Comprehension Mock Test designed for Year 5 students preparing for 11+ Grammar & Independent School exams.

*Bookmark this page for future reference*

Table of Contents

11 plus english practice papers - private/independent school.

Aldenham School

  • Aldenham School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Aldenham School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • Aldenham School 11 Plus English Paper 2020
  • Aldenham School 11 Plus English Paper 2022
  • Aldenham School 11 Plus English Paper 2023
  • Alleyns 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Alleyns 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2

Bancroft’s School

  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2016
  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2017
  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Writing Task 1 2022
  • Bancroft’s School 11 Plus English Writing Task 2 2022

Bishop Challoner School

  • Bishop Challoner School 11 Plus English Sample Paper

Chigwell School

  • Chigwell School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2019

City of London Freemans

  • City of London Freemans 11 Plus English Sample Paper

City of London School

  • City of London School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2018
  • City of London School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper
  • City of London School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper Group 2

City of London School for Girls

  • City of London School for Girls 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2010
  • City of London School for Girls 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2021

Colfe’s School

  • Colfe’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Colfe’s School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2

Dulwich College

  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper A
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper B
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper C
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper A 2023
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper A 2023 – Mark Scheme
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper B 2023
  • Dulwich College 11 Plus English Specimen Paper C 2023

Eltham College

  • Eltham College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2020
  • Eltham College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2023

Emmanuel School

  • Emmanuel School 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Emmanuel School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Emmanuel School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • Emmanuel School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 3
  • Emmanuel School 11 Plus English Paper 2022

Forest School

  • Forest School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2020

Haberdashers’ Boys’ School

  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2009
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2014 – Source
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2016
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2017
  • Haberdashers’ Boys’ School 11 Plus English Paper 2017 – Source

Hampton Court House

  • Hampton Court House 11 Plus English Sample Paper

Highgate School

  • Highgate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper A
  • Highgate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper B
  • Highgate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper C
  • Highgate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper D
  • Highgate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper D – Mark Scheme

James Allen’s Girls’ School

  • James Allen’s Girls’ School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 

Kent College

  • Kent College 11 Plus English Sample Paper
  • Kent College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2009

King’s College Wimbledon

  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Paper Reading Paper 2015
  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Writing Paper 2015
  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Paper Section A 2017 (2019)
  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Paper Section B 2017 (2019)
  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Paper Section C 2017 (2019)
  • King’s College School Wimbledon 11 Plus English Paper Section A 2023 (2025)

Latymer School

  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 1 – Question Booklet 
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 1 – Extract
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 1 – Mark Scheme 
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2 – Question Booklet 
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2 – Extract 
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2 – Mark Scheme 
  • Latymer School 11 Plus English Creative Writing Mark Scheme

Magdalen College School

  • Magdalen College School 11 Plus English Paper

Manchester Grammar School

  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2010 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2011
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2011 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2011 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2011 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2012
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2012 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2012 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2012 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2013
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 1 2013 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2013 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2013 – Map
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2 2013 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2014
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2014 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2014 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2014 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2016
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2016 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2016 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2016 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2017
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper A 2017 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2017 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper B 2017 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section A 2018
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section A 2018 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section B 2018 – Passage
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section B 2018 – Question Booklet
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Section A 2019
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Section A 2019 – Mark Scheme
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section B 2019 – Passage 
  • Manchester Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper Section B 2019 – Question Booklet

Merchant Taylors School

  • Merchant Taylors School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2010
  • Merchant Taylors School 11 Plus English Practice Paper 

North London Collegiate School

  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2008
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2009
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2013
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Paper 2015
  • North London Collegiate School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 

Oundle School

  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2013
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2016
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2017
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2018
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2019
  • Oundle School 11 Plus English Paper 2020

Randor House School

  • Randor House School 11 Plus English Paper

Reigate Grammar School

  • Reigate Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Reigate Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2019
  • Reigate Grammar School 11 Plus English Paper 2022

