How To Write A Good Speech About Another Person

Table of contents

  • 1 Tips On Writing A Persuasive Speech About Famous Person
  • 2 How To Write A Speech About Someone You Know?
  • 3 What Will Make Your Speech About A Person Excellent?

Students are often asked to write a speech about other people. You can be assigned to talk about your friend, relative, teacher, or famous person. To do it well, you should concentrate on what you can tell about this person to others and what you can write about him or her. It is necessary to understand how to write a speech about someone if you have such a task and should do it quickly. It is not very difficult, but it requires some research on the subject of your essay and analysis of information.

Be careful with what you write on paper. If those whom you describe are close to you and you surely met them personally, try not to expose their secrets or any information they don’t want to be shared with others. You should also do in-depth research to create a good study of a famous writer, actress, etc. If you already have specific facts, it doesn’t mean that they are true. That’s why all information should be checked.

Tips On Writing A Persuasive Speech About Famous Person

Here are a few tips for those who are creating such a presentation. These tips could be useful if you have to develop a short or funny speech about someone you don't know or if you don’t understand how to work with such a type of assignment.

Start when you feel like it. This is a simple tip, but a huge one. How to start a speech about someone? Just start as you are talking to something. All speeches are designed to be spoken. They are not something you will read while in your bed! As you are moving forward, add the main points and just continue. You can always edit and make the content better afterwards.

Use short words and very short sentences. In order to write an informative speech, your writing process will have to change. You need to make sure the main points are there you need to write as you talk. This means short words and also short sentences. The main point here is to make the whole paper sound easier and more appealing when you read it out loud. Now, write a speech and try using this tip. Then, complete another with long words and longer sentences. Read out loud, both. You will see the difference, and you can imagine the effect on the audience's attention. Yes, you still need to write a speech outline.

Even if you are a friend of the person you describe, if he or she inspires you, it would be recommended to do some additional research on his or her biography, find more facts, and use them. Many facts about interviewed famous people are not true, that is why you need to analyze them wisely.

Check everything you read, and be sure you use only verified information. Get facts from credible media and make references to them in your paper. If it is needed, it is recommended to use many forms of media, and you will get information from different sides.

Define the goals of your graduation or other speech. You may want just to talk about a person, concentrate on their childhood, highlight their most notable achievements, or show how clever or friendly this person is.

When you work on a speech for someone, you should always try to relate and make a personal story told. In most cases, when you work on a speech for someone, this is not an option. But if it is, make sure to include it.

Always make a catchy introduction to your speech. Try to grab the attention of your audience in the first few seconds. An informative speech will sound much better instantly. It is one of the main points we all need to know about.

Don’t be prejudiced. If you admire the subject of your paper and want to speak from the heart, you shouldn’t repeat too many good words or invent good facts. If you dislike them, you should explain what the reasons for disliking the person are.

Writing a speech about another person can be a daunting task, especially if you don't know them very well. However, with careful research and creativity, you can craft an informative and inspiring speech that will bring your subject to life. To get started, write your personal essay in a relevant way by including new information about the person you are talking about. Research their life, accomplishments, and experiences to provide context for your audience and create a meaningful connection between the subject of your speech and the listeners.

How To Write A Speech About Someone You Know?

Writing about people you already know is both a simple and difficult task, simply because you are familiar with these people and can tell many stories. It is also difficult because you should pick only a few stories that describe them correctly. Here you can find a few tips on writing a speech about someone you admire, about your friends, relatives, classmates, and other people you know and want to tell your readers about them.

  • Concentrate on the objectives of your essay. You can describe people from different sides, and you should define any points of view before working on the paper. People can be described as good relatives, kind and reliable friends, or professionals in their jobs.
  • Provide all information that isn’t available to your readers. If you connect with people well, you may not notice that others don’t know your subject as well or even didn’t know about the subject before your speech.
  • Even if you work on a speech for someone, you will need to try and include a personal anecdote. This does make a lot of difference and can help you. Now you can write a speech that sounds much better and more interesting.
  • Don’t expose any information about the subject of your speech that shouldn’t be shared. In the story of every person, there are many private moments, and you should think wisely about what moments should be described.
  • He is the hero. When you try to introduce someone in this form, readers will want to know all about him. As such, you can try to make him a hero of the story. If you’re writing about a close friend, he or she will be grateful in the end.

If all these things don’t help, you can order speech writing services from an academic essay writing service . They work well with such tasks and write them fast. Writers of these services are experienced in working on different types of papers.

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What Will Make Your Speech About A Person Excellent?

If you wonder how to write a good speech, you should read it several times before you show it to others. This is mandatory for all types of writing, and there are no other means you can use to get the same effect. Also, be especially focused on small elements of the life of that person and definitely include appealing and interesting ones that your audience wants to know. But you are probably going to write this in the form of an essay for a professor, and he already knows those things. As such, you need to add possible things about the person and make an accent that they are controversial, but the audience still needs to know about them.

If you have to tell your speech to a big audience, you should try it in an empty room or with friends before. You can also use multimedia devices to screen your speech and watch it later and find mistakes.

Notice that there are different methods of writing a speech about famous people. That is why you should check your requirements before starting your writing and define your goals, then, you can start creating your draft.

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When writing a speech of this kind, always try to put yourself in your audience's shoes. What do they want to hear? Why they are even reading this? What do they want to know specifically? if you answer these questions in a proper manner, you will have excellent content and your reader or readers will be impressed.  You can even use a speech writing service because it can help you with any type of task and hire the best quick writers experienced in this field.

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How to Write a Speech about Someone

December 27, 2023

Conducting interviews with the person and their colleagues

Conducting interviews with the person and their colleagues is an essential step when writing a speech about someone. These interviews provide valuable firsthand insights and personal anecdotes that can bring the speech to life. Start by scheduling a one-on-one interview with the person you are writing about, allowing them to share their thoughts, experiences, and achievements. Additionally, reach out to their colleagues, friends, and family members who can offer a different perspective and additional information. Prepare thoughtful and open-ended questions to encourage detailed responses. Take thorough notes during the interviews and pay attention to key moments, emotions, and noteworthy stories. These interviews will not only provide you with valuable content for the speech but will also help you capture the essence and personality of the person you are writing about.

Researching online and offline sources

Researching online and offline sources is crucial when writing a speech about someone. It allows you to gather a comprehensive understanding of the person’s background, accomplishments, and impact. Begin by exploring reputable online sources such as news articles, biographies, interviews, and profiles. These sources can provide a wealth of information, including professional achievements, personal milestones, and notable events. Additionally, delve into offline sources such as books, magazines, journals, and archives that may offer unique insights and lesser-known details. Pay attention to relevant speeches or presentations the person has given in the past, as this can provide valuable inspiration and guidance for your own speech. By conducting thorough research, you can ensure that your speech is well-informed, accurate, and compelling, showcasing the person’s achievements and capturing their essence effectively.

Outlining the speech and organizing the information

Outlining the speech and organizing the information is a critical step when writing a speech about someone. It helps ensure that your speech is coherent, well-structured, and easy to follow for your audience. Here are some steps to help you outline and organize the information effectively:

  • Identify the main themes and key points: Start by identifying the overarching themes and main points you want to convey in your speech. These could be the person’s achievements, personal qualities, or significant milestones.
  • Create a logical flow: Arrange the main points in a logical order that makes sense to your audience. Consider using a chronological order, a problem-solution approach, or a thematic structure to organize your speech.
  • Use sub-points or supporting details: Break down each main point into sub-points or supporting details that provide more depth and context. These can include specific examples, stories, statistics, or quotes that support your main points.
  • Prioritize information: Determine the most important information you want to include in your speech and ensure it receives the appropriate focus. Trim down any excess or less relevant details to keep your speech concise and impactful.
  • Consider transitions: Plan smooth transitions between different sections of your speech to maintain a cohesive flow. Transitions help your audience follow along easily and understand the logical progression of your ideas.
  • Review and revise: Once you have outlined your speech, review and revise it for clarity, coherence, and effectiveness. Ensure that each point aligns with your overall purpose and message.

By following these steps, you can create a well-organized speech that effectively communicates your message and honors the person you are speaking about.

Identifying the Theme and Purpose of the Speech

When writing a speech about someone, it is essential to establish a clear theme and purpose to ensure a coherent and impactful delivery. The theme of the speech should revolve around the key attributes, accomplishments, or impact of the person you are speaking about. It might focus on their leadership qualities, innovative contributions, or personal journey.

The purpose of the speech could vary depending on the context. It could aim to celebrate their achievements, inspire and motivate the audience, or pay tribute to their legacy. Understanding the theme and purpose helps structure the speech, allowing you to gather relevant anecdotes, quotes, or examples that support your message.

To identify the theme and purpose, consider the overall message you want to convey and the desired impact on the audience. Research the person extensively to gather sufficient material, and then structure your speech around a central theme that aligns with the purpose. Remember, clarity in theme and purpose creates a memorable and meaningful speech about someone.

Using Rhetorical Devices to Enhance the Message

In order to write a compelling speech about someone, incorporating rhetorical devices can elevate the impact of your message. Rhetorical devices are techniques and language patterns that engage and persuade the audience, making your speech more memorable and persuasive.

One commonly used device is the use of repetition, where key words or phrases are repeated for emphasis and to reinforce the message. This helps to create a rhythmic flow and enhance the overall impact.

Another powerful device is the use of metaphors and analogies, as they provide vivid imagery and facilitate a deeper understanding of the person you are speaking about. They can help paint a picture in the minds of the audience, making your speech more relatable and engaging.

Furthermore, employing rhetorical questions can evoke curiosity and prompt the audience to reflect on the subject, while alliteration and parallelism add a poetic touch and enhance the overall delivery.

By integrating these and other rhetorical devices strategically throughout your speech, you can captivate the audience, amplify your message, and bring your speech about someone to life.

Choosing the Right Language and Tone

When writing a speech about someone, selecting the right language and tone is crucial in effectively conveying your message and connecting with the audience. The language used should be clear, concise, and appropriate for the occasion and the audience’s level of understanding.

Consider the tone you want to set – whether it is formal, informal, celebratory, or reflective – and tailor your language accordingly. Utilize words and phrases that resonate with the subject’s personality, achievements, or values, ensuring they are accurately represented.

Additionally, be mindful of the emotional impact you want to create. By using descriptive and evocative language, you can engage the audience’s senses and create a deeper connection to the person you are speaking about.

It’s also important to strike a balance between facts and emotions. While presenting relevant information, infuse the speech with anecdotes, stories, and personal experiences that highlight the human side of the individual, fostering empathy and relatability.

Ultimately, choosing the right language and tone plays a crucial role in crafting a speech that not only informs but also inspires, capturing the essence of the person you are speaking about and leaving a lasting impression on the audience.

Creating a Compelling Opening and Closing

The opening and closing of a speech are critical moments that have the power to capture the audience’s attention and leave a lasting impression. To make these moments compelling and impactful, consider the following strategies:

  • Start with a bold statement or a thought-provoking question that immediately grabs the audience’s attention.
  • Use an engaging anecdote or story that relates to the person you are speaking about. This can create an emotional connection and draw the audience into the speech.
  • Incorporate a powerful quote or a relevant statistic that highlights the significance or impact of the individual.
  • Invoke the audience’s curiosity by presenting a surprising or intriguing fact related to the person.
  • Include a personal reflection or experience that showcases your own connection to the individual. This can help establish credibility and demonstrate the personal significance of the speech.

In the closing, aim to leave a lasting impression by:

  • Summarizing the key points of the speech in a concise and compelling manner.
  • Reiterating the significance and impact of the person’s achievements or influence.
  • Ending with a strong call to action, inspiring the audience to act or reflect upon the person’s legacy.
  • Utilizing a memorable metaphor or analogy that reinforces the central theme or message of the speech.
  • Expressing gratitude or offering a heartfelt tribute to the person, leaving the audience with a sense of admiration and appreciation.

By utilizing these strategies, you can create a captivating opening and closing that effectively frame the speech and resonate with the audience.

Tips for Making a Lasting Impression

When crafting a speech about someone, it’s crucial to ensure that your words leave a lasting impression on the audience. Here are some tips to help you achieve that:

  • Research extensively: Take the time to thoroughly research and gather as much information as possible about the person you are speaking about. This will enable you to create a comprehensive and impactful speech.
  • Establish a connection: Find a personal connection between yourself and the individual, whether it’s through shared experiences, values, or goals. This will make your speech more relatable and genuine.
  • Tell memorable stories: Incorporate anecdotes and stories that illustrate the person’s character, achievements, or impact. Narrative elements create emotional engagement and enhance the audience’s understanding of the subject.
  • Use vivid language: Employ strong and descriptive language that paints a vivid picture in the minds of the listeners. This will make your speech more engaging and memorable.
  • Engage the senses: Appeal to the audience’s senses by using sensory language, such as sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. This will create a more immersive experience and make your speech stand out.
  • Utilize visual aids: Include compelling visual aids, such as images or videos, to supplement your speech. Visuals have a powerful impact and can enhance the audience’s understanding and emotional connection.
  • Practice delivery: Rehearse your speech to ensure smooth and confident delivery. Practice your pacing, body language, and intonation to effectively convey your message and captivate the audience.

By following these tips, you can write a speech that leaves a lasting impression, resonates with your audience, and does justice to the person you are speaking about.

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How to write a speech that your audience remembers

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Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . 

But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech. With the proper preparation and a clear outline, apprehensive public speakers and natural wordsmiths alike can write and present a compelling message. Here’s how to write a good speech you’ll be proud to deliver.

What is good speech writing?

Good speech writing is the art of crafting words and ideas into a compelling, coherent, and memorable message that resonates with the audience. Here are some key elements of great speech writing:

  • It begins with clearly understanding the speech's purpose and the audience it seeks to engage. 
  • A well-written speech clearly conveys its central message, ensuring that the audience understands and retains the key points. 
  • It is structured thoughtfully, with a captivating opening, a well-organized body, and a conclusion that reinforces the main message. 
  • Good speech writing embraces the power of engaging content, weaving in stories, examples, and relatable anecdotes to connect with the audience on both intellectual and emotional levels. 

Ultimately, it is the combination of these elements, along with the authenticity and delivery of the speaker , that transforms words on a page into a powerful and impactful spoken narrative.

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What makes a good speech?

A great speech includes several key qualities, but three fundamental elements make a speech truly effective:

Clarity and purpose

Remembering the audience, cohesive structure.

While other important factors make a speech a home run, these three elements are essential for writing an effective speech.

The main elements of a good speech

The main elements of a speech typically include:

  • Introduction: The introduction sets the stage for your speech and grabs the audience's attention. It should include a hook or attention-grabbing opening, introduce the topic, and provide an overview of what will be covered.
  • Opening/captivating statement: This is a strong statement that immediately engages the audience and creates curiosity about the speech topics.
  • Thesis statement/central idea: The thesis statement or central idea is a concise statement that summarizes the main point or argument of your speech. It serves as a roadmap for the audience to understand what your speech is about.
  • Body: The body of the speech is where you elaborate on your main points or arguments. Each point is typically supported by evidence, examples, statistics, or anecdotes. The body should be organized logically and coherently, with smooth transitions between the main points.
  • Supporting evidence: This includes facts, data, research findings, expert opinions, or personal stories that support and strengthen your main points. Well-chosen and credible evidence enhances the persuasive power of your speech.
  • Transitions: Transitions are phrases or statements that connect different parts of your speech, guiding the audience from one idea to the next. Effective transitions signal the shifts in topics or ideas and help maintain a smooth flow throughout the speech.
  • Counterarguments and rebuttals (if applicable): If your speech involves addressing opposing viewpoints or counterarguments, you should acknowledge and address them. Presenting counterarguments makes your speech more persuasive and demonstrates critical thinking.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion is the final part of your speech and should bring your message to a satisfying close. Summarize your main points, restate your thesis statement, and leave the audience with a memorable closing thought or call to action.
  • Closing statement: This is the final statement that leaves a lasting impression and reinforces the main message of your speech. It can be a call to action, a thought-provoking question, a powerful quote, or a memorable anecdote.
  • Delivery and presentation: How you deliver your speech is also an essential element to consider. Pay attention to your tone, body language, eye contact , voice modulation, and timing. Practice and rehearse your speech, and try using the 7-38-55 rule to ensure confident and effective delivery.

While the order and emphasis of these elements may vary depending on the type of speech and audience, these elements provide a framework for organizing and delivering a successful speech.

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How to structure a good speech

You know what message you want to transmit, who you’re delivering it to, and even how you want to say it. But you need to know how to start, develop, and close a speech before writing it. 

Think of a speech like an essay. It should have an introduction, conclusion, and body sections in between. This places ideas in a logical order that the audience can better understand and follow them. Learning how to make a speech with an outline gives your storytelling the scaffolding it needs to get its point across.

Here’s a general speech structure to guide your writing process:

  • Explanation 1
  • Explanation 2
  • Explanation 3

How to write a compelling speech opener

Some research shows that engaged audiences pay attention for only 15 to 20 minutes at a time. Other estimates are even lower, citing that people stop listening intently in fewer than 10 minutes . If you make a good first impression at the beginning of your speech, you have a better chance of interesting your audience through the middle when attention spans fade. 

Implementing the INTRO model can help grab and keep your audience’s attention as soon as you start speaking. This acronym stands for interest, need, timing, roadmap, and objectives, and it represents the key points you should hit in an opening. 

Here’s what to include for each of these points: 

  • Interest : Introduce yourself or your topic concisely and speak with confidence . Write a compelling opening statement using relevant data or an anecdote that the audience can relate to.
  • Needs : The audience is listening to you because they have something to learn. If you’re pitching a new app idea to a panel of investors, those potential partners want to discover more about your product and what they can earn from it. Read the room and gently remind them of the purpose of your speech. 
  • Timing : When appropriate, let your audience know how long you’ll speak. This lets listeners set expectations and keep tabs on their own attention span. If a weary audience member knows you’ll talk for 40 minutes, they can better manage their energy as that time goes on. 
  • Routemap : Give a brief overview of the three main points you’ll cover in your speech. If an audience member’s attention starts to drop off and they miss a few sentences, they can more easily get their bearings if they know the general outline of the presentation.
  • Objectives : Tell the audience what you hope to achieve, encouraging them to listen to the end for the payout. 

Writing the middle of a speech

The body of your speech is the most information-dense section. Facts, visual aids, PowerPoints — all this information meets an audience with a waning attention span. Sticking to the speech structure gives your message focus and keeps you from going off track, making everything you say as useful as possible.

Limit the middle of your speech to three points, and support them with no more than three explanations. Following this model organizes your thoughts and prevents you from offering more information than the audience can retain. 

Using this section of the speech to make your presentation interactive can add interest and engage your audience. Try including a video or demonstration to break the monotony. A quick poll or survey also keeps the audience on their toes. 

Wrapping the speech up

To you, restating your points at the end can feel repetitive and dull. You’ve practiced countless times and heard it all before. But repetition aids memory and learning , helping your audience retain what you’ve told them. Use your speech’s conclusion to summarize the main points with a few short sentences.

Try to end on a memorable note, like posing a motivational quote or a thoughtful question the audience can contemplate once they leave. In proposal or pitch-style speeches, consider landing on a call to action (CTA) that invites your audience to take the next step.

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How to write a good speech

If public speaking gives you the jitters, you’re not alone. Roughly 80% of the population feels nervous before giving a speech, and another 10% percent experiences intense anxiety and sometimes even panic. 

The fear of failure can cause procrastination and can cause you to put off your speechwriting process until the last minute. Finding the right words takes time and preparation, and if you’re already feeling nervous, starting from a blank page might seem even harder.

But putting in the effort despite your stress is worth it. Presenting a speech you worked hard on fosters authenticity and connects you to the subject matter, which can help your audience understand your points better. Human connection is all about honesty and vulnerability, and if you want to connect to the people you’re speaking to, they should see that in you.

1. Identify your objectives and target audience

Before diving into the writing process, find healthy coping strategies to help you stop worrying . Then you can define your speech’s purpose, think about your target audience, and start identifying your objectives. Here are some questions to ask yourself and ground your thinking : 

  • What purpose do I want my speech to achieve? 
  • What would it mean to me if I achieved the speech’s purpose?
  • What audience am I writing for? 
  • What do I know about my audience? 
  • What values do I want to transmit? 
  • If the audience remembers one take-home message, what should it be? 
  • What do I want my audience to feel, think, or do after I finish speaking? 
  • What parts of my message could be confusing and require further explanation?

2. Know your audience

Understanding your audience is crucial for tailoring your speech effectively. Consider the demographics of your audience, their interests, and their expectations. For instance, if you're addressing a group of healthcare professionals, you'll want to use medical terminology and data that resonate with them. Conversely, if your audience is a group of young students, you'd adjust your content to be more relatable to their experiences and interests. 

3. Choose a clear message

Your message should be the central idea that you want your audience to take away from your speech. Let's say you're giving a speech on climate change. Your clear message might be something like, "Individual actions can make a significant impact on mitigating climate change." Throughout your speech, all your points and examples should support this central message, reinforcing it for your audience.

4. Structure your speech

Organizing your speech properly keeps your audience engaged and helps them follow your ideas. The introduction should grab your audience's attention and introduce the topic. For example, if you're discussing space exploration, you could start with a fascinating fact about a recent space mission. In the body, you'd present your main points logically, such as the history of space exploration, its scientific significance, and future prospects. Finally, in the conclusion, you'd summarize your key points and reiterate the importance of space exploration in advancing human knowledge.

5. Use engaging content for clarity

Engaging content includes stories, anecdotes, statistics, and examples that illustrate your main points. For instance, if you're giving a speech about the importance of reading, you might share a personal story about how a particular book changed your perspective. You could also include statistics on the benefits of reading, such as improved cognitive abilities and empathy.

6. Maintain clarity and simplicity

It's essential to communicate your ideas clearly. Avoid using overly technical jargon or complex language that might confuse your audience. For example, if you're discussing a medical breakthrough with a non-medical audience, explain complex terms in simple, understandable language.

7. Practice and rehearse

Practice is key to delivering a great speech. Rehearse multiple times to refine your delivery, timing, and tone. Consider using a mirror or recording yourself to observe your body language and gestures. For instance, if you're giving a motivational speech, practice your gestures and expressions to convey enthusiasm and confidence.

8. Consider nonverbal communication

Your body language, tone of voice, and gestures should align with your message . If you're delivering a speech on leadership, maintain strong eye contact to convey authority and connection with your audience. A steady pace and varied tone can also enhance your speech's impact.

9. Engage your audience

Engaging your audience keeps them interested and attentive. Encourage interaction by asking thought-provoking questions or sharing relatable anecdotes. If you're giving a speech on teamwork, ask the audience to recall a time when teamwork led to a successful outcome, fostering engagement and connection.

10. Prepare for Q&A

Anticipate potential questions or objections your audience might have and prepare concise, well-informed responses. If you're delivering a speech on a controversial topic, such as healthcare reform, be ready to address common concerns, like the impact on healthcare costs or access to services, during the Q&A session.

By following these steps and incorporating examples that align with your specific speech topic and purpose, you can craft and deliver a compelling and impactful speech that resonates with your audience.

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Tools for writing a great speech

There are several helpful tools available for speechwriting, both technological and communication-related. Here are a few examples:

  • Word processing software: Tools like Microsoft Word, Google Docs, or other word processors provide a user-friendly environment for writing and editing speeches. They offer features like spell-checking, grammar correction, formatting options, and easy revision tracking.
  • Presentation software: Software such as Microsoft PowerPoint or Google Slides is useful when creating visual aids to accompany your speech. These tools allow you to create engaging slideshows with text, images, charts, and videos to enhance your presentation.
  • Speechwriting Templates: Online platforms or software offer pre-designed templates specifically for speechwriting. These templates provide guidance on structuring your speech and may include prompts for different sections like introductions, main points, and conclusions.
  • Rhetorical devices and figures of speech: Rhetorical tools such as metaphors, similes, alliteration, and parallelism can add impact and persuasion to your speech. Resources like books, websites, or academic papers detailing various rhetorical devices can help you incorporate them effectively.
  • Speechwriting apps: Mobile apps designed specifically for speechwriting can be helpful in organizing your thoughts, creating outlines, and composing a speech. These apps often provide features like voice recording, note-taking, and virtual prompts to keep you on track.
  • Grammar and style checkers: Online tools or plugins like Grammarly or Hemingway Editor help improve the clarity and readability of your speech by checking for grammar, spelling, and style errors. They provide suggestions for sentence structure, word choice, and overall tone.
  • Thesaurus and dictionary: Online or offline resources such as thesauruses and dictionaries help expand your vocabulary and find alternative words or phrases to express your ideas more effectively. They can also clarify meanings or provide context for unfamiliar terms.
  • Online speechwriting communities: Joining online forums or communities focused on speechwriting can be beneficial for getting feedback, sharing ideas, and learning from experienced speechwriters. It's an opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals and improve your public speaking skills through collaboration.

Remember, while these tools can assist in the speechwriting process, it's essential to use them thoughtfully and adapt them to your specific needs and style. The most important aspect of speechwriting remains the creativity, authenticity, and connection with your audience that you bring to your speech.

Man-holding-microphone-while-speaking-in-public-how-to-give-a-speech

5 tips for writing a speech

Behind every great speech is an excellent idea and a speaker who refined it. But a successful speech is about more than the initial words on the page, and there are a few more things you can do to help it land.

Here are five more tips for writing and practicing your speech:

1. Structure first, write second

If you start the writing process before organizing your thoughts, you may have to re-order, cut, and scrap the sentences you worked hard on. Save yourself some time by using a speech structure, like the one above, to order your talking points first. This can also help you identify unclear points or moments that disrupt your flow.

2. Do your homework

Data strengthens your argument with a scientific edge. Research your topic with an eye for attention-grabbing statistics, or look for findings you can use to support each point. If you’re pitching a product or service, pull information from company metrics that demonstrate past or potential successes. 

Audience members will likely have questions, so learn all talking points inside and out. If you tell investors that your product will provide 12% returns, for example, come prepared with projections that support that statement.

3. Sound like yourself

Memorable speakers have distinct voices. Think of Martin Luther King Jr’s urgent, inspiring timbre or Oprah’s empathetic, personal tone . Establish your voice — one that aligns with your personality and values — and stick with it. If you’re a motivational speaker, keep your tone upbeat to inspire your audience . If you’re the CEO of a startup, try sounding assured but approachable. 

4. Practice

As you practice a speech, you become more confident , gain a better handle on the material, and learn the outline so well that unexpected questions are less likely to trip you up. Practice in front of a colleague or friend for honest feedback about what you could change, and speak in front of the mirror to tweak your nonverbal communication and body language .

5. Remember to breathe

When you’re stressed, you breathe more rapidly . It can be challenging to talk normally when you can’t regulate your breath. Before your presentation, try some mindful breathing exercises so that when the day comes, you already have strategies that will calm you down and remain present . This can also help you control your voice and avoid speaking too quickly.

How to ghostwrite a great speech for someone else

Ghostwriting a speech requires a unique set of skills, as you're essentially writing a piece that will be delivered by someone else. Here are some tips on how to effectively ghostwrite a speech:

  • Understand the speaker's voice and style : Begin by thoroughly understanding the speaker's personality, speaking style, and preferences. This includes their tone, humor, and any personal anecdotes they may want to include.
  • Interview the speaker : Have a detailed conversation with the speaker to gather information about their speech's purpose, target audience, key messages, and any specific points they want to emphasize. Ask for personal stories or examples they may want to include.
  • Research thoroughly : Research the topic to ensure you have a strong foundation of knowledge. This helps you craft a well-informed and credible speech.
  • Create an outline : Develop a clear outline that includes the introduction, main points, supporting evidence, and a conclusion. Share this outline with the speaker for their input and approval.
  • Write in the speaker's voice : While crafting the speech, maintain the speaker's voice and style. Use language and phrasing that feel natural to them. If they have a particular way of expressing ideas, incorporate that into the speech.
  • Craft a captivating opening : Begin the speech with a compelling opening that grabs the audience's attention. This could be a relevant quote, an interesting fact, a personal anecdote, or a thought-provoking question.
  • Organize content logically : Ensure the speech flows logically, with each point building on the previous one. Use transitions to guide the audience from one idea to the next smoothly.
  • Incorporate engaging stories and examples : Include anecdotes, stories, and real-life examples that illustrate key points and make the speech relatable and memorable.
  • Edit and revise : Edit the speech carefully for clarity, grammar, and coherence. Ensure the speech is the right length and aligns with the speaker's time constraints.
  • Seek feedback : Share drafts of the speech with the speaker for their feedback and revisions. They may have specific changes or additions they'd like to make.
  • Practice delivery : If possible, work with the speaker on their delivery. Practice the speech together, allowing the speaker to become familiar with the content and your writing style.
  • Maintain confidentiality : As a ghostwriter, it's essential to respect the confidentiality and anonymity of the work. Do not disclose that you wrote the speech unless you have the speaker's permission to do so.
  • Be flexible : Be open to making changes and revisions as per the speaker's preferences. Your goal is to make them look good and effectively convey their message.
  • Meet deadlines : Stick to agreed-upon deadlines for drafts and revisions. Punctuality and reliability are essential in ghostwriting.
  • Provide support : Support the speaker during their preparation and rehearsal process. This can include helping with cue cards, speech notes, or any other materials they need.

Remember that successful ghostwriting is about capturing the essence of the speaker while delivering a well-structured and engaging speech. Collaboration, communication, and adaptability are key to achieving this.

Give your best speech yet

Learn how to make a speech that’ll hold an audience’s attention by structuring your thoughts and practicing frequently. Put the effort into writing and preparing your content, and aim to improve your breathing, eye contact , and body language as you practice. The more you work on your speech, the more confident you’ll become.

The energy you invest in writing an effective speech will help your audience remember and connect to every concept. Remember: some life-changing philosophies have come from good speeches, so give your words a chance to resonate with others. You might even change their thinking.

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Elizabeth Perry

Content Marketing Manager, ACC

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How To Write A Speech That Inspires You Audience: 13 Steps

Learn how to write a speech that will effectively reach your audience.

A good speech is a powerful tool. Effective speeches make people powerful, whether in the hands of a world leader trying to get people to believe their ideology or in the mouth of a teacher trying to inspire students. A well-written speech can lift the hearts of a nation in times of war, inspire people to action when complacency is commonplace, honor someone who has died, and even change a nation’s mind on a particular topic, which, in turn, can change history.

Excellent speech writing is a skill that you must learn. While public speaking may come naturally to some people, the sentence structure and nuances of a powerful speech are something you must learn if you are going to gain the audience’s attention.

So how can you learn how to write a speech? The writing process is a little different than the process you’d use to write a paper or essay, so here is a guide that can help.

Materials Needed

Step 1: define your purpose, step 2: determine your audience, step 3: start your research, step 4: choose the right length, step 5: create an outline, step 6: craft the introduction, step 7: write the body, step 8: use transitions, step 9: conclude your speech, step 10: add some spice, step 11. implement spoken language, step 12: edit your speech, step 13: read it out.

  • Research materials
  • Audience demographic information

Before you can write a speech, you must know the purpose of your speech. You can deliver many types of speeches, and the purpose will determine which one you are giving. While there may be more than these, here are some common types of speeches:

  • Informative speech: An informative speech strives to educate the audience on a topic or message. This is the type of speech a teacher gives when delivering a lecture. “ First World Problems ” by Sarah Kwon is an excellent example of an informative speech.
  • Entertaining speech: This speech strives to amuse the audience. These are typically short speeches with funny, personal stories woven in. A wedding guest giving a speech at a wedding may be an example of this type of speech.
  • Demonstrative speech: This speech demonstrates how to do something to the audience. A company showing how to use a product is delivering this type of speech.
  • Persuasive speech: This speech aims to persuade the audience of your particular opinion. Political speeches are commonly persuasive. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous “ I Have a Dream ” speech is an example of a persuasive speech, as it called the government to make changes that protected civil and economic rights.
  • Oratorical speech: An oratory is a formal speech at an event like a funeral or graduation. The goal is to express an opinion and inspire the audience, but not necessarily to persuade.
  • Motivational speech: These speeches inspire people to take action, such as to improve themselves or to feel better and happier. For example, a coach may deliver this kind of speech to his players during halftime to inspire them to win the game. Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address is an excellent example of a motivational speech.
  • Eulogy: A Eulogy is a funeral speech. This speech is given to the mourners at someone’s funeral and talks about the excellent character rates of the person who died. “ Eulogy for Rosa Parks ” is a famous example of this type of speech given by Oprah Winfrey in 2015.
  • Explanatory speech: This final speech type describes a situation or item. These speeches often have step-by-step instructions on how to do a particular thing.

Your audience members are an essential part of the speech writing process. Consider taking notes about your audience before you start writing your speech. You can even make a fake audience member you are writing toward as you prepare your speech. Even though they do not directly impact what you talk about, they should impact how you talk about it. Therefore, you must write your speech to reach that particular audience.

For example, if you are writing a speech for an audience that does not agree with you, you will need to bring more facts and figures to persuade them of your opinion. On the other hand, if you are writing a speech for an audience already on your side, you must encourage them to hold the line. To get to know your audience, consider factors like:

  • Income level
  • Pain points
  • Questions they might ask

Before you outline or write your speech, you must know some facts about the big idea or speech topic. So perform some research, and take notes. See if you can find any new or surprising information in your research. If it was new and surprising, it also might be to your audience members. You can use this research to make the essential points of your piece.

Finally, know the required length of your speech. Speeches usually have time limits, not word count limits. You will need to know the desired length before you can start writing the speech, or you will end up with a speech that is too long or too short. The length of your speech will vary depending on where you are giving it and who your audience is.

Generally, a 20-minute speech is standard when delivering a speech to adults in a professional or academic setting. However, if you are a student who is preparing a speech for a classroom, you may be limited to three to five minutes. Sometimes speakers will get booked to take on a 60-minute session, but if you talk for 60 minutes, you will lose the attention of some of your audience members.

Remember, some of the most famous speeches in history are very short. President Abraham Lincoln’s “ Gettysburg Address ” was less than 300 words long and took less than two minutes to deliver. President Franklin Roosevelt’s “ Day of Infamy ” speech lasted less than 10 minutes. However, knowing your speech’s length can be challenging after you prepare it. Generally, a double-spaced page of writing will take about 90 seconds to speak. Thus, a 20-minute speech will take about 13 typed, double-spaced pages if you type out your entire speech.

Consider using a words-to-minutes calculator to determine how long your speech likely is. Remember that the average English speaker speaks 140 words a minute. You may get up to 170 words a minute if you speak fast. If your speech is slow, it may be as little as 110 words a minute.

How to write a speech: Create an outline

Now you are ready to start writing. Before you write a speech, you must create an outline. Some public speakers will speak from an outline alone, while others will write their speech word-for-word. Both strategies can lead to a successful speech, but both also start with an outline. Your speech’s outline will follow this template:

  • Introduction: Introduces your main idea and hooks the reader’s attention.
  • Body: Covers two to three main points with transitions.
  • Conclusion: Summarizes the speech’s points and drive home your main message.

As you fill in these areas, answer these questions: Who? What? Why? and How? This will ensure you cover all the essential elements your listeners need to hear to understand your topic. Next, make your outline as detailed as you can. Organize your research into points and subpoints. The more detail on your outline, the easier it will be to write the speech and deliver it confidently.

As you prepare your speech, your introduction is where you should spend the most time and think. You only have moments to capture your audience’s attention or see them zone out in front of you. However, if you do it right, you will cause them to turn to you for more information on the topic. In other words, the introduction to a speech may be the most memorable part, so it deserves your attention. Therefore, you must have three main parts:

  • Hook: The hook is a rhetorical question, funny story, personal anecdote, or shocking statistic that grabs the listener’s attention and shows them why your speech is worth listening to.
  • Thesis: This is your main idea or clear point.
  • Road map: You will want to preview your speech outline in the introduction.

Here is an example of a good introduction for a persuasive speech from Jamie Oliver’s TED Talk about children and food:

“Sadly, in the next 18 minutes when I do our chat, four Americans that are alive will be dead from the food that they eat.”

This shocking statistic gets the audience’s attention immediately. In his speech, Oliver details why America’s food choices are so poor, how it affects them, and how we can teach children to do better.

Here is an example of an informative speech about pollution and what can be done about it. This introduction follows the template perfectly.

“I want you to close your eyes for a minute and picture a beautiful oceanfront. The sound of the waves crashing on the sand while seagulls fly overhead. Do you have it? Now I am going to say one word that will destroy that image: Pollution. What changed in your mental picture? Do you now see sea turtles with bottles on their head or piles of debris washing on shore? Marine pollution is a massive problem because plastic does not decompose. Not only does it use up many resources to create, but it rarely gets disposed of properly. We must protect our natural areas, like that beautiful beach. Today I am going to show you how destructive the effects of plastic can be, how it is managing our natural resources, and what steps we can take to improve the situation.”

Now you are ready to write the body of your speech. Draw from your research and flesh out the points stated in your introduction. As you create your body, use short sentences. People can’t listen as long as they can read, so short and sweet sentences are most effective. Continuing the theme of the marine pollution speech, consider this body paragraph.

“You might be thinking plastic isn’t a big deal. Let’s think for a minute that you’re at the beach drinking bottled water. According to “The Problem with Plastic,” an article by Hannah Elisbury, one out of every six plastic water bottles ends up in recycling. The rest become landfill fodder. Worse, many get dropped in nature. Perhaps you are packing up at the end of your beach trip and forget to grab your bottle. Maybe your kid is buried in the sand. Now it’s adding pollutants to the water. That water becomes part of the drinking water supply. It also becomes part of the fish you eat at your favorite seafood restaurant. Just one bottle has big consequences.”

As you write the body, don’t stress making every word perfect. You will revise it later. The main goal is to get your ideas on paper or screen. This body paragraph is effective for two reasons. First, the audience members likely use water bottles, which resonates with them. Second, she uses a resource and names it, which gives your work authority.

It would be best to use transitions to move from each speech section. This keeps the audience engaged and interested. In addition, the transitions should naturally merge into the next section of the speech without abruptness. To transition between points or ideas, use transition words. Some examples include:

  • Coupled with
  • Following this
  • Additionally
  • Comparatively
  • Correspondingly
  • Identically
  • In contrast
  • For example

You can also use sequence words, like first, second, third, etc., to give the idea of transition from one thought to the next. Make sure your speech has several transition words to drive it through to completion and to keep the audience engaged.

In his speech “ Their Finest Hour ,” Winston Churchill uses transitions well. Here is an excerpt from his conclusion:

“ But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age made more sinister, perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Therefore, let us brace ourselves to our duties and bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, “This was their finest hour.”

Notice that he uses “therefore,” “so,” and “but.” Each of these transition words effectively moves the speech along.

Your conclusion needs to restate your thesis but differently. It should personalize the speech to the audience, restate your main points and state any key takeaways. Finally, it should leave the audience with a thought to ponder.

Here are some practical ways to end a speech:

  • Use a story
  • Read a poem
  • State an inspirational quote
  • Summarize the main points
  • Deliver a call to action

Here are some examples of fantastic conclusions:

  • Here is an excellent example of a concluding statement for an inspirational graduation speech: “As you graduate, you will face great challenges, but you will also have great opportunities. By embracing all that you have learned here, you will meet them head-on. The best is yet to come!”
  • A CEO that is trying to inspire his workforce might conclude a speech like this: “While the past year had challenges and difficulties, I saw you work through them and come out ahead. As we move into the next year, I am confident we will continue to excel. Let’s join hands, and together this can be the best year in company history!”
  • In “T he Speech to Go to the Moon, ” President Kennedy concluded this way: “ Many years ago the great British explorer George Mallory, who was to die on Mount Everest, was asked why did he want to climb it. He said, “Because it is there. Well, space is there, and we’re going to climb it, and the moon and the planets are there, and new hopes for knowledge and peace are there. And, therefore, as we set sail we ask God’s blessing on the most hazardous and dangerous and greatest adventure on which man has ever embarked.” Many speechwriters say something like “in conclusion” or “that’s all I have for you today.” This is not necessary. Saying “in conclusion” could cause your audience to stop listening as they anticipate the end of the speech, and stating that you have said all you need to say is just unnecessary.

Now that you have the basic structure, you’re ready to add some spice to your speech. Remember, you aren’t reading a research essay. Instead, you are making an exciting and engaging spoken presentation. Here are some ideas:

  • Consider giving your speech some rhythm. For example, change the wording, so it has a pace and cadence.
  • Work to remove a passive voice from your sentences where possible. Active speaking is more powerful than passive.
  • Use rhetorical questions throughout because they make the listener stop and think for a moment about what you are saying.
  • Weave some quotes into your speech. Pulling famous words from other people will make your speech more interesting.
  • Where possible, use personal stories. This helps your audience engage with you as the speaker while keeping the speech interesting.

You may not use all of these ideas in your speech, but find some that will work for the type of speech you plan to give. They will make it more exciting and help keep listeners engaged in what you are saying.

Writing a speech is not like writing a paper. While you want to sound educated with proper grammar, you need to write in the way you speak. For many people, this is much different from the way they write. Not only will you use short sentences, but you will also use:

  • Familiar vocabulary: This is not the time to start adding scientific terminology to the mix or jargon for your industry that the audience won’t understand. Use familiar vocabulary.
  • Transitions: Already discussed, but spoken language uses many transition words. Your speech should, too.
  • Personal pronouns: “You” and “I” are acceptable in a speech but not in academic writing.
  • Colloquialisms: Colloquialisms are perfectly acceptable in a speech, provided the audience would readily understand them.
  • Contractions: We use contractions when we speak, so we also use them in speeches, while some writing platforms and assignments do not allow them.
  • Repetition: Repeating words and phrases makes them memorable. This helps emphasize the main ideas and works well in speeches.

Now you are ready to edit your speech. Remember, spoken language is acceptable, but grammar errors may not be ideal. As you edit, pay attention to the length of sentences. Shorten any long ones. Also, watch for those transition words. Add them in if you need to. Remember, a well-written speech takes time. Put in the effort to revise and improve it, and you will be rewarded with an effective speech that is easy to deliver. If you still need help, our guide to grammar and syntax explains more.

Now that you have written your speech, you are ready to read it. Read it out loud at your average speaking speed, and time yourself. This will tell you if you are within your allotted time limit. However, reading it has another benefit. When you read the piece, you can determine if it flows smoothly. You may catch grammar issues or poor transitions that you can change. Look for places where the speech may be hard to speak and adjust those sentences to make them more accessible.

After you update the speech, practice it again. Reading it, revising it, rereading it, and repeating it will help you create a speech that flows well. This process will also help you become familiar with the speech so you can deliver it confidently when your speaking engagement comes.

Looking for inspiration? Read our round-up of argumentative essays !

how to write speech about someone

Nicole Harms has been writing professionally since 2006. She specializes in education content and real estate writing but enjoys a wide gamut of topics. Her goal is to connect with the reader in an engaging, but informative way. Her work has been featured on USA Today, and she ghostwrites for many high-profile companies. As a former teacher, she is passionate about both research and grammar, giving her clients the quality they demand in today's online marketing world.

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The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

What this handout is about

This handout will help you create an effective speech by establishing the purpose of your speech and making it easily understandable. It will also help you to analyze your audience and keep the audience interested.

What’s different about a speech?

Writing for public speaking isn’t so different from other types of writing. You want to engage your audience’s attention, convey your ideas in a logical manner and use reliable evidence to support your point. But the conditions for public speaking favor some writing qualities over others. When you write a speech, your audience is made up of listeners. They have only one chance to comprehend the information as you read it, so your speech must be well-organized and easily understood. In addition, the content of the speech and your delivery must fit the audience.

What’s your purpose?

People have gathered to hear you speak on a specific issue, and they expect to get something out of it immediately. And you, the speaker, hope to have an immediate effect on your audience. The purpose of your speech is to get the response you want. Most speeches invite audiences to react in one of three ways: feeling, thinking, or acting. For example, eulogies encourage emotional response from the audience; college lectures stimulate listeners to think about a topic from a different perspective; protest speeches in the Pit recommend actions the audience can take.

As you establish your purpose, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do you want the audience to learn or do?
  • If you are making an argument, why do you want them to agree with you?
  • If they already agree with you, why are you giving the speech?
  • How can your audience benefit from what you have to say?

Audience analysis

If your purpose is to get a certain response from your audience, you must consider who they are (or who you’re pretending they are). If you can identify ways to connect with your listeners, you can make your speech interesting and useful.

As you think of ways to appeal to your audience, ask yourself:

  • What do they have in common? Age? Interests? Ethnicity? Gender?
  • Do they know as much about your topic as you, or will you be introducing them to new ideas?
  • Why are these people listening to you? What are they looking for?
  • What level of detail will be effective for them?
  • What tone will be most effective in conveying your message?
  • What might offend or alienate them?

For more help, see our handout on audience .

Creating an effective introduction

Get their attention, otherwise known as “the hook”.

Think about how you can relate to these listeners and get them to relate to you or your topic. Appealing to your audience on a personal level captures their attention and concern, increasing the chances of a successful speech. Speakers often begin with anecdotes to hook their audience’s attention. Other methods include presenting shocking statistics, asking direct questions of the audience, or enlisting audience participation.

Establish context and/or motive

Explain why your topic is important. Consider your purpose and how you came to speak to this audience. You may also want to connect the material to related or larger issues as well, especially those that may be important to your audience.

Get to the point

Tell your listeners your thesis right away and explain how you will support it. Don’t spend as much time developing your introductory paragraph and leading up to the thesis statement as you would in a research paper for a course. Moving from the intro into the body of the speech quickly will help keep your audience interested. You may be tempted to create suspense by keeping the audience guessing about your thesis until the end, then springing the implications of your discussion on them. But if you do so, they will most likely become bored or confused.

For more help, see our handout on introductions .

Making your speech easy to understand

Repeat crucial points and buzzwords.

Especially in longer speeches, it’s a good idea to keep reminding your audience of the main points you’ve made. For example, you could link an earlier main point or key term as you transition into or wrap up a new point. You could also address the relationship between earlier points and new points through discussion within a body paragraph. Using buzzwords or key terms throughout your paper is also a good idea. If your thesis says you’re going to expose unethical behavior of medical insurance companies, make sure the use of “ethics” recurs instead of switching to “immoral” or simply “wrong.” Repetition of key terms makes it easier for your audience to take in and connect information.

Incorporate previews and summaries into the speech

For example:

“I’m here today to talk to you about three issues that threaten our educational system: First, … Second, … Third,”

“I’ve talked to you today about such and such.”

These kinds of verbal cues permit the people in the audience to put together the pieces of your speech without thinking too hard, so they can spend more time paying attention to its content.

Use especially strong transitions

This will help your listeners see how new information relates to what they’ve heard so far. If you set up a counterargument in one paragraph so you can demolish it in the next, begin the demolition by saying something like,

“But this argument makes no sense when you consider that . . . .”

If you’re providing additional information to support your main point, you could say,

“Another fact that supports my main point is . . . .”

Helping your audience listen

Rely on shorter, simpler sentence structures.

Don’t get too complicated when you’re asking an audience to remember everything you say. Avoid using too many subordinate clauses, and place subjects and verbs close together.

Too complicated:

The product, which was invented in 1908 by Orville Z. McGillicuddy in Des Moines, Iowa, and which was on store shelves approximately one year later, still sells well.

Easier to understand:

Orville Z. McGillicuddy invented the product in 1908 and introduced it into stores shortly afterward. Almost a century later, the product still sells well.

Limit pronoun use

Listeners may have a hard time remembering or figuring out what “it,” “they,” or “this” refers to. Be specific by using a key noun instead of unclear pronouns.

Pronoun problem:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This cannot continue.

Why the last sentence is unclear: “This” what? The government’s failure? Reality TV? Human nature?

More specific:

The U.S. government has failed to protect us from the scourge of so-called reality television, which exploits sex, violence, and petty conflict, and calls it human nature. This failure cannot continue.

Keeping audience interest

Incorporate the rhetorical strategies of ethos, pathos, and logos.

When arguing a point, using ethos, pathos, and logos can help convince your audience to believe you and make your argument stronger. Ethos refers to an appeal to your audience by establishing your authenticity and trustworthiness as a speaker. If you employ pathos, you appeal to your audience’s emotions. Using logos includes the support of hard facts, statistics, and logical argumentation. The most effective speeches usually present a combination these rhetorical strategies.

Use statistics and quotations sparingly

Include only the most striking factual material to support your perspective, things that would likely stick in the listeners’ minds long after you’ve finished speaking. Otherwise, you run the risk of overwhelming your listeners with too much information.

Watch your tone

Be careful not to talk over the heads of your audience. On the other hand, don’t be condescending either. And as for grabbing their attention, yelling, cursing, using inappropriate humor, or brandishing a potentially offensive prop (say, autopsy photos) will only make the audience tune you out.

Creating an effective conclusion

Restate your main points, but don’t repeat them.

“I asked earlier why we should care about the rain forest. Now I hope it’s clear that . . .” “Remember how Mrs. Smith couldn’t afford her prescriptions? Under our plan, . . .”

Call to action

Speeches often close with an appeal to the audience to take action based on their new knowledge or understanding. If you do this, be sure the action you recommend is specific and realistic. For example, although your audience may not be able to affect foreign policy directly, they can vote or work for candidates whose foreign policy views they support. Relating the purpose of your speech to their lives not only creates a connection with your audience, but also reiterates the importance of your topic to them in particular or “the bigger picture.”

Practicing for effective presentation

Once you’ve completed a draft, read your speech to a friend or in front of a mirror. When you’ve finished reading, ask the following questions:

  • Which pieces of information are clearest?
  • Where did I connect with the audience?
  • Where might listeners lose the thread of my argument or description?
  • Where might listeners become bored?
  • Where did I have trouble speaking clearly and/or emphatically?
  • Did I stay within my time limit?

Other resources

  • Toastmasters International is a nonprofit group that provides communication and leadership training.
  • Allyn & Bacon Publishing’s Essence of Public Speaking Series is an extensive treatment of speech writing and delivery, including books on using humor, motivating your audience, word choice and presentation.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Boone, Louis E., David L. Kurtz, and Judy R. Block. 1997. Contemporary Business Communication . Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Ehrlich, Henry. 1994. Writing Effective Speeches . New York: Marlowe.

Lamb, Sandra E. 1998. How to Write It: A Complete Guide to Everything You’ll Ever Write . Berkeley: Ten Speed Press.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Write a Speech About Someone Else - PapersOwl.com

    Do you have an assignment to write a speech about another person but don't know how to do it right? Find useful tips on writing a great speech about someone else - your friend or even a famous person. Log in / Sign up Forgot password Confirm email

  2. How to Write a Speech about Someone Else | CustomWriting

    Writing Tips How to Write a Speech about Someone December 27, 2023 Conducting interviews with the person and their colleagues Conducting interviews with the person and their colleagues is an essential step when writing a speech about someone.

  3. Here's How to Write a Perfect Speech | Grammarly

    Educate, inspire, entertain, argue a point? Your goals will dictate the tone and structure, and result in dramatically different speeches. Know your audience: Your speech should be tailored for your audience, both in terms of ideas and language.

  4. 26 Ways To Start a Speech and Capture People's Attention - Indeed

    1. Use a quote One method of starting a speech and gaining the audience's attention is to use a famous or relatable quote. This approach can give your audience context for your topic and connect it to something they recognize. For instance, if you plan to give a speech on a political topic, you might use a famous quote about your speech's subject.

  5. How to Write a Good Speech: 10 Steps and Tips - BetterUp

    Take quiz Whether in a work meeting or at an investor panel, you might give a speech at some point. And no matter how excited you are about the opportunity, the experience can be nerve-wracking . But feeling butterflies doesn’t mean you can’t give a great speech.

  6. How To Write A Speech That Inspires You Audience: 13 Steps

    Step 1: Define Your Purpose Before you can write a speech, you must know the purpose of your speech. You can deliver many types of speeches, and the purpose will determine which one you are giving. While there may be more than these, here are some common types of speeches:

  7. How to Write a Speech: 6 Tips for a Powerful Address

    How Do You Write a Good Speech? Before you can deliver a powerful message that stays with your listeners for a long time, you must write a well-structured speech that is clear, definite, brief, and complete. Here are the steps you can follow if you’ve booked a speaking engagement or need to deliver an important presentation: 1.

  8. Speeches – The Writing Center • University of North Carolina ...

    Ethos refers to an appeal to your audience by establishing your authenticity and trustworthiness as a speaker. If you employ pathos, you appeal to your audience’s emotions. Using logos includes the support of hard facts, statistics, and logical argumentation. The most effective speeches usually present a combination these rhetorical strategies.