illustrated essay

How to Write an Illustration Essay: Quick and Easy Guide

illustrated essay

How to Write an Illustration Essay: All You Need to Know

Creating an illustrative essay entails more than simply sketching a few beautiful images, even though some might believe that they are easy because they can incorporate drawings into the writing. To excel in this type of work and enhance the visual appeal of your piece, it demands both time and a solid comprehension of the subject matter.

Students can master this academic writing style by consulting guides and examples. So, to acquire comprehensive guidance on crafting an exceptional illustration essay from beginning to end, check out our article to discover the definition, suggested themes, and guidelines for creating an uncontested paper from beginning to end.

Illustration Essay Definition

To give you a clear idea of your first potential question on the concept of - what is an illustration essay - here is a simple definition from our essay writing service : Illustration papers serve as a form of written composition employed to present instances or examples of a particular concept or idea. These essays commonly incorporate visuals and other illustrations to aid in explaining the discussed concept.

Similar to other essay types, this paper typically commences with a thesis statement that establishes the main overarching theme of the work and provides a preview of what readers can expect. Subsequently, a series of examples are presented throughout the essay to support the thesis statement. While illustrative elements can be found in other types of essays, such as argumentative essays, this type of work must avoid presenting claims or personal opinions.

How to Write an Illustration Essay: Steps To Begin

Let's take a journey together with our essay writer to learn how to start writing your paper. By following these steps, you'll be able to bring your illustration essay ideas to life and make a strong impact on your readers.

How to Write an Illustration Essay_ Steps To Begin

Step 1: Select a Topic

If you are given the freedom to choose your illustration essay topics, take full advantage of it. Consider selecting a subject you are passionate about, so you will be motivated to explore it further, and the writing process will not feel burdensome.

Step 2. Research

Embrace research as your closest companion. When embarking on your work, refrain from diving into writing before gathering ample material. It is crucial to locate credible sources from which you can extract relevant information. Platforms such as Oxford Academic and Google Scholar prove excellent for conducting your research.

Step 3. Write an Outline

While some students argue that creating an outline is a futile task, it actually serves as a valuable step. When constructing your outline, be sure to incorporate the following components:

  • Introductory paragraph: Introduce the topic, provide background information, clarify the significance and relevance of the topic, and present a strong thesis statement.
  • Body paragraphs: Present your ideas in a logical and organized manner. Dedicate each paragraph with a topic sentence to discuss a single idea, utilize transitional devices to enhance the flow between paragraphs, and strive for paragraph coherence.
  • Conclusion: Restate the thesis statement, summarize the main ideas discussed in the body paragraphs, and provide a concluding statement that wraps up the entire paper.

Step 4. Write Your Ideas

Having completed the necessary steps thus far, crafting an outstanding essay should pose no difficulty. Simply transform your main ideas into concise paragraphs and bolster each one with the appropriate supporting evidence.

Step 5. Review

After completing your essay, it is essential to give it a thorough editing. Take the time to read through it once or twice to identify any grammatical, structural, or contextual errors. Additionally, ensure that your essay is free from any instances of plagiarism.

Step 6. Enjoy Your Perfect Essay

By considering the aforementioned steps, you should now be able to appreciate your perfectly completed essay. Keep in mind that the writing process can be painless when you follow our expert tips (more to come below!), leading to a flawless outcome.

Why Write Illustration Essay: Purpose and Importance 

The primary objective of illustration essays is to facilitate readers in comprehending a concept or argument with clarity by presenting tangible and illustrative examples and evidence. The examples utilized in this type of paper should be pertinent, vibrant, and precise, enabling readers to understand and visualize the topic being discussed.

Illustrative writing can prove advantageous for both the writer and the readers. On the one hand, this type of assignment enhances a student's creativity and comprehensive abilities. On the other hand, it stimulates the reader's imagination as they are required to mentally construct a visual representation.

If you find yourself uncertain about how to start an illustration essay, one approach is to delve into your personal experiences that are relevant to the topic or subject matter. Reflect on real-life examples or incidents that can effectively illustrate the concept you intend to discuss. By drawing from your own experiences, you can provide authentic and relatable illustrations for your essay.

Main Tips For Writing

If you are still unsure about how to write an illustration essay and need additional tips, you've come to the right place! Make the most of the advice provided below.

Main Tips For Writing

Collect Evidence - When embarking on your academic essay , refrain from diving into writing before gathering ample material. This type of writing necessitates the inclusion of numerous examples, so acquire a multitude of firsthand examples from professional writers.

Be Concise - Aim for precise and focused illustrations, steering clear of unnecessary elaboration or lengthy descriptions. Keep your examples concise while ensuring they retain clarity and effectiveness.

Provide Concrete Instances - Opt for specific illustration essay examples that vividly depict your points. The inclusion of specific details enhances the clarity and impact of your illustrations, making them more relatable and captivating to readers.

Rely on Reliable Sources - Make use of trustworthy and credible sources when gathering examples and evidence. This approach bolsters the credibility and reliability of your essay. Consider referencing scholarly articles, academic books, reliable websites, or expert opinions to reinforce your arguments.

Ensure Clear Expression - Ensure the clarity and comprehensibility of your illustrations. Avoid ambiguity or confusion by offering ample context and explanation. Take the time to review your essay, ensuring that your examples effectively convey the intended message and provide support for your thesis statement.

Topics for Illustration Essay: Choose The Best One

Presented below are a collection of ideas to ignite your creativity when writing an illustration essay. Feel free to explore and adapt them according to your personal interests and the specific guidelines of your assignment.

  • Student Life:

a. The Challenges and Benefits of Balancing Academics and Extracurricular Activities

b. The Impact of Peer Pressure on College Students' Decision-Making

  • Personal Development:

a. The Role of Traveling in Broadening a College Student's Perspective

b. The Benefits of Mindfulness and Meditation for Stress Reduction in College Life

  • Social Relationships:

a. The Influence of Social Media on Interpersonal Communication Skills

b. The Importance of Developing Healthy Boundaries in Friendships and Relationships

  • Career and Future Planning:

a. Exploring Alternative Career Paths: Non-Traditional Options for College Graduates

b. The Significance of Internships in Gaining Practical Experience and Building Professional Networks

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Illustration Essay Examples

Exploring our collection of expertly crafted illustration paper examples offers a valuable opportunity to delve deeper into the intricacies of this writing style. Utilize the vivid examples below as a point of reference as you refine your own writing skills.

We also recommend taking a look at our comprehensive guide on a narrative essay , complete with examples.

To wrap up, by thoughtfully selecting enthralling examples, conducting meticulous research, and skillfully presenting them with clarity, your illustration essay has the potential to transform into a captivating masterpiece. Allow your imagination to roam free, infuse your prose with the enchantment of visual storytelling, and embark on an extraordinary odyssey where ideas flourish, and comprehension deepens.

And if you still find it challenging, buy essay from our creative writers who will infuse vitality into your essay through illustrations that invigorate, leaving readers uplifted, enlightened, and yearning for more!

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An illustration essay is one of the most interesting essay assignments that you will get in your college and university life. It is a unique style of writing and very different from other types of academic essays. 

A deep understanding of what exactly an illustration essay is and how to write a perfect one is important for success with this kind of work.

If you are new to illustration essays and don’t know how to start, our blog is here to help!

In this blog, you will find out how to write an illustration essay. You will also get a list of illustration essay ideas and samples to help you get started. 

So let’s dive in!

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Illustration Essay Definition

An illustration essay is a type of essay that aims to present a compelling and vivid picture of a particular subject or personal experiences. 

Unlike other essays that may focus solely on presenting arguments or analyzing data. An exemplification/illustration essay employs various examples, anecdotes, or scenarios to provide clarity and support for the chosen topic. 

Purpose of Writing an Illustration Essay 

The goal of an illustration essay is to paint a picture for the reader, helping them understand the subject through real-life instances or relatable situations. 

This type of essay allows the writer to showcase their ability to express ideas in a relatable manner, making it an engaging and informative piece of writing.

In simpler words, think of an illustration essay as a bunch of pictures or examples that come together to create a clear and detailed image of the chosen topic. It's a way of making the subject more alive and easy to understand for the reader.

Check out this video to improve your understanding of illustration essays:

Read on to get a step-by-step guide on how to write one yourself!

How to Write an Illustration Essay?

Here is the step-by-step guide that you can follow for writing a great illustration essay:

1. Choose a Topic 

The first step is to choose an interesting topic for your essay. Make sure the topic you choose has enough material available online.     2. Plan Your Writing 

Once you have decided on the topic, start planning your essay. Find credible sources before starting to write your essay. In this way, you will have plenty of information and examples to include in your essay. 

3. Creating an Outline

Create a rough outline to make the writing easier. Make sections for the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion, and write ideas you would add to each section. 

4. Introduction & Thesis Statement

Here’s the answer to “how to start an illustration essay?”

Introduction is the opening paragraph that typically contains 5 to 10 sentences. The number of sentences in the introduction depends on the complexity of the topic. 

The essay introduction should begin with a hook statement followed by some background information. End your introduction with the thesis statement. 

It is important to include a well-written thesis statement at the end of the introductory paragraph. The thesis statement for illustration essay should reflect your point of view. It is basically a one-sentence statement that tells the readers what you will discuss in your essay. 

Here is an illustration essay thesis example:

5. Body Paragraphs

This body section is typically made up of 3 paragraphs, but the number can be increased depending on the topic. In an illustration essay the body paragraphs should begin with a topic sentence followed by some supporting details and an example. 