Sevenoaks School

  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2013
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2015
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2016
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2017
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2018
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2019
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2020
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2021
  • Sevenoaks 11 Plus English Paper 2022

Shebbear College

  • Shebbear College 11 Plus English Paper

Solihull School

  • Solihull School 11 Plus English Paper

St Albans School

  • St Albans School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2016
  • St Albans School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2017

St Augustine’s Priory

  • St Augustine’s Priory 11 Plus English Paper 2016

St Francis’ College

  • St Francis’ College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 
  • St Francis’ College 11 Plus English Sample Paper – Mark Scheme

St Georges College Weybridge

  • St George’s College Weybridge 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • St George’s College Weybridge 11 Plus English Specimen Paper
  • St Mary’s School Cambridge 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2018

St Paul’s Girls’ School

  • St Paul’s Girls’ 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • St Paul’s Girls’ 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • St Paul’s Girls’ 11 Plus English Comprehension Paper
  • St Paul’s Girls’ 11 Plus English Paper 2016

Streatham and Clapham High

  • Streatham and Clapham High School 11 Plus English Paper 2020
  • Streatham and Clapham High School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper

Sydenham High School

  • Sydenham High School 11 Plus English Sample Paper

The King’s School Chester

  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Specimen Paper
  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Paper – Extract
  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Paper – Question Booklet
  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2019
  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Paper 2019 – Extract
  • The Kings School Chester 11 Plus English Paper 2019 – Writing Section
  • The Kingsley School 11 Plus English Paper
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 1
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 2
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 3
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 4
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 5
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Specimen Paper 6
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1 2022
  • The Perse Upper School 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2 2022

Trinity School Croydon

  • Trinity School 11 Plus English Sample Paper

Warwick School

  • Warwick School 11 Plus English Sample Paper

11 Plus English Practice Papers - Grammar School

Crossley Heath & Halifax Grammar Schools

  • Crossley Heath & Halifax Grammar Schools 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • Crossley Heath & Halifax Grammar Schools 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • Crossley Heath & Halifax Grammar Schools 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2016
  • Crossley Heath & Halifax Grammar Schools 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2017

Dame Alice Owens School

  • Dame Alice Owens School 11 Plus English Familiarisation Paper 1
  • Dame Alice Owens School 11 Plus English Familiarisation Paper 2
  • Dame Alice Owens School 11 Plus English Familiarisation Paper 2 – Mark Scheme

St Anselm’s College

  • St Anselm’s College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1
  • St Anselm’s College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 2
  • St Anselm’s College 11 Plus English Sample Paper 1 2021

11 Plus English Practice Papers - Exam Boards

  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing Familiarisation
  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing Familiarisation – Mark Scheme
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2015
  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing 2015
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2015 – Mark Scheme
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2016
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2016 – Mark Scheme
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2017
  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing 2017
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2017 – Mark Scheme
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2018
  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing 2018
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2018 – Mark Scheme
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2019
  • CSSE 11+ English Continuous Writing 2019
  • CSSE 11+ English Paper 2019 – Mark Scheme
  • GL 11+ English Paper 1
  • GL 11+ English Paper 1 – Mark Scheme
  • GL 11+ English Paper 2
  • GL 11+ English Paper 2 – Mark Scheme

North London Girls’ Schools Consortium Group 1 & 2 (Now ‘The London 11+ Consortium’)

  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2008
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2009
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2013
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2015
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Paper 2016
  • Group 1 11 Plus English Sample Paper
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2008
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2009
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2010
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2011
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2012
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2013
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2014
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2015
  • Group 2 11 Plus English Paper 2016

SET (Sutton Selective Eligibility Test)

  • SET 11 Plus English Paper

11 Plus English Practice Papers - Publishers

  • Bond 11+ English Sample Paper
  • Bond 11+ Enlgish Sample – Mark Scheme
  • Bond 11+ English Sample Paper 2
  • CGP 11+ English Sample Paper
  • CGP 11+ English Sample Paper – Mark Scheme

