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How to Write an Expository Essay | Structure, Tips & Examples

Published on July 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

“Expository” means “intended to explain or describe something.” An expository essay provides a clear, focused explanation of a particular topic, process, or set of ideas. It doesn’t set out to prove a point, just to give a balanced view of its subject matter.

Expository essays are usually short assignments intended to test your composition skills or your understanding of a subject. They tend to involve less research and original arguments than argumentative essays .

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Table of contents

When should you write an expository essay, how to approach an expository essay, introducing your essay, writing the body paragraphs, concluding your essay, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

Sometimes it won’t be directly stated that the assignment is an expository essay, but there are certain keywords that imply expository writing is required. Consider the prompts below.

The word “explain” here is the clue: An essay responding to this prompt should provide an explanation of this historical process—not necessarily an original argument about it.

Sometimes you’ll be asked to define a particular term or concept. This means more than just copying down the dictionary definition; you’ll be expected to explore different ideas surrounding the term, as this prompt emphasizes.

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how to write a conclusion for expository essay

An expository essay should take an objective approach: It isn’t about your personal opinions or experiences. Instead, your goal is to provide an informative and balanced explanation of your topic. Avoid using the first or second person (“I” or “you”).

The structure of your expository essay will vary according to the scope of your assignment and the demands of your topic. It’s worthwhile to plan out your structure before you start, using an essay outline .

A common structure for a short expository essay consists of five paragraphs: An introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Like all essays, an expository essay begins with an introduction . This serves to hook the reader’s interest, briefly introduce your topic, and provide a thesis statement summarizing what you’re going to say about it.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a typical introduction works.

In many ways, the invention of the printing press marked the end of the Middle Ages. The medieval period in Europe is often remembered as a time of intellectual and political stagnation. Prior to the Renaissance, the average person had very limited access to books and was unlikely to be literate. The invention of the printing press in the 15th century allowed for much less restricted circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.

The body of your essay is where you cover your topic in depth. It often consists of three paragraphs, but may be more for a longer essay. This is where you present the details of the process, idea or topic you’re explaining.

It’s important to make sure each paragraph covers its own clearly defined topic, introduced with a topic sentence . Different topics (all related to the overall subject matter of the essay) should be presented in a logical order, with clear transitions between paragraphs.

Hover over different parts of the example paragraph below to see how a body paragraph is constructed.

The invention of the printing press in 1440 changed this situation dramatically. Johannes Gutenberg, who had worked as a goldsmith, used his knowledge of metals in the design of the press. He made his type from an alloy of lead, tin, and antimony, whose durability allowed for the reliable production of high-quality books. This new technology allowed texts to be reproduced and disseminated on a much larger scale than was previously possible. The Gutenberg Bible appeared in the 1450s, and a large number of printing presses sprang up across the continent in the following decades. Gutenberg’s invention rapidly transformed cultural production in Europe; among other things, it would lead to the Protestant Reformation.

The conclusion of an expository essay serves to summarize the topic under discussion. It should not present any new information or evidence, but should instead focus on reinforcing the points made so far. Essentially, your conclusion is there to round off the essay in an engaging way.

Hover over different parts of the example below to see how a conclusion works.

The invention of the printing press was important not only in terms of its immediate cultural and economic effects, but also in terms of its major impact on politics and religion across Europe. In the century following the invention of the printing press, the relatively stationary intellectual atmosphere of the Middle Ages gave way to the social upheavals of the Reformation and the Renaissance. A single technological innovation had contributed to the total reshaping of the continent.

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An expository essay is a broad form that varies in length according to the scope of the assignment.

Expository essays are often assigned as a writing exercise or as part of an exam, in which case a five-paragraph essay of around 800 words may be appropriate.

You’ll usually be given guidelines regarding length; if you’re not sure, ask.

An expository essay is a common assignment in high-school and university composition classes. It might be assigned as coursework, in class, or as part of an exam.

Sometimes you might not be told explicitly to write an expository essay. Look out for prompts containing keywords like “explain” and “define.” An expository essay is usually the right response to these prompts.

An argumentative essay tends to be a longer essay involving independent research, and aims to make an original argument about a topic. Its thesis statement makes a contentious claim that must be supported in an objective, evidence-based way.

An expository essay also aims to be objective, but it doesn’t have to make an original argument. Rather, it aims to explain something (e.g., a process or idea) in a clear, concise way. Expository essays are often shorter assignments and rely less on research.

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How to Write a Conclusion for an Expository Essay

Writing a solid expository essay takes time, thought and effort. It is no small task to develop a strong thesis statement, gather and evaluate evidence to support your thesis and present your argument in a coherent manner. Once you craft the introduction and body of your essay, you may feel tempted to jot off a bland conclusion that does little more than restate your thesis. In reality, your conclusion is your chance to expose the larger implications of your thesis. Don't deny your reader the opportunity to learn something deeper about your topic. Instead, take the time to write a conclusion that leaves a lasting impression.

Develop and present your concluding thoughts in the form of a complete paragraph. There are no hard and fast rules about how long your conclusion needs to be, but strive to craft a fully developed concluding paragraph. Make sure your concluding remarks flow logically.

Avoid introducing new information into your concluding paragraph. Instead, bring together all the main points of your introduction and body and use a unifying conclusion to tie up any loose ends. Synthesize the information you have already presented in your essay and draw a conclusion based on what you now know.

Remind the reader of the central point of your thesis statement, but avoid restating your thesis word for word. Vary your language.

Avoid summarizing the material you presented in the introduction and body of your essay. Consider your conclusion an opportunity to reflect on your arguments and to offer one final, closing point.

Ask yourself meaningful questions about the material you presented and provide the answers in your conclusion. How is the information you presented relevant to you and your reader? What are the deeper implications of your thesis statement? What is the overall importance of your discussion?

Leave an impression. Recommend a specific course of action, answer any questions you may have posed in your introduction, reflect on any experiences you may have recorded in the body of your essay or offer one final telling example.

  • Purdue Online Reading Lab: The Expository Essay
  • Highline Community College; Conclusions for Expository Essays; Wendy Swyt
  • University of Northern Texas: Expository Essays

Judy Fisk has been writing professionally since 2011, specializing in fitness, recreation, culture and the arts. A certified fitness instructor with decades of dance training, she has taught older adults, teens and kids. She has written educational and fundraising material for several non-profit organizations and her work has appeared in numerous major online publications. Fisk holds a Bachelor of Arts in public and international affairs from Princeton University.

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Expository Essays

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The Modes of Discourse—Exposition, Description, Narration, Argumentation (EDNA)—are common paper assignments you may encounter in your writing classes. Although these genres have been criticized by some composition scholars, the Purdue OWL recognizes the wide spread use of these approaches and students’ need to understand and produce them.

What is an expository essay?

The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

Please note : This genre is commonly assigned as a tool for classroom evaluation and is often found in various exam formats.

The structure of the expository essay is held together by the following.

  • A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay.

It is essential that this thesis statement be appropriately narrowed to follow the guidelines set forth in the assignment. If the student does not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective or persuasive essay.

  • Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Without logical progression of thought, the reader is unable to follow the essay’s argument, and the structure will collapse.

  • Body paragraphs that include evidential support.

Each paragraph should be limited to the exposition of one general idea. This will allow for clarity and direction throughout the essay. What is more, such conciseness creates an ease of readability for one’s audience. It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph.

  • Evidential support (whether factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal).

Often times, students are required to write expository essays with little or no preparation; therefore, such essays do not typically allow for a great deal of statistical or factual evidence.

  • A bit of creativity!

Though creativity and artfulness are not always associated with essay writing, it is an art form nonetheless. Try not to get stuck on the formulaic nature of expository writing at the expense of writing something interesting. Remember, though you may not be crafting the next great novel, you are attempting to leave a lasting impression on the people evaluating your essay.

  • A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided.

It is at this point of the essay that students will inevitably begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize and come to a conclusion concerning the information presented in the body of the essay.

A complete argument

Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of the Great Depression and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation. In fact, if I were to end the exposition in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the Depression. Therefore, the expository essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument.

The five-paragraph Essay

A common method for writing an expository essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of:

  • an introductory paragraph
  • three evidentiary body paragraphs
  • a conclusion

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

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How to Write an Expository Essay: Writing Tips & Structure

Have you ever been tasked with writing an expository essay and found yourself struggling to convey information clearly and concisely? Expository essays are a unique form of academic writing, requiring a neutral stance and factual evidence to educate the reader on a specific topic.

In this step-by-step guide on how to write an expository essay, we’ll delve into the intricacies of crafting a compelling expository essay, from brainstorming to polishing the final draft. Prepare to embark on a journey to enhance your writing skills and master the art of expository writing.

Table of Contents

Expository Essay Writing: Key Takeaways

  • Expository essays are structured academic writing that analyze a given topic objectively.
  • This guide provides a comprehensive approach to crafting an expository essay, from idea generation and research through outlining, drafting, refining and polishing techniques.
  • The structure of the essay should include a precise thesis statement with evidence-based body paragraphs and transition words for coherence.

The Essence of Expository Essays

Expository essays are a type of structured academic writing that utilizes factual evidence to analyze or investigate a designated topic. Different from descriptive essays and personal opinion pieces, expository writing focuses on providing the reader with information about a given topic, maintaining a neutral stance. This objective description is crucial in academic settings, where expository essays are often assigned as a means of assessment and featured in various exam formats.

To write a good expository essay, it is important to select an engaging topic and articulate a precise, well-informed thesis statement. Examining expository essay examples can offer valuable insights into constructing a well-organized, informative essay. Remember, creativity and artistry can still be incorporated into expository writing, so don’t let the formulaic nature of such essays discourage you from developing a captivating piece.

Crafting an Effective Expository Essay Outline

An effective expository essay outline is crucial for organizing your thoughts and research, as it serves as the foundation of your essay. The basic structure of an expository essay comprises an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The more comprehensive your outline is, the less time you’ll need to spend on research and writing, ultimately making the writing process more efficient.

There is no specific length for an expository essay; however, it should be sufficient to effectively articulate the thesis statement. Typically, a five-paragraph essay is a common approach, with an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. By crafting a detailed outline, you can ensure that each section of your essay supports and builds upon your thesis statement, resulting in a cohesive and well-structured piece.

The Writing Process: Step-by-Step Guide

Now that we’ve covered the fundamentals of expository essays and the importance of outline, let’s dive into the step-by-step guide to writing an expository essay.