Make sure to include stronger evidence to support the thesis. The stronger the evidence is, the more seriously the reader will consider your point. Make sure the illustration you provide to support a point must relate to the subject and your audience. 

You can also mention evidence in terms of importance, either from important to least important or from least important to the most important. 

6. Conclusion 

Create a summary of the whole essay in the last paragraph. Then, reiterate the thesis statement and include a finishing statement in the last. 

7. Add References 

An illustration essay may require you to use empirical data and other research material. Don’t forget to state the sources on the final page of the essay. Follow the referencing style specified by your instructor. 

8. Proofread 

Once you have finished the writing process, proofread your essay for any mistakes in grammar or structure. Edit and revise your essay to make sure it is free from any language mistakes. 

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Illustration Essay Outline

Below you can find the most common layout of the illustration essay. 

Below you can find a sample illustration essay outline that you can refer to for a better understanding. 

Illustration Essay Outline Example

Free Illustration Essay Examples

You can look at some professionally written illustration essay examples to better understand the correct writing style and tone for a great essay. 

Here are some illustration essay examples that you can review before beginning the writing process. 

Illustration Essay on Social Media

Example Illustration Essay on Smoking

Illustration Essay Sample

Illustration Essay Examples Pdf

Illustration Essay Examples For College

Illustration Essay Introduction Examples

Transition Words for Illustration Essay 

Transition words and phrases are important to include for a smooth flow of information. However, students sometimes find it difficult to have a smooth transition in this type of essay.  

Using transitions in your essay will make it easy for you to maintain a flow in your writing and for the readers to understand the connection in between. 

Here’s a list of transition words and phrases that will come in handy for writing an illustration essay: 

  • For example
  • For instance
  • To illustrate
  • In other words
  • As an illustration
  • In particular
  • The result that
  • Consequently
  • Accordingly
  • For this reason
  • As a result

Illustration Essay Topics 

Choosing the right topic is the key point in crafting an outstanding essay. Below you can find some good illustration essay topics for college to choose from. 

  • What are the best hobbies that can help you make money? 
  • Illustrate how a good education can lead to a successful life
  • Explain your views on your favorite social media platform
  • What is the most common challenge faced by Students today?
  • What are the necessary steps for writing a resume? 
  • Rugby and football: Write about the main differences
  • Status symbol and Fashion shows: Share your views with examples 
  • What are the most effective ways to save money?
  • Write about the challenges currently faced by students
  • Explain how movies impact our view of life

Looking for more great topics for your illustrative essay? Browse through our list of illustration essay topics !

Illustration Essay Writing Tips

Ready to start writing your illustration essay? Keep these tips in mind to make the process easier.

  • Define the Focus of Your Illustration Essay:

Before you start writing your essay, it is important to clearly identify the focus of your illustration essay. This will help to ensure that you are able to effectively illustrate your points in an organized and concise manner.

  • Use Illustrative Examples:

Make sure to include examples to support your points in your essay. These can be real-world examples that illustrate a point or hypothetical situations designed to show how certain aspects of the topic work.

  • Check for Clarity:

Once you’ve finished writing your essay, read it over and make sure it’s clear and easily understood. If there are any areas of confusion or ambiguity, revise them to ensure the reader understands your point.

  • Use Credible Sources:

If you’re going to include any facts or figures in your essay, make sure they are accurate and up-to-date. Before including them, make sure to check their credibility with reliable sources. This will help improve the authority of your essay.

  • Proofread Carefully:

Finally, proofread carefully for grammar, spelling, punctuation, and other errors. Make sure to edit and proofread your essay before submitting it. This will help to ensure that your essay is as polished and professional as possible.

Following these tips will let you write an excellent illustration essay. So be sure to keep these in mind while writing.

To conclude,

Hopefully, now you understand what an illustration essay is and the necessary steps for writing a perfect one. 

If you are still unsure how to write a good illustration essay, get help from expert essay writers. MyPerfectWords.com is a legit essay writing service that can help you with all of your essay writing tasks.

Just hire our top essay writer and get the best illustration essay writing help from experts.

Barbara P (Literature, Marketing)

Dr. Barbara is a highly experienced writer and author who holds a Ph.D. degree in public health from an Ivy League school. She has worked in the medical field for many years, conducting extensive research on various health topics. Her writing has been featured in several top-tier publications.

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How To Write an Illustration Essay?

12 May, 2020

8 minutes read

Author:  Tomas White

Not all of us are "right-brained" enough to have a powerful visual imagination. So, when the tutor handles the illustration essay task, hands could get a little shaky. But, no worries! This type of essay is not about artistic visualization nor it requires any kind of drawing experience. It is much more about the "big picture" vision and the ability to formulate examples supporting your claims/arguments. So..

Illustration Essay

<h2 “alignnone” title=”Illustration Essay Writing Guide”>What is an Illustration Essay?

Illustration essay is here to prove a particular thing exists. This particular essay type relies much more on research than analysis in order to prove a particular point. It contains a great deal of description and provides the reader with vocal examples. The thesis is formulated in the introduction; then it is developed with the help of illustrative examples within the body paragraphs – just to be perpetuated in the conclusion by the end of the essay.

How to write an Illustration Essay?

An illustration essay is also commonly referred to as an Example essay. Of all the different kinds of essays students write, this exists as the most straightforward, easiest essay to write.

While other essays require very specific aspects, such as the Cause and Effect essay , an illustration essay is exactly what it sounds like: an illustration of a particular subject. If you’re wondering if it requires drawing, have no fear! In an illustration essay, the writer illustrates his or her points with clear, authentic examples—not pictures. The body paragraphs should contain research illustrating the thesis, and likely the Works Cited and/or Bibliography pages.

Structure of an Illustration Essay

Introduction

This paragraph opens the illustration essay. It typically contains anywhere from 5 to 15 sentences; a number of sentences depend upon the density of the topic being explained in the essay. It should begin with a hook – a sentence to gain and keep the reader’s attention. Hooks may also be referred to as “attention getters”.  Examples of hooks include:

  • Interesting facts
  • Relevant statistics
  • Rhetorical question
  • Personal anecdote
Related post: How to write an Essay Introduction

Following the hook should be several background sentences . These sentences provide key information the audience may need to fully understand the concept being illustrated in the essay. Such information could include defining important vocabulary, providing historic or social context, or relevant personal background for individuals discussed in the paper. Information plays a fundamental role when it comes to putting up a piece of content, whether it’s an informative essay or not.

Finally, the last sentence of the introduction paragraph should be the thesis statement . It’s a good idea to craft your thesis statement before you begin any research; a well-written thesis should be able to guide your research and make it more effective. What makes a good thesis? So glad you asked!

A thesis statement should be both clear and argumentative.  For an illustrative essay, a thesis statement should focus on identifying the subject to be illustrated and the way the writer plans to support the illustration.

Body Paragraphs

Body paragraphs

A body paragraph’s purpose is to support the thesis. Each paragraph should contain a different piece of evidence that proves the writer’s thesis has merit. All body paragraphs follow a universal format involving five basic sentence types:

  • Topic Sentence. This sentence identifies the topic of the paragraph and how it relates to the thesis statement.
  • Background sentence(s). Depending on the complexity of the subject identified in the topic sentence, the essay writer may need one to three or more background sentences.
  • Research sentences. These sentences can be direct quotations or paraphrases of important ideas found during the research process. Any research sentences supporting the topic should be cited according to your teacher’s preference.
  • Analysis. Analysis sentences explain how the research sentences are relevant to the topic sentence and thesis sentence. These sentences often use analysis words such as shows, portrays, illustrates, proves, and communicates.
  • Conclusion/Transition. This sentence wraps up the paragraph and transitions the reader to the next idea in the following paragraph.

Now, here is where the “illustration” part comes in. You need to support each body paragraph statement with examples, proving or supporting your claim. Two examples covering each statement works the best. There is no need to dive too deep into examples – just lay them out as you outline your body paragraphs.

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Beginning the conclusion paragraph means that you’re almost done! Conclusion paragraphs are typically the shortest paragraphs in an illustration essay. Its purpose is to reiterate the main points within each body paragraph and prove to the reader that the writer proved his or her point within the essay. While these paragraphs are short, they are important; it is the last impression the reader has – so make it a good one!

Conclusion paragraphs should be strongly worded and confident. However, they should not introduce any new information; focus only one what’s already been presented as evidence in the essay.

Tips from our writers – free takeaways!

Transition words.

Transitions  can really help move an argument along in an illustration essay. Transitions are words that act as connectors in a sentence; they connect one idea to another. They can show similarity, contrast, or illustration among other connections. Want your illustration essay to shine? Consider incorporating the following transitions to improve the flow of the essay:

Transition words

Transitions can link similar ideas in the same body paragraph or link different examples of body paragraphs.

Outline Example

As with all essay writing assignments, it’s important to begin early and stay on-task. Keep to a writing schedule, beginning with an idea outline to organize your thoughts and help guide your research.

Check out this no-frills outline:

Outline Example

Illustration Essay Sample

Be sure to check the sample essay, completed by our writers. Use it as an example to write your own essay. Link:  Illustration Essay on Social Statuses

Drawing the line (figuratively)

Taking the time to outline and narrow your research focus makes finding information much, much easier! But it is not always necessary to verse an outstanding illustrative essay. The best way to prove your point is to show a real-life example.

Nothing really works better than cases and situations taken straight from your life experience (almost like the narrative essay , right?) People with colorful life experience tend to be the best in the illustrative essay “business”.

Remember: you have many resources available to you to help you earn the grade you want. Stick to a good writing schedule and take a rough draft to your professor for constructive criticism. Visit the campus writing center if you have one, or send your essay to our professional editing service. Revisit and revise your draft at least once – perfection is a process!