IMAGES

  1. 11+ English Creative Writing Skills Guide

    english creative writing 11

  2. English Year 11 Creative Writing

    english creative writing 11

  3. Creative Writing Short Story

    english creative writing 11

  4. 🔥 How to creative writing examples. 27 Creative Writing Examples. 2022

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  5. Creative Writing Year 11

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  6. 11+plus English Creative Writing Task Book

    english creative writing 11

VIDEO

  1. English Creative Writing Phrases to Use #study #student #revishaan #english #shorts #gcse #alevel

  2. English writing course lesson# 13

  3. English writing course lesson# 14

  4. English With Creative Writing BA(Hons)

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  6. Creative Writing

COMMENTS

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    The real aim of the 11+ creative writing task is to showcase your child's writing skills and techniques. And that's why preparation is so important. This guide begins by answering all the FAQs that parents have about the 11+ creative writing task.

  2. How To Prepare For 11 Plus (11+) Creative Writing

    How To Prepare For 11 Plus (11+) Creative Writing — A Complete Guide | The Exam Coach Sign In Home 11 Plus Online Tuition 11 Plus Schedule Bookings and Resources Free 11 Plus Practice Papers and Answers English Vocabulary Podcast Episodes 1-10 Episodes 11-20 Episodes 21-30 Episodes 31-40 Episodes 41-50 Episodes 51-60 Episodes 61-70 Episodes 71-80

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    The creative writing materials offered by 11 Plus Lifeline teach students to use all the techniques explained on this page. Every writing paper has full example answers, as well as detailed step-by-step discussions, marking guidelines and story-planning advice.

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    11 plus applicants may need to complete a creative writing task as part of the exam. The task could be to write an original short story or continue a story from a given text. The main 11 plus exam boards ( GL Assessment and the Independent Schools Examinations Board (ISEB)) do not include creative writing tasks in their tests.

  5. 11 Plus (11+) Creative and Persuasive Writing: Student Model Answers

    Free 11 Plus Practice Papers and Answers English Vocabulary Podcast Episodes 1-10 Episodes 11-20 Episodes 21-30 Episodes 31-40 Episodes 41-50 Episodes 51-60 Episodes 61-70 Episodes 71-80 Episodes 81-90 Episodes 91-100 Episodes 101-110 Episodes 111-120 Episodes 121-130 Episodes 131-140 Episodes 141-150 Episodes 151-160 Episodes 161-170

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    Download PDF Check Answer English Creative Writing Paper 2: Descriptive creative writing - continuing a story on a given line Download PDF Check Answer English Creative Writing Paper 3: Persuasive writing - charity appeal Download PDF Check Answer English Creative Writing Paper 4: Persuasive writing - book review Download PDF Check Answer

  7. 11 Plus Creative Writing Tips & Examples

    The 11 Plus creative writing exam assesses a child's ability to compose structured and engaging pieces of written work. It's designed to evaluate a student's fluency, imaginative capabilities, grammar, punctuation and overall ability to write creatively. What does the 11 Plus creative writing exam include?

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    the basics of what the 11+ creative writing test is; what may come up in the creative writing for 11 plus exams; how to revise for the 11 plus creative writing, including how PiAcademy can help; tips and tricks to help your child ace the exam in the moment; and guidance as to how you may tutor your child in creative writing yourself.

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    11 PLUS CREATIVE WRITING (ENGLISH) - STARTING A STORYEasy 11 Plus is LIVE every Tuesday at 6pm. Please like this video and subscribe (and click the bell)!Thi...

  10. How to prepare for Creative Writing

    Creative writing for the 11+ may require you to write either an original story or complete a continuous prose exercise in the same style of writing (when you are given the start of a story/piece of writing and you continue it). Both types of task will examine your ability to plan, create and then write in a structured manner.

  11. 11 Plus Creative Writing Topics

    Their book, Creative Writing Skills, has sold over 4,000 copies and has been a Number One Best Seller on Amazon. It is suitable for children aged 7-14. The questions your child might be asked in an 11 plus creative writing assessment are endless, but here is a list which you could use to guide and inspire your child's practice.

  12. Creative Writing 101: Everything You Need to Get Started

    Creative writing is writing meant to evoke emotion in a reader by communicating a theme. In storytelling (including literature, movies, graphic novels, creative nonfiction, and many video games), the theme is the central meaning the work communicates. Take the movie (and the novel upon which it's based) Jaws, for instance.

  13. 11 Plus Creative Writing

    11 Plus creative writing example topics list The following topics and tasks have come up in either in grammar school or independent school 11 plus writing tests: Core themes for creative writing topics and tasks: Many stories have core themes or emotions or feelings within them.

  14. PDF Area of Learning: ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Grade 11 CREATIVE WRITING 11 (4

    Creative Writing 11 is grounded in the exploration and application of writing processes, inviting students to express themselves creatively as they reflect on, adjust, and extend their writing skills. The following are possible areas of focus within Creative Writing 11:

  15. Creative writing 11 plus

    List of 11 Plus Creative Writing Topics. When it comes to developing creative writing topics and tasks, it's helpful to focus on core themes and emotions that often appear in stories. Here are some areas to consider when building your descriptions: Animals - You can use literary devices like personification, exaggeration, and similes to bring ...

  16. 11 Plus Creative Writing Help: How to Ace the Exam

    The 11 Plus exams are meant to test children's understanding of subjects, such as; Maths, English, Verbal Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning. In some 11 Plus English exam papers, children will be asked to complete a creative writing test - an important component that, unfortunately, many students fear. At Tutor Rise, we are dedicated to ...

  17. Class 11 English Creative Writing Format, Examples, Topics, Exercises

    Examples Of Class 11 English Creative Writing: Creative writing encompasses various forms and genres, including short stories, poetry, and personal essays. Short Stories Short stories are concise narratives that focus on a specific event, character, or theme.

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    Please visit Kent Mock Tests for further information. 11+ Mock Tests in Sutton NEW! Our latest 2022 papers are available for purchase here, for the small price of £2 each. Creative Writing We pride ourselves on the detailed feedback we give to pupils on their creative writing papers.

  19. Creative Writing Examples (20 Types for You to Try)

    Short stories range between 1,000 and 10,000 words, and like novels, they appear in a variety of genres. "Passing Ghosts" by Hannah Lee Kidder (from her collection Starlight) "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gillman. "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allen Poe.

  20. CBSE Class 11: English- Creative Writing Skills and Grammar

    Creative writing is a type of writing in which imagination, originality, and innovation are used to tell stories with graphical quality. It creates an emotional impact on readers. Examples of creative writing include- poetry writing, short story writing, novel writing, and more.

  21. 11 Plus Creative Writing

    1/ Spelling and punctuation - Getting the basics right is very important. Children should read through their work critically and correct errors. The better an impression they can make (few mistakes) the greater their scores will be. It is also the case that demonstrating their knowledge of punctuation also helps (e.g. Correct use of direct speech).

  22. 11 Plus (11+) English Past Papers With Detailed Answers

    The national average in 11 Plus test scores, which are standardized, is approximately 100. Some regions' averages can reach a maximum of 111. The lowest scores would be in the range of 60 to 70, and the best scores would typically be in the range of 130 to 140. You can practice 11+ English past papers to get high scores in 11+ English exams.

  23. Free 11 Plus (11+) English Practice Papers

    Below is the most complete and up-to-date list of all free 11 Plus English practice papers available on the internet. All of these 11+ English practice papers are in pdf format and we have provided the answers where possible.