This guide will cover idea generation, research, outlining, drafting, refining, and polishing, providing a comprehensive approach to crafting a compelling expository essay, including problem and solution essay techniques.

Generating Ideas and Researching

The first step to write an expository essay is brainstorming potential expository essay topics. Consider the topics discussed in class, anticipate what your teacher might expect, and choose something that genuinely interests you. This will ensure that you are engaged in the writing process and motivated to create a captivating essay. After narrowing down your options, conduct research on each topic to determine if reliable sources are easily accessible and gain a more comprehensive understanding of the subject.

Once you have gathered sufficient information, it’s time to analyze your research and select an expository essay topic that best suits your interests and meets your instructor’s guidelines. Keep in mind that your chosen topic should be able to provide enough factual evidence to support your thesis statement, as this will be the core of your essay. By selecting a strong, engaging topic, you set the foundation for a successful expository essay.

Organizing Thoughts with an Outline

Creating an outline is essential for organizing your thoughts and laying the groundwork for your expository essay. Start by developing a strong thesis statement that outlines the main idea of your essay and provides a well-informed, reasoned response to your research question. Your outline should specify what information will be included in each paragraph, ensuring that each section of your essay supports your thesis statement.

The outline serves as a roadmap, guiding you through the writing process and helping you stay focused on your topic. By organizing your thoughts and research in a logical manner, you’ll find it easier to begin writing and stay on track throughout the development of your expository essay.

Drafting the Essay

With a comprehensive outline in hand, it’s time to start drafting your expository essay. Focus on crafting well-structured body paragraphs that stay on topic and provide factual evidence to support your thesis statement. It’s often beneficial to postpone writing the introduction until after you’ve completed the body paragraphs and conclusion, as this will allow you to develop a more accurate and engaging introduction based on the content of your essay.

As you write, use transition words and sentences to connect ideas, maintain narrative flow, and guide readers through your argument. This will ensure that your essay is coherent and easy to follow, ultimately enhancing the reader’s understanding of your topic.

Refining Your Draft

Once you’ve completed the first draft of your expository essay, it’s time to refine your work. Start by reorganizing content, ensuring that each sentence serves its purpose and enhances the reader’s understanding of your topic. Edit for clarity and coherence, and double-check that your essay remains focused on your thesis statement throughout.

As you review your draft, read the paper as if it’s your first encounter with the topic. This will help you determine if the essay is coherent and if the information provided is relevant to the intended purpose of each section. Remember to abstain from attempting to make a persuasive argument and to utilize opinions as evidence, as this can detract from the objective nature of your expository essay.

Polishing the Essay: Editing and Proofreading

The final step in crafting a compelling expository essay is editing and proofreading. Check for errors in grammar, spelling, and formatting, and ensure that your citations are accurate and adherent to the assigned style guide. Tools like Grammarly can be helpful in detecting errors and phrases that lack clarity, as well as ensuring a uniform tone throughout your essay.

In addition to self-editing, consider having someone else review your work. This can provide a fresh perspective and help identify any remaining inconsistencies or areas that need improvement. With your polished expository essay in hand, you’ll be ready to present your well-researched, informative, and engaging piece to your audience.

Analyzing Expository Essay Examples

Examining expository essay examples can be an invaluable tool in understanding how to create a well-structured, informative essay. By analysing the structure, style, and use of evidence in an expository essay example, you can gain insight into crafting your own compelling piece. Remember, it’s not recommended to directly source information or text from expository essay examples, but they can serve as an inspirational reference for your work.

Take note of how the thesis statement is presented, how the body paragraphs are organized, and how the conclusion effectively summarizes the main points of the essay. By carefully studying expository essay examples, you’ll be better equipped to create your own well-crafted, engaging, and informative piece.

Diving into Expository Essay Types

Expository essays come in various forms, each with its own unique purpose and structure. Understanding the different types of expository essays can aid in selecting a subject and organizing your essay’s overall trajectory and framework. The primary types of expository essays include classification, definition, process, compare-and-contrast, and cause-and-effect essays.

Classification essays identify and organize various subjects within one category, outlining their individual characteristics. A definition essay, on the other hand, provides a clear and concise explanation of a subject matter. A process essay outlines the steps necessary for completing a task, providing the reader with an understanding of the procedure.

Compare-and-contrast essays analyze the differences and similarities between sources cited. Cause-and-effect essays investigate the reasons behind a particular occurrence and the consequences that follow. Familiarizing yourself with these expository essay types will expand your writing capabilities and help you craft a compelling piece.

Structuring Your Expository Essay

To ensure a coherent and engaging expository essay, it’s crucial to understand the expository essay structure, which includes a distinct introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion that support your thesis statement. The introduction should include a precise and succinct thesis statement that outlines the primary focus of your essay, providing the reader with a clear understanding of the topic at hand.

Each body paragraph should contain evidence that supports your thesis statement, ensuring that every section of your essay contributes to the overall argument.

Finally, the conclusion should succinctly summarize the main points and provide a clear and concise statement of the essay’s overarching message. By following this structure, you’ll create a well-organized, informative, and engaging expository essay that effectively communicates your ideas to your audience.

The Role of the Thesis Statement

The thesis statement serves as the foundation of your expository essay, providing a succinct, precise synopsis of the primary point of your essay. A strong, clear, and memorable thesis statement is essential, as it gives the reader a clear understanding of the main focus of your essay and sets the tone for the entire piece. Examples of effective thesis statements include: “The effects of global warming are becoming increasingly evident in our environment,” “The use of technology in the classroom can have both positive and negative effects,” and “The rise of social media has had a profound impact on our society.”

To create a thesis statement, identify your essay topic, conduct research on the topic, and formulate a main idea or argument based on your findings. This statement should be concise and direct, ensuring that your essay remains focused and well-organized throughout the writing process.

Enhancing Your Essay with Transition Words and Sentences

Transition words and sentences play a crucial role in connecting ideas, maintaining narrative flow, and guiding readers through your argument. They serve as the binding element that keeps your essay’s foundation intact, preventing confusion and ensuring that your argument remains coherent and easy to follow. A lack of logical progression of thought can make it difficult for the reader to comprehend your essay’s argument, ultimately compromising its structure.

Examples of transition words and phrases include “however,” “in addition,” “on the other hand,” and “as a result.” By incorporating these transitions into your expository essay, you’ll create a seamless reading experience that effectively communicates your ideas and maintains the reader’s interest throughout the piece.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you start an expository essay.

To start an expository essay, begin with a general statement about your topic that captures the reader’s attention. This should be followed by your thesis or main point of the essay, which can be further supported with three body paragraphs.

Use a formal tone and avoid introducing unnecessary information or summaries.

How do you write an expository essay step by step?

Writing an expository essay can be done step-by-step by organizing your thoughts, researching the topic, formulating a thesis statement, writing an introduction, composing the body paragraphs, and summarizing the essay in the conclusion.

Finally, revise and proofread the essay to ensure its quality.

What is an example of an expository essay?

An example of an expository essay is one that provides readers with a step-by-step guide on how to do something, or a descriptive essay that is loaded with details.

These types of essays seek to explain a particular topic in an informative and logical manner.

What are the 4 parts of the expository essay?

An expository essay is composed of four parts: an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

It provides a clear and organized explanation of a specific topic.

What is an expository essay?

An expository essay is an essay that communicates factual information, requiring the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning it in a clear and concise manner.

It is important for the student to be able to organize their thoughts and ideas in a logical manner in order to effectively communicate their argument. Splitting the text into paragraphs is a key to better readability. Start a new paragraph whenever you introduce a new idea or change direction in your argument. This will be a success.

In conclusion, crafting a compelling expository essay requires careful planning, research, and organization. By understanding the essence of expository essays, creating an effective outline, following a step-by-step writing process, and analyzing examples, you can develop your writing skills and create an engaging, informative piece.

Familiarize yourself with the different types of expository essays and the importance of structuring your essay to support your thesis statement. Remember to enhance your essay with transition words and sentences, ensuring a smooth, coherent reading experience for your audience. With these tools and techniques in hand, you’re well on your way to mastering the art of expository writing.

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How to Write an Expository Essay

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  • 29th March 2020

An expository essay explains something. This means investigating an idea, looking at evidence, coming to a conclusion, and explaining your thinking. But how do you write a strong expository essay? Our top tips include:

  • Read the essay prompt carefully and using it to guide your research.
  • Come up with a thesis statement (i.e., a position that you’ll explain).
  • Plan the structure of your essay before you start writing.
  • Once you have a first draft, revise and proofread to make sure it is perfect.

For more advice on how this works, check out the guide below.

1. Read Your Essay Prompt

Most expository essay prompts will ask you to do one of the following:

  • Define and explain a concept or theory.
  • Compare and contrast two ideas.
  • Examine a problem and propose a solution.
  • Describe a cause and effect relationship.
  • Explain a step-by-step process.
  • Analyze a broad subject and classify examples into groups.

When you’ve been set an expository assignment, then, check the prompt or question carefully. You can use the phrasing to guide your research. You may also need to select a topic to write about. If so, try to think of something:

  • You already know at least something about.
  • You find interesting enough to research.
  • That fits with the instructions in the essay prompt (e.g., if you’ve been asked to contrast two things, you’ll need a topic that allows for a comparison).
  • That is narrow enough to discuss in one essay.

Start by brainstorming topics, then narrow it down to one or two ideas.

2. Come Up with a Thesis Statement

Once you have a topic, you’ll need to do some research and develop a thesis statement. This is the proposition or position that you’ll explain in your essay.

Your thesis statement should be something you can back up with evidence and facts, as well as something that answers the question in your essay prompt. Keep in mind, too, that an expository essay should present a balanced account of the facts available, not personal opinions. For instance, we’ve come up with thesis statements for a few example essay prompts:

When you’ve selected a thesis, make sure you’ve got evidence to back it up! This may mean doing a little more research before you start writing.

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3. Structuring an Expository Essay

The exact length and content of your essay will depend on the topic and prompt. However, most expository essays follow a similar basic structure:

  • Introduction – A paragraph where you introduce the essay topic and your thesis statement (i.e., the issue or idea you will explain in the essay).
  • Main Body – A series of short paragraphs in which you explain your thesis statement, providing evidence and arguments to support each point.
  • Conclusion – A final paragraph where you restate your thesis and how your evidence supports this. Try not to introduce any new information here (if it’s important, it should go in the main body).
  • References – If required, include a bibliography of sources you’ve used.

Before you start writing, then, create an essay outline with the structure above in mind and plan what each paragraph will say.

4. Editing and Proofreading

When you have a first draft, take a break and re-read it. Now comes the redrafting ! This is where you go back over your essay and look for areas to improve. Do you provide enough evidence? Is your argument clear? Even a few tweaks may increase your mark, so make sure to redraft at least once!

Finally, make sure to have your essay proofread before you submit it for marking. This will ensure your writing is error free and easy to read, giving you an even better chance of getting the grades you deserve.

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How To Write The Best Conclusions For Your Expository Essays

conclusion for expository essay

Table of Contents

Importance of closure.

No matter what you are writing, it has distinct phases of progression before coming to end. But writers should keep in mind the importance of closure and how to move through the writing before it. A closure or conclusion serves a very important purpose in an essay as it ties all the loose ends and provides a fitting closing to the discussion.

Before setting out to write the whole essay, writers should understand the importance of conclusions and mold their writing around them. This will help them in keeping a steady pace and sign off naturally. Otherwise, the whole discussion could fall apart.

Introduction to Expository Essays

Before we move on to cover the tips and professional ways to conclude an expository essay, let us take a look at the expository essay itself.

Defining an expository essay is not a difficult feat. Simply put, this essay conveys factual information to the readers based on facts and hard figures. There is no room for the writer to showcase his signature prose style, both in an understated or overstated manner.

There is no single class of expository essays as they are divided into different types and forms to convey the point better. The most common types include cause and effect essays, compare and contrast essays, classification essays, as well as definition essays.

Another thing that sets an expository essay apart from narrative and descriptive essays is its reliance on objective content and unbiased tone and voice. However, it is similar to those when it comes to the structure and formatting of the essay.

Distinguishing Features of An Expository Essay

When we try to understand and learn a thing, it is necessary to understand the things that make it or break it. In the case of expository essays , writers need to learn the hallmarks or distinguishing features of expository essays that set them apart.

This section is dedicated to taking a look at the characteristics that are exclusive to expository essays only. Also, they are prerequisites because their absence will denature the write-up.

Objectivity At Its Core

If you did not know already, it is the best time to know that there is no room for subjectivity and sentimentalism in expository essays. One of its hallmarks is objectivity and actionable knowledge across the sections. That’s why writers cannot express their personal opinions or commentary because it will affect the very foundations of the essay. Arguments and developments must be backed by empirical evidence alone. Anything less and it will not be an expository essay.

Neutral Voice And Tone

Descriptive essays  are adorned with flowery phrases and figurative language because they add to the value of the subject or topic. Similarly, a narrative essay carries the biases and subjectivity of the writer, including charged or suggestive language. This is not possible in an expository essay. One of the traits of these essays is that they carry a neutral voice and tone. Anything opinionated or suggestive can affect the whole structure and contents of the essay.

Organized Information

Across different  types of expository essays  and different topics, the flow of the text remains the same. It is important to provide pieces of empirical evidence but they should be presented in an organized fashion. This helps writers compose well-researched sections and helps readers to follow and understand the context. That’s the reason how-to articles and manuals for vocations are written in expository format. This avoids ambiguity and helps readers reach predictable conclusions.

Ideas To Compose Exceptional Conclusions

Now that we have covered the nature and traits of expository essay writing, let us get to the core of this blog – writing conclusions to those essays.

Many novice writers and students give a lot of time and effort to introductions but wing it through to the conclusion. This results in poor structure overall and leaves readers with a bad taste in their mouths.

In this section, we will share some interesting yet doable ideas with students that will help them in writing strong conclusions to their expository essays.

Circling The Introduction

A conclusion should summarize the discussion from the introduction and the main body and produce in a compact form. This is the part and parcel of writing a conclusion of an essay . If you are at odds as to what to do with the conclusion of your expository essay, you can try to circle the discussion around the introduction. Use phrases and ideas from the introduction, especially the context, and lie the loose ends there.

Reiteration of Major Ideas

Writing a conclusion is about reinforcing the arguments and their evidence for the readers before they sign off. Still, this does not mean that they cannot carry the value of their own. Writers should not simply compress the main ideas and simply restate them in the conclusion. They can add value by expressing them in a more palatable manner. It will not only make it memorable but catchy and understandable, especially if you utilize one-liners.

No Place For New Development

The introduction is where writers set a hook, provide context, and then transition to the main body with the thesis statement. In the main body, all the developments happen, such as arguments and ideas along with their supporting materials. In the conclusion, it is time to wrap up the discussion and not reignite it with new developments, especially when the new ideas are contradictory to those in the main body. This should be kept in mind.

How to Write The Best Conclusions For Expository Essays

Now, let us go through the practical steps of writing conclusions for expository essays. Novice writers and students must keep all the steps in mind and practice them when they sit down to write their expository essays.

Highlighting The Thesis

If we trace the common threads between different sections of the essay, we can see that the topic and the thesis keep the structure from falling apart. Whether you need to write the introduction or the conclusion, keeping those common threads in mind can save a lot of time and hustle.

They add true value and character to the essay. So, highlighting the thesis in a new light can save the conclusion of your expository essay.

Outlining The Whole Section

Just like you outline the essay before setting out to write it, it is best to outline the conclusion part. This will help in composing a taut section with no room for errors and inconsistencies. You can start the conclusion with its hook, such as a transitional phrase. Then write the body which is the summary of all the main points and postulates developed in the main body of the essay. Then, conclude the conclusion with a catchy memorable line.

Making An Independent Section

Many experts believe that conclusions should be able to keep up on their own. It means they should be composed in such a way that they can serve as an independent section of the whole essay. We have seen that many students go through the conclusions of essays before reading the whole essay. So, it should be able to give a taste of the whole discussion succinctly and briefly. Even if that’s not possible, it should check all the boxes.

Signing Off At High Notes

Putting effort into the introduction is understandable and commendable, but shirking efforts during writing the conclusion is not acceptable. Like the ending of a movie or a novel, it should truly conclude the discussion, not merely end the text. There are many ways to achieve that effect.

We have discussed many in the above sections. Whatever way a student uses, it should let them sign off on high notes with one-liners and catchy statements for the desired effect.

Common Pitfalls In Writing Conclusions

This is a bright red flag for conclusions when they introduce a new argument. Writers have more than enough space in the main body to develop and prove arguments. There is no need to create and introduce new ones before signing off. This can contradict or confuse the reader which is against the purpose of writing an expository essay in the first place.

Of course, we are not suggesting that writers should use over-the-top language and phrasing in the conclusion. But we urge that they use assertive and objective language to get their points across. As we have discussed earlier, it is possible to make up for a poor introduction or the main body, but there is no remedy for a poor conclusion.

After discussing the arguments and covering the bases, it is natural for writers to feel opinionated. So, it is possible that the conclusion can have suggestive language or even outright commentary on the whole narrative. If that is the case with the first draft of your essay, you should proofread and edit it to remove the unwanted elements.

Why is the conclusion an important section of an expository essay?

A conclusion adds value to the whole essay before signing off. Since readers will read this section in the end and probably remember most of it, it is best to compose it in a way where it offers exceptional value. Otherwise, it is a lost opportunity for the writers.

What is the ideal word count for the closing section?

In a conventional essay structure, one paragraph is assigned for the conclusion as it is for the introduction. Writers should not be concerned with the word count in the earlier drafts. But if they have to, it should be around 125 to 150 words.

Can I add to the arguments in my conclusion?

No, you may not. The conclusion to an expository essay is there to tie the loose ends and summarize the discussion from the main body. You may reinforce the ideas further but it is best to never introduce new ideas or forward new arguments in the conclusion.

Do I need to stay objective while writing the conclusion to my expository essay?

Yes, objectivity is the key to writing expository essays. Biases and subjectivity can create ambiguity. This is against the nature and premise of expository essays. That’s why objectivity is the main ingredient of expository essays.

What is the effect of unbiased voice and tone in expository writing?

Expository essays consist of actionable content that can help readers reach the desired conclusion. For instance, manuals and how-to articles are written in this format where readers can achieve a feat through the write-up. That’s the reason unbiased voice and tone are one of the hallmarks of expository writing.

How can I make the word count for the conclusion while summarizing major points?

There is no need to worry about the word count for the conclusion in the early drafts. You should focus on the quality first. Then, when everything is in its place, you can cover the word count.

Touching All Bases For Readers’ Sake

Expository essay writing is the sum of all its parts that can add more value when they are combined. The main sections, including the introduction, the main body, and the conclusion are nothing if they are taken in isolation.

The conclusion is one of the major sections of an expository essay. Novice writers and students often wing the process of concluding the essay. In this guide, we have covered many bases, including how to write a good conclusion, the things you should avoid in the closing section, and more.

So, students should connect with this resource whenever they need to write exceptional conclusions to their essays!

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Every student has to write an expository essay at least once in their educational career. These are actually fairly simple essays to write, but they do require some serious research skills. Like most academic essays, the expository essay requires formal writing with an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Guide Overview

  • Focus on the thesis
  • Listen to the assignment
  • Explain, don’t argue
  • Revise and edit, revise and edit
  • Choosing the right topic

Tips for Writing a Kick-Butt Essay

Want to really impress your professor? Here are a few ways you can turn an ordinary essay into something that will blow their socks off.

Focus on the Thesis

Your thesis is the central point of the entire essay, so if it’s amazing, you’re off to a great start. Begin with this and make sure you decide on something that is impressive to kick off the essay.

Listen to the Assignment

Your professor may give you hints on what they’re looking for. If you just write down the basics of the assignment, you could miss out on some key points. For example, your professor may hint at a preferred topic or give tips that could result in a higher score. Write it all down and then analyze what is wanted before you write.

Long before you actually put pen to paper or fingers to keyboard to write the essay, you need to complete the pre-writing phase. This is where you do research and outline your essay. You’ll be amazed at how much better your writing is when you have these basic elements in place first. If you need help with these basic elements consider using an Expository Essay Template.

Explain, Don’t Argue

If you’re not careful, an expository essay can turn into a persuasive or argumentative essay. Focus on explaining the topic, rather than convincing people of something about it.

Revise and Edit, Revise and Edit

Going over the essay once to edit and polish isn’t really enough. If you’re tight on time, such as when writing an essay for an exam, just once will do. However, if you have time, it’s a good idea to edit immediately, then let the essay sit overnight or even longer. When you come back, you won’t be as close to the writing and can look at it more objectively.

Choosing the Right Topic

Topics for an expository essay vary widely, but ideally, you should select something you’re interested in writing about. Topics can answer a question such as “How can we prevent bullying in school?” or they can describe something like a historical building in your area. Other interesting topics to inspire you include:

  • How does technology affect our relationships?
  • How to treat a burn
  • What are the must-haves for a freshman in college?
  • How to handle anxiety attacks naturally
  • How to train your dog to stop barking on command
  • Research the history of a monument in your area
  • Why roller skating is a great exercise

As you can see, there’s no limit to the types of topics you can choose for your essay and it really comes down to what the professor assigns you and what you enjoy writing about. How narrow your topic is will also depend on how much you plan to write. An entire history of the Civil War won’t fit into two page, for example, so you’ll need to narrow it down to a specific battle or element of the Civil War.

Writing an expository essay can actually be a fun experience if you approach it the right way. When you enjoy the topic and are interested in it, your essay will show that and will stand out from those written out of boredom.

Finally, if you’re ever facing writer’s block for your college paper, consider WriteWell Essay Templates to help you get started.

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how to write a conclusion for expository essay

Quick and Easy Guide on How to Write an Expository Essay

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

Understanding What Is an Expository Essay

If you clicked on this article, then you must have recently been assigned an expository essay homework. There is also a possibility that you are here because you enjoy exploring different ideas and concepts rather than solely scratching the surface. Well, that explains why you decided to research more about expository essay writing. We won't leave you hanging, so let's delve right into the expository essay definition.

It's only reasonable to first give you a clear explanation of what is an expository essay and what this kind of paper tries to accomplish. Simply put, an expository essay presents information on a topic. It explains something about a situation, person, idea, or occurrence and communicates knowledge about it to the reader. It does not attempt to persuade the reader of a certain point of view or present a convincing case. An expository essay depends on facts rather than personal opinion since it aims to inform the reader about a subject.

Expository writing involves anything from sharing your day to outlining a job assignment. Therefore it wouldn't be unfair to say that it is the most popular type of writing in the world.

expository essay types

Expository Essay Topics

Speaking of the above, there must be plenty of options to write your expository paper on, right? You're correct! But one needs a properly worded title that would make great expository essay topics. That's why our research paper service covered some interesting areas below. You can browse myriads of choices and find one that is just right for your endeavor!

Expository Essay Topics About Education

  • School Dress Codes: A Physical And Mental Stress
  • The Idea Of Free Higher Education
  • The Issue With High School Massacres
  • The Importance of College Success
  • STEM versus STEAM educational approaches
  • How literate people differ from uneducated ones
  • The advantages of studying foreign languages.
  • What changes should be made to the educational system in your nation?
  • Does 'educated' have the same connotation as 'smart'?
  • Can someone receive a top-notch education at home?

Expository Essay Topics About Mental Health

  • Is it true that music impacts our mental and physical health?
  • Are acts of heroism and patriotic acts typical in terms of mental health?
  • Is there a need to increase mental health benefits under health insurance?
  • Comparatively speaking, does the American mental health system lag behind other nations?
  • Effects of mental health law
  • The connection between antisocial personality disorder and parenting methods
  • Learning-disabled kids can benefit greatly from school programs.
  • How social anxiety is influenced by digital communication
  • Patients with mental illness receiving physical care
  • Issues with mental health and grief therapy

Expository Essay Topics About Society

  • Advertisements seen via the lens of social science.
  • Prejudices towards African Americans.
  • The social implications of feminism.
  • Global refugee crisis.
  • Constructing a wall to separate Mexico and the US.
  • The psychology of implicit racial prejudice and discrimination
  • The effects of racism at work on the economy and mind.
  • Gender roles in society: shifting perspectives and effects on families.
  • Who was responsible for the cost of the War on Terror?
  • Is peace education receiving enough attention from society?

Expository Essay Topics About Politics

  • The connection between politics and religion
  • What are the pros and drawbacks of democracy?
  • How powerful are NGOs?
  • What are the UN's primary responsibilities?
  • What are the disadvantages of not having a state?
  • Has the US soured relations with its European allies?
  • What does the Human Development Index mean?
  • Celebrity Influence in political campaigning
  • What objectives does the anti-globalization movement seek to achieve?

How to Write an Expository Essay with an Expository Essay Outline

Outlining is one of the most vital steps for knowing how to write an expository essay. Many believe that creating an outline is a waste of time, but in reality, the more complete your expository essay plan is, the fewer hours you will have to devote to research and writing. An expository essay outline divides each paragraph of the essay into various components. By doing so, you may divide a more complex activity into more manageable components and better understand how various pieces of information will work together. Let's go through each section of the expository essay format prepared by our writer.

expository essay outline

I. Introduction

So, how to start expository essay on a strong note? Consider opening with a bold claim that is related to your topic. After that, go on to briefly describe your subject's significance. Finally, make a statement about your essay's core thesis or objective.

  • Background information
  • Thesis statement

II. Body Paragraphs

In your first body paragraph. introduce the first major point that backs up your primary statement. Then, support your claim with instances or facts, and then explain how these examples or evidence link to your thesis and support your core notion. Remember to include a transitional sentence that relates to the following paragraph.

If you follow a five paragraph essay format, then feel free to develop three body paragraphs with the similar order.

  • Topic sentence

III. Conclusion

In your concluding paragraph, try restating your thesis statement in a different way to successfully conclude your work. Then put your essay's essential ideas in a brief summary before concluding with a powerful remark that will stay with your readers.

  • Restate thesis
  • Closing sentence

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Even though you now know a lot about the expository essay format, there are other things to keep in mind as well. In this section, we'll go over the specific steps you should take when figuring out how to write an expository essay.

Brainstorming Ideas

The absolute first thing you should do when given an expository essay assignment is to carefully go over the guidelines. Make sure you completely understand what is required of you. If it is for class, you may be limited to certain topics and word counts, there may be restrictions on the quality of sources you can use, etc. You might write an incredible essay but get a low grade because you missed out on some small restriction or guideline.

Once you know exactly what you are supposed to do, it's time to think about different concepts you would like to explain. Make sure you are aware of the different types of expository essays so that when you brainstorm topics you have a tentative idea of what type of expository essay would be best suited for that topic.

Think about what has been covered in class, what the teacher might expect, and what you find interesting to try and come up with a list of topics. Do a little bit of research on each topic to figure out whether you can easily find reputable sources and to gain a further understanding of the topic. After keeping all these things in mind, you should end up with an expository essay topic that is appropriate, engaging, and high-scoring.

Fill Up an Outline

Once you have zeroed in on a topic it's time to do research. One of the best ways to plan your writing is to use an expository essay outline to organize interesting information. While conducting research focus on the body paragraphs rather than on the introduction or conclusion. Think about three main ways you can explain the topic and put information that fits into those subtopics under the appropriate body paragraphs.

While conducting research and filling out an outline, think about potential thesis statements. Coming up with a thesis statement too early will restrict your research, so it is better to develop a thesis statement as you find out more and more information. That being said, by the end of the planning stage you should have a finalized thesis statement

Planning out your essay beforehand will give direction to your research, cut down on the amount of time you spend on the assignment, improve the overall flow of the final essay, and make the actual writing process much easier.

Write the First Draft

Now is the time to translate your outline into full sentences. It is often useful to leave the writing of the introduction till the end because after writing the body paragraphs you will have a better idea of what to say in an introduction, but make sure that you write down your thesis statement.

Use the information you have found to create a cohesive analysis of the topic in each body paragraph. Make sure that the information you present is on topic and connects to the other facts around it. Think about what the purpose of each body paragraph is and question whether the information you are presenting fits that purpose or not. Make sure to use transition words within the paragraph and use transition sentences between paragraphs to improve overall comprehensibility and flow.

Finalize Your Draft

Go over the first draft of the essay and focus on whether the different paragraphs make sense or not. Don't be afraid to reorganize sections or completely get rid of some pieces of information. As you write your draft, new ways of expressing the information can come to mind that will make the overall essay more powerful.

Make sure that you are not trying to make a persuasive argument and that you are using facts rather than opinions as evidence.

Go over each sentence to make sure that it is clear and that it fits the purpose of the paragraph it is in. Look at the information you have included and make sure that it is useful and enhances understanding of the topic. It is better to have less information than more if the information is distracting or does not add anything to the essay.

Try and read the paper as if it is the first time you are coming across the topic to see if it makes sense or not. Congratulations, you are just one step away from being able to submit an expository essay!

Editing and Proofreading

Go over the final draft of your essay and check for formatting errors, grammatical errors, spelling mistakes, etc and make sure that it complies with all the guidelines of the assignment. Finally, ask a friend or relative to go over the paper to do the last check. If you feel like you still need to make a lot of changes, don't be disheartened, spend the extra time to make the changes or reach out to expository essay writing service .

Expository Essay Examples

One of the best ways to learn how to write an expository essay is to look at an expository essay example. Looking at expository essay examples can give you a deeper understanding of what is expected as well as how to write an essay that flows well. Make sure that you use any examples you find as inspiration rather than a place to directly source information or text!

Expository Essay Example

The shift from traditional to current methods in treating diseases has improved the quality of many services, products, and processes. However, many regions worldwide are still applying traditional medicines (Stefanov et al., 2020). Therefore, conventional western medicine and alternative Eastern medicine are two recognized approaches to treating multiple diseases. Researchers have developed the foundational differences between these two approaches that have helped establish the pros and cons of each. Each approach has advantages and drawbacks. There have been debates on which approach is cheaper in terms of time and cost of treatment. Also, there is ongoing concern on which approach is safer than the other.
As of 2019, there were over 3.5 billion social media users globally, and this figure still increases by 9% each year. It is impossible to deny that social media has become an important part of many people’s lives. There are various positive effects linked with the platforms, including better connectivity. However, addiction to social media platforms, the increased comparisons between individuals, and the fear of missing out have increased depression and sadness. Social media addiction has become rampant, which has negatively influenced the lives of many individuals in society. Checking and scrolling through the different social media platforms has become increasingly popular over time, leading to excessive and compulsive use.

Now that you know whats an expository essay, you must agree that writing an expository essay is a great method to learn how to effectively communicate information while also pursuing an interest of yours. Therefore, there are many ways in which knowing how to convey ideas and explain things will help you both professionally and individually.

And if you ever feel like you need an extra push towards pursuing your dream academic life, consider us your go-to college life partner. We won't criticize you no matter how many times you need essay writing help . The EssayPro team is loyal, always reliable, and never judgmental! 

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FAQs on Expository Essay Writing

If the information was not quite enough for you to create an outstanding paper, our college essay writer has yet to supply you with further details about expository essays. Below you'll find the most frequently asked questions on this matter, so you won't have to spend extra time and effort researching any unanswered questions.

What are the Different Types of Expository Essays?

What is the most important part of the expository essay structure, what is the main idea in expository writing, related articles.

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How to Write Conclusions for Expository Papers

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The main reason that it's so difficult to write a conclusion is that all of the content of a paper has already been said, so a writer must avoid repeating himself while also not introducing anything new. The best conclusions are brief and clear -- most essays under 10 pages require only a paragraph or two. Write a succinct and powerful conclusion to leave the reader feeling that the information was covered thoroughly and that the paper was worth reading.

New Context for Introductory Ideas

The main purpose of a conclusion in an expository paper is to look back at your original ideas -- the content in your introduction -- in the context of all the things you stated in the main body of the essay. The simplest way to approach this is thinking of your conclusion as an answer. For example, now that the reader has has seen all your references and quotes in an essay on "The Great Gatsby," your conclusion explains how all that supports your interpretation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's commentary on the American upper class.

Reiterating Your Thesis

In the introduction to an expository paper, there is almost always a thesis -- a statement about the topic which is to be explored in the body of the essay. A literary essay might have a thesis like, "Fitzgerald's treatment of Daisy and Tom reveals the author's distaste for what he views as a shallow and selfish aristocracy." The body of the paper provides evidence to support this claim, primarily in the form of things Daisy and Tom have said which show them to be shallow and selfish. This evidence is then reiterated in the conclusion. A concluding sentence to match the thesis might say something like, "Although Daisy and Tom possess wealth and grace, they are ultimately superficial and self-interested. Fitzgerald does not intend for them to be likeable characters in any sense."

Use Your Transitions

Transitions in an essay help your ideas flow together gracefully, rather than seeming entirely disconnected, like items on a list. Because their task is simply to create connections, transitions can be extremely useful for finding ways to summarize a paper without sounding repetitive. For example, a transition in a paper about "The Great Gatsby" might read, "Despite the grace and nobility evident in Tom and Daisy's house, these qualities are entirely shallow." Another transition in the same paper might read, "The final and perhaps saddest display of superficiality and coldness appears just before Gatsby's funeral, when Tom and Daisy move away so as to avoid attending such an unseemly affair." These transitions provide two important clues that can be used in writing a conclusion: first, that Tom and Daisy might seem noble at first, and second, that they remain shallow and apathetic through to the end of the story.

Things to Avoid

The most common error in writing conclusions is for a writer to simply restate the introduction as a conclusion. This can be remedied by incorporating some of the "discoveries" from the body paragraphs to give the conclusion context that the introduction did not have. There are other errors, however, that you should avoid with great care. First, don't use phrases like "in conclusion" or "to conclude." When a work is written, your readers can see that it's the conclusion. Second, don't introduce any brand new information. This includes new research and evidence as well as new arguments. Finally, don't write a conclusion that covers only a portion of your paper. The conclusion, while not detailed, should represent the essay in its entirety, not just one point or section.

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Amber Hathaway is an English teacher in the Boston area. She has earned bachelor and masters degrees in English education, and is currently licensed to teach ELA in grades 8-12. She specializes in curriculum development and program design.

  • How it works

How to Write an Expository Essay

Published by Grace Graffin at August 17th, 2021 , Revised On July 26, 2023

Expository means “to describe or explain something” . It is related to the words ‘exposition’, ‘expound’, and ‘expose’ – to explain or reveal the meaning, to lay open, speak one’s mind.

Whenever there is a need to gather research and describe an idea, a  topic , or a process clearly and logically, it is done in the form of an expository  essay .

An expository essay requires the writer to take a balanced approach to the subject matter rather than justifying a particular point of view.

Expository essays are assigned to students to evaluate their subject knowledge and composition skills. When compared with  argumentative essays , they involve a lot less research.

Definition of Expository Essay

“The expository essay is the  type of essay  that involves an investigation of an idea or topic, appraises relevant supporting evidence material, and presents an argument in a clear and concise manner. ”

When to Write an Expository Essay

Your school or university could assign an expository essay to you as coursework or as part of an online exam.

However, the guidelines may or may not clearly state that your assignment is an expository essay. If that is the case, then look for keywords like ‘explain’, ‘describe’, ‘define’, etc., to be sure that what has been asked for is an expository essay.

You might even be asked to explain and emphasise a particular concept or term. Writing a simple definition will not be enough because you will be expected to explore the ideas in detail.

Writing an Expository Essay

An expository essay should not be based on your  personal  experiences and opinions. It rather takes an objective approach. You will be expected to explain the topic in a balanced way without any personal bias.

Make sure to avoid the first and second person (“I” and “You”) when writing an expository essay.

How to Structure an Expository Essay

The  structure  and format of your expository essay assignment will depend on your school’s guidelines and the topic you are investigating. However, it is always a good idea to develop an outline for your  essay  before starting to work.

The Five-Paragraph Essay Writing Approach

An expository essay will require you to take the five-paragraph essay approach: an  introductory paragraph , a main body paragraph , and a concluding paragraph . This is often referred to as the hamburger style of the essay because, like a hamburger, it contains five main parts: the introduction and conclusion being the bun that encapsulates everything.

Rationale and Thesis Statement

Start your essay  with a rationale and thesis, also known as the  thesis statement , so your readers know what you set out to achieve in your expository essay assignment. Ensure the thesis statement is narrow enough to follow the guidelines in the assignment brief. If the thesis statement is weak and too broad, you will struggle to produce a flawless expository essay.

The Framework

Construct a framework, so you know what elements will constitute the basis of your essay.

Expository Essay Introduction

Like other  essay types , an expository essay begins with an  introduction , including a hook, background to the topic, and a thesis statement. Once you have grabbed the readers’ interest, it will be easier to get them to read the remaining essay.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will i need the skill of expository writing after i finish my studies.

It depends on what you are studying for. While you might or might not write any more expository essays after your formal education has ended, the skill will be very useful in certain careers, such as business reports, journalism, and in scientific and technical writing.

How does an expository essay differ from an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay is usually longer and requires more research. It starts with a claim about something that will need supporting evidence. And both sides of the argument need to be discussed. In an expository essay, there is no requirement to make an original argument and defend/support it.

What is the purpose of expository essays?

This style of essay is necessary when you have to showcase your knowledge on a given subject, or your ability to gather research on one and present your findings.

How long is an expository essay?

There is no fixed length but an expository essay could be part of an exam, in which case it might only be 1,000 words or less. They are usually shorter than argumentative essays . It can depend on the subject under discussion. You will likely be given instructions on the required word count.

Are there different types of expository essay?

There are six different types of expository essay, each with a different purpose.

The six types are:

Process essay – describing a task, a method, how to complete something Cause and effect essay – why something happened and its effects Problem-solution essay – provide analysis of problems and their solutions Compare and contrast essay – describe the similarities and differences between two subjects Definition essay – define the topic in detail and explain the how, what, and why Classification essay – separate the topic’s categories and define them in detail

When you are assigned your essay, you should be able to distinguish which of these approaches you are required to take.

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What is an Expository Essay and How to Write It

What is an expository essay and how to write it

You’ve been asked to write an expository essay on a particular topic. You know that an essay is generally a written composition that is usually limited in length and reflects the author’s perspective. However, the “expository” part is a little less clear. Keep reading, and you’ll get enough information to understand what an expository essay is and how to create an effective expository essay that meets the assignment requirements.

Table of Contents

What is an expository essay, what is the purpose of expository writing, when should you write an expository essay, 5 types of expository essays, how to structure an expository essay, how to write an expository essay, key takeaways, frequently asked questions about expository essays.

The expository essay is the appropriate type of essay to write if you need to inform your audience. If your intent is to critically compare, argue, or persuade, you will want to consider a different essay format. To explain it in more detail:

  • An expository essay is a type of academic writing that aims to present a balanced and objective analysis of a specific topic.
  • Expository essays often employ various techniques to enhance clarity and understanding. These techniques may include definition, comparison and contrast, cause and effect analysis, problem and solution exploration, or descriptive explanations. The writer should also ensure that the essay maintains a neutral and objective tone, avoiding personal biases or emotional language.
  • In an expository essay, the writer typically starts with an introduction that presents the topic and provides an overview of what will be discussed in the essay. The body paragraphs then delve into the details, presenting evidence, examples, and relevant information to support the main points. Each paragraph should focus on a specific aspect or subtopic, and the information should be organized logically and coherently.
  • Expository essays are commonly assigned in academic settings as they encourage critical thinking, research skills, and the ability to present information in a clear and concise manner.
  • The ability to write an expository essay is an essential skill for students and professionals. It promotes critical thinking, objectivity, and clear and concise communication.

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

The primary goal of expository writing is to explain or clarify a concept, process, or phenomenon using evidence, examples, and logical reasoning. Unlike persuasive or argumentative essays, the purpose of an expository essay is not to convince the reader of a particular viewpoint or opinion, but rather to provide clear and concise information.

The main objectives of expository writing are:

  • Informing: Expository writing aims to educate and provide readers with new or valuable information. It seeks to convey facts, details, concepts, or ideas about a topic in a straightforward and concise manner.
  • Explaining: Expository writing helps readers grasp complex subjects by breaking them down into simpler terms. It aims to clarify abstract concepts, processes, or phenomena, making them more accessible and understandable.
  • Instructing: Expository writing provides step-by-step instructions or guidelines on how to perform a task, accomplish a goal, or understand a process. It offers a clear sequence of actions or explanations to ensure readers can follow and replicate the instructions.
  • Presenting an analysis: Expository writing often involves analyzing and evaluating information, data, or evidence related to a particular subject. It may include comparing and contrasting different viewpoints, examining cause-and-effect relationships, or offering an objective evaluation of a situation.

Overall, the purpose of expository writing is to provide readers with accurate, unbiased, and well-organized information about a specific topic. It aims to enhance understanding, broaden knowledge, and facilitate learning by presenting information in a clear, coherent, and logical manner.

An expository essay is a good choice when the goal is to inform, explain, describe, or instruct. You may be assigned an expository essay as part of an in-class exam or coursework assignment. Here are some common situations in which writing an expository essay would be appropriate:

  • Academic Assignments: Expository essays are frequently assigned in educational settings. Teachers often use this type of essay to assess students’ understanding of a particular subject or to teach them how to research and present information effectively. They are common in subjects such as English, history, science, social studies, or any discipline that requires a clear explanation or analysis of a topic.
  • Instructional or How-to Writing: When you want to provide step-by-step instructions or guidance on how to perform a task, solve a problem, or achieve a specific outcome, an expository essay can be an appropriate format. This type of writing is commonly used in manuals, guidebooks, tutorials, or any instructional material.
  • Journalism or News Writing: Expository writing is prevalent in journalism, where the goal is to inform readers about current events, news stories, or investigative reports. Journalists strive to present objective information, provide background details, and explain complex issues clearly to their audience.
  • Professional or Technical Writing: In various professional fields, such as business, healthcare, engineering, or law, expository writing is utilized to convey information to colleagues, clients, or the general public. This includes writing reports, memos, manuals, research papers, or any form of communication that requires clear and factual presentation of information.

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

Expository essays can serve different purposes and present information in various ways. Here are five common types of expository essays:

  • Descriptive essay: This type of expository essay focuses on describing a person, place, object, event, or any subject in detail. It aims to create a vivid and sensory-rich portrayal of the topic, using language that appeals to the reader’s senses and emotions.
  • Process essay: Also known as a “how-to” essay, a process essay explains a sequence of steps or procedures to accomplish a task or achieve a particular outcome. It provides clear instructions and guidance, breaking down complex processes into manageable and easy-to-follow stages.
  • Compare-and-contrast essay: This type of expository essay explores the similarities and differences between two or more subjects. It involves examining various aspects, characteristics, or elements of the subjects and highlighting their similarities, differences, or both.
  • Cause-and-effect essay: A cause-and-effect essay explores the reasons (causes) behind an event, situation, or phenomenon, as well as the consequences (effects) that result from it. It aims to analyze and explain the relationship between causes and effects, demonstrating how one factor leads to another.
  • Problem-and-solution essay: In this type of expository essay, a specific problem or issue is identified and analyzed, followed by the presentation of potential solutions or strategies to address it. The essay outlines the problem, examines its causes and effects, and proposes practical solutions or recommendations.

It’s important to note that these are not the only types of expository essays, and there can be variations or combinations of these types. Additionally, within each type, the specific approach and structure can vary depending on the requirements of the assignment or the writer’s purpose.

Structuring an expository essay involves organizing your thoughts, ideas, and information in a clear and logical manner. Here is a commonly used structure for an expository essay:

  • Begin with an attention-grabbing hook to engage the reader.
  • Provide some background information on the topic to set the context.
  • Present a clear and concise thesis statement that states the main idea or purpose of the essay.
  • Start each paragraph with a clear topic sentence that introduces the main point of the paragraph.
  • Support your topic sentence with evidence, facts, examples, or expert opinions that relate to the main point.
  • Provide detailed explanations, analysis, or descriptions to clarify and develop your ideas.
  • Use transitional words and phrases to ensure smooth flow and coherence between paragraphs and ideas.
  • Each paragraph should focus on a specific aspect or subtopic related to the main idea.
  • Restate the thesis statement but rephrase it in a way that reinforces the main idea.
  • Summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs.
  • Avoid introducing new information or ideas in the conclusion.
  • End with a closing statement that leaves a lasting impression.

Writing an expository essay involves a systematic approach to presenting information in a clear and objective manner. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to write an expository essay:

  • Understand the purpose and requirements: Familiarize yourself with the purpose of the essay and any specific guidelines or requirements. Then, determine the topic or subject of your expository essay and gather relevant information and resources.
  • Conduct research and gather information: Conduct thorough research on your topic to gather factual information, examples, evidence, or expert opinions.
  • Plan and outline: Develop a clear and coherent outline that includes an introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Decide on the main points or subtopics you will cover in each paragraph of your expository essay and arrange your ideas in a logical order that flows well.
  • Write the introduction: Be sure to include a clear and concise thesis statement that states the main idea or purpose of your expository essay.
  • Write the body paragraphs: Write one paragraph for each main idea, using transitions to ensure a smooth flow throughout.
  • Write the conclusion: Restate your thesis statement and summarize the evidence.
  • Revise and edit: Review your expository essay for clarity, coherence, and logical flow, and check for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors. Remember to always maintain an objective tone and focus on presenting information rather than expressing personal opinions.

As you can see, effective expository essays vary widely based on their topic and ultimate purpose. However, they have several important characteristics in common. When you’re writing an expository essay, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Use clear, concise, and formal language, avoiding unnecessary jargon or complex terms.
  • The thesis statement needs to be clear, concise, and appropriately focused.
  • Provide sufficient evidence and examples to support your claims and make your writing more credible.
  • Consider the logical flow of your ideas and make sure they are presented in a coherent manner.
  • Use appropriate transitions to connect your sentences, paragraphs, and ideas.
  • Remember that the specific structure of your expository essay may vary depending on the requirements of your assignment or the complexity of your topic. Adapt the structure as needed while ensuring that your essay is organized and focused on conveying information effectively.

You should consider writing an expository essay when you need to explain, inform, or describe a particular topic or subject to your readers. Expository essays are usually assigned in academic settings, but they can also be used in other contexts, such as writing articles or blog posts. For example, an expository essay would be appropriate for purposes such as explaining the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, describing the process of a scientific experiment, or discussing the impact of technology on society.

Expository essay: The main purpose of an expository essay is to explain, describe, or inform the reader about a particular topic or subject. It should be written in a neutral manner, focusing on presenting facts, explaining concepts, and offering a clear understanding of the topic. Argumentative essay: The primary purpose of an argumentative essay is to present a well-structured argument or position on a specific issue. The writer takes a clear stance on a topic and provides strong arguments, counterarguments, and evidence to support their position. The language used may be more passionate and persuasive to convince the reader.

The length of an expository essay can vary depending on the specific requirements or guidelines provided by your instructor or the purpose of your writing. Expository essays can range from a few hundred words for shorter essays to several thousand words for more in-depth or research-based essays. The number of body paragraphs typically range from three to five, but it can vary based on the complexity of the topic and the amount of information you need to convey.

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How to Write an Expository Essay

Last Updated: December 13, 2022 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Tristen Bonacci . Tristen Bonacci is a Licensed English Teacher with more than 20 years of experience. Tristen has taught in both the United States and overseas. She specializes in teaching in a secondary education environment and sharing wisdom with others, no matter the environment. Tristen holds a BA in English Literature from The University of Colorado and an MEd from The University of Phoenix. There are 10 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 564,045 times.

Expository essays are often assigned in academic settings. In an expository essay, you need to consider an idea, investigate the idea, then explain the idea. Some expository essays may include an argument, while others are purely informative. [1] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source While it may seem overwhelming, writing an expository essay is easy if you take it one step at a time.

Sample Essay Conclusion

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

Planning Your Essay

Step 1 Define your purpose for writing.

  • If you are writing an expository essay for an assignment, read the assignment guidelines. Ask your instructor if anything seems unclear.

Step 2 Consider your audience.

  • If you are writing your essay for a class assignment, consider what your instructor will expect you to include in your essay.

Step 3 Generate ideas for your expository essay.

  • Try listing. List all your ideas for your expository essay. Then look over the list you have made and group similar ideas together. Expand those lists by adding more ideas or by using another prewriting activity. [6] X Research source
  • Try freewriting. Write nonstop for about 10 minutes. Write whatever comes to mind and don’t edit yourself. After you finish writing, review what you have written. Highlight or underline the most useful information for your expository essay. Repeat the freewriting exercise using the passages you underlined as a starting point. You can repeat this exercise many times to continue to refine and develop your ideas. [7] X Research source
  • Try clustering. Write a brief explanation of the subject of your expository essay on the center of a piece of paper and circle it. Then draw three or more lines extending from the circle. Write a corresponding idea at the end of each of these lines. Continue developing your cluster until you have explored as many connections as you can. [8] X Research source
  • Try questioning. On a piece of paper, write out “Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?” Space the questions about two or three lines apart on the paper so that you can write your answers on these lines. Respond to each question in as much detail as you can. [9] X Research source

Step 4 Make an outline.

  • Trustworthy internet sources usually include academic institutions like universities or research labs, government websites, and non-profit organizations.

Step 6 Evaluate your sources to determine their credibility before you decide to use them.

  • Identify the author and his or her credentials. Think about what qualifies this person to write about their subject. If the source has no author or the author does not have adequate credentials, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Check for citations to see if this author has researched the topic well enough. If the author has provided few or no sources, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Look for bias. Think about whether or not this author has presented an objective, well-reasoned account of the topic. If the author seems to value a particular argument or slant that is not supported or only thinly supported by fact, then this source may not be trustworthy.
  • Consider the publication date to see if this source presents the most up to date information on the subject.
  • Cross-check some of the information in the source. If you are still concerned about a source, cross-check some of its information against a trustworthy source.

Step 7 Read your sources well.

  • Show when you have quoted a source word for word by putting it into quotation marks. Include information about the source such as the author’s name, article title or book title, and page number.
  • Write down the publishing information of each source. You will need this information for your "References," "Bibliography," or "Works Cited" pages. Format this page according to your instructor's guidelines.

Step 9 Develop your tentative thesis.

  • Make sure your thesis is arguable. Do not state facts or matters of taste. For example, "George Washington was the first president of the United States," is not a good thesis because it states a fact. Likewise, "Die Hard is a great movie," is not a good thesis because it expresses a matter of taste. [16] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source
  • Make sure your thesis provides enough detail. In other words, avoid just saying that something is "good" or "effective." Instead, say what makes something "good" or "effective. [17] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source

Introducing Your Essay

Step 1 Begin with an engaging sentence that gets right into your topic.

  • An engaging hook can take many forms. You could start with an anecdote, an informative and attention-grabbing quote, a bold opinion statement, or anything that will make your readers want to continue with your essay.

Step 2 Provide context.

  • If you are writing about a book, provide the name of the work, the author, and a brief summary of the plot.
  • If you are writing about a specific day in history, summarize the day's events. Then, explain how it fits into a broader historical scope.
  • If you are writing about a person, name the person and provide a brief biography.
  • Keep in mind that your context should lead up to your thesis statement. Explain everything your reader needs to know to understand what your topic is about. Then narrow it down until you reach the topic itself.

Step 3 Provide your thesis statement.

Expressing Your Main Points

Step 1 Determine how many paragraphs to include.

  • A five-paragraph essay should include three body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence that supports your thesis.
  • Even if your essay is longer than five paragraphs, the same principles still apply. Each paragraph should discuss a piece of supporting evidence.

Step 2 Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence.

  • "Dogs played an active role in Marine Corps missions in the Pacific."
  • "The Doberman Pinscher was the official dog of the US Marine Corps during WWII, but all breeds were eligible to train as war dogs."
  • "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service."

Step 3 Elaborate on your supporting evidence.

  • Most of your evidence should be in the form of cited quotes, paraphrases, and summaries from your research.
  • Your evidence could also come from interviews, anecdotes, or personal experience.
  • Try to provide at least two to three pieces of evidence to support each of your claims.
  • For example, if a paragraph starts with, "War dogs were even eligible to receive military awards for their service," the supporting evidence might be a list of dogs who got awards and the awards they were given.

Step 4 Analyze the significance of each piece of evidence.

  • You could write, "Even though Dobermans were the most common breed used in WWII, they were not the only breed, and were not the only dogs recognized for their help."

Concluding Your Essay

Step 1 Restate and rephrase your thesis.

  • Note that the second sentence repeats the information provided in your original thesis. It just says it in a new way while also hinting at the information you included in the body of the essay.

Step 2 Summarize and review your main ideas.

  • Explain how the topic affects the reader
  • Explain how your narrow topic applies to a broader theme or observation
  • Call the reader to action or further exploration on the topic
  • Present new questions that your essay introduced

Expert Q&A

Tristen Bonacci

  • If you are unsure about anything as you work on your essay, talk to your instructor or meet with a writing tutor for help. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0

how to write a conclusion for expository essay

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Write an Essay

  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/academic_writing/essay_writing/expository_essays.html
  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/expository-essay/
  • ↑ Tristen Bonacci. Licensed English Teacher. Expert Interview. 21 December 2021.
  • ↑ http://writing.ku.edu/prewriting-strategies
  • ↑ https://grammar.yourdictionary.com/grammar-rules-and-tips/tips-on-writing-an-excellent-expository-essay.html
  • ↑ http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/reading-and-researching/notes-from-research
  • ↑ http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/thesis-statements/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/using_research/quoting_paraphrasing_and_summarizing/index.html
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html

About This Article

Tristen Bonacci

Before you write an expository essay, take some time to jot down ideas for your essay. Try the clustering method by writing a brief explanation of your subject in a bubble in the center of your page. Then, draw 3 or more lines extending from the circle and jot down idea bubbles that connect to your main theme. Once you have a plan for your expository essay, write out an outline to organize what you’re going to say. Make sure to begin your outline with an engaging introduction sentence. After the introduction sentence, provide some background information and include your thesis statement, which is your main argument. If you’re writing a 5 paragraph essay, you should include 3 body paragraphs after your introduction then a conclusion paragraph that summarizes your main points. However you organize your essay, make sure to include credible sources for important information, like statistics, so your teacher knows that it’s accurate. To learn how to use transitions in your essay, read more from our Writing co-author. Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Writing essays can be a real challenge for many students. They often struggle to organize their thoughts and convey them clearly in expository essays.

This struggle leads to essays that lack clarity and fail to captivate the reader’s interest.

But worry not! This guide is your go-to helper. We're going to break down the ins and outs of expository writing using simple steps. Plus, we’ve included some tips and topic ideas, so you can craft essays that are both clear and engaging!

So, keep reading!

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What is an Expository Essay?

An expository essay is a type of essay that seeks to inform, describe, or explain a particular subject or topic. 

It's distinct in its approach as it emphasizes presenting facts, analyzing information, and providing a comprehensive understanding without incorporating personal opinions or biases.

Why Write an Expository Essay?

The purpose of writing an expository essay extends beyond academic requirements. 

This form of writing nurtures the ability to research deeply, logically organize thoughts, and articulate information coherently. 

Developing these skills not only enhances academic performance but also prepares individuals for effectively communicating complex ideas in various real-world scenarios.

Expository Essay Vs. Argumentative Essay

Expository and argumentative essays vary in their purposes and approaches. 

Expository essays aim to inform or describe a topic without personal opinions, using a neutral, informative tone. 

On the other hand, argumentative essays seek to persuade by presenting a clear viewpoint and supporting it with evidence. 

Expository essays follow a simpler structure, providing information, while argumentative essays involve complex structures, presenting and countering arguments. Understanding these differences helps in choosing the right essay type for specific writing goals.

Types of Expository Essay

Before we dive into the different types of expository essays, let's check out five common ones:

Descriptive Essays

Descriptive essays aim to create a detailed image or sensory experience in the reader's mind by vividly describing a particular place, object, person, or event. 

They use rich language and sensory details to paint a clear picture and evoke emotions, making the reader feel like they're experiencing what's being described.

Process Analysis Essays

In a process analysis essay , the writer breaks down a series of steps needed to achieve a specific task or goal. 

They provide a clear, step-by-step guide, making complex tasks easy to understand. For example, they might explain how to bake a cake, fix a bicycle, or perform a scientific experiment.

Compare and Contrast Essays

Compare and contrast essays focus on exploring the similarities and differences between two or more subjects. 

They present a balanced view, showing how things are alike and how they're different. Whether it's comparing different cultures, products, historical events, or ideas, these essays aim to offer insights into relationships and contrasts.

Cause and Effect Essays

Cause and effect essays delve into examining the causes that lead to specific effects or the effects that arise from certain causes. 

They analyze the relationship between events, explaining why things happen and what outcomes result from those actions or occurrences. They aim to provide a clear understanding of the connections between different elements.

Problem and Solution Essays

Focused on a specific issue, problem and solution essays identify a problem, its causes, and effects, and propose solutions to address and resolve the problem. 

They aim to offer practical, effective solutions to real-life issues, providing a roadmap for solving problems or improving situations.

Structure of an Expository Essay

An expository essay typically comprises three main parts: the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. Here's what the general structure of an expository essay looks like:

Introduction

The introduction of an expository essay is where the writer presents the topic, provides background information, and ends with a clear thesis statement . 

This section aims to grab the reader's attention and set the stage for the discussion that follows.

Body Paragraphs

The body of the essay contains a series of paragraphs that delve deeper into the topic. 

Each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence that introduces the main idea or argument. 

These paragraphs present evidence, examples, or explanations supporting the thesis statement. Smooth transitions between paragraphs ensure a coherent flow of information.

The conclusion of an expository essay restates the thesis statement using different wording. It summarizes the key points discussed in the body paragraphs. 

Finally, it offers a sense of closure, wrapping up the essay's main ideas. It's not just a repetition of earlier information but rather a synthesis of the key points to leave a lasting impression on the reader.

How to Write an Expository Essay?

Writing an expository essay involves a step-by-step process to effectively communicate information. Here's a guide to crafting an expository essay:

Select a Topic

When selecting a topic for an expository essay, it's crucial to choose something that's not only interesting but also suitable for an informative discussion. 

Consider the following pointers while choosing an expository essay topic:

  • Select a topic that personally interests you.
  • Choose a topic that can be explained within the essay's scope
  • Choose subjects allowing for an objective, fact-based analysis.
  • Consider prevalent issues or areas of curiosity for discussion.

Conduct Research

When researching for your expository essay, explore diverse and credible sources like books, scholarly articles, and reputable websites. 

Ensure the information gathered directly relates to your topic and is from reliable sources. Verify the credibility by checking the author's credentials and publication dates. 

Consider various perspectives to present a well-rounded view. Organize your findings systematically, keeping detailed notes for citation. This approach helps in crafting a well-informed and supported expository essay.

Create an Outline

Develop a structured outline for your essay. Organize your thoughts, decide on the main points, and arrange them logically. 

Here's what the general structure of an expository essay looks like:

This outline template provides a clear structure, allowing for a well-organized and coherent expository essay.

View this in-depth guide on creating an expository essay outline for a structured essay!

Write The Introduction

The introduction of an expository essay plays a pivotal role in engaging the reader and setting the stage for the discussion. Here are the essential components:

  • Engaging Hook : Begin your essay with a captivating fact, question, quote, or story related to the topic to captivate the reader's attention and encourage them to continue reading.
  • Background Context: Offer essential background information about the topic, providing the necessary context for the reader to understand its relevance and importance.
  • Clear Thesis Statement: End the introduction with a clear thesis statement. It should express the main idea or argument of your essay. This statement helps guide the reader, indicating the purpose and direction of your essay.

Compose Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs serve as the essay's core. 

Each paragraph starts with a topic sentence introducing the main idea. Back up this idea with evidence or examples to support your point. 

Make sure each paragraph smoothly connects to the next for a logical flow of ideas. This structured approach ensures a coherent and well-supported discussion throughout your expository essay.

Write the Conclusion

In the conclusion of your expository essay, recap the main points without introducing new information. 

Restate the thesis in different words to reinforce the main argument. Additionally, offer closing thoughts or discuss the broader implications related to the topic. This section serves as a summary, emphasizing the significance of the essay's ideas and their broader relevance.

Revise and Edit

Revision and editing are crucial steps in the essay writing process. 

Review the content for coherence and logical flow, ensure the essay structure is smooth and well-organized, and focus on clear, concise language. 

Check for grammar, punctuation, and spelling errors, verify citations, and seek feedback for improvements. Finally, perform a final proofread to ensure the essay is error-free and polished for submission.

Expository Essay Example

Below is an example illustrating the concept of climate change and its effects, exploring the causes, impacts, and potential solutions.

This essay serves as a basic example of how an expository essay on climate change might be structured, offering insights into its causes, effects, and potential solutions.

Need more examples? Check out these expertly crafted expository essay examples on multiple topics and themes!

Tips for Writing a Good Expository Essay

Here are some tips for writing a good expository essay:

  • Ensure the essay has a clear and narrowly defined topic for effective exploration.
  • Present facts, statistics, and evidence without incorporating personal opinions or biases.
  • Utilize a well-structured format with logical sequencing of ideas and paragraphs.
  • Provide detailed and comprehensive explanations to support each point or idea.
  • Use diverse and relevant examples to illustrate and reinforce key points.
  • Present information in a concise and easily understandable manner, avoiding unnecessary details.
  • Use transitional words and phrases for seamless connections between paragraphs and ideas.
  • Make sure that all information presented is relevant and sourced from credible, reputable materials.

Expository Essay Topics

Expository essay topics typically revolve around subjects that can be explained, clarified, or described without personal opinions. 

They cover a wide array of areas such as science, technology, education, health, social issues, historical events, and more. These topics should allow for in-depth exploration and factual analysis.

Here are some essay topics for students:

Expository Essay Topics for High School Students

  • The Impact of Social Media on Teenagers
  • Benefits of Exercise and Healthy Lifestyle Choices
  • Exploring Climate Change: Causes and Effects
  • The Importance of Education in Today's Society
  • Understanding Cyberbullying and its Impact
  • Analyzing a Historical Event: The Civil Rights Movement
  • The Advantages and Disadvantages of E-Learning
  • Explaining the Process of Photosynthesis
  • The Effects of Video Games on Adolescents
  • The Role of Leadership in Problem Solving

Expository Essay Topics for University Students

  • The Future of Artificial Intelligence and its Ethical Implications
  • Analyzing the Impact of Globalization on World Economies
  • Climate Change: Policy Interventions and Global Strategies
  • The Psychology Behind Procrastination and Ways to Overcome It
  • Exploring Renewable Energy Sources and Their Viability
  • The Evolution of Social Media and its Societal Impact
  • Gender Disparities in the Workplace: Causes and Solutions
  • The Effects of Stress on Mental Health in Modern Society
  • Analyzing the Influence of Cultural Diversity in Global Business
  • Understanding Quantum Mechanics: Principles and Applications

Can’t pick a topic? Have a look at these extensive expository essay topics and get more ideas!

With our steps, tips, and topics, you have all you need to get started on your expository essay.

If you're still encountering challenges in composing your expository essay, our custom essay writing service is here to help. 

Our proficient writers specialize in creating well-structured, informative expository essays. With our expert support, you can be sure you’ll receive a top-quality, plagiarism-free essay.

Reach out to our expository essay writing service today to get the help you need. Place your order today!

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how to write a conclusion for expository essay

An expository essay is a type of writing that aims to explain, clarify, or provide information on a particular subject using facts, evidence, and logical reasoning. While the thought of writing an expository essay may seem overwhelming, following these four easy steps can make the process smooth and enjoyable.

1. Select a topic and clarify your purpose:

Picking an appealing and relevant topic is the first step in writing an expository essay. Brainstorm ideas, considering the interests of your target audience as well as your own passion for the subject matter. Once you’ve chosen a topic, define your main purpose or goal – do you want to inform, explain, or analyze? Being clear about your objective will help you stay focused throughout the writing process.

2. Conduct thorough research:

Invest time in researching your topic to gather credible facts, evidence, and data that will support your claims. Use reliable resources such as books, academic journals, newspaper articles, and official websites to ensure accuracy in your essay. Organize your materials systematically by taking notes for each significant point you wish to include in your essay.

3. Craft a solid thesis statement:

Your thesis statement is the foundation of your expository essay. It should be clear, concise, and provide a brief overview of what readers can expect from the rest of your essay. To create a strong thesis statement, think about the main ideas you want to convey and find a way to state them succinctly.

For example: “This article explores four easy ways to write an expository essay by discussing selecting an appropriate topic, conducting thorough research, crafting a solid thesis statement, and organizing ideas in a logical manner.”

4. Outline and organize your ideas:

Begin by outlining the structure of your expository essay – typically including an introduction (with the thesis statement), body (where you’ll present supporting evidence), and conclusion (summarizing and reinforcing your main points). In the body paragraphs, each paragraph should focus on a single idea or piece of evidence, described clearly and logically. To maintain the flow of your essay, use appropriate transitions and topic sentences to connect your arguments.

In conclusion, writing an expository essay doesn’t have to be daunting. By choosing an interesting topic, conducting thorough research, crafting a solid thesis statement, and organizing your ideas with care, you can create an informative and engaging essay that effectively informs readers about your chosen subject.

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Write an Expository Essay

    Concluding your essay Other interesting articles Frequently asked questions about expository essays When should you write an expository essay? In school and university, you might have to write expository essays as in-class exercises, exam questions, or coursework assignments.

  2. Expository Essay Guide With Definition & Examples

    It's the kind of writing you do when you're analyzing information you've been assigned to study, thinking critically about concepts covered in class, and explaining the processes and reasons behind the conclusions you've reached. The purpose of expository writing Expository writing has a clear purpose: to educate the reader.

  3. PDF Writing an Expository Essay

    Section 1 Essay structure An essay is a piece of writing made up of a number of paragraphs. Each paragraph has a specifi c role in an essay. In a fi ve-paragraph essay, the fi rst paragraph is an introduction; the second, third, and fourth paragraphs form the body of the essay; and the fi fth paragraph is a conclusion (see diagram on page 4).

  4. How to Write a Conclusion for an Expository Essay

    How to Write a Conclusion for an Expository Essay Judy Fisk Home » The Rewrite Writing a solid expository essay takes time, thought and effort. It is no small task to develop a strong thesis statement, gather and evaluate evidence to support your thesis and present your argument in a coherent manner.

  5. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    Before we dive into the details, here's a basic outline of how to write a conclusion: Restate your thesis: remind readers of your main point. Reiterate your supporting points: remind readers of your evidence or arguments. Wrap everything up by tying it all together. Write a clincher: with the last sentence, leave your reader with something to ...

  6. Expository Essays

    The expository essay is a genre of essay that requires the student to investigate an idea, evaluate evidence, expound on the idea, and set forth an argument concerning that idea in a clear and concise manner. This can be accomplished through comparison and contrast, definition, example, the analysis of cause and effect, etc.

  7. How to Write an Expository Essay: Writing Tips & Structure

    Writing an expository essay can be done step-by-step by organizing your thoughts, researching the topic, formulating a thesis statement, writing an introduction, composing the body paragraphs, and summarizing the essay in the conclusion. Finally, revise and proofread the essay to ensure its quality.

  8. How to Write an Expository Essay (Professor Approved Guide)

    Step One: Research Your Topic. An expository essay starts with research. You need to understand the topic before you write about it. You also need to understand what points the reader needs to know to comprehend the subject. The internet has been outstanding in terms of helping people get access to information.

  9. How to Write an Expository Essay

    1. Read Your Essay Prompt. Most expository essay prompts will ask you to do one of the following: Define and explain a concept or theory. Compare and contrast two ideas. Examine a problem and propose a solution. Describe a cause and effect relationship. Explain a step-by-step process.

  10. How To Write The Best Conclusions For Your Expository Essays

    October 27, 2022 F WP Perfect Essay | Basic Writing Tips | How To Write The Best Conclusions For Your Expository Essays Table of Contents Importance of Closure Introduction to Expository Essays Distinguishing Features of An Expository Essay Objectivity At Its Core Neutral Voice And Tone Organized Information Ideas To Compose Exceptional Conclusions

  11. How to Write an Expository Essay

    Like most academic essays, the expository essay requires formal writing with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Guide Overview Tips for writing a kick-butt essay Focus on the thesis Listen to the assignment Pre-write Explain, don't argue Revise and edit, revise and edit Choosing the right topic Tips for Writing a Kick-Butt Essay

  12. How to Write an Expository Essay: Types, Tips, and Topics

    You can write an expository essay using the following steps. 1. Define your thesis statement. Because an expository essay generally goes in-depth on a given subject, it's important that you specify your thesis statement from the get-go. State it in a clear and concise manner in the first paragraph of your essay.

  13. How to Write an Expository Essay: Topics, Outline, Examples

    Quick and Easy Guide on How to Write an Expository Essay Written by Annie L. March 21, 2023 12 min read Share the article Table of Contents Understanding What Is an Expository Essay If you clicked on this article, then you must have recently been assigned an expository essay homework.

  14. How to Write Conclusions for Expository Papers

    The best conclusions are brief and clear -- most essays under 10 pages require only a paragraph or two. Write a succinct and powerful conclusion to leave the reader feeling that the information was covered thoroughly and that the paper was worth reading. New Context for Introductory Ideas

  15. How to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay will require you to take the five-paragraph essay approach: an introductory paragraph, a main body paragraph, and a concluding paragraph.

  16. How to Write an Expository Essay: A Step-By-Step Guide

    How To Write an Expository Essay 1. Understand the Essence of Exposition At its core, an expository essay aims to explain, clarify, or inform about a particular subject. For example, imagine you're tasked with elucidating the intricate workings of climate change.

  17. How to End an Essay: Writing a Strong Conclusion

    End your essay with a call to action, warning, or image to make your argument meaningful. Keep your conclusion concise and to the point, so you don't lose a reader's attention. Do your best to avoid adding new information to your conclusion and only emphasize points you've already made in your essay. Method 1.

  18. How To Write an Excellent Expository Essay: Expert Tips and Examples

    An expository essay asks for a critical explanation of a specific idea, theory, or topic. Our expert tips can help you write a well-structured and informative piece.

  19. What is an Expository Essay and How to Write It

    Key takeaways Frequently asked questions about expository essays What is an expository essay? The expository essay is the appropriate type of essay to write if you need to inform your audience. If your intent is to critically compare, argue, or persuade, you will want to consider a different essay format. To explain it in more detail:

  20. Expository Essays

    Hence, the main goal of an expository essay is to provide factual information on a particular subject. Although writing an engaging essay is definitely a plus, it is secondary. The main goal of writing an expository essay is to educate. An expository essay is a relatively unbiased piece of writing that explores a topic from all angles.

  21. 4 Easy Ways to Write an Expository Essay

    Sample Expository Essay Conclusion Part 1 Planning Your Essay Download Article 1 Define your purpose for writing. Think about why you are writing an expository essay. Jot down some of the reasons why you are writing an expository essay and what you hope to do with your completed essay. [2]

  22. How To Write An Expository Essay

    An expository essay is a type of essay that seeks to inform, describe, or explain a particular subject or topic. It's distinct in its approach as it emphasizes presenting facts, analyzing information, and providing a comprehensive understanding without incorporating personal opinions or biases.

  23. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    conclusions, consider whether you can write a stronger conclusion by creating a transition that shows the relationship between your ideas rather than by flagging the paragraph simply as a conclusion. Transitional words that signal a conclusion include in conclusion, as a result, ultimately, overall—but strong

  24. 4 Easy Ways to Write an Expository Essay

    An expository essay is a type of writing that aims to explain, clarify, or provide information on a particular subject using facts, evidence, and logical reasoning. While the thought of writing an expository essay may seem overwhelming, following these four easy steps can make the process smooth and enjoyable. ... In conclusion, writing an ...

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