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10.2 Illustration

Learning objectives.

  • Determine the purpose and structure of the illustration essay.
  • Understand how to write an illustration essay.

The Purpose of Illustration in Writing

To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay clearly demonstrates and supports a point through the use of evidence.

As you learned in Chapter 9 “Writing Essays: From Start to Finish” , the controlling idea of an essay is called a thesis . A writer can use different types of evidence to support his or her thesis. Using scientific studies, experts in a particular field, statistics, historical events, current events, analogies, and personal anecdotes are all ways in which a writer can illustrate a thesis. Ultimately, you want the evidence to help the reader “see” your point, as one would see a good illustration in a magazine or on a website. The stronger your evidence is, the more clearly the reader will consider your point.

Using evidence effectively can be challenging, though. The evidence you choose will usually depend on your subject and who your reader is (your audience). When writing an illustration essay, keep in mind the following:

  • Use evidence that is appropriate to your topic as well as appropriate for your audience.
  • Assess how much evidence you need to adequately explain your point depending on the complexity of the subject and the knowledge of your audience regarding that subject.

For example, if you were writing about a new communication software and your audience was a group of English-major undergrads, you might want to use an analogy or a personal story to illustrate how the software worked. You might also choose to add a few more pieces of evidence to make sure the audience understands your point. However, if you were writing about the same subject and you audience members were information technology (IT) specialists, you would likely use more technical evidence because they would be familiar with the subject.

Keeping in mind your subject in relation to your audience will increase your chances of effectively illustrating your point.

You never want to insult your readers’ intelligence by overexplaining concepts the audience members may already be familiar with, but it may be necessary to clearly articulate your point. When in doubt, add an extra example to illustrate your idea.

On a separate piece of paper, form a thesis based on each of the following three topics. Then list the types of evidence that would best explain your point for each of the two audiences.

Topic: Combat and mental health

Audience: family members of veterans, doctors

Topic: Video games and teen violence

Audience: parents, children

Topic: Architecture and earthquakes

Audience: engineers, local townspeople

The Structure of an Illustration Essay

The controlling idea, or thesis, belongs at the beginning of the essay. Evidence is then presented in the essay’s body paragraphs to support the thesis. You can start supporting your main point with your strongest evidence first, or you can start with evidence of lesser importance and have the essay build to increasingly stronger evidence. This type of organization— order of importance —you learned about in Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” and Chapter 9 “Writing Essays: From Start to Finish” .

The time transition words listed in Table 10.1 “Transition Words and Phrases for Expressing Time” are also helpful in ordering the presentation of evidence. Words like first , second , third , currently , next , and finally all help orient the reader and sequence evidence clearly. Because an illustration essay uses so many examples, it is also helpful to have a list of words and phrases to present each piece of evidence. Table 10.2 “Phrases of Illustration” provides a list of phrases for illustration.

Table 10.2 Phrases of Illustration

Vary the phrases of illustration you use. Do not rely on just one. Variety in choice of words and phrasing is critical when trying to keep readers engaged in your writing and your ideas.

Writing at Work

In the workplace, it is often helpful to keep the phrases of illustration in mind as a way to incorporate them whenever you can. Whether you are writing out directives that colleagues will have to follow or requesting a new product or service from another company, making a conscious effort to incorporate a phrase of illustration will force you to provide examples of what you mean.

On a separate sheet of paper, form a thesis based on one of the following topics. Then support that thesis with three pieces of evidence. Make sure to use a different phrase of illustration to introduce each piece of evidence you choose.

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your answers. Discuss which topic you like the best or would like to learn more about. Indicate which thesis statement you perceive as the most effective.

Writing an Illustration Essay

First, decide on a topic that you feel interested in writing about. Then create an interesting introduction to engage the reader. The main point, or thesis, should be stated at the end of the introduction.

Gather evidence that is appropriate to both your subject and your audience. You can order the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important. Be sure to fully explain all of your examples using strong, clear supporting details. See Chapter 15 “Readings: Examples of Essays” to read a sample illustration essay.

On a separate sheet of paper, write a five-paragraph illustration essay. You can choose one of the topics from Note 10.23 “Exercise 1” or Note 10.27 “Exercise 2” , or you can choose your own.

Key Takeaways

  • An illustration essay clearly explains a main point using evidence.
  • When choosing evidence, always gauge whether the evidence is appropriate for the subject as well as the audience.
  • Organize the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important.
  • Use time transitions to order evidence.
  • Use phrases of illustration to call out examples.

Writing for Success Copyright © 2015 by University of Minnesota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

Module 5: Illustration/Example Essay

Writing for success: illustration/example, learning objectives.

This section will help you determine the purpose and structure of illustration/ example in writing.

The Purpose of Illustration in Writing

To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay, also known as an example essay, clearly demonstrates and supports a point through the use of evidence.

The controlling idea of an essay is called a thesis. A writer can use different types of evidence to support his or her thesis. Using scientific studies, experts in a particular field, statistics, historical events, current events, analogies, and personal anecdotes are all ways in which a writer can illustrate a thesis. Ultimately, you want the evidence to help the reader “see” your point, as one would see a good illustration in a magazine or on a website. The stronger your evidence is, the more clearly the reader will consider your point.

Using evidence effectively can be challenging, though. The evidence you choose will usually depend on your subject and who your reader is (your audience). When writing an illustration essay, keep in mind the following:

  • Use evidence that is appropriate to your topic as well as appropriate for your audience.
  • Assess how much evidence you need to adequately explain your point depending on the complexity of the subject and the knowledge of your audience regarding that subject.

For example, if you were writing about a new communication software and your audience was a group of English-major undergrads, you might want to use an analogy or a personal story to illustrate how the software worked. You might also choose to add a few more pieces of evidence to make sure the audience understands your point. However, if you were writing about the same subject and you audience members were information technology (IT) specialists, you would likely use more technical evidence because they would be familiar with the subject.

Keeping in mind your subject in relation to your audience will increase your chances of effectively illustrating your point.

The Structure of an Illustration Essay

The controlling idea, or thesis, belongs at the beginning of the essay. Evidence is then presented in the essay’s body paragraphs to support the thesis. You can start supporting your main point with your strongest evidence first, or you can start with evidence of lesser importance and have the essay build to increasingly stronger evidence. This type of organization is called “order of importance.”

Transition words are also helpful in ordering the presentation of evidence. Words like first, second, third, currently, next, and finally all help orient the reader and sequence evidence clearly. Because an illustration essay uses so many examples, it is also helpful to have a list of words and phrases to present each piece of evidence. Certain  transitional words and phrases  aid in keeping the reader oriented in the sequencing of a story. Some of these phrases are listed here:

Phrases of Illustration

Vary the phrases of illustration you use. Do not rely on just one. Variety in choice of words and phrasing is critical when trying to keep readers engaged in your writing and your ideas.

Writing an Illustration Essay

First, decide on a topic that you feel interested in writing about. Then create an interesting introduction to engage the reader. The main point, or thesis, should be stated at the end of the introduction.

Gather evidence that is appropriate to both your subject and your audience. You can order the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important. Be sure to fully explain all of your examples using strong, clear supporting details.

Illustration/Example Essay Example

Letter to the City

By Scott McLean in Writing for Success

To: Lakeview Department of Transportation

From: A Concerned Citizen

The intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street is dangerous and demands immediate consideration for the installation of a controlling mechanism. I have lived in Lakeview my entire life, and during that time I have witnessed too many accidents and close calls at that intersection. I would like the Department of Transportation to answer this question: how many lives have to be lost on the corner of Central Avenue and Lake Street before a street light or stop sign is placed there?

Over the past twenty years, the population of Lakeview has increased dramatically. This population growth has put tremendous pressure on the city’s roadways, especially Central Avenue and its intersecting streets. At the intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street it is easy to see how serious this problem is. For example, when I try to cross Central Avenue as a pedestrian, I frequently wait over ten minutes for the cars to clear, and even then I must rush to the median. I will then have to continue to wait until I can finally run to the other side of the street. On one hand, even as a physically fit adult, I can run only with significant effort and care. Expecting a senior citizen or a child to cross this street, on the other hand, is extremely dangerous and irresponsible. Does the city have any plans to do anything about this?

Recent data show that the intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street has been especially dangerous. According to the city’s own statistics, three fatalities occurred at that intersection in the past year alone. Over the past five years, the intersection witnessed fourteen car accidents, five of which were fatal. These numbers officially qualify the intersection as the most fatal and dangerous in the entire state. It should go without saying that fatalities and accidents are not the clearest way of measuring the severity of this situation because for each accident that happens, countless other close calls never contribute to city data. I hope you will agree that these numbers alone are sufficient evidence that the intersection at Central Avenue and Lake Street is hazardous and demands immediate attention.

Nearly all accidents mentioned are caused by vehicles trying to cross Central Avenue while driving on Lake Street. I think the City of Lakeview should consider placing a traffic light there to control the traffic going both ways. While I do not have access to any resources or data that can show precisely how much a traffic light can improve the intersection, I think you will agree that a controlled busy intersection is much safer than an uncontrolled one. Therefore, at a minimum, the city must consider making the intersection a four-way stop.

Each day that goes by without attention to this issue is a lost opportunity to save lives and make the community a safer, more enjoyable place to live. Because the safety of citizens is the priority of every government, I can only expect that the Department of Transportation and the City of Lakeview will act on this matter immediately. For the safety and well-being of Lakeview citizens, please do not let bureaucracy or money impede this urgent project.

A Concerned Citizen

Key Takeaways

  • An illustration essay clearly explains a main point using evidence.
  • When choosing evidence, always gauge whether the evidence is appropriate for the subject as well as the audience.
  • Organize the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important.
  • Use time transitions to order evidence.
  • Use phrases of illustration to call out examples.
  • Provided by : Lumen Learning. Located at : http://lumenlearning.com/ . License : CC BY: Attribution
  • Successful Writing. Provided by : Anonymous. Located at : http://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/successful-writing/s14-02-illustration.html . License : CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
  • Letter to the City. Authored by : Scott McLean. Located at : http://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/successful-writing/s19-03-illustration-essay.html . License : CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

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Humanities LibreTexts

12.1: Why Write an Illustration Essay?

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Illustration is often used as a mode of writing when the writer needs to clarify general statements or observations about perceived truths about society, nature, experiences, and behavior. Illustration is used to clarify abstract concepts by providing a demonstration of a concept with supporting examples which show, in a concrete way, the point the writer is trying to establish. For example, a review of a beach resort would likely include main points and supporting examples regarding the hotel amenities, the restaurants available, beach access and related beach activities, and perhaps, price. All of these points would be assembled in an organized written composition—a personal journal entry, a travel brochure, a newspaper review, or a letter of complaint or praise to resort management.

Understanding Illustration

The point of any illustration assignment is for the writer to assert an overall observation and back up that assertion with evidence-based examples. Like other rhetorical modes, it can be simply informative—providing a neutral presentation of information for readers to use to draw their own conclusions, or it can be argumentative—providing a stance of favoritism or superiority on the topic. The key to organizing the overall essay is to decide on categories of main ideas that are needed to provide a comprehensive overview of the topic.

The Thesis Statement

The thesis statement for an illustration essay should convey the main point for why clarification or development of a deeper understanding of the topic is necessary or important.

Example \(\PageIndex{1}\):

  • The over-reliance on social media and texting has created an environment where people feel comfortable sharing critical feelings they would have previously kept to themselves.
  • Many of today’s popular movies rely on excessive gore and violence to entertain audiences which could explain why book adaptations are more violent than the original text.
  • If money is not object, then a vacation to the Kanaapali Shores Beach Resort will satisfy a tourist’s paradise dream.

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Illustration/Example

Kirk Fontenot

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Characterize the purpose of the illustration/example essay
  • Determine the best structure for the illustration/example essay
  • Compose an illustration/example essay

Introduction to Illustration/Example

To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay clearly demonstrates and supports a point using examples and evidence . Ultimately, you want the evidence to help the reader “see” your point, as one would see a good illustration in a magazine or on a website. The stronger your evidence is, the more clearly the reader will consider your point.

Illustration/example writing simply means using specific examples to illustrate your point. Every essay has a point called the thesis statement . The thesis statement is the point you’re trying to make, stated clearly in one sentence. The rest of the essay is all about proving that point using different types of evidence.

The key to illustration/example is to use specific examples. General statements don’t make much of an impact on our reader; in other words, they’re boring. No one wants to read a boring essay, so why would you want to write one?

When thinking of examples, don’t try to come up with examples that can apply to everyone and every situation; these are general (i.e., boring) examples. Instead, think of specific, personal, interesting, unique examples.

Here’s an example of general writing that we should avoid:

There’s nothing wrong with this writing grammatically, but it’s boring .

Compare this to more specific writing:

The second example is specific, personal, and more interesting. The writer names specific restaurants and specific foods.

Illustration/example is an important rhetorical mode because specific examples are always a great way to make an essay more interesting, no matter what the writing prompt. In fact, if a rough draft of an essay is ever too short, don’t ever add filler; instead, add specific examples to get to the right length.

To make an essay more interesting, we can add:

  • Hypothetical examples that we make up
  • Real-life specific examples from personal experience (when appropriate)
  • Interesting examples that we read about

In this module, you will develop your skills in illustration/example writing.

The Purpose of Illustration in Writing

To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay, also known as an example essay, clearly demonstrates and supports a point through the use of evidence.

The controlling idea of an essay is called a thesis. A writer can use different types of evidence to support their thesis. Using scientific studies, experts in a particular field, statistics, historical events, current events, analogies, and personal anecdotes are all ways in which a writer can illustrate a thesis. Ultimately, you want the evidence to help the reader “see” your point, as one would see a good illustration in a magazine or on a website. The stronger your evidence is, the more clearly the reader will consider your point.

Using evidence effectively can be challenging, though. The evidence you choose will usually depend on your subject and who your reader is (your audience). When writing an illustration essay, keep in mind the following:

  • Use evidence that is appropriate to your topic as well as appropriate for your audience.
  • Ask yourself: How much evidence do you need to adequately explain your point? Consider how complex your subject is and how much background your audience may already have.

For example, if you were writing about a new communication software and your audience was a group of English major undergrads, you might want to use an analogy or a personal story to illustrate how the software worked. You might also choose to add a few more pieces of evidence to make sure the audience understands your point.

However, if you were writing about the same subject and your audience members were information technology (IT) specialists, you would likely use more technical evidence because they would be familiar with the subject.

Keeping your audience in mind will increase your chances of effectively illustrating your point.

The Structure of an Illustration Essay

The controlling idea, or thesis, belongs at the beginning of the essay. Evidence is then presented in the essay’s body paragraphs to support the thesis. You can start supporting your main point with your strongest evidence first, or you can start with evidence of lesser importance and have the essay build to increasingly stronger evidence. This type of organization is called “order of importance.”

Transition words are also helpful in ordering the presentation of evidence. Words like first , second , third , currently , next , and finally all help orient the reader and sequence evidence clearly. Because an illustration essay uses so many examples, it is also helpful to have a list of words and phrases to present each piece of evidence. Certain transitional words and phrases aid in keeping the reader oriented in the sequencing of a story. Some of these phrases are listed here:

Phrases of Illustration

case in point       for example

for instance         in particular

in this case          one example/another example

specifically to illustrate

Vary the phrases of illustration you use. Do not rely on just one. Variety in choice of words and phrasing is critical when trying to keep readers engaged in your writing and your ideas.

Writing an Illustration Essay

First, decide on a topic that you feel interested in writing about. Then create an interesting introduction to engage the reader. The main point, or thesis, should be stated at the end of the introduction.

Gather evidence that is appropriate to both your subject and your audience. You can order the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important. Be sure to fully explain all of your examples using strong, clear supporting details.

Professional Illustration/Example Writing

In “April & Paris,” writer David Sedaris explores the unique impact of animals on the human psyche. Click on the link to view the essay “April & Paris” by David Sedaris or read it below.

April & Paris by David Sedaris

While watching TV one recent evening, I stumbled upon a nature program devoted to the subject of making nature programs. The cameraman’s job was to catch a bird of paradise in full display, so he dug himself a hole, covered it with branches, and sat inside it for three weeks. This was in New Guinea, where the people used to wear sexy loincloths but now stand around in T-shirts reading “I survived the 2002 IPC Corporate Challenge Weekend.” A villager might wear a pair of gym shorts and then add a fanny pack or a sun visor with the name of a riverboat casino stitched onto the brim. I suppose that these things came from a relief organization. Either that or a cruise ship went down and this was what had washed up onshore.

I’ll wager that quite a few sun visors found their way to Southeast Asia after the tsunami. One brutal news story after another, and it went on for weeks. The phone numbers of aid organizations would skitter across the bottom of the TV screen, and I recall thinking that if they wanted serious donations they ought to show a puppy. People I know, people who had never before contributed to charity, emptied their pockets when a cocker spaniel was shown standing on a rooftop after Hurricane Katrina hit, eight months later. “What choice did I have?” they asked. “That poor little thing looked into the camera and penetrated my very soul.”

The eyes of the stranded grandmother, I noted, were not half as piercing. There she was, clinging to a chimney with her bra strap showing, and all anyone did was wonder if she had a dog. “I’d hate to think there’s a Scotty in her house, maybe trapped on the first floor. What’s the number of that canine-rescue agency?”

Saying that this was everyone’s reaction is, of course, an exaggeration. There were cat people, too, and those whose hearts went out to the abandoned reptiles. The sight of an iguana sailing down the street on top of a refrigerator sent a herpetologist friend over the edge. “She seems to be saying, ‘Where’s my master?'” he speculated. “‘Here it is, time for our daily cuddle and I’m stuck on the S.S. Whirlpool!!'”

I’ve often heard that anthropomorphizing an animal is the worst injustice you can do to it. That said, I’m as guilty of it as anyone. In childhood stories, the snail might grab her purse and dash out the door to put money in the meter. The rabbit cries when the blue jay makes fun of her buckteeth. The mouse loves his sister but not that way. They’re just like us! we think.

Certain nature shows only add to this misconception, but that, to me, is why they’re so addictive. Take “Growing Up Camel,” a program my friend Ronnie and I watched one evening. It was set in a small, privately owned zoo somewhere in Massachusetts. The camel in question was named Patsy, and the narrator reminded us several times that she had been born on Super Bowl Sunday. While still an infant (the football stadium probably not even cleared yet), she was taken from her mother. Now she was practically grown, and the narrator announced a reunion: “Today Patsy has reached what may be the biggest milestone in her life—moving back in with her mom.”

In the next segment, the two were reintroduced, and the grumpy old mother chased her daughter around the pen. When the opportunity arose, she bit Patsy on the backside, and pretty hard, it seemed to me. This was the camels not getting along and it wasn’t too terribly different from the way they acted when they did get along.

When the next break approached, the narrator hooked us with “When we continue, a heartbreaking event that will change Patsy’s life forever.”

I’d have put my money on an amputated leg, but it turned out to be nothing that dramatic. What happened was that the mother got bone cancer and died. The veterinarian took it hard, but Patsy didn’t seem to care one way or another, and why would she, really? All her mom ever did was browbeat her and steal her food, so wasn’t she better off on her own?

The zookeepers worried that if Patsy were left alone she would forget how to be a camel, and so they imported some company, a male named Josh and his girlfriend, Josie, who were shipped in from Texas. The final shot was of the three of them, standing in the sunshine and serenely ignoring one another. Ronnie cleared her throat and said, “So that’s what became of the little camel who was born on Super Bowl Sunday.” She turned on the light and looked me in the face. “Are you crying?”

I told her I had an ash in my eye.

“Growing Up Camel” had its merits, but I think I prefer the more serious kind of nature show, the kind that follows its subject through the wild. This could be a forest, a puddle, or a human intestinal tract, it makes no difference. Show me a tiger or show me a tapeworm, and I’ll watch with equal intensity. In this sort of program we see the creature’s world reduced to its basic components: food, safety, and reproduction. It’s a constant chain of desperation and heartache, the gist being that life is hard, and then it ends violently. I know I should watch these things with an air of detachment, but time and again I forget myself. The show will run its course, and afterward I’ll lie on the sofa, shattered by the death of a doda or a guib, one of those four-letter antelope-type things which are forever turning up in my crossword puzzles.

Apart from leaving me spent and depressed, such programs remind me that I am rarely, if ever, alone. If there’s not an insect killing time on the ceiling, there’s surely a mite staring out from the bath towel, or a parasite resting on the banks of my bloodstream. I’m reminded, too, that, however repellent, each of these creatures is fascinating, and worthy of a miniseries.

This was a lesson I learned a few summers back, in Normandy. I was at my desk one afternoon writing a letter when I heard a faint buzzing sound, like a tiny car switching into a higher gear. Curious, I went to the window, and there, in a web, I saw what looked like an angry raisin. It was a trapped fly, and as I bent forward to get a closer look a spider rushed forth, and carried it screaming to a little woven encampment situated between the wall and the window casing. It was like watching someone you hate getting mugged: three seconds of hardcore violence, and when it was over you just wanted it to happen again.

It’s hard to recall having no working knowledge of the Tegenaria duellica, but that’s what I was back then—a greenhorn with a third-rate field guide. All I knew was that this was a spider, a big one, the shape of an unshelled peanut. In color it ranged from russet to dark brown, the shades alternating to form a mottled pattern on the abdomen. I later learned that the Tegenaria can live for up to two years, and that this was an adult female. At that moment, though, as I stood at the window with my mouth hanging open, all I recognized was a profound sense of wonder.

How had I spent so much time in that house and never realized what was going on around me? If the Tegenaria barked or went after my food, I might have picked up on them earlier, but, as it was, they were as quiet and unobtrusive as Amish farmers. Outside mating season, they pretty much stayed put, a far cry from the Carolina wolf spiders I grew up with. Those had been hunters rather than trappers. Big shaggy things the size of a baby’s hand, they roamed the basement of my parents’ house, and evoked from my sisters the prolonged, spine-tingling screams called for in movies when the mummy invades the delicate lady’s dressing room. “Kill it!” they’d yell, and then I’d hear a half-dozen shoes hitting the linoleum, followed by a world atlas or maybe a piano stool—whatever was heavy and close at hand.

I was put off by the wolf spiders as well, but never thought that they were out to get me. For starters, they didn’t seem that organized. Then, too, I figured they had their own lives to lead. This was an attitude I picked up from my father, who squashed nothing that was not directly related to him. “You girls,” he’d say, and no matter how big the thing was he’d scoot it onto a newspaper and release it outside. Come bedtime, I’d knock on my sisters’ door and predict that the spider was now crawling to the top of the house, where he’d take a short breather before heading down the chimney. “I read in the encyclopedia that this particular breed is known for its tracking ability, and that once they’ve pegged their victims almost nothing will stop them. Anyway, good night.”

My sisters would have been horrified by the house in Normandy, as would most people, probably. Even before I joined the American Arachnological Society, the place looked haunted, cobwebs sagging like campaign bunting from the rafters and curtain rods. If one was in my way, I’d knock it down. But that all changed when I discovered that first Tegenaria—April, I called her. After writing her name on an index card and taping it to the wall, I found my interest spreading to her neighbors. The window they lived in was like a tenement building, one household atop another, on either side of the frame. Above April was Marty, and then Curtis and Paula. Across the way were Linda, Russell, Big Chief Tommy, and a sexless little speck of a thing I decided to call Leslie. And this was just one window.

Seeing as I’d already broken the No. 1 rule of a good nature documentary —not to give names to your subjects—I went ahead and broke the next one, which was not to get involved in their lives. “Manipulating,” my boyfriend, Hugh, would call it, but, to my mind, that was a bit too mad scientist. Manipulating is cross-breeding, or setting up death matches with centipedes. What I was doing was simply called feeding.

No Tegenaria, or at least none that I’ve observed, wants anything to do with a dead insect, even a freshly dead one. A spider’s food needs to be alive and struggling, and because our house was overrun, and I had some time on my hands, I decided to help out. In my opinion, the best place to catch flies is against a windowpane. Something about the glass seems to confuse them, and they get even dopier when you come at them with an open jar. Once one was in, I’d screw on the lid and act like I was shaking a cocktail. The little body would slam against the sides, and, as Hugh went progressively Gandhi on me, I’d remind him that these were pests, disease carriers who feasted upon the dead, and then came indoors to dance on our silverware. “I mean, come on,” I said. “You can’t feel sorry for everything.”

The Tegenaria build what I soon learned to call “horizontal sheet webs”—dense trampoline-like structures that are most often triangular, and range in size from that of a folded handkerchief to that of a placemat. Once my prey was good and woozy, I’d unscrew the lid, and tip the jar toward the waiting spider. The fly would drop, and, after lying still for a moment or two, it would begin to twitch and rouse itself, a cartoon drunk coming to after a long night. “What the fuck…?” I imagined it saying. Then it would notice the wings and foreheads of earlier victims. “I’ve got to get out of here.” A whisper of footsteps off in the distance, and just as the fly tasted futility, the monster was upon it.

“And cut!” I would yell.

Watching this spectacle became addictive, and so, in turn, did catching flies. There were days when I’d throw a good three dozen of them to their deaths—this at the expense of everything else I was supposed to be doing. As the spiders moved from healthy to obese, their feet tore holes in their webs. Running became a chore, and I think their legs started chafing. By this point, there was no denying my emotional attachment. There were nights that first summer when I’d get out of bed at 3 A.M. and wander into my office with a flashlight. Everyone would be wide-awake, but it was always April that I singled out. If I thought about her a hundred times a day, it seemed only fair that she thought about me as well. My name, my face: I didn’t expect these things to register, but, in the way that a body feels the warmth of the sun, I fully imagined that she sensed my presence, and missed it when I was away.

“That’s all right,” I’d tell her. “It’s only me.” Often, I’d take out my magnifying glass and stare into the chaos that was her face.

Most people would have found it grotesque, but when you’re in love nothing is so abstract or horrible that it can’t be thought of as cute. It slayed me that she had eight eyes, and that none of them seemed to do her any good. They were more like decoration, really, a splay of beads crowded above her chelicerae. These were what she used to grip her prey, and if you looked at her the right way you could see them as a pair of enormous buckteeth. This made her appear goofy rather than scary, though I’d never have said so in her presence. For a Tegenaria, she was quite attractive, and I was glad to see that Principal Hodges shared my view. He was a freshly molted adult male who travelled from the other side of the room and spent six days inside her inner sanctum. Why Marty or Curtis or Big Chief Tommy didn’t mate with April is a mystery, and I put it on a list beside other nagging questions, such as “What was Jesus like as a teen-ager?” and “Why is it you never see a baby squirrel?”

As the summer progressed, so did the mysteries. Spiders relocated, both male and female, and I started noticing a lot of spare parts—a forsaken leg or palp lying in a web that used to belong to Paula or Philip or the Right Reverend Karen. Someone new would move in, and, as soon as I tacked up a fresh name card, he or she would vacate without notice. What had once seemed like a fine neighborhood quickly became a dangerous one, the tenants all thuggish and transitory. Maybe April was more respected than anyone else in her window unit. Maybe her enemies knew that she was being watched, but, for whatever reason, she was one of the few Tegenaria that managed to stay put and survive. In mid-September, Hugh and I returned to the city and, at the last minute, I decided to buy a plastic terrarium and to take her with me. The “April in Paris” business didn’t occur to me until we were on the train, and I held her container against the window, saying, “Look, the Eiffel Tower!”

Funny the details that slip your notice until it’s too late. The fact, for instance, that we don’t really have flies in Paris, at least not in our apartment. Back in Normandy, catching prey had been a breeze. I could do it barefoot and in my pajamas, but now I was forced to go outside and lurk around the trash cans in the Luxembourg Gardens. Someone would toss in a disposable diaper and I’d stand a few feet from the bin, and wait for the scent to be picked up. Then there’d be the sneak attack, the clattering jar, the little spell of cursing and foot stomping. Had the flies been gathered on a windowpane, I would have enjoyed the last laugh, but out in the open, and with an audience of French people noting my every failure, my beautiful hobby became a chore.

I’d been telling myself for months that April needed me, though of course she didn’t. An adequate amount of prey stumbled into her web and she caught it quite capably on her own—in Normandy, anyway. Now, though, trapped inside a terrarium in a fourth-floor apartment, she honestly did need me, and the responsibility weighed a ton. Tegenaria can go without eating for three months, but whenever I returned home empty-handed I could feel her little spider judgement seeping from the plastic box. The face that had once seemed goofy was now haughty and expectant. “Hmm,” I imagined her saying. “I guess I had you figured all wrong.”

In early October, the weather turned cool. Then the rains came and, overnight, every fly in Paris packed up and left town. April hadn’t eaten in more than a week when, just by chance, I happened upon a pet store and learned that it sold live crickets, blunt little black ones that looked like bolts with legs. I bought a chirping boxful and felt very proud of myself until the next morning, when I learned something that no nature show ever told me: crickets stink. They reek. Rather than dirty diapers or spoiled meat—something definite you can put your finger on—they smell like an inclination: cruelty, maybe, or hatred.

No amount of incense or air freshener could diminish the stench. Any attempt only made it worse, and it was this more than anything that led me back to Normandy. April and I took the train in late October, and I released her into her old home. I guess I thought that she would move back in, but in our absence her web had fallen to ruin. One corner had come unmoored and its ragged, fly-speckled edge drooped like a filthy petticoat onto the window ledge. “I’m pretty sure it can be fixed,” I told her, but before I could elaborate, or even say goodbye, she took off running. And I never saw her again.

There have been other Tegenaria since then, a new population every summer, and though I still feed them and monitor their comings and goings, it’s with a growing but not unpleasant distance, an understanding that spiders, unlike mammals, do only what they’re supposed to do. Whatever drives the likes of April is private and severe, and my attempts to humanize it only moved me further from its majesty. I still can’t resist the fly catching, but in terms of naming and relocating I’ve backed off considerably, though Hugh would say not enough.

I suppose there’s a place in everyone’s heart that’s reserved for another species. My own is covered in cobwebs rather than dog or cat hair, and, because of this, people assume it doesn’t exist. It does, though, and I felt it ache when Katrina hit. The TV was on, the grandmother signalled from her rooftop, and I found myself wondering, with something akin to panic, if there were any spiders in her house.

Discussion Questions (Part I & Part II)

  • What is the author’s primary thesis or theme? In other words, what is the point Sedaris is making?
  • List some specific examples provided by the author to illustrate the point.
  • Does the essay use “multiple” examples (a series of brief examples to illustrate or assert the thesis) or “extended” examples (longer examples explained through multiple sentences or paragraphs)?

This essay also connects back to the previous chapter on d efinition . Remember, definition is a rhetorical mode that explains or defines an unfamiliar term in such a way that your audience can gain a clearer understanding.

Go back to the essay and look for the term “anthropomorphizing.”

  • Based on context clues, what does the term mean?
  • How does the writer’s use of specific examples contribute to the definition?
  • List examples of denotation (the literal meaning) and connotation (the feeling or attitude) of the term.

Student Illustration/Example Writing

Letter to the city.

To: Lakeview Department of Transportation

From: A Concerned Citizen

The intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street is dangerous and demands immediate consideration for the installation of a controlling mechanism. I have lived in Lakeview my entire life, and during that time I have witnessed too many accidents and close calls at that intersection. I would like the Department of Transportation to answer this question: how many lives have to be lost on the corner of Central Avenue and Lake Street before a street light or stop sign is placed there?

Over the past twenty years, the population of Lakeview has increased dramatically. This population growth has put tremendous pressure on the city’s roadways, especially Central Avenue and its intersecting streets. At the intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street it is easy to see how serious this problem is. For example, when I try to cross Central Avenue as a pedestrian, I frequently wait over ten minutes for the cars to clear, and even then I must rush to the median. I will then have to continue to wait until I can finally run to the other side of the street. On one hand, even as a physically fit adult, I can run only with significant effort and care. Expecting a senior citizen or a child to cross this street, on the other hand, is extremely dangerous and irresponsible. Does the city have any plans to do anything about this?

Recent data show that the intersection of Central Avenue and Lake Street has been especially dangerous. According to the city’s own statistics, three fatalities occurred at that intersection in the past year alone. Over the past five years, the intersection witnessed fourteen car accidents, five of which were fatal. These numbers officially qualify the intersection as the most fatal and dangerous in the entire state. It should go without saying that fatalities and accidents are not the clearest way of measuring the severity of this situation because for each accident that happens, countless other close calls never contribute to city data. I hope you will agree that these numbers alone are sufficient evidence that the intersection at Central Avenue and Lake Street is hazardous and demands immediate attention.

Nearly all accidents mentioned are caused by vehicles trying to cross Central Avenue while driving on Lake Street. I think the City of Lakeview should consider placing a traffic light there to control the traffic going both ways. While I do not have access to any resources or data that can show precisely how much a traffic light can improve the intersection, I think you will agree that a controlled busy intersection is much safer than an uncontrolled one. Therefore, at a minimum, the city must consider making the intersection a four-way stop.

Each day that goes by without attention to this issue is a lost opportunity to save lives and make the community a safer, more enjoyable place to live. Because the safety of citizens is the priority of every government, I can only expect that the Department of Transportation and the City of Lakeview will act on this matter immediately. For the safety and well-being of Lakeview citizens, please do not let bureaucracy or money impede this urgent project.

A Concerned Citizen

Discussion Questions

  • What is the thesis of the essay? Where is it found?
  • List one specific example that the writer cites to illustrate their point.
  • Do the examples used in the essay successfully illustrate the point the writer is making?
  • Point out (a) a personal example and (b) an example found through research in this essay.
  • Describe a hypothetical example that you could add to the writer’s letter that would further illustrate the point.

Think back to a time when you won an argument by providing a specific example to prove your point. Use freewriting to describe that argument and the example you cited, then write a brief outline of an illustration/example essay. 

  • Illustration
  • Thesis statement
  • Transition words
  • An illustration essay clearly explains a main point using evidence.
  • When choosing evidence, always gauge whether the evidence is appropriate for the subject as well as the audience.
  • Organize the evidence in terms of importance, either from least important to most important or from most important to least important.
  • Use time transitions to order evidence.
  • Use phrases of illustration to call out examples.

Reflective Response

Now that you have read the chapter and written an illustration/example essay, describe ways in which using specific examples can be valuable in personal, academic, and professional writing. 

Additional Chapter Sources

“April and Paris” by David Sedaris appeared in the March 24, 2008, issue of The New Yorker . All rights reserved.

To show or demonstrate something clearly

An essay which clearly demonstrates and supports a point using examples and evidence

Available facts or information

The Thesis Statement expresses the overall point and main ideas that will be discussed in the body. It usually appears as the last sentence of the introduction and is usually one sentence.

Transition words and phrases are used to link together different ideas in your text.

The literal and explicit definition of a word

The feelings or attitudes that make up the extended definition of a word

Illustration/Example Copyright © 2022 by Kirk Fontenot is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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How To Write An Illustration Essay

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Illustration Essay

Writing an illustration essay requires you to have not only a very specific set of writing skills, but also a deep understanding of what is illustration essay and how to achieve success with this task. The professional writers of our top-rated essay writing service are ready to share how to write an illustration essay with you right now!

what is an illustration

What Is an Illustration Essay?

According to the illustration essay definition , this kind of work is an explanation of the subject matter with the use of relevant examples. Before you learn how to create an interesting and engaging piece of work, you should know its specificity and its difference from other written tasks.

An illustration essay, also known as an exemplification paper, needs you to sum up empirical data, make an explanation, and provide supporting evidence. This is why it is often confused with compare and contrast essays and cause and effect essays. Instead of arguing a point, you need to demonstrate your all-around understanding of the topic by using sufficient examples.

what is an illustration essay

Throughout the writing process, you should demonstrate a topic through the prism of associated details. This is how the reader can visualize the described person, situation, process, or event. Without the discussion of examples, an illustration essay won’t be complete.

Why Is an Illustration Essay Important?

Illustration essay writing is crucial for your personal academic development. It creates the necessary basis for dissertation and thesis writing in the future. While writing an illustration essay , you learn how to develop arguments based on thorough research and analysis. By illustrating different points in the academic format, you demonstrate your ability to deal with discussions. The significance of illustrations is determined by their value in an academic essay. Here are three types of illustrations to be used:

  • The personal illustration can be taken from your personal background. For example, you can describe the situation that is taken from your personal background. In your essay, you will say how to deal with it.
  • The traditional illustration is a generic example that can be addressed by many people on the particular topic. For example, the situation can be discussed as an average thing that might happen to everyone.
  • The hypothetical illustration is an invented illustration. For example, you can cover the idea of circumstances under which this kind of situation might occur.

Whatever illustration you are about to use, you need to adjust it to your context. This way, you can provide the reader with the better understanding of the covered topic. Thus, illustrations are to be relevant to both your subject and your audience. You can sort out the evidence in terms of importance by moving from the least valuable to most valuable examples or from the most valuable to least valuable examples.

Illustration Essay Outline

How to write an illustration essay? Proving your point through different examples is not hard. When you choose a correct topic and conduct proper research, you make the content sound trustworthy and reliable. Similar to every academic piece of work, an illustration essay can be written in three stages. Here they are:

Introduction

The introduction paragraph aims to present the topic you are going to cover in an illustration essay. It is crucial to find a thesis that reflects your point of view. You need to point briefly why other people have different opinions from yours. You should be able to defend your thesis better than they can defend theirs.

If you decide to discuss social networks’ impact on your daily communication, you may refer to the personal background and scientific data. Before you integrate certain examples, you can make up some foundations first. Once you are done with it, you can highlight some key points to prove that the membership in the popular social network has really changed the way you communicate with other people. First, you can talk about the value of communication in social networks. Second, you can discuss the opportunity to get closer to your family and friends. Finally, you can explain how social networks help you in your studies or work. You can also take the opposite side by discussing the negative effects of social networks on human life. The final sentence of your introductory paragraph is the thesis statement, where you build up the foundation for your further discussion.

An average introduction involves five sentences. But it can be slightly smaller or bigger, depending on the general size of an illustration essay. While writing an introduction, you should include the following elements:

  • Inform : Inform the reader about the selected topic.
  • Notify : Notify the reader of background information about the topic.
  • Translate : Translate the essay question by saying it in different words.
  • Report : Report on your supporting points after you introduce the example.
  • Outline : Outline the essay organization by using transition words, such as “firstly, secondly, thirdly.”

Body paragraphs

An average number of body paragraphs is three, although there can be some variations. Depending on how many ideas you want to cover, you can have more than three paragraphs involved. Each body paragraph should highlight a separate idea that addresses your thesis statement. Generally, paragraphs in the body section have two goals:

  • Describe and define : You need to introduce your topic in a simple and clear way. The reader should gain the impression that you have a deep knowledge of the topic.
  • Explain and exemplify : You need to provide as many examples as possible to address your topic.

Before you start writing the body paragraphs, you should introduce them first. For each paragraph, write down a topic sentence with an argument addressing your thesis. This is where you should mention all the support that includes factual data, examples, and other proofs. After you finish your initial research on the thesis, sort out the examples by priority. It will make your narration more structured. As a result, it won’t be difficult for the reader to understand your points of view.

Every example should be examined and defended in detail. This way, you will convince the audience of your thesis by using factual information and formal language. Some topics need additional investigation and collecting examples, while others will allow you to rely on your own personal experiences.

Throughout the writing process, you should remember who your target reader is. This will allow you to keep your text customized. Depending on the target reader, you will make the right accents, involve the right details, and collect the relevant examples in the text. With this information in mind, you will be able to describe the central points effectively.

Now that you have your topic properly covered in the body section, you need to create a striking conclusion. The last paragraph aims to sum up everything that has been mentioned in the previous parts of the illustration essay.

You may use the 5 C’s method to make your conclusion interesting and memorable for the reader. Ideally, you write one or two sentences per point. But some variations are acceptable.

  • Close the loop : You need to connect the first and the last paragraph. This is why you will discuss the thesis statement through the prism of examples highlighted in the body section. This will make your essay look concise and cohesive.
  • Conclude : You should make the final word on the issue. In other words, you can rephrase the thesis statement by using different words.
  • Clarify : You should answer the essay question by using the examples from the body section.
  • Concern : You should mention the party that might take responsibility for the issue.
  • Consequences : You should introduce the possible effects of the covered issue.

The conclusion section is usually the shortest one in an illustration essay. It aims to mention the main points from the body paragraphs and prove their relevance to the reader. While this section is short, it is also important. In order to create a high-quality conclusion, think of it as the last impression the reader has! So, this section should be strongly worded.

While a research essay won’t be complete without references, an illustration essay can be used with and without them. If an illustration essay relies on your personal experiences, it won’t need external sources. If it relies on scientific data, the use of sources is inevitable.

Now that your illustration essay is finished, it needs to be edited properly. You should read it once or twice to check it for grammatical, structural, and contextual mistakes. Also, make sure that your essay is devoid of plagiarism. While there are some general rules for an illustration essay outline, your instructor may have some additional instructions for you. Make sure you read your assignment properly not to miss a crucial detail.

An illustration essay should be simple and clear. Otherwise, the reader won’t be able to understand what you are writing about. Complicated topics, massive paragraphs, and overwhelming information can hardly be suitable for an illustration essay.

How to Choose a Topic for an Illustration Essay?

If you struggle to create an excellent illustration essay, you have most likely chosen the wrong topic. It will turn the writing process into torture as you won’t know what to write about and how to write it. When you choose the right subject, you will move in the right direction from the very beginning. So, how can you make the right choice? Here are the instructions to be followed:

  • Write about your personal interests. You should choose the topics for an illustration essay that correspond to your personal interests. While writing about something you are actually interested in, you become more enthusiastic about the whole creative process. Before you come up with the idea for writing, you should think of the topics you are passionate about.
  • Focus on the topic simplicity. You should make sure that your topic is convenient for you. If you try to impress the instructor by choosing an overly complicated topic, you shouldn’t do this. Instead of demonstrating your writing skills, you will demonstrate your inability to create a worthy piece of content.
  • Pay attention to the topic originality . When choosing a topic, you should focus on less common and less generic options. A unique topic has higher chances to catch the reader’s attention and earn you a higher score. Moreover, a unique topic will have more space for discussions, which is always interesting to read.
  • Consider information availability on the topic. When writing an illustration essay, you need to dig deep into the examples and descriptions related to the topic. Before starting the actual writing process, you need to collect sufficient information. Therefore, it is much easier to cover the topic that is widely discussed in academic and scientific sources.
  • Stick to essay writing guidelines . While choosing a topic, you should never forget about the initial instructions. If your professor asks you to write about a psychological disorder or discuss a philosophical dilemma, you should stick to this detail. Keep the topic manageable without making it too narrow or too wide.

Choosing the right illustration essay topics has always been a serious challenge, even for experienced writers. A successful topic should match the interests of the audience and have certain value in society. Here are some examples you may use:

  • How can society support school victims of bullying?
  • Customers are never wrong. Discuss this popular statement.
  • Discuss the impact of Tick Tock and Instagram on the young generation.
  • Describe the best ways to prepare for a college exam.
  • Write a complete description of a student’s academic duties.

That being said, the variety of topics to discuss is huge. But instead of rushing with the final decision, you should take some time to check the catalogue of options. This is where you shouldn’t underestimate the value of research. With the adequate information on the subject matter, you won’t struggle to create a decent piece of writing.

Illustration Essay Examples

Taking a look at a professional illustration essay sample will let you understand this form of writing. Although you still need to proceed with your individual research, you won’t have to struggle with the right structure and format. Feel free to use the following examples as a reference when writing your own piece of work.

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/englishcomp1v2xmaster/chapter/writing-for-success-illustrationexample/

Illustration Essay Writing Tips

Knowing how to put your illustration essay ideas together is important for doing a good job with your illustration essay. With the professional writing tips, you will be able to deliver an excellent result. Feel free to check some of them down there:

  • Do some brainstorming . When you choose a topic or collect examples, you may do some brainstorming. The main point is that there are no bad ideas. When you have a particular idea, you should use every piece of mind. By writing down every idea in your head, you will gain a better understanding of what you want to write about. After all, your ideas build up bases for successful writing. So, if you think that you don’t have time for silly games, you are wrong. Instead of being a time-waster, a method of brainstorming turns out to be a time-saver for you.
  • Avoid undebatable illustration topics . The importance of the topic choice has been mentioned before. So, you should write about something that is actually suitable for debates. You should be able to find sufficient information on the selected topic.
  • Conduct a lot of research . Now that you know the topic of your essay, you should conduct thorough research to collect sufficient information. Even if your topic relies on your personal experiences, you should still analyze your background to extract the relevant examples. In other words, you need to find the authentic points that will support the topic.
  • Rely on credible sources . Although most illustration essays are personable, some of them rely on factual information. This is why you should use respectable scientific and academic literature as a credible source of information. With unreliable sources, you increase your chances to lose some valuable points from your grade. The use of editable sources such as Wikipedia is also a bad idea since they can be edited by everyone. So, when you choose information for your illustration essay, you should double check its authenticity in advance.
  • Filter out the information. If you spend a lot of time thinking about the topic, you probably have enough to say in your illustration essay. Of course, not all of them can make it into the final draft of your paper because they have a negative impact on the context. By choosing a few strongest examples, you can make your essay more convincing. This way, the final result will be interesting, engaging, and concise.
  • Focus on the target audience . While you are writing an essay, you should always put yourself in the reader’s place. What information do you want to see in the essay? Is every example clear to you? Do you understand the descriptions that are in the essay? Answer the questions honestly before, during, and after the writing process.
  • Make every example clear. Find examples to enable a better illustration of the selected topic. The stronger your evidence is, the more seriously the reader will consider your point. This is what will make your essay academically correct. By using strong words in your example, you will make each example sound convincing. Reading a paper that contains unclear pieces of information and mismatched conclusions will irritate the reader. The importance and urgency of the work will automatically become distant. Using evidence effectively can be a hard thing to do, though. Try to collect relevant examples to make sure that they are interrelated. Thus, the reader will never question the use or meaning of any illustrations you will include in your essay.
  • Edit your paper before submitting it. Before you hand over your illustration essay to the instructor, you should make sure that it is grammatically, structurally, and contextually accurate. For this reason, check your essay more than once to eliminate all the imperfections.

Write My Illustration Essay for Me, Please!

As you can see, writing illustration essays is not such a complicated assignment. However, it may take time to set the balance between its descriptive nature and your personal experience. While you don’t have sufficient skills to perform this kind of work, you may use an illustration essay sample or just order an essay from professional writers. But it still can’t guarantee you an excellent result.

In a situation like this, you can send a “Write my illustration essay for me, please!” request to professional writers. You can find a lot of writing services that know everything about academic writing on the Internet. Regardless of what your academic level is, you will get exceptional and 100% unique content right on time!

Being aware of all the characteristics and peculiarities of illustration essays, our qualified and experienced essay service knows how to take this kind of challenge. For this reason, their professionalism can fulfill the requirements of the most complicated orders. If you are not ready for the illustration kind of work, entrust it to specialists. They will prove their proficiency to you!

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Illustration Essay

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Learn How to Craft An Effective Illustration Essay

Published on: Jun 13, 2022

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2024

Illustration Essay

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Best Illustration Essay Topics - A List of 260+ Ideas

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Have you ever wanted to bring a topic to life with vivid details and examples? If so, then the illustration essay may be the perfect writing assignment for you! 

This type of essay allows you to paint a picture with words and show your readers exactly what you mean. 

In this blog, we'll explore illustration essays and how they can captivate an audience by using vivid examples and anecdotes. Whether you're a student or a professional, this guide will provide you with practical tips on crafting an engaging and effective illustration essay.

So, get set to amplify your imagination and take your writing game to the next level!

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Illustration Essay Definition

An illustration essay is a piece of writing that uses examples to support a thesis statement or main idea. It is also known as an exemplification essay because it provides specific instances that demonstrate or " exemplify " the writer's point.

Importance of Illustration Essay

An illustration essay is important because it:

  • Helps the reader understand abstract or complex concepts by providing concrete examples.
  • Makes arguments more convincing by providing evidence to support them.
  • Enhances the reader's engagement by using relatable and vivid examples .
  • Demonstrates the writer's ability to think critically and organize ideas effectively.
  • Develops the writer's research and writing skills by requiring them to find and analyze relevant examples.

Enhance your understanding of illustration essays with this informative video!

How to Write an Illustration Essay?

Writing an illustration essay can be a challenging task, but by following these steps, you can create a well-organized and effective essay.

Step 1: Select a Compelling Topic

  • Start an illustration essay by choosing a topic that is interesting, relevant, and has ample examples to support your thesis.
  • Ensure the topic aligns with the purpose of illustration—to clarify, explain, or prove a point.

Step 2: Conduct Research and Gather Examples

  • Find relevant and credible sources that support your topic. Use a variety of sources, including books, academic journals, and online articles, to gather information.
  • Collect a variety of examples that support your thesis. These could be personal experiences, historical events, case studies, or research findings.
  • Ensure each example is relevant and directly contributes to the understanding of your main point.

Step 3: Define Your Thesis

  • Clearly state the main argument or point you want to illustrate in your essay.
  • Your illustration essay thesis statement should provide a roadmap for the reader, indicating the specific aspects you will illustrate.

Here is an illustration essay thesis example: 

Step 4: Create your Illustration Essay Outline

Organize your ideas and examples into an outline that includes an introduction , body paragraphs, and a conclusion. This will help you stay focused and ensure that your essay flows logically.

Here's a basic illustration essay outline template:

Step 5: Write the Introduction

Start your introductory paragraph with a strong thesis statement that clearly states your main argument or point. Use an attention-grabbing hook to engage your reader and provide background information to set the stage for your examples.

Step 6: Develop Body Paragraphs

In each body paragraph, present a specific example that supports your thesis statement. Use transitions to connect your examples and show how they relate to your main argument.

Step 7: Write the Conclusion

Summarize your main points and restate your thesis statement in a new and compelling way. End your conclusion with a memorable final thought that leaves a lasting impression on your reader.

Step 8: Final Review

  • Conduct a final review to ensure that your essay effectively communicates your main point through well-supported examples.
  • Make any final adjustments to enhance overall coherence and effectiveness.

By following these steps, you can write an effective illustration essay that engages your reader and showcases your point of view.

Types of Illustration Essay 

Each type of illustration essay brings its own strengths and nuances. This allows writers to choose the approach that best suits their topic and the message they want to convey.

Single Example

These essays deeply explore one example to vividly illustrate and substantiate the main point. By focusing on a specific subject matter, they engage the reader in the writing process, ensuring the audience considers the writer's perspective.

Multiple Examples

Utilizing various examples, these essays provide a comprehensive view of the subject matter. By incorporating empirical data, they strengthen the writer's argument, making it more compelling for the reader.

Personal Experience

Relying on personal anecdotes, these essays connect the subject matter to the writer's life. This personal touch in the writing process ensures readers consider the writer's point more deeply.

Historical Illustration Essay

Drawing from historical events, these essays provide context and depth to the subject matter. By linking the past to the present, they engage the audience and the reader will consider your point.

Analyze specific cases or scenarios in detail. Examines real-life situations to illustrate broader trends or patterns.

Process Illustration Essays

Illustrates a step-by-step process to explain a concept or phenomenon. Break down complex procedures into manageable examples for clarity.

Research-Based Illustration Essays

Incorporates findings from academic research as supporting examples. Leverages scholarly studies and data to strengthen the essay's credibility.

Comparative Illustration Essays

Compares and contrasts multiple examples to highlight differences or similarities. Emphasizes the relationship between various instances to support the thesis.

Contemporary Issue

Addresses current events or societal issues through relevant examples. Connects the essay's message to contemporary concerns for relevance.

Analogical Illustration Essays

Uses analogies to illustrate complex ideas or relationships. Draws parallels between familiar situations and the topic to enhance understanding.

Literary Illustration Essays

Utilizes examples from literature, such as novels or poems, to support the argument. Analyzes literary works to illustrate broader themes or concepts.

Visual Illustration Essays

Incorporates visual examples, such as charts, graphs, or images, to enhance understanding. Appeals to visual learners and provides a different dimension to the illustrative process.

Transition Words for Illustration Essay

Transition words or phrases are crucial in an illustration essay as they help to connect ideas, providing a smooth flow of information for the reader. Here are some transition words that can be useful in an illustration essay:

  • For example
  • For instance
  • Specifically
  • In particular
  • To illustrate
  • As an illustration
  • In other words
  • In this case
  • As evidence

These transition words can be used to introduce examples, provide specific details, give evidence, and clarify ideas in an illustration essay. Remember to use them appropriately and effectively to enhance the coherence and clarity of your essay.

Illustration Essay Topics Ideas

Here is a list of illustration essay ideas to get you inspired: 

  • Illustrate the Impact of Social Media on Interpersonal Relationships.
  • Explore the Benefits of Regular Exercise on Mental Health.
  • Illustrate the Role of Technology in Shaping Education Today.
  • Illustrate How Cultural Diversity Enriches Workplace Environments.
  • Illustrate the Influence of Positive Parental Involvement on Academic Success.
  • Explore the Effects of Climate Change on Global Biodiversity.
  • Illustrate the Evolution of Online Shopping and Its Impact on Traditional Retail.
  • Illustrate How Reading Fiction Enhances Empathy and Emotional Intelligence.
  • Illustrate the Importance of Financial Literacy in Personal Finance.
  • Examine the Positive Effects of Volunteering on Personal Well-being.

Check our blog on illustration essay topics for college, university, and highschool to get inspired for your next assignment!

Illustration Essay Examples

Looking for free illustration essay examples for college? Check out our selection of well-crafted illustration essays and get insight into this type of writing: 

The History of The Civil Rights Movement

The Impact of Social Media on Society

The Benefits of Mindfulness Meditation

Tips for Writing an Illustration Essay

Here are extra pointers to enhance your illustration essay:

  • Clarity in Examples: Choose vivid, diverse examples that directly relate to your thesis for clarity and impact.
  • Detailed Explanations: Provide in-depth explanations for each example to establish its relevance and support.
  • Varied Examples: Utilize different types of examples (personal, historical, data-driven) to enrich your argument.
  • Thesis Clarity: Ensure your thesis is clear and specific, guiding the selection and presentation of your examples.
  • Transitions: Use smooth transitions between examples and paragraphs for a cohesive and logical flow.
  • Engagement: Connect with the reader by making examples relatable and showing their relevance to real-life situations.
  • Revision: Review and revise thoroughly for coherence, relevance, and effective illustration of your main point.

Wrapping Up!

We hope this guide has helped you understand the basics of writing an effective illustration essay. We have covered the purpose, types, and how to write an illustration essay step-by-step. 

By following our guidelines and tips, you can craft a compelling essay that effectively illustrates your point. Remember to choose a relevant topic, use vivid examples, and organize your essay properly. 

Looking for professional assistance with your illustration essay? Contact CollegeEssay.org today! Avail custom essay writing assistance 24/7 with all of your academic needs. 

Contact us now and experience the difference our AI essay writer can make!

Frequently Asked Questions

How long should an illustration essay be.

The length can vary, but a typical illustration essay is around 500-800 words, with a clear introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion.

How does an illustration essay differ from story writing?

In story writing, the focus is on narrative and plot development, often with characters and a storyline. Illustration essays, on the other hand, emphasize the use of examples to clarify and support a specific point.

Do all body paragraphs need examples in an illustration essay?

Yes, each body paragraph in an illustration essay should present a specific example that supports the thesis, providing detailed explanations and analysis.

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illustrated essay

101 Of Writing An Illustrative Essay

Students are often asked to write an illustration essay as an exercise before writing an elaborate thesis on the same topic in the future. The whole point of writing illustrative essays is to find and savour the joy of discovering something unique about an already existing issue. And that is precisely what makes the whole process so much more cumbersome.

But writing illustration essays is important.  Now, why is that?

Illustration essays compel you to find a fresh perspective about something generic and dig deep to come up with supportive arguments. As a result, you learn a lot about the research process of finding and assembling relevant materials for future academic endeavours. Moreover, when you learn to illustrate ideas formally in the theoretical structure, you learn to think critically – a skill that helps you put your point in debates and disputes.

The task may sound complex but can be made simpler once you know the basics of writing an illustrative essay. On that note, let us understand how to write an illustration essay, starting with the fundamentals.

What is an Illustration Essay?

An illustration essay, aka an exