• How it works

How to Cite a Dissertation in Harvard Style

Published by Alaxendra Bets at August 27th, 2021 , Revised On September 25, 2023

What is a Dissertation?

In the UK, countries of Western Europe, as well as New Zealand and Australia, the term ‘ dissertation ’ is used instead of a ‘thesis.’ The majority of the remaining countries in the world prefer to use ‘thesis’ instead of ‘dissertation.’

Both represent the same thing, though: a full-length, academic piece of writing that students must submit after their undergraduate, post-graduate (Master), or PhD studies.

More specifically, a dissertation can refer to:

  • Large-scale research as part of a degree.
  • An article based on a small-scale study as part of a degree.
  • A review of another study, research or an accumulation of both.
  • Other full-length body texts are a requirement of the student’s degree program, no matter which level it is.

1.    Basic Format

In Harvard, the following in-text citation format is used for the dissertation:

(Author Surname, Year Published)

For example, ‘Occasionally the talent for drawing passes beyond mere picture-copying and shows the presence of a real artistic capacity of no mean order. (Darius, 2014)’

In Harvard, the following reference list entry format is used for the dissertation:

Author Surname, Author Initials. (Year Published). Title of the dissertation in italics. Level. Institution Name.

For example, reference list entry for the above source would be:

Darius, H. (2014). Running head: SAVANT SYNDROME – THEORIES AND EMPIRICAL FINDINGS . University of Skövde, University of Turku.

However, a slightly different format is also used in some institutions. According to that, in-text citations are done in the following way:

Author surname Year, p.#

For instance, Exelby (1997, p. 3) described the process … OR … processing gold (Exelby 1997, p. 3).

But in the case of reference list entries, these ‘other’ institutions recommend naming the dissertation title not in italics but in single quotation marks. The format would then be:

Author Surname, Initials Year of Publication, ‘Title of thesis in single quotation marks’, Award, Institution issuing degree, Location of the institution.

So, according to this format, the above example’s reference list entry would be:

Exelby, HRA 1997, ‘Aspects of Gold and Mineral Liberation’, PhD thesis, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld.

Whichever format is followed largely depends on one’s institutional guidelines. The format specified by the university is the one that should be followed. Furthermore, it should be followed consistently throughout a manuscript.

2.    Citing a Dissertation Published Online

The format for both in-text and reference list entries is the same for online and print dissertations. For example:

  • In-text citation: (Ram 2012) OR (Ram 2011, p. 130)
  • Reference list entry: Ram, R 2012, ‘Development of the International Financial Reporting Standard for Small and Medium-sized Entities’, PhD thesis, The University of Sydney, viewed 23 May 2014, <http://hdl.handle.net/2123/8208>.

An important point to note: While referencing dissertations published online, the URL may or may not be enclosed within < > symbols. Whichever format is chosen, it should be used consistently throughout the text.

3.    Citing an Unpublished Dissertation

This type of dissertation also uses the same formatting for in-text and reference list entries in Harvard style. For example:

  • In-text citation: (Sakunasingha 2006) OR (Sakunasingha 2006, p. 36)
  • Reference list entry: Sakunasingha, B 2006, ‘An empirical study into factors influencing the use of value-based management tools’, DBA thesis, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Hire an Expert Writer

Orders completed by our expert writers are

  • Formally drafted in an academic style
  • Free Amendments and 100% Plagiarism Free – or your money back!
  • 100% Confidential and Timely Delivery!
  • Free anti-plagiarism report
  • Appreciated by thousands of clients. Check client reviews

Hire an Expert Writer

Frequently Asked Questions

How do i cite my dissertation.

To cite your dissertation, follow your chosen citation style (e.g., APA, MLA). Generally, include author name, year, title, and source details. For APA: Author. (Year). Title. Source. For MLA: Author. “Title.” Degree, University, Year.

You May Also Like

Citing Journals may vary slightly in style, depending on the style used by the journal.

To cite a government website or report in a Harvard style, the basic format will be discussed in this guide

Sometimes citing the Movie, Television and Radio Programs in Harvard Style is very tricky. Here is the easiest guide to do so

USEFUL LINKS

LEARNING RESOURCES

DMCA.com Protection Status

COMPANY DETAILS

Research-Prospect-Writing-Service

  • How It Works

Dissertation zitieren

Wissenschaftliche dissertation als quelle nutzen, unveröffentlichte dissertation.

Meier, Wolf: Korrektes Zitieren in Abschlussarbeiten. Zitierweisen für akademische Arbeiten, unv. Diss., Fachhochschule XXX, 2021.

Gedruckte Dissertation

Meier, Wolf: Korrektes Zitieren in Abschlussarbeiten. Zitierweisen für akademische Arbeiten. Fachhochschulstudien XVII, Stuttgart, 2021.

Zitierwürdigkeit einer Dissertation

Dissertation im text zitieren , dissertation im literaturverzeichnis .

  • Autor mit Nach- und Vornamen
  • Titel und Untertitel der Dissertation
  • Art der Dissertation und Studienfach
  • Verlag oder Hochschule, Erscheinungsjahr und Erscheinungsort

Dissertation im Literaturverzeichnis richtig angeben

Häufig gestellte fragen, kann ich für meine facharbeit auch aus einer dissertation zitieren, was mache ich, wenn ich wichtige informationen aus einer unveröffentlichten doktorarbeit verwenden will, müssen dissertationen grundsätzlich gedruckt werden.

author image

  • Formatting Your Dissertation
  • Introduction

Harvard Griffin GSAS strives to provide students with timely, accurate, and clear information. If you need help understanding a specific policy, please contact the office that administers that policy.

  • Application for Degree
  • Credit for Completed Graduate Work
  • Ad Hoc Degree Programs
  • Acknowledging the Work of Others
  • Advanced Planning
  • Dissertation Submission Checklist
  • Publishing Options
  • Submitting Your Dissertation
  • English Language Proficiency
  • PhD Program Requirements
  • Secondary Fields
  • Year of Graduate Study (G-Year)
  • Master's Degrees
  • Grade and Examination Requirements
  • Conduct and Safety
  • Financial Aid
  • Registration

On this page:

Language of the Dissertation

Page and text requirements, body of text, tables, figures, and captions, dissertation acceptance certificate, copyright statement.

  • Table of Contents

Front and Back Matter

Supplemental material, dissertations comprising previously published works, top ten formatting errors, further questions.

  • Related Contacts and Forms

When preparing the dissertation for submission, students must follow strict formatting requirements. Any deviation from these requirements may lead to rejection of the dissertation and delay in the conferral of the degree.

The language of the dissertation is ordinarily English, although some departments whose subject matter involves foreign languages may accept a dissertation written in a language other than English.

Most dissertations are 100 to 300 pages in length. All dissertations should be divided into appropriate sections, and long dissertations may need chapters, main divisions, and subdivisions.

  • 8½ x 11 inches, unless a musical score is included
  • At least 1 inch for all margins
  • Body of text: double spacing
  • Block quotations, footnotes, and bibliographies: single spacing within each entry but double spacing between each entry
  • Table of contents, list of tables, list of figures or illustrations, and lengthy tables: single spacing may be used

Fonts and Point Size

Use 10-12 point size. Fonts must be embedded in the PDF file to ensure all characters display correctly. 

Recommended Fonts

If you are unsure whether your chosen font will display correctly, use one of the following fonts: 

If fonts are not embedded, non-English characters may not appear as intended. Fonts embedded improperly will be published to DASH as-is. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that fonts are embedded properly prior to submission. 

Instructions for Embedding Fonts

To embed your fonts in recent versions of Word, follow these instructions from Microsoft:

  • Click the File tab and then click Options .
  • In the left column, select the Save tab.
  • Clear the Do not embed common system fonts check box.

For reference, below are some instructions from ProQuest UMI for embedding fonts in older file formats:

To embed your fonts in Microsoft Word 2010:

  • In the File pull-down menu click on Options .
  • Choose Save on the left sidebar.
  • Check the box next to Embed fonts in the file.
  • Click the OK button.
  • Save the document.

Note that when saving as a PDF, make sure to go to “more options” and save as “PDF/A compliant”

To embed your fonts in Microsoft Word 2007:

  • Click the circular Office button in the upper left corner of Microsoft Word.
  • A new window will display. In the bottom right corner select Word Options . 
  • Choose Save from the left sidebar.

Using Microsoft Word on a Mac:

Microsoft Word 2008 on a Mac OS X computer will automatically embed your fonts while converting your document to a PDF file.

If you are converting to PDF using Acrobat Professional (instructions courtesy of the Graduate Thesis Office at Iowa State University):  

  • Open your document in Microsoft Word. 
  • Click on the Adobe PDF tab at the top. Select "Change Conversion Settings." 
  • Click on Advanced Settings. 
  • Click on the Fonts folder on the left side of the new window. In the lower box on the right, delete any fonts that appear in the "Never Embed" box. Then click "OK." 
  • If prompted to save these new settings, save them as "Embed all fonts." 
  • Now the Change Conversion Settings window should show "embed all fonts" in the Conversion Settings drop-down list and it should be selected. Click "OK" again. 
  • Click on the Adobe PDF link at the top again. This time select Convert to Adobe PDF. Depending on the size of your document and the speed of your computer, this process can take 1-15 minutes. 
  • After your document is converted, select the "File" tab at the top of the page. Then select "Document Properties." 
  • Click on the "Fonts" tab. Carefully check all of your fonts. They should all show "(Embedded Subset)" after the font name. 
  •  If you see "(Embedded Subset)" after all fonts, you have succeeded.

The font used in the body of the text must also be used in headers, page numbers, and footnotes. Exceptions are made only for tables and figures created with different software and inserted into the document.

Tables and figures must be placed as close as possible to their first mention in the text. They may be placed on a page with no text above or below, or they may be placed directly into the text. If a table or a figure is alone on a page (with no narrative), it should be centered within the margins on the page. Tables may take up more than one page as long as they obey all rules about margins. Tables and figures referred to in the text may not be placed at the end of the chapter or at the end of the dissertation.

  • Given the standards of the discipline, dissertations in the Department of History of Art and Architecture and the Department of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning often place illustrations at the end of the dissertation.

Figure and table numbering must be continuous throughout the dissertation or by chapter (e.g., 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, etc.). Two figures or tables cannot be designated with the same number. If you have repeating images that you need to cite more than once, label them with their number and A, B, etc. 

Headings should be placed at the top of tables. While no specific rules for the format of table headings and figure captions are required, a consistent format must be used throughout the dissertation (contact your department for style manuals appropriate to the field).

Captions should appear at the bottom of any figures. If the figure takes up the entire page, the caption should be placed alone on the preceding page, centered vertically and horizontally within the margins.

Each page receives a separate page number. When a figure or table title is on a preceding page, the second and subsequent pages of the figure or table should say, for example, “Figure 5 (Continued).” In such an instance, the list of figures or tables will list the page number containing the title. The word “figure” should be written in full (not abbreviated), and the “F” should be capitalized (e.g., Figure 5). In instances where the caption continues on a second page, the “(Continued)” notation should appear on the second and any subsequent page. The figure/table and the caption are viewed as one entity and the numbering should show correlation between all pages. Each page must include a header.

Landscape orientation figures and tables must be positioned correctly and bound at the top so that the top of the figure or table will be at the left margin. Figure and table headings/captions are placed with the same orientation as the figure or table when on the same page. When on a separate page, headings/captions are always placed in portrait orientation, regardless of the orientation of the figure or table. Page numbers are always placed as if the figure were vertical on the page.

If a graphic artist does the figures, Harvard Griffin GSAS will accept lettering done by the artist only within the figure. Figures done with software are acceptable if the figures are clear and legible. Legends and titles done by the same process as the figures will be accepted if they too are clear, legible, and run at least 10 or 12 characters per inch. Otherwise, legends and captions should be printed with the same font used in the text.

Original illustrations, photographs, and fine arts prints may be scanned and included, centered between the margins on a page with no text above or below.

Use of Third-Party Content

In addition to the student's own writing, dissertations often contain third-party content or in-copyright content owned by parties other than you, the student who authored the dissertation. The Office for Scholarly Communication recommends consulting the information below about fair use, which allows individuals to use in-copyright content, on a limited basis and for specific purposes, without seeking permission from copyright holders.

Because your dissertation will be made available for online distribution through DASH , Harvard's open-access repository, it is important that any third-party content in it may be made available in this way.

Fair Use and Copyright 

What is fair use?

Fair use is a provision in copyright law that allows the use of a certain amount of copyrighted material without seeking permission. Fair use is format- and media-agnostic. This means fair use may apply to images (including photographs, illustrations, and paintings), quoting at length from literature, videos, and music regardless of the format. 

How do I determine whether my use of an image or other third-party content in my dissertation is fair use?  

There are four factors you will need to consider when making a fair use claim.

1) For what purpose is your work going to be used?

  • Nonprofit, educational, scholarly, or research use favors fair use. Commercial, non-educational uses, often do not favor fair use.
  • A transformative use (repurposing or recontextualizing the in-copyright material) favors fair use. Examining, analyzing, and explicating the material in a meaningful way, so as to enhance a reader's understanding, strengthens your fair use argument. In other words, can you make the point in the thesis without using, for instance, an in-copyright image? Is that image necessary to your dissertation? If not, perhaps, for copyright reasons, you should not include the image.  

2) What is the nature of the work to be used?

  • Published, fact-based content favors fair use and includes scholarly analysis in published academic venues. 
  • Creative works, including artistic images, are afforded more protection under copyright, and depending on your use in light of the other factors, may be less likely to favor fair use; however, this does not preclude considerations of fair use for creative content altogether.

3) How much of the work is going to be used?  

  • Small, or less significant, amounts favor fair use. A good rule of thumb is to use only as much of the in-copyright content as necessary to serve your purpose. Can you use a thumbnail rather than a full-resolution image? Can you use a black-and-white photo instead of color? Can you quote select passages instead of including several pages of the content? These simple changes bolster your fair use of the material.

4) What potential effect on the market for that work may your use have?

  • If there is a market for licensing this exact use or type of educational material, then this weighs against fair use. If however, there would likely be no effect on the potential commercial market, or if it is not possible to obtain permission to use the work, then this favors fair use. 

For further assistance with fair use, consult the Office for Scholarly Communication's guide, Fair Use: Made for the Harvard Community and the Office of the General Counsel's Copyright and Fair Use: A Guide for the Harvard Community .

What are my options if I don’t have a strong fair use claim? 

Consider the following options if you find you cannot reasonably make a fair use claim for the content you wish to incorporate:

  • Seek permission from the copyright holder. 
  • Use openly licensed content as an alternative to the original third-party content you intended to use. Openly-licensed content grants permission up-front for reuse of in-copyright content, provided your use meets the terms of the open license.
  • Use content in the public domain, as this content is not in-copyright and is therefore free of all copyright restrictions. Whereas third-party content is owned by parties other than you, no one owns content in the public domain; everyone, therefore, has the right to use it.

For use of images in your dissertation, please consult this guide to Finding Public Domain & Creative Commons Media , which is a great resource for finding images without copyright restrictions. 

Who can help me with questions about copyright and fair use?

Contact your Copyright First Responder . Please note, Copyright First Responders assist with questions concerning copyright and fair use, but do not assist with the process of obtaining permission from copyright holders.

Pages should be assigned a number except for the Dissertation Acceptance Certificate . Preliminary pages (abstract, table of contents, list of tables, graphs, illustrations, and preface) should use small Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, iv, v, etc.). All pages must contain text or images.  

Count the title page as page i and the copyright page as page ii, but do not print page numbers on either page .

For the body of text, use Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc.) starting with page 1 on the first page of text. Page numbers must be centered throughout the manuscript at the top or bottom. Every numbered page must be consecutively ordered, including tables, graphs, illustrations, and bibliography/index (if included); letter suffixes (such as 10a, 10b, etc.) are not allowed. It is customary not to have a page number on the page containing a chapter heading.

  • Check pagination carefully. Account for all pages.

A copy of the Dissertation Acceptance Certificate (DAC) should appear as the first page. This page should not be counted or numbered. The DAC will appear in the online version of the published dissertation. The author name and date on the DAC and title page should be the same. 

The dissertation begins with the title page; the title should be as concise as possible and should provide an accurate description of the dissertation. The author name and date on the DAC and title page should be the same. 

  • Do not print a page number on the title page. It is understood to be page  i  for counting purposes only.

A copyright notice should appear on a separate page immediately following the title page and include the copyright symbol ©, the year of first publication of the work, and the name of the author:

© [ year ] [ Author’s Name ] All rights reserved.

Alternatively, students may choose to license their work openly under a  Creative Commons  license. The author remains the copyright holder while at the same time granting up-front permission to others to read, share, and (depending on the license) adapt the work, so long as proper attribution is given. (By default, under copyright law, the author reserves all rights; under a Creative Commons license, the author reserves some rights.)

  • Do  not  print a page number on the copyright page. It is understood to be page  ii  for counting purposes only.

An abstract, numbered as page  iii , should immediately follow the copyright page and should state the problem, describe the methods and procedures used, and give the main results or conclusions of the research. The abstract will appear in the online and bound versions of the dissertation and will be published by ProQuest. There is no maximum word count for the abstract. 

  • double-spaced
  • left-justified
  • indented on the first line of each paragraph
  • The author’s name, right justified
  • The words “Dissertation Advisor:” followed by the advisor’s name, left-justified (a maximum of two advisors is allowed)
  • Title of the dissertation, centered, several lines below author and advisor

Dissertations divided into sections must contain a table of contents that lists, at minimum, the major headings in the following order:

  • Front Matter
  • Body of Text
  • Back Matter

Front matter includes (if applicable):

  • acknowledgements of help or encouragement from individuals or institutions
  • a dedication
  • a list of illustrations or tables
  • a glossary of terms
  • one or more epigraphs.

Back matter includes (if applicable):

  • bibliography
  • supplemental materials, including figures and tables
  • an index (in rare instances).

Supplemental figures and tables must be placed at the end of the dissertation in an appendix, not within or at the end of a chapter. If additional digital information (including audio, video, image, or datasets) will accompany the main body of the dissertation, it should be uploaded as a supplemental file through ProQuest ETD . Supplemental material will be available in DASH and ProQuest and preserved digitally in the Harvard University Archives.

As a matter of copyright, dissertations comprising the student's previously published works must be authorized for distribution from DASH. The guidelines in this section pertain to any previously published material that requires permission from publishers or other rightsholders before it may be distributed from DASH. Please note:

  • Authors whose publishing agreements grant the publisher exclusive rights to display, distribute, and create derivative works will need to seek the publisher's permission for nonexclusive use of the underlying works before the dissertation may be distributed from DASH.
  • Authors whose publishing agreements indicate the authors have retained the relevant nonexclusive rights to the original materials for display, distribution, and the creation of derivative works may distribute the dissertation as a whole from DASH without need for further permissions.

It is recommended that authors consult their publishing agreements directly to determine whether and to what extent they may have transferred exclusive rights under copyright. The Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) is available to help the author determine whether she has retained the necessary rights or requires permission. Please note, however, the Office of Scholarly Communication is not able to assist with the permissions process itself.

  • Missing Dissertation Acceptance Certificate.  The first page of the PDF dissertation file should be a scanned copy of the Dissertation Acceptance Certificate (DAC). This page should not be counted or numbered as a part of the dissertation pagination.
  • Conflicts Between the DAC and the Title Page.  The DAC and the dissertation title page must match exactly, meaning that the author name and the title on the title page must match that on the DAC. If you use your full middle name or just an initial on one document, it must be the same on the other document.  
  • Abstract Formatting Errors. The advisor name should be left-justified, and the author's name should be right-justified. Up to two advisor names are allowed. The Abstract should be double spaced and include the page title “Abstract,” as well as the page number “iii.” There is no maximum word count for the abstract. 
  •  The front matter should be numbered using Roman numerals (iii, iv, v, …). The title page and the copyright page should be counted but not numbered. The first printed page number should appear on the Abstract page (iii). 
  • The body of the dissertation should be numbered using Arabic numbers (1, 2, 3, …). The first page of the body of the text should begin with page 1. Pagination may not continue from the front matter. 
  • All page numbers should be centered either at the top or the bottom of the page.
  • Figures and tables Figures and tables must be placed within the text, as close to their first mention as possible. Figures and tables that span more than one page must be labeled on each page. Any second and subsequent page of the figure/table must include the “(Continued)” notation. This applies to figure captions as well as images. Each page of a figure/table must be accounted for and appropriately labeled. All figures/tables must have a unique number. They may not repeat within the dissertation.
  • Any figures/tables placed in a horizontal orientation must be placed with the top of the figure/ table on the left-hand side. The top of the figure/table should be aligned with the spine of the dissertation when it is bound. 
  • Page numbers must be placed in the same location on all pages of the dissertation, centered, at the bottom or top of the page. Page numbers may not appear under the table/ figure.
  • Supplemental Figures and Tables. Supplemental figures and tables must be placed at the back of the dissertation in an appendix. They should not be placed at the back of the chapter. 
  • Permission Letters Copyright. permission letters must be uploaded as a supplemental file, titled ‘do_not_publish_permission_letters,” within the dissertation submission tool.
  •  DAC Attachment. The signed Dissertation Acceptance Certificate must additionally be uploaded as a document in the "Administrative Documents" section when submitting in Proquest ETD . Dissertation submission is not complete until all documents have been received and accepted.
  • Overall Formatting. The entire document should be checked after all revisions, and before submitting online, to spot any inconsistencies or PDF conversion glitches.
  • You can view dissertations successfully published from your department in DASH . This is a great place to check for specific formatting and area-specific conventions.
  • Contact the  Office of Student Affairs  with further questions.

CONTACT INFO

Katie riggs, explore events.

RefME Logo

Cite A Dissertation in Harvard style

Powered by chegg.

  • Select style:
  • Archive material
  • Chapter of an edited book
  • Conference proceedings
  • Dictionary entry
  • Dissertation
  • DVD, video, or film
  • E-book or PDF
  • Edited book
  • Encyclopedia article
  • Government publication
  • Music or recording
  • Online image or video
  • Presentation
  • Press release
  • Religious text

Use the following template or our Harvard Referencing Generator to cite a dissertation. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator .

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Popular Harvard Citation Guides

  • How to cite a Book in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Website in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Journal in Harvard style
  • How to cite a DVD, video, or film in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Online image or video in Harvard style

Other Harvard Citation Guides

  • How to cite a Archive material in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Artwork in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Blog in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Broadcast in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Chapter of an edited book in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Conference proceedings in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Court case in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Dictionary entry in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Dissertation in Harvard style
  • How to cite a E-book or PDF in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Edited book in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Email in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Encyclopedia article in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Government publication in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Interview in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Legislation in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Magazine in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Music or recording in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Newspaper in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Patent in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Podcast in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Presentation or lecture in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Press release in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Religious text in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Report in Harvard style
  • How to cite a Software in Harvard style

X

Library Services

UCL LIBRARY SERVICES

  • Guides and databases
  • Library skills

Thesis or dissertation

  • A-Z of Harvard references
  • Citing authors with Harvard
  • Page numbers and punctuation
  • References with missing details
  • Secondary referencing
  • Example reference list
  • Journal article
  • Magazine article
  • Newspaper article
  • Online video
  • Radio and internet radio
  • Television advertisement
  • Television programme
  • Ancient text
  • Bibliography
  • Book (printed, one author or editor)
  • Book (printed, multiple authors or editors)
  • Book (printed, with no author)
  • Chapter in a book (print)
  • Collected works
  • Dictionaries and Encyclopedia entries
  • Multivolume work
  • Religious text
  • Translated work
  • Census data
  • Financial report
  • Mathematical equation
  • Scientific dataset
  • Book illustration, Figure or Diagram
  • Inscription on a building
  • Installation
  • Painting or Drawing
  • Interview (on the internet)
  • Interview (newspaper)
  • Interview (radio or television)
  • Interview (as part of research)
  • Act of the UK parliament (statute)
  • Bill (House of Commons/Lords)
  • Birth/Death/Marriage certificate
  • British standards
  • Command paper
  • European Union publication
  • Government/Official publication
  • House of Commons/Lords paper
  • Legislation from UK devolved assemblies
  • Statutory instrument
  • Military record
  • Film/Television script
  • Musical score
  • Play (live performance)
  • Play script
  • Song lyrics
  • Conference paper
  • Conference proceedings
  • Discussion paper
  • Minutes of meeting
  • Personal communication
  • PowerPoint presentation
  • Published report
  • Student's own work
  • Tutor materials for academic course
  • Unpublished report
  • Working paper
  • Referencing glossary

To be made up of:

  • Year of submission (in round brackets).
  • Title of thesis (in italics).
  • Degree statement.
  • Degree-awarding body.
  • Available at: URL.
  • (Accessed: date).

In-text citation: 

(Smith, 2019)

Reference List:  

Smith, E. R. C. (2019). Conduits of invasive species into the UK: the angling route? Ph. D. Thesis. University College London. Available at: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10072700 (Accessed: 20 May 2021).

Quick links

  • Harvard references A-Z
  • << Previous: Religious text
  • Next: Translated work >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 15, 2024 9:40 AM
  • URL: https://library-guides.ucl.ac.uk/harvard
  • Für Universitäten
  • Für Unternehmen

harvard dissertation zitieren

Die Plagiatsprüfung für deine Abschlussarbeit

Plagiatsprüfung starten

Professionelles Lektorat und Korrekturlesen

Zum Lektorat & Korrekturlesen

Deine Abschlussarbeit online drucken & binden lassen

Jetzt Bindung konfigurieren

  • Allgemeines
  • Quellenangaben
  • Formatierung
  • APA-Beispiele
  • Sperrvermerk

Inhaltsverzeichnis

  • Abbildungsverzeichnis
  • Tabellenverzeichnis
  • Abkürzungsverzeichnis
  • Forschungsfrage
  • Theoretischer Rahmen
  • Forschungsergebnisse
  • Beratungsbericht
  • Handlungsempfehlung
  • Literaturverzeichnis
  • Eidesstattliche Erklärung
  • Vorbereitung
  • Schreibphase
  • Abgabephase
  • Englische Grammatik
  • Englische Zeitformen
  • Bachelorarbeit Formatierung
  • Definitionen
  • Beispiele der deutschen Zitierweise
  • Anfertigen eines Essays
  • Arten von Essays
  • Anfertigen einer Facharbeit
  • Arten von Facharbeiten
  • Häufige Fehler
  • Gliederung Aufbau Bachelorarbeit
  • Beispiele der Harvard-Zitierweise
  • Anfertigen einer Hausarbeit
  • Arten der Literaturrecherche
  • Allgemeine Begrifflichkeiten
  • Forschungsarten
  • Gütekriterien
  • Beobachtung
  • Weitere Forschungsmethoden
  • Unterrichtsentwurf
  • Arten von Motivationsschreiben
  • Arten von Plagiaten
  • Plagiatsprüfung
  • Anfertigen eines Praktikumsberichts
  • Anfertigen einer Projektarbeit
  • Prüfungsvorbereitung
  • Häufige Rechtschreibfehler
  • Erstellung eines Referats
  • Gendern mit Sonderzeichen
  • Gendern ohne Sonderzeichen
  • Zitierstile
  • Online-Quellen
  • Abkürzungen beim Zitieren
  • Literatur-Typen
  • Zitat-Typen
  • Literaturverwaltungsprogramme
  • Anfertigen einer Seminararbeit
  • Allgemeine Begriffe
  • Streuungsmaße
  • Zusammenhangsmaße
  • Hypothesentest
  • Weitere statistische Verfahren
  • Studenten-Service
  • Wissenschaftliche Arbeiten
  • Zeichensetzung
  • Alle Stilmittel

Deine 3 Schritte zum Erfolg

Deine professionelle Korrektur

Zum Lektorat

Jetzt konfigurieren

Dissertation zitieren – das gilt es zu beachten!

Wie gefällt dir dieser beitrag.

Dissertation zitieren

Dissertationen werden in Seminar-, Bachelor- oder Masterarbeiten häufig als zuverlässige Quelle herangezogen, da sie meist öffentlich zugänglich und zitierwürdig sind. Wer eine Dissertation zitieren will, muss einige Regeln beachten. Wir geben dir die besten Tipps zum Thema „Dissertation zitieren“.

  • 1 Häufig gestellte Fragen
  • 2 Zitierwürdigkeit einer Dissertation
  • 3 Zitierregeln für eine Dissertation
  • 4 Dissertation zitieren im Text
  • 5 Dissertation zitieren: Literaturverzeichnis
  • 6 Dissertation zitieren: Fazit

Häufig gestellte Fragen

Darf ich eine dissertation zitieren.

Ja, es wird sogar empfohlen, aus Dissertationen bzw. Doktorarbeiten zu zitieren. In Deutschland und der Schweiz unterliegen Dissertationen einer Veröffentlichungspflicht. Dissertationen sind demnach öffentlich zugänglich und zitierwürdig.

Wie zitierte ich eine Dissertation?

Je nachdem, ob es sich um eine unveröffentlichte oder gedruckte Dissertation handelt, gibt es einige Unterschiede. Darüber hinaus gibt es auch Zitierregeln für Open-Access-Veröffentlichungen sowie Sekundärzitate.

Wie zitiert man Internetquellen richtig?

Wenn du eine seriöse Internetquelle zitieren möchtest, musst du die URL in deiner Quellenangabe hinzufügen. Achte außerdem darauf, dass in deiner Internetquelle Autor und Veröffentlichungsdatum genannt werden.

Welche Zitierweisen stehen mir zur Verfügung?

Um eine Dissertation zitieren zu können, musst du dich entweder an die APA-, Harvard- oder die deutsche Zitierweise halten. Oft wünschen sich Institute auch eine bestimmte Zitierweise.

Wie sieht die Quellenangabe einer Dissertation im Literaturverzeichnis aus?

Folgende Angaben müssen beim Dissertation zitieren unbedingt enthalten sein: Autor, Jahr, Titel der Dissertation, Art der Dissertation, Studienfach, Verlag oder Hochschule und Erscheinungsort, ggf. die URL.

Zitierwürdigkeit einer Dissertation

Dissertationen sind öffentlich zugängliche wissenschaftliche Arbeiten , die in einem Verlag oder einer elektronischen Datenbank publiziert wurden. Die Dissertation dient zur Erlangung eines Doktorgrades. Wenn du gerade deine Seminar-, Bachelor- oder Masterarbeit schreibst, empfiehlt es sich ausschließlich aus Dissertationen bzw. Doktorarbeiten zu zitieren. Für Dissertationen besteht in Deutschland und der Schweiz eine Veröffentlichungspflicht. Das heißt, dass alle Dissertationen zitierwürdig publiziert werden müssen. Damit werden Dissertationen einer großen Leserschaft zugänglich gemacht und können eine hilfreiche Quelle für deine Arbeit sein.

Wenn du aus einer anderen Bachelor- oder Masterarbeit zitieren möchtest, musst du den Zusatz „unveröffentlicht“ in deinem Quellenverweis angeben, da diese Arbeiten in der Regel nicht publiziert werden. Generell empfehlen wir dir jedoch aus Dissertationen und Doktorarbeiten zu zitieren. Allerdings solltest du auch hierbei einige Kriterien beachten:

  • Nur dann die Dissertation zitieren, wenn es sich um Forschungsergebnisse des jeweiligen Autors handelt
  • Nur dann Dissertation zitieren, wenn die Ergebnisse wirklich einen Mehrwert für deine Arbeit bieten

Zitierregeln für eine Dissertation

Wer eine Dissertation zitieren möchte, muss einige Regeln beachten. So wird eine unveröffentlichte Dissertation (nicht in allen Ländern besteht eine Veröffentlichungspflicht) zum Beispiel anders zitiert als eine gedruckte Dissertation.

Unveröffentlichte Dissertation

Möchtest du eine unveröffentlichte Dissertation zitieren, musst du folgendermaßen vorgehen:

Als Erstes gibst du den Namen und Vornamen des Autors/der Autorin getrennt durch ein Komma an, gefolgt von einem Doppelpunkt. Dann schreibst du in dieselbe Zeile den Titel der Dissertation. Danach folgt ein Punkt. Im Anschluss folgt der Untertitel der Dissertation und danach gibst du mit dem Kürzel „unv. Diss.“ an, dass es sich um eine unveröffentlichte Dissertation handelt. Ebenfalls durch ein Komma getrennt gibst du jetzt die Universität an und wieder durch ein Komma getrennt, das Erscheinungsjahr. Das Dissertation zitieren sieht dann folgendermaßen aus:

Mustermann, Max: Warum richtiges Zitieren in wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten Pflicht ist. Zitieren mit der APA-Zitierweise, unv. Diss., Universität Mainz, 2019.

Gedruckte Dissertation

Du möchtest aus einer gedruckten Dissertation zitieren? Das stellst du wie folgt an: Die ersten Angaben gleichen der Zitierregel bei einer unveröffentlichten Dissertation. Du gibst also als Erstes Name, Vorname, Titel sowie Untertitel an. Anschließend folgt ein Punkt. Danach weist du auf die Veröffentlichung hin. Die Ausgabe, der Erscheinungsort und das Erscheinungsjahr müssen schließlich ebenfalls angegeben werden.

Dissertation zitieren im Text

An der Stelle in deinem Fließtext, an der man aus der Dissertation zitieren möchte (direkt oder indirekt), musst du einen kurzen Verweis einfügen. Je nachdem welche Zitierweise du bevorzugst ( Harvard , APA oder deutsche Zitierweise) fügst du deinen Quellenverweis entweder direkt im Fließtext oder in der Fußnote (deutsche Zitierweise) ein. So sieht das dann zum Beispiel laut APA Richtlinien aus:

Die Studie konnte feststellen, dass… (Mustermann, 2020). „Aus der Dissertation zitieren, empfiehlt sich für die Bachelorarbeit.“ (Mustermann, 2020, S. 19)

Dissertation zitieren: Literaturverzeichnis

Die Quellenangabe einer Dissertation im Literaturverzeichnis ist mit jener in einem Buch vergleichbar. Folgende Informationen muss die Quellenangabe beim Dissertation zitieren beinhalten:

Diese Angaben findest du ganz einfach und unkompliziert auf dem Titel der Dissertation, die du zitieren möchtest. So sieht das dann im Literaturverzeichnis aus:

Mustermann, T. (2020). Entwicklungsverzögerungen im Kindheits- und Jugendalter (Dissertation, Psychologie). Springer, Heidelberg. Akademische Grade wie Doktortitel (Dr.) musst du in deiner Quellenangabe nicht auflisten.

Diese Zitierregeln solltest du außerdem beachten:

  • Solltest du ein Zitat aus einer Dissertation zitieren, die aus einer anderen Quelle stammt, handelt es sich um ein Sekundärzitat
  • Verwende das Sekundärzitat nur, wenn die Originalquelle dazu auffindbar ist
  • Beim Sekundärzitat musst du den Zusatz „zitiert“ hinzufügen
  • Für die Art der Dissertation und das Studienfach musst du den genauen Wortlaut von der Titelseite übernehmen
  • Wenn die Dissertation in einem Verlag publiziert wurde, musst du diesen in der Quellenangabe erwähnen
  • Wurde die Doktorarbeit über die Hochschule veröffentlicht, musst du diese mit vollständigem Namen und Ort in deiner Quellenangabe erwähnen
  • Bei Dissertationen handelt es sich häufig um Open-Access-Veröffentlichungen – in diesem Fall musst du die URL in deiner Quellenangabe hinzufügen

Dissertation zitieren: Fazit

Ob APA-, Harvard- oder deutsche Zitierweise – richtiges Zitieren ist in jeder wissenschaftlichen Arbeit Pflicht. Da Studenten für ihre Haus-, Bachelor- oder Seminararbeiten oft aus einer Dissertation zitieren müssen, sollte man sich mit den Zitierregeln einer Dissertation auseinandersetzen, um Fehler in der eigenen Arbeit zu vermeiden. Zunächst einmal macht es einen Unterschied, ob die Dissertation gedruckt oder unveröffentlicht ist. Handelt es sich um eine unveröffentlichte Dissertation musst du unbedingt die Abkürzung „unv. Diss.“ angeben. Sowohl im Fließtext als auch in der Literaturangabe musst du einige Hinweise bezüglich der Zitierregeln beachten. Im Fließtext (bzw. in der Fußnote) musst du einen kurzen Verweis auf die Dissertation einfügen.

Im Literaturverzeichnis musst du schließlich Autor, Jahr, Titel der Dissertation, Art der Dissertation, Studienfach, Verlag oder Hochschule und Erscheinungsort und ggf. die URL angeben. Achte während deiner Literaturrecherche außerdem immer darauf, ob es sich um ein Sekundärzitat handelt oder nicht.

Unsere Beiträge zu weiteren Themen

Dissertation zitieren Lerntypen

Wir zeigen dir welcher Lerntyp du bist!

Dissertation zitieren GAP-Analyse

So schließt du Lücken mit der GAP-Analyse!

Dissertation zitieren Operationalisierung

Operationalisierung für dich Schritt für Schritt erklärt!

Dissertation zitieren Ansoff Matrix

So nutzt du die Ansoff Matrix effektiv!

* Weitere Hinweise und Fußnoten anzeigen

Wir nutzen Cookies auf unserer Website. Einige von ihnen sind essenziell, während andere uns helfen, diese Website und Ihre Erfahrung zu verbessern.

  • Statistiken
  • Externe Medien

Ich akzeptiere

Individuelle Datenschutzeinstellungen

Cookie-Details Datenschutzerklärung Impressum

Hier finden Sie eine Übersicht über alle verwendeten Cookies. Sie können Ihre Einwilligung zu ganzen Kategorien geben oder sich weitere Informationen anzeigen lassen und so nur bestimmte Cookies auswählen.

Alle akzeptieren Speichern

Essenzielle Cookies ermöglichen grundlegende Funktionen und sind für die einwandfreie Funktion der Website erforderlich.

Cookie-Informationen anzeigen Cookie-Informationen ausblenden

Statistik Cookies erfassen Informationen anonym. Diese Informationen helfen uns zu verstehen, wie unsere Besucher unsere Website nutzen.

Inhalte von Videoplattformen und Social-Media-Plattformen werden standardmäßig blockiert. Wenn Cookies von externen Medien akzeptiert werden, bedarf der Zugriff auf diese Inhalte keiner manuellen Einwilligung mehr.

Datenschutzerklärung Impressum

logo TopKorrektur.com

  • So zitierst du eine Dissertation richtig

Mädchen in einer Bibliothek. Studentin mit einem Laptop und Bücher.

Dissertation im Text zitieren

Harvard-zitierweise, chicago-stil.

  • Was gibt es bei einer unveröffentlichten Dissertation zu beachten?

Gedruckte Dissertation

Dissertation im literaturverzeichnis, dissertation im literaturverzeichnis angeben, harvard-zitierweise, wissenschaftliche arbeiten als quelle nutzen, was gibt es bei einer unveröffentlichten dissertation zu beachten .

Dissertation zitieren

Dissertationen kannst du problemlos als Quellen für deine wissenschaftliche Arbeit verwenden. In diesem Beitrag und in unserem Video  erfährst du, wie du Dissertationen richtig zitierst und im Literaturverzeichnis angibst.

Dissertation zitieren – einfach erklärt

Wissenschaftliche arbeiten als quelle, dissertation zitieren – im text, dissertation zitieren – im literaturverzeichnis, dissertation zitieren – besonderheiten, dissertation zitieren – dos und don’ts, dissertation zitieren – häufigste fragen, deutsche zitierweise.

Du darfst Dissertationen , also Doktorarbeiten, in deinen Haus- oder Abschlussarbeiten als Quelle zitieren . Das gilt auch für andere wissenschaftliche Arbeiten , wie Bachelor- oder Masterarbeiten. Zitiere Dissertationen oder andere wissenschaftliche Texte nur dann, wenn sie deine eigenen Überlegungen unterstützen oder sogar belegen .

Um eine Doktorarbeit zu zitieren, musst du sowohl Angaben im Text als auch im Literaturverzeichnis machen. Egal welchen Zitierstil du benutzt, gib immer Informationen über

  • Autor oder die Autorin
  • Erscheinungsdatum und -ort
  • Fach der Dissertation  

Wichtig: Wurde die Dissertation nicht über einen Verlag publiziert, fügst du den Zusatz „ unveröffentlicht “ hinzu und gibst die Universität an.

Wissenschaftliche Arbeiten von anderen Studierenden können eine gute Quelle für deine eigene Arbeit sein. Lass dich dafür an verschiedenen Stellen von Bachelor- und Masterarbeiten oder auch Dissertationen inspirieren:

  • Einleitung: Motivation für deine Forschungsinteressen
  • Hauptteil: Basis für deine methodischen Überlegungen und den theoretischen Rahmen
  • Schluss: Beispiel für weiterführende Forschungsvorhaben

Dissertationen zitieren

Doktorarbeiten eignen sich als Quelle am besten, denn sie wurden in der Regel veröffentlicht . Das macht sie zu einer zitierwürdigen akademischen Quelle. Nur, wenn ein wissenschaftlicher Text auch für deine Leserschaft einsehbar ist, können deine Zitate auf Plagiate geprüft werden. 

In Deutschland und in der Schweiz gilt die sogenannte Veröffentlichungspflicht für Dissertationen. Das bedeutet, Doktorarbeiten müssen als Buch oder online publiziert werden.

Tipp: Wenn du dir bei der Auswahl einer Quelle unsicher bist, frag am besten bei der betreuenden Person (z. B. Dozent/in oder Professor/in) nach.

Nicht alle Länder haben eine Veröffentlichungspflicht für Doktorarbeiten. Solche Arbeiten darfst du dann nur nutzen, wenn sie frei zugänglich sind, beispielsweise in der Uni Bibliothek oder in einer Online Datenbank.

Bachelor- und Masterarbeiten zitieren

Beim Zitieren von Bachelor- oder Masterarbeiten musst du angeben, dass sie unveröffentlicht sind. Denn diese Arbeiten wurden nicht offiziell publiziert. Sind sie öffentlich zugänglich, zum Beispiel online, darfst du sie prinzipiell aber trotzdem zitieren.

Verwendest du eine solche Arbeit, muss deine Quellenangabe und das Literaturverzeichnis den Zusatz „ unveröffentlicht “ beinhalten. Anstatt des Verlags gibst du die Universität an, an der die Arbeit abgegeben wurde

Allerdings weißt du nicht, wie gut diese Abschlussarbeiten abgeschnitten haben. Denn anders als bei Doktorarbeiten gibt es hier keine einheitlichen Qualitätskriterien. Also vermeide sie als Quellen eher.

Hat die Abschlussarbeit einen Sperrvermerk , darfst du sie nicht als Quelle benutzen.

Beziehst du dich durch ein Zitat oder eine Paraphrase direkt oder indirekt auf eine Dissertation, musst du das kenntlich machen. Erkundige dich immer bei deinem zuständigen Betreuer, welche Zitierweise in deiner Arbeit verlangt wird!

In einen vollständigen Verweis gehören:

  • Nachname des Autors
  • Erscheinungsdatum  

Zitiere beim Schreiben möglichst nur Ergebnisse und Aussagen des Autors selbst . Benutzt du doch einmal ein Sekundärzitat, dann gibst du im Text den Zusatz „ zitiert nach “ an.

Gib nur Quellen im Literaturverzeichnis an, die du wirklich gelesen hast.

Liste Dissertationen wie jede zitierte Quelle im Literaturverzeichnis auf. Alle relevanten Angaben findest du auf der Titelseite der Doktorarbeit. Der Aufbau der Angabe ist dabei fast derselbe wie bei der Quellenangabe eines Buches .

Deine vollständige Quellenangabe enthält Informationen über:

  • Autor : Name und Vorname, akademischer Grad ist nicht notwendig 
  • Jahr : Zeitangabe der Veröffentlichung
  • Titel : Vollständiger Titel mit Untertitel
  • „Dissertation“ und Studienfach : Gleicher Wortlaut wie auf der Titelseite
  • Verlag mit Erscheinungsort : Wo und von wem die Arbeit publiziert wurde

Je nach Zitierstil , sieht deine Quellenangabe im Literaturverzeichnis dann so aus:

Je nachdem, in welchem Format dir die Doktorarbeit vorliegt, musst du die Angaben im Literaturverzeichnis anpassen.

Für Doktorarbeiten, die online zugänglich sind (z. B. als Open-Access-Veröffentlichung), brauchst du im Literaturverzeichnis:

  • Universität
  • Letzter Besuch (Wann du das letzte Mal auf der Seite warst)

Eine solche Quelle gibst du im deutschen Zitierformat so an:

  • Fischer, Anja : Zitieren wie ein Profi , Dissertation, Germanistik , Universität Augsburg , 2022 , https://www.dissertationen.onlinepub/zitieren-wie-ein-profi.de (Zugriff: 20.07.2022) .

Schau dir die wichtigsten Dos und Don’ts zum Thema Dissertation zitieren an:

  • Darf ich eine Dissertation zitieren? Ja, du darfst Dissertationen zitieren. Wenn sie von anderen einsehbar sind, sind sie eine gute akademische Quelle.
  • Wie zitiere ich aus einer Dissertation? Je nach Zitierstil gibst du sowohl den Nachnamen des Autors, das Veröffentlichungsdatum und die Seitenzahl an.
  • Wie sieht die Quellenangabe einer Dissertation aus? Die Quellenangabe im Literaturverzeichnis beinhaltet den Namen des Autors, die Jahreszahl, den vollständigen Titel, das Fach der Dissertation und den Verlag.
  • Wie gebe ich unveröffentlichte Dissertationen an? Ist eine deiner Quellen unveröffentlicht, gibst du diesen Vermerk im Literaturverzeichnis an. Anstatt des Verlags steht hier die Universität.
  • Darf ich auch andere wissenschaftliche Arbeiten zitieren? Ja, Abschlussarbeiten wie Bachelor- oder Masterarbeiten darfst du auch zitieren. Achte dabei auf den Sperrvermerk und auf den Zusatz, dass sie unveröffentlicht sind.

Eine der bekanntesten Arten zu zitieren ist die deutsche Zitierweise . Wie du sicher schon gemerkt hast, unterscheidet sie sich in der Form von den englischen Varianten APA oder Harvard. Alles, was du über die Besonderheiten der deutschen Zitierweise wissen musst, erfährst du im nächsten Video ! 

Zum Video: Deutsche Zitierweise

Beliebte Inhalte aus dem Bereich Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten

  • Internetquellen zitieren Dauer: 04:40
  • Duden zitieren Dauer: 03:16
  • Zeitungsartikel zitieren Dauer: 04:17

Weitere Inhalte: Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten

Hallo, leider nutzt du einen AdBlocker.

Auf Studyflix bieten wir dir kostenlos hochwertige Bildung an. Dies können wir nur durch die Unterstützung unserer Werbepartner tun.

Schalte bitte deinen Adblocker für Studyflix aus oder füge uns zu deinen Ausnahmen hinzu. Das tut dir nicht weh und hilft uns weiter.

Danke! Dein Studyflix-Team

Wenn du nicht weißt, wie du deinen Adblocker deaktivierst oder Studyflix zu den Ausnahmen hinzufügst, findest du hier eine kurze Anleitung . Bitte lade anschließend die Seite neu .

  • Free Tools for Students
  • Harvard Referencing Generator

Free Harvard Referencing Generator

Generate accurate Harvard reference lists quickly and for FREE, with MyBib!

🤔 What is a Harvard Referencing Generator?

A Harvard Referencing Generator is a tool that automatically generates formatted academic references in the Harvard style.

It takes in relevant details about a source -- usually critical information like author names, article titles, publish dates, and URLs -- and adds the correct punctuation and formatting required by the Harvard referencing style.

The generated references can be copied into a reference list or bibliography, and then collectively appended to the end of an academic assignment. This is the standard way to give credit to sources used in the main body of an assignment.

👩‍🎓 Who uses a Harvard Referencing Generator?

Harvard is the main referencing style at colleges and universities in the United Kingdom and Australia. It is also very popular in other English-speaking countries such as South Africa, Hong Kong, and New Zealand. University-level students in these countries are most likely to use a Harvard generator to aid them with their undergraduate assignments (and often post-graduate too).

🙌 Why should I use a Harvard Referencing Generator?

A Harvard Referencing Generator solves two problems:

  • It provides a way to organise and keep track of the sources referenced in the content of an academic paper.
  • It ensures that references are formatted correctly -- inline with the Harvard referencing style -- and it does so considerably faster than writing them out manually.

A well-formatted and broad bibliography can account for up to 20% of the total grade for an undergraduate-level project, and using a generator tool can contribute significantly towards earning them.

⚙️ How do I use MyBib's Harvard Referencing Generator?

Here's how to use our reference generator:

  • If citing a book, website, journal, or video: enter the URL or title into the search bar at the top of the page and press the search button.
  • Choose the most relevant results from the list of search results.
  • Our generator will automatically locate the source details and format them in the correct Harvard format. You can make further changes if required.
  • Then either copy the formatted reference directly into your reference list by clicking the 'copy' button, or save it to your MyBib account for later.

MyBib supports the following for Harvard style:

🍏 What other versions of Harvard referencing exist?

There isn't "one true way" to do Harvard referencing, and many universities have their own slightly different guidelines for the style. Our generator can adapt to handle the following list of different Harvard styles:

  • Cite Them Right
  • Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU)
  • University of the West of England (UWE)

Image of daniel-elias

Daniel is a qualified librarian, former teacher, and citation expert. He has been contributing to MyBib since 2018.

Scribbr Harvard Referencing Generator

Accurate Harvard references, verified by experts, trusted by millions.

Save hours of repetitive work with Scribbr's Harvard Referencing Generator.

Stop wasting hours figuring out the correct citation format. With Scribbr's referencing generator , you can search for your source by title, URL, ISBN, or DOI and generate accurate Harvard style references in seconds.

Rely on accurate references, verified by experts.

You don’t want points taken off for incorrect referencing. That’s why our referencing experts have invested countless hours perfecting our algorithms. As a result, we’re proud to be recommended by teachers worldwide.

Enjoy the Harvard Referencing Generator with minimal distraction.

Staying focused is already challenging enough. You don’t need video pop-ups and flickering banner ads slowing you down. At Scribbr, we keep distractions to a minimum while also keeping the Harvard Referencing Generator free for everyone.

Referencing Generator features you'll love

Search for your source by title, URL, DOI, ISBN, and more to retrieve the relevant information automatically.

Cite Them Right 12th ed.

Scribbr's Harvard Referencing Generator supports the most commonly used versions: Cite Them Right (12th edition).

Export to Bib(La)TeX

Easily export in BibTeX format and continue working in your favorite LaTeX editor.

Export to Word

Reference list finished? Export to Word with perfect indentation and spacing set up for you.

Sorting, grouping, and filtering

Organize the reference list the way you want: from A to Z, new to old, or grouped by source type.

Save multiple lists

Stay organized by creating a separate reference list for each of your assignments.

Choose between Times New Roman, Arial, Calibri, and more options to match your style.

Industry-standard technology

The Scribbr Referencing Generator is built using the same citation software (CSL) as Mendeley and Zotero, but with an added layer for improved accuracy.

Explanatory tips help you get the details right to ensure accurate citations.

Secure backup

Your work is saved automatically after every change and stored securely in your Scribbr account.

  • Introduction

Reference examples

Missing information, citation examples, tools and resources, how to reference in harvard style.

Cite Them Right 12th edition

Harvard referencing is a widely used referencing style (especially in UK universities) that includes author-date in-text citations and a complete reference list at the end of the text.

There are many versions of Harvard referencing style. Our guidance reflects the rules laid out in Cite Them Right: The Essential Referencing Guide (12th edition) by Richard Pears and Graham Shields.

Scribbr’s free reference generator can create flawless Harvard style references for a wide variety of sources.

  • Cite a webpage
  • Cite a book
  • Cite a journal article

Harvard reference entries

The reference list appears at the end of your text, listing full information on all the sources you cited. A Harvard reference entry generally mentions the author , date , title , publisher or publication that contains the source, and URL or DOI if relevant.

You’ll include different details depending on the type of source you’re referencing, as some information is only relevant to certain kinds of publications.

The format of a reference entry varies based on source type. Apart from the information included, formatting details such as the use of italics also depend on what you’re referencing. The tabs below show formats and examples for the most commonly referenced source types.

The suggested information won’t necessarily all be available for the source you’re referencing. To learn how to work around missing information in your references, check the table below.

Harvard Referencing Generator

Generate accurate Harvard style references in seconds

Get started

Harvard in-text citations

Harvard referencing style uses author-date in-text citations, which means including the author’s last name and the publication year of the source, like this: (Smith, 2019). This citation points the reader to the corresponding entry in the reference list.

Always include an in-text citation when you quote or paraphrase a source. Include a page number or range when available and relevant to indicate which part of the source you’re drawing on. Using material from other sources without acknowledging them is plagiarism.

In-text citations can be parenthetical (author and date both in parentheses) or narrative (author name mentioned in the sentence, date in parentheses). A source may also have more than one author. If there are four or more, name only the first, followed by “ et al. ”

As with reference entries, it’s good to be aware of how to deal with missing information in your in-text citations.

Scribbr offers a variety of other tools and resources to help with referencing and other aspects of academic writing:

  • Referencing generator : Scribbr’s free referencing generator can also create flawless citations in other styles, such as APA and MLA .
  • Free plagiarism checker : Detect and fix plagiarism issues with the most accurate plagiarism checker available, powered by Turnitin.
  • Proofreading services : Make sure your writing is clear and professional with the help of an expert editor.
  • Guide to Harvard style : Understand the rules of Harvard referencing style, and learn how to cite a variety of sources.
  • Guides and videos : Explore our Knowledge Base, our YouTube channel, and a wide variety of other educational resources covering topics ranging from language to statistics.
  • Harvard Library
  • Research Guides
  • Faculty of Arts & Sciences Libraries

Computer Science Library Research Guide

Find dissertations and theses.

  • Get Started
  • What is Peer Review?
  • How to get the full-text
  • Find Conference Proceedings
  • Find Patents This link opens in a new window
  • Find Standards
  • Find Technical Reports
  • Find Videos
  • Ask a Librarian This link opens in a new window

Engineering Librarian

Profile Photo

How to search for Harvard dissertations

  • DASH , Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard, is the university's central, open-access repository for the scholarly output of faculty and the broader research community at Harvard.  Most Ph.D. dissertations submitted from  March 2012 forward  are available online in DASH.
  • Check HOLLIS, the Library Catalog, and refine your results by using the   Advanced Search   and limiting Resource  Type   to Dissertations
  • Search the database  ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global Don't hesitate to  Ask a Librarian  for assistance.

How to search for Non-Harvard dissertations

Library Database:

  • ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global

Free Resources:

  • Many  universities  provide full-text access to their dissertations via a digital repository.  If you know the title of a particular dissertation or thesis, try doing a Google search.  

Related Sites

  • Formatting Your Dissertation - GSAS
  • Ph.D. Dissertation Submission  - FAS
  • Empowering Students Before you Sign that Contract!  - Copyright at Harvard Library

Select Library Titles

Cover Art

  • << Previous: Find Conference Proceedings
  • Next: Find Patents >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 23, 2024 2:47 PM
  • URL: https://guides.library.harvard.edu/cs

Harvard University Digital Accessibility Policy

  • Wissensdatenbank
  • Die Harvard-Zitierweise
  • Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Literaturverweise im Text

Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Quellenangaben im Text - So geht´s

Veröffentlicht am 12. Oktober 2017 von Niklas Melcher . Aktualisiert am 18. Januar 2024 von Mandy Theel.

Verwendest du im Fließtext deiner Abschlussarbeit Gedankengut aus einer Quelle, musst du laut Harvard-Zitierweise direkt auf diese verweisen.

Direkt nach dem Zitat in deinem Fließtext gibst du die Quelle in folgendem Format an: (Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl) .

Wir erklären dir im Detail, wie du Verweise im Text erstellst und auf welche Besonderheiten du achten musst.

Quellen nach Harvard-Richtlinien erstellen

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Harvard-grundregeln für verweise im text, 3 oder mehr autoren, erscheinungsjahr, seitenzahlen, harvard verweis im text: positionierung und satzzeichen, mehrere werke in einem verweis, mit ebd. im text zitieren, sekundärzitate, zitat im zitat, häufig gestellte fragen.

Die Harvard-Zitierweise besteht aus einer Quellenangabe in Klammern direkt im Fließtext. Sie ist auch als amerikanische Zitierweise bekannt und funktioniert dabei ganz ohne Fußnoten .

Du verweist mit den Quellenangaben im Text auf die ausführliche Literaturangabe in deinem Literaturverzeichnis .

Bei dem Verweis im Text werden immer der Name des Autors , das Erscheinungsjahr des Werkes sowie die Seitenzahl angegeben.

Verwende dabei folgendes Format: (Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl) .

Scribbr-Quellenvorschau : Harvard-Zitierweise im Text

Je nach Universität gibt es Abweichungen für die Harvard-Zitierweise. Wir zeigen dir in unserer Anleitung eine einheitliche Harvard-Zitierweise sowie alternative Harvard-Schreibweisen.

Es ist wichtig, dass du dich sowohl bei deinen Verweisen im Text als auch in deinem Literaturverzeichnis für eine konsistente Form entscheidest.

Die Position der Quellenangabe befindet sich in der Regel am Ende des Satzes, in dem das Zitat genannt wird.

Wörtliche Zitate werden mit „ … “ (doppelten Anführungszeichen) hervorgehoben. Bei Paraphrasierungen  wird der Zusatz vgl. hinzugefügt.

Aktuelle Studien schlagen vor, dass … ( vgl. Müller 2019: 12). Forscher sind der Meinung: „ Die Bedeutung von X wird sich vergrößern “ (Müller 2019: 23).

Möchtest du eine fehlerfreie Arbeit abgeben?

Mit einem Lektorat helfen wir dir, deine Abschlussarbeit zu perfektionieren.

Neugierig? Bewege den Regler von links nach rechts!

harvard dissertation zitieren

Zu deiner Korrektur

Bei nur einem Autor wird in der Klammer als Erstes der Nachname des Autors angegeben. Anschließend folgen das Erscheinungsjahr des Werkes und die Seitenzahl: ( Autor  Jahr: Seitenzahl).

Wird der Name des Autors im Fließtext erwähnt, folgen die Jahresangabe und die Seitenzahl in Klammern direkt dahinter.

„In den nächsten zehn Jahren wird sich die Zahl der … erheblich vergrößern“  ( Müller  2019: 23).

Eine Studie, in der X und Y verglichen wurden, ergab, dass … (vgl. Müller 2019: 23).

Müller (2019: 23) zeigt, wie sich die Forschung mit X befasst.

Ausnahme – gleiche Nachnamen

Wenn du in deiner Bachelorarbeit mehrere Autoren mit dem gleichen Nachnamen zitierst, sollte auch der Anfangsbuchstabe des Vornamens in deinem Quellenverweis im Text berücksichtigt werden.

Wenn zwei Autoren an einem Werk beteiligt waren, sollten deren Namen mit einem / getrennt werden.

Erwähnst du die Autoren im Fließtext, solltest du sie mit dem Wort und trennen.

Je nach Universität kannst du die Autorennamen auch mit einem und oder & verbinden. Egal, für welche Version du dich entscheidest: Bleibe in deinem gesamten Dokument einheitlich.

Die Forschung bestätigt, dass sich „der Bedarf an … unproportional vergrößert hat“ (Müller / Neuer 2019: 65).Die Forschung zeigt, dass im Jahr 2019 ein erheblicher Bedarf an … bestand (vgl. Müller / Neuer 2018: 65).

Müller und Neuer (2018: 65) beschreiben, dass es einen erheblichen Bedarf an … gibt.

Bei drei oder mehr Autoren reicht es aus, wenn du den ersten Autor und den Zusatz ‚ et al. ‘ verwendest. Die Abkürzung steht dabei für das lateinische et alii , was übersetzt ‚und andere‘ bedeutet.

Je nach Vorgaben deiner Universität können bei der ersten Erwähnung alle Autoren genannt werden. Trenne in diesem Fall alle Autoren mit / , so wie du es schon bei 2 Autoren gemacht hast.

Bei allen weiteren Nennungen im nachfolgenden Fließtext nennst du nur den ersten Autor und fügst ‚et al.‘ hinzu.

„Im Gegensatz zu X ist Y … “ (Müller et al. 2019: 12).Aktuelle Forschung schlägt vor, dass … (vgl. Müller et al. 2019: 12).

Müller et al. (2019: 12) argumentieren, dass …

  • (Müller / Neuer / Robben 2019: 12)

ab der zweiten Erwähnung:

  • (Müller et al. 2019: 12)

Alternativ kannst du auch ein und oder &  verwenden. Orientiere dich dabei an der Version, die du bei der Nennung von 2 Autoren gewählt hast.

Trenne dabei alle Autoren mit einem Komma und setze vor dem letzten ein  und bzw. & ein.

Anders bei der ersten Erwähnung:

  • (Müller , Neuer und Robben 2019: 12)
  • (Müller , Neuer & Robben 2019: 12)

Ab der zweiten Erwähnung:

Zum Harvard-Generator

Quellenangaben kostenlos und fehlerfrei erstellen

Das Erscheinungsjahr befindet sich im Verweis direkt nach dem Autor: (Autor Jahr : Seitenzahl).

Das dient dazu, die verwendete Quelle in den historischen Kontext einzuordnen.

Bei der Angabe des Erscheinungsjahres solltest du dich immer an der verwendeten Auflage orientieren.

Ausnahme – mehrere Werke aus einem Jahr vom selben Autor

Wenn ein Autor mehrere Werke im gleichen Jahr veröffentlicht hat, füge der Jahreszahl einen Kleinbuchstaben (2019 a / 2019 b / …) hinzu.

Ausnahme – stark abweichendes Erscheinungsjahr

Die Erstveröffentlichung ist das Erscheinungsdatum der 1. Auflage. Wenn es mehrere Auflagen eines Buches gibt, weicht das Erscheinungsjahr der jeweiligen Auflage von dem der Erstveröffentlichung ab.

Für den besonderen Fall, dass das Jahr der Erscheinung deutlich (ca. 20–30 Jahre) von der Erstveröffentlichung abweicht, sollte dies zusätzlich erwähnt werden. Dadurch kann die Quelle besser in den historischen Kontext eingeordnet werden.

Seitenzahlen werden bei der Harvard-Zitierweise nach dem Erscheinungsjahr angegeben und durch einen Doppelpunkt abgetrennt: (Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl ).

Statt eines Doppelpunkts gibt es auch Alternativen mit einem Komma als Trennung. Auch ein S. kann der Seitenzahl vorausgehen.

Befindet sich ein Zitat auf zwei Seiten , kann dies mit f. für folgende kenntlich gemacht werden.

Bezieht sich eine Quellenangabe auf 3 oder mehr Seiten , muss der exakte Bereich angegeben werden.

Verwende für die Seitenangabe den Bis-Strich bzw. Halbgeviertstrich (–) und nicht den Bindestrich (-).

In manchen Fällen wird auch ff. genutzt, um 2 oder mehr Seiten anzugeben. Davon ist jedoch abzuraten, da die genauen Seitenzahlen unklar bleiben.

Bei der Harvard-Zitierweise folgt die Quellenangabe nach dem Zitat – bei wörtlichen genau wie bei sinngemäßen Zitaten.

Jedoch gibt es ein paar Ausnahmen:

  • Ist das Zitat nur ein Satzteil und steht am Ende des Satzes, wird das abschließende Satzzeichen nach den Anführungsstrichen gesetzt.
  • Endet ein Zitat auf ein Frage- oder Ausrufezeichen , müssen diese angegeben werden.
  • Sollte ein Zitat einen vollständigen Satz bilden, steht das abschließende Satzzeichen vor den Anführungszeichen . Dies gilt auch, wenn das Zitat nach einem Doppelpunkt beginnt.
  • Wenn der Name des Autors schon in demselben Satz vorkommt, werden Erscheinungsjahr und Seitenzahl direkt dahinter angegeben.

Es lässt sich feststellen, dass aktuelle Forschung „einen erheblichen Bedarf an …“ (Müller 2019: 50) . Die Studie über X kommt zu dem Ergebnis, dass „es keine Alternative gibt ! “ (Neuer 2018: 19).

Andere Studien betrachten das Problem aus einer neuen Sichtweise: „Die Entwicklung von X bewegt sich immer mehr Richtung Y “ (Müller 2019: 50).

Neuer (2018: 22) fügt allerdings hinzu, dass sich X in eine andere Richtung entwickelt.

Wenn du mehrere Werke als Quelle für einen Satz verwendest, werden diese innerhalb der Klammer durch ein Semikolon getrennt.

Dabei werden die Werke nach Wichtigkeit für die eigene Aussage angeordnet. Haben die Werke die gleiche Gewichtung, wird das ältere Werk zuerst genannt.

Bei der Harvard-Zitierweise kannst du in deinen Literaturverweisen im Text ebd. (ebenda = genau, gerade dort) verwenden. Die Abkürzung ersetzt die Nachnamen der Autorenschaft und das Erscheinungsjahr, wenn diese zweimal oder mehrmals hintereinander genannt werden. Durch die Verwendung von ebd. kannst du die Lesbarkeit deiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit vereinfachen.

Achte beim Zitieren mit ebd. darauf, dass die vorherige Quellenangabe

  • im gleichen Absatz oder
  • auf der gleichen Seite steht.

Die Studie ergab … (vgl. Müller 2019: 23).

Zusätzlich kam auch heraus, dass … (vgl. ebd. : 28).

„Die gleiche Studie im Zitat“ ( ebd. : 31).

Als Sekundärzitate bezeichnet man wörtliche oder sinngemäße Zitate aus Werken, die man selbst nicht vorliegen hat. Diese sollten grundsätzlich vermieden werden, da so die Richtigkeit nicht überprüft werden kann.

Solltest du dennoch ein Sekundärzitat verwenden, gibst du mit dem Zusatz zitiert nach Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl an, aus welchem Werk du das Zitat hast.

Anstatt den Zusatz auszuschreiben, kannst du auch die Abkürzung zit. nach verwenden.

Befindet sich ein Zitat in einem Zitat, z. B. in Form einer wörtlichen Rede, muss dies kenntlich gemacht werden.

Verwende ‚ … ‘ (einfache Anführungszeichen), um das Zitat hervorzuheben. Stelle dabei sicher, dass in dem Zitat deutlich wird, woher das Zitat im Zitat stammt. Das kann z. B. von Studienteilnehmern sein.

Erfahre mehr über

Literaturverzeichnis laut Harvard oder zu Zitieren und Paraphrasieren

Nach der Harvard-Zitierweise gibst du deine Quellen direkt nach dem Zitat im Fließtext deiner wissenschaftlichen Arbeit an. Dafür gibst du die Literaturverweise in folgendem Format an: (Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl).

Beispiel Verweis im Text

(Müller 2019: 23)

Ja, bei der Harvard-Zitierweise kannst du die Abkürzung ebd. im Literaturverweis im Text nutzen. Sie ersetzt die Nachnamen der Autorenschaft und das Erscheinungsjahr, wenn diese zweimal oder mehrmals hintereinander zitiert werden.

Beispiel: ebd. verwenden

Die Studie ergab … (vgl. Müller 2019: 23). Zusätzlich kam auch heraus, dass … (vgl. ebd. : 28). „Die gleiche Studie im Zitat“ ( ebd. : 31).

Bei der Harvard-Zitierweise werden indirekte Zitate mit dem Zusatz vgl. (= vergleiche) im Literaturverweis im Text zitiert. Dieser Zusatz steht vor der Quellenangabe im Text.

Zum Beispiel: (vgl. Müller 2019: 23)

Direkte bzw. wörtliche Zitate werden nicht mit vgl. zitiert.

Diesen Scribbr-Artikel zitieren

Wenn du diese Quelle zitieren möchtest, kannst du die Quellenangabe kopieren und einfügen oder auf die Schaltfläche „Diesen Artikel zitieren“ klicken, um die Quellenangabe automatisch zu unserem kostenlosen Zitier-Generator hinzuzufügen.

Melcher, N. (2024, 18. Januar). Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Quellenangaben im Text - So geht´s. Scribbr. Abgerufen am 22. Februar 2024, von https://www.scribbr.ch/harvard-zitierweise-ch/harvard-im-text/

War dieser Artikel hilfreich?

Niklas Melcher

Niklas Melcher

Das hat anderen studenten noch gefallen, beispiel harvard-zitierweise: buch, beispiel harvard-zitierweise: internetquellen, die harvard-zitierweise: literaturverzeichnis.

  • The Magazine
  • City Journal
  • Contributors
  • Manhattan Institute
  • Email Alerts

harvard dissertation zitieren

Harvard’s Plagiarism Problem Multiplies

Another administrator at the Ivy League university appears to have plagiarized her dissertation.

Harvard has a plagiarism problem. At the beginning of the year, Claudine Gay resigned as university president following a plagiarism scandal. Weeks later, the Washington Free Beacon published a report indicating that Harvard’s chief diversity officer, Sherri Ann Charleston, apparently plagiarized passages in multiple academic papers.

Now allegations have emerged that another Harvard DEI administrator, Shirley Greene, of Harvard Extension School, plagiarized more than 40 passages of her 2008 dissertation , “Converging Frameworks: Examining the Impact of Diversity-Related College Experiences on Racial/Ethnic Identity Development.” According to the Harvard directory, Greene is a Title IX coordinator affiliated with the Office for Gender Equity. She has worked to advance “Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging,” and hosted a panel on “The Past, Present, and Future of Juneteenth” in conjunction with the DEI department. (Harvard did not respond to an emailed request for comment.)

The Harvard Crimson previously reported on the allegations against Greene, which a whistleblower lodged anonymously. I have obtained the full complaint , which paints a much more damning indictment of Greene’s scholarship than the student newspaper had let on. Seen in its entirety, the complaint raises serious questions about Greene’s scholarship and academic integrity.

In the most serious instance, Greene lifts directly from Janelle Lee Woo’s 2004 dissertation , “Chinese American Female Identity.” In two significant sections, Greene copied words, phrases, passages, and almost entire paragraphs verbatim, without proper attribution or quotation. She also copies most of an entire table on “Racial/Ethnic Identity Development Models,” a foundational concept in the paper, without acknowledging the source.

We can examine one representative paragraph that illustrates the brazen nature of this adaptation. In her paper, Woo writes:

Stage 2, White Identification (WI), is a direct consequence of the increase in significant contact between the individual and white society. This stage entails the sense of being different from other people and not belonging anywhere. The individual’s self-perception changes from neutral/positive to negative, and she begins to internalize the belief systems of white society. Consequently, the individual does not question what it means to be Asian American. The individual alienates herself from other Asian Americans, while simultaneously experiencing social alienation from her white peers. Only when the individual seeks to “acquire a political understanding of [her] social status” (Kim 1981: 138) does she enter into the next stage.

Here is Greene’s version, with the duplicated portions of Woo and Woo’s citations italicized:

White Identification (WI), is a direct consequence of the increase in significant contact between the individual and white society. Individuals in this stage have the sense of being different from other people and not belonging anywhere. Their self-perception changes from neutral/positive to negative and they begin to internalize the belief systems of white society. Consequently, the individual fails to question what it means to be Asian American and alienates themselves from other Asian Americans, while simultaneously experiencing social alienation from their white peers. In order to move to the next stage, the individual must acquire a political understanding of social status.

The complaint, which has been sent to Harvard’s research-integrity officials, features more than three dozen other examples of Greene allegedly lifting language from other scholars, without proper attribution or quotations. For another typical example, we can compare a passage from Anthony Antonio’s paper, “Developing Leadership Skills for Diversity,” with Greene’s dissertation.

Here is Antonio’s original text:

Astin found that independent of students' entering characteristics and different types of college environments, frequent interracial interaction in college was associated with increases in cultural awareness, commitment to racial understanding, commitment to cleaning up the environment, and higher levels of academic development (critical thinking skills, analytical skills, general and specific knowledge, and writing skills) and satisfaction with college.

Compare this with Greene’s dissertation, which copies the entire paragraph verbatim, adds the word “ethnic,” and, though it cites the source, does not include quotation marks. Here is Greene, with italics added to mark the plagiarized content:

Astin found that independent of students’ entering characteristics and different types of college environments, frequent interracial interaction in college was associated with increases in cultural awareness, commitment to racial/ethnic understanding, commitment to cleaning up the environment, and higher levels of academic development (critical thinking skills, analytical skills, general and specific knowledge, and writing skills) and satisfaction with college.

In total, the complaint identifies dozens of such passages in Greene’s dissertation, ranging from minor infringements to what appears to be outright theft of concepts and language. Most of these instances would appear to violate Harvard’s own plagiarism policy , which states: “If you copy language word for word from another source and use that language in your paper, you are plagiarizing  verbatim … you  must  give credit to the author of the source material, either by placing the source material in quotation marks and providing a clear citation, or by paraphrasing the source material and providing a clear citation.”

In its initial report, the Crimson chose to downplay these violations and focus on the fact that the complaint against Greene “marks the third set of anonymous plagiarism allegations against Black women who hold or held leadership positions at Harvard.” The implication, of course, is that the anonymous critics are motivated by racism—which other commentators have made explicit in defending Gay, Charleston, and Greene.

This should sound familiar. For years, America’s elite institutions have maintained the convenient fiction that all racial disparities can be explained by racism, not disparities in behavior. For the subjects of Harvard’s plagiarism scandal, however, another plausible explanation exists: namely, that academics who focus on DEI and advocate lower standards for “oppressed” racial groups might hold themselves to lower standards of academic integrity than academics in more legitimate disciplines.

Regardless of the cause, Harvard should ask itself a simple question: how did so many alleged plagiarists rise to positions of power at the nation’s most prestigious university? If Harvard officials believe that they can shrug off the university’s growing plagiarism crisis, they should know that this may just be the beginning. My sources indicate that many more allegations may be coming.

Christopher F. Rufo  is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a contributing editor of  City Journal , and the author of  America’s Cultural Revolution .

Photo by: Sergi Reboredo/VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

City Journal is a publication of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research (MI), a leading free-market think tank. Are you interested in supporting the magazine? As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, donations in support of MI and City Journal are fully tax-deductible as provided by law (EIN #13-2912529).

Further Reading

Copyright © 2024 Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Inc. All rights reserved.

  • Eye on the News
  • From the Magazine
  • Books and Culture
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Use

EIN #13-2912529

Quellenangaben kostenlos und fehlerfrei erstellen

  • Wissensdatenbank
  • Die Harvard-Zitierweise
  • Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Literaturverzeichnis

Literaturverzeichnis Harvard: Regeln und Ausnahmen

Veröffentlicht am 11. Oktober 2017 von Mandy Theel . Aktualisiert am 18. Januar 2024.

Am Ende deiner Abschlussarbeit brauchst du immer ein Literaturverzeichnis, das zur vollständigen und ausführlichen Angabe deiner Quellen dient.

Erstelle fehlerfreie Harvard-Zitate mit Scribbr

Scribbrs kostenlose rechtschreibprüfung.

Fehler kostenlos beheben

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Harvard-grundregeln für das literaturverzeichnis, zusätzliche angaben, einheitlichkeit, fehlende angaben, formatierung und reihenfolge.

Das Literaturverzeichnis ist das Register aller Quellen, die du für deine Bachelorarbeit bzw. Masterarbeit verwendet hast. Quellen, die zur Inspiration genutzt wurden, aber im Fließtext nicht zitiert werden, musst du nicht angeben.

Das Literaturverzeichnis nach Harvard folgt dem folgenden Format: AutorName (Jahr): Titel . Jede Quelle wird nur einmal angegeben.

Je nach Quellenart unterscheiden sich die Angaben, die du machen musst, voneinander. Zusätzliche Angaben werden, wenn nicht anders beschrieben, durch Kommata getrennt.

Scribbr-Quellenvorschau : Literaturverzeichnis der Harvard-Zitierweise

Wusstest du schon, dass ....

Scribbr durchschnittlich 150 Fehler pro 1000 Wörter korrigiert?

Unsere Sprachexperten verbessern vor Abgabe deiner Abschlussarbeit den akademischen Ausdruck, die Interpunktion und sprachliche Fehler.

Erfahre mehr zur Korrektur

Alle Autoren müssen in einem Literaturverzeichnis immer vollständig aufgeführt werden.

Der erste Autor wird immer zuerst beim Nachnamen genannt. Daraus ergibt sich die Reihenfolge der Einträge im Literaturverzeichnis.

Auf den Nachnamen folgt ein Komma und der Vorname des Autors. Namenszusätze wie ‚von‘ oder ‚de‘ werden nach dem Vornamen angegeben.

Bei zwei Autoren beginnt die Angabe, wie auch schon bei 1 Autor , mit Nachname , Vorname des ersten Autors.

Die Namen der beiden Autoren werden durch einen Schrägstrich ( / ) getrennt. Die Nennung des zweiten Autors beginnt anschließend mit dem Vornamen .

Je nachdem welche Vorgaben du von deiner Universität hast, gibt es alternative Schreibweisen .

Orientiere dich dabei an dem Format, das du für deine Verweise im Text verwendet hast. Wichtig ist vor allem, dass du in deiner Schreibweise Einheitlichkeit bewahrst.

3 oder mehr Autoren

Anders als bei den Verweisen im Text müssen in der Quellenangabe im Literaturverzeichnis alle Autorennamen genannt werden.

Bei drei oder mehreren Autoren wird der erste Autor mit dem Nachnamen zuerst genannt. Alle weitere Autoren werden mit einem / getrennt und mit Vorname Nachname angegeben.

Unternehmen als Autor

Sollte eine Quelle von einem Unternehmen publiziert sein und nicht von einer Person, verwendest du den Namen des Unternehmens .

Herausgeber

Weicht der Herausgeber von dem Autor, muss dieser zusätzlich angegeben werden.

Dies ist in der Regel bei Sammelwerken oder Journalen der Fall. Um dies kenntlich zu machen, wird das übergeordnete Werk mit in: eingeleitet und hinter dem Namen des Herausgebers die Abkürzung (Hrsg.) platziert.

Der Titel folgt beim Eintrag im Literaturverzeichnis auf die Jahresangabe und ist mit einem Doppelpunkt getrennt.

Nach dem Titel folgt ein Komma. Untertitel werden mit einem Punkt vom Haupttitel getrennt.

Die Titel der verwendeten Werke werden immer in Kursivschrift angegeben, wenn es offizielle Veröffentlichungen sind, wie z. B.:

  • Titel Journal
  • Titel Sammelwerk

Auf Kursivdruck wir bei folgenden Titeln verzichtet:

  • Titel Internetquelle
  • Titel Studienarbeit
  • Artikeltitel Journal
  • Artikeltitel Sammelwerk

Je nach Art der Quelle müssen zusätzlich zum Autor, Jahr und Titel unterschiedliche weitere Angaben gemacht werden.

Diese zusätzlichen Angaben folgen nach dem Titel und werden durch Kommata voneinander getrennt.

In unserem Scribbr-Quellenvorschau kannst du genau sehen, bei welcher Quelle, welche zusätzlichen Angaben nötig sind.

Schau dir zusätzlich unsere Beispiele für die einzelnen Quellenarten an, um mehr zu den jeweiligen Besonderheiten zu erfahren.

Möchtest du eine fehlerfreie Arbeit abgeben?

Mit einem Lektorat helfen wir dir, deine Abschlussarbeit zu perfektionieren.

Neugierig? Bewege den Regler von links nach rechts!

harvard dissertation zitieren

Zu deiner Korrektur

Bei der Verwendung von Satzzeichen und der Nennung von Seitenzahlen gibt es verschiedene Varianten. Diese können von der Hochschule vorgegeben sein.

Je nachdem für welche Version du dich entscheidest, achte darauf, dass du Einheitlichkeit bewahrst.

Sollte für eine Quelle bestimmte Angaben nicht vorhanden sein, kannst du dies mit einer Abkürzung kenntlich machen. Diese wird an der Stelle der fehlenden Angabe platziert.

Fehlt der Verfasser, solltest du die Quelle zunächst auf Glaubwürdigkeit prüfen. Entscheidest du dich dennoch für die Quelle, kannst du den Namen des Unternehmens oder den Titel der Quelle anstelle des Autors verwenden.

Abkürzungen fehlende Angaben

Wenn du in deiner Abschlussarbeit ein Literaturverzeichnis nach der Harvard-Zitierweise erstellst, beachte die folgenden Formalia:

  • Schriftsatz ist linksbündig und einzeilig.
  • Füge zwischen den einzelnen Werken du einen größeren Abstand (1.5 pt) ein.
  • Ab der zweiten Zeile wird bei jeder Quelle der Übersichtlichkeit halber eingerückt.
  • Jede Quellenangabe endet mit einem Punkt.

Sortiere alle Quellen alphabetisch nach Nachnamen der (ersten) Autoren. Zwischen verschiedenen Quellenarten wird dabei nicht unterschieden.

Wenn Autoren sowohl allein als auch in Zusammenarbeit mit anderen Autoren vorkommen, solltest du zunächst die eigenen Werke anführen.

Wenn ein Autor mit mehreren Werken in deiner Bachelorarbeit zitiert wird, solltest du diese aufsteigend, beginnend mit dem ältesten Werk, sortieren.

Beispiel Literaturverzeichnis Harvard-Reihenfolge

  • 1.1 Alleinige Veröffentlichungen
  • 1.1.1 Ältere Veröffentlichungen
  • 1.1.2 Neuere Veröffentlichungen
  • 1.2 Gemeinsame Veröffentlichungen mit anderen Autoren

Literaturverzeichnis erstellen

Diesen Scribbr-Artikel zitieren

Wenn du diese Quelle zitieren möchtest, kannst du die Quellenangabe kopieren und einfügen oder auf die Schaltfläche „Diesen Artikel zitieren“ klicken, um die Quellenangabe automatisch zu unserem kostenlosen Zitier-Generator hinzuzufügen.

Theel, M. (2024, 18. Januar). Literaturverzeichnis Harvard: Regeln und Ausnahmen. Scribbr. Abgerufen am 22. Februar 2024, von https://www.scribbr.de/harvard-zitierweise/literaturverzeichnis-harvard/

Blogverzeichnis - Bloggerei.de

War dieser Artikel hilfreich?

Mandy Theel

Mandy Theel

Das hat anderen studierenden noch gefallen, beispiel literaturverzeichnis harvard-zitierweise, form-unterschiede bei der harvard-zitierweise, die harvard-zitierweise: literaturverweise im text, aus versehen plagiiert finde kostenlos heraus.

19th Edition of Global Conference on Catalysis, Chemical Engineering & Technology

  • Victor Mukhin

Victor Mukhin, Speaker at Chemical Engineering Conferences

Victor M. Mukhin was born in 1946 in the town of Orsk, Russia. In 1970 he graduated the Technological Institute in Leningrad. Victor M. Mukhin was directed to work to the scientific-industrial organization "Neorganika" (Elektrostal, Moscow region) where he is working during 47 years, at present as the head of the laboratory of carbon sorbents.     Victor M. Mukhin defended a Ph. D. thesis and a doctoral thesis at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (in 1979 and 1997 accordingly). Professor of Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Scientific interests: production, investigation and application of active carbons, technological and ecological carbon-adsorptive processes, environmental protection, production of ecologically clean food.   

Title : Active carbons as nanoporous materials for solving of environmental problems

Quick links.

  • Conference Brochure
  • Tentative Program

Watsapp

  • Map of Boston Exhibits
  • Map of Istanbul Exhibits
  • Timeline of Mumbai Exhibits
  • Looking Backward

A Display of Trains in the Moscow Metro Museum (Still Image)

http://dighist.fas.harvard.edu/courses/2015/HUM54/files/original/46e3f1e270cc4632591edaa21b64c9f2.jpg

Dublin Core

A Display of Trains in the Moscow Metro Museum

Description:

This is a display from the Public Museum of the Moscow Metro. It shows miniatures of three different kinds of train cars from the Metro system.

http://www.anothercity.ru/metro-nuseum-en

Contributor:

Sally H. Na

Collection:

Geolocation.

  • ← Previous Item
  • Next Item →

IMAGES

  1. Die 10 wichtigsten Zitierregeln für deine wissenschaftliche Arbeit

    harvard dissertation zitieren

  2. Richtig zitieren

    harvard dissertation zitieren

  3. Harvard Referencing Style & Format: Easy Guide + Examples

    harvard dissertation zitieren

  4. Die deutsche Harvard-Zitierweise

    harvard dissertation zitieren

  5. HARVARD ZITIERWEISE

    harvard dissertation zitieren

  6. Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Methode & Regeln im Überblick

    harvard dissertation zitieren

COMMENTS

  1. Dissertation zitieren

    Gib beim Zitieren von Dissertationen die Art der Arbeit und das Studienfach an. Falls die Arbeit nicht publiziert wurde, füge den Zusatz ,unveröffentlicht' und die Universität hinzu. Zitiere eine Dissertation nur, wenn es sich um Forschungsergebnisse oder Erkenntnisse des Autors selbst handelt, die Ergebnisse Mehrwert für deine Arbeit bieten und

  2. How to Cite a Dissertation in Harvard Style

    1. Basic Format In Harvard, the following in-text citation format is used for the dissertation: (Author Surname, Year Published) For example, 'Occasionally the talent for drawing passes beyond mere picture-copying and shows the presence of a real artistic capacity of no mean order. (Darius, 2014)'

  3. Dissertation zitieren: Doktorarbeiten richtig zitieren!

    Harvard Auch beim Zitieren nach der Harvard-Methode setzt du im Fließtext nur einen kurzen Verweis, der ein wenig anders ausfällt als nach APA (Meier 2021: 38). Und auch gehört der Vollverweis ins Literaturverzeichnis. Deutsche Zitierweise Bei der deutschen Zitierweise nutzt du Fußnoten und platzierst den Verweis in den Fußnotentext 1.

  4. Abschlussarbeit zitieren

    Die meisten Abschlussarbeiten erfüllen diese Bedingungen nicht, deshalb solltest du in der Regel nur Dissertationen zitieren. Möchtest du eine unveröffentlichte Abschlussarbeit als Quelle nutzen, solltest du ihre Zitierwürdigkeit überprüfen und ihre Verwendung unbedingt vorher mit deiner Betreuungsperson besprechen. Beachte

  5. Formatting Your Dissertation

    August 21, 2023 GSAS Policies Academic Requirements Application for Degree Credit for Completed Graduate Work Degree Requirements Doctor of Philosophy Ad Hoc Degree Programs Dissertations Acknowledging the Work of Others Advanced Planning Dissertation Submission Checklist Formatting Your Dissertation Publishing Options Submitting Your Dissertation

  6. Cite A Dissertation in Harvard style

    Level. Institution Name. Example: Darius, H. (2014). Running head: SAVANT SYNDROME - THEORIES AND EMPIRICAL FINDINGS. University of Skövde, University of Turku. In-text citation Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment. Template (Author Surname, Year Published) Example

  7. Guides and databases: Harvard: Thesis or dissertation

    Harvard; Thesis or dissertation; Search this Guide Search. Harvard. This guide introduces the Harvard referencing style and includes examples of citations. ... Title of thesis (in italics). Degree statement. Degree-awarding body. Available at: URL. (Accessed: date). In-text citation: (Smith, 2019)

  8. Dissertation zitieren

    Dissertation zitieren: Fazit. Ob APA-, Harvard- oder deutsche Zitierweise - richtiges Zitieren ist in jeder wissenschaftlichen Arbeit Pflicht. Da Studenten für ihre Haus-, Bachelor- oder Seminararbeiten oft aus einer Dissertation zitieren müssen, sollte man sich mit den Zitierregeln einer Dissertation auseinandersetzen, um Fehler in der ...

  9. A Quick Guide to Harvard Referencing

    When you cite a source with up to three authors, cite all authors' names. For four or more authors, list only the first name, followed by ' et al. ': Number of authors. In-text citation example. 1 author. (Davis, 2019) 2 authors. (Davis and Barrett, 2019) 3 authors.

  10. Dissertation richtig zitieren

    Harvard-zitierweise Die Harvard-Zitierweise unterscheidet sich von dem APA-Stil. Wende folgende Angaben an, um den Zitierstil richtig umzusetzen: • „Die Studie offenbart..." (vgl. Autor 1 Erscheinungsjahr : Seitenzahl). • „Der Verweis steht direkt im Fließtext." (Autor 1/Autor 2 Erscheinungsjahr: Seitenzahl)

  11. Dissertation zitieren • Das musst du beachten · [mit Video]

    Dissertation zitieren leicht gemacht Zitierregeln und Literaturverzeichnis Doktorarbeiten als Quelle mit kostenlosem Video Navigation überspringen. studyflix. Alle Inhalte Suche ... Harvard: Fischer, Anja (2022): Zitieren wie ein Profi, Dissertation, Germanistik, Augsburg: Uni-Verlag.

  12. Free Harvard Referencing Generator [Updated for 2024]

    Updated for 2024 Generate accurate Harvard reference lists quickly and for FREE, with MyBib! 🤔 What is a Harvard Referencing Generator? A Harvard Referencing Generator is a tool that automatically generates formatted academic references in the Harvard style.

  13. Free Harvard Referencing Generator

    There are many versions of Harvard referencing style. Our guidance reflects the rules laid out in Cite Them Right: The Essential Referencing Guide (12th edition) by Richard Pears and Graham Shields. Scribbr's free reference generator can create flawless Harvard style references for a wide variety of sources. Cite a webpage.

  14. Beispiele der Harvard-Zitierweise

    Um dir zu helfen hat Scribbr die Harvard Zitation verständlich beschrieben: Methode und Regeln im Überblick Literaturverweise im Text mit Harvard Das Literaturverzeichnis nach Harvard Tipp Erstelle deine vollständige Quellenangabe mit unserem Harvard-Generator. Harvard-Beispiele

  15. Find Dissertations and Theses

    How to search for Harvard dissertations. DASH, Digital Access to Scholarship at Harvard, is the university's central, open-access repository for the scholarly output of faculty and the broader research community at Harvard.Most Ph.D. dissertations submitted from March 2012 forward are available online in DASH.; Check HOLLIS, the Library Catalog, and refine your results by using the Advanced ...

  16. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    Harvard College Writing Center 1 Strategies for Essay Writing Table of Contents Tips for Reading an Assignment Prompt . . . . . 2-4 ... Harvard College Writing Center 8 Thesis Your thesis is the central claim in your essay—your main insight or idea about your source or topic. Your thesis should appear early in an academic essay, followed by a

  17. Die Harvard-Zitierweise: Quellenangaben im Text

    Bei dem Verweis im Text werden immer der Name des Autors, das Erscheinungsjahr des Werkes sowie die Seitenzahl angegeben. Verwende dabei folgendes Format: (Autor Jahr: Seitenzahl). Scribbr-Quellenvorschau: Harvard-Zitierweise im Text. <. Je nach Universität gibt es Abweichungen für die Harvard-Zitierweise. Wir zeigen dir in unserer Anleitung ...

  18. Harvard University Theses, Dissertations, and Prize Papers

    The Harvard University Archives ' collection of theses, dissertations, and prize papers document the wide range of academic research undertaken by Harvard students over the course of the University's history.

  19. Harvard's Plagiarism Problem Multiplies

    Harvard has a plagiarism problem. At the beginning of the year, Claudine Gay resigned as university president following a plagiarism scandal. Weeks later, the Washington Free Beacon published a report indicating that Harvard's chief diversity officer, Sherri Ann Charleston, apparently plagiarized passages in multiple academic papers.. Now allegations have emerged that another Harvard DEI ...

  20. Vladimir Smirnov Home Page (Владимир Александрович Смирнов)

    to the homepage of the Theoretical High Energy Physics Division . Last update: December 10, 2019

  21. Literaturverzeichnis Harvard: Regeln und Ausnahmen

    Am Ende deiner Abschlussarbeit brauchst du immer ein Literaturverzeichnis, das zur vollständigen und ausführlichen Angabe deiner Quellen dient. Quellen, die im Text genannt werden, müssen immer im Literaturverzeichnis angegeben werden.

  22. Victor Mukhin

    Catalysis Conference is a networking event covering all topics in catalysis, chemistry, chemical engineering and technology during October 19-21, 2017 in Las Vegas, USA. Well noted as well attended meeting among all other annual catalysis conferences 2018, chemical engineering conferences 2018 and chemistry webinars.

  23. A Display of Trains in the Moscow Metro Museum (Still Image)

    This is a display from the Public Museum of the Moscow Metro. It shows miniatures of three different kinds of train cars from the Metro system.

  24. The Next Battle in Higher Ed May Strike at Its Soul: Scholarship

    Marc Tessier-Lavigne, president of Stanford University, resigned in August after an investigation found serious flaws in studies he had supervised going back decades. Claudine Gay, president of Harvard University, resigned as the new year dawned, under mounting accusations of plagiarism going back to her graduate student days. Then, Neri Oxman, a former star professor at Massachusetts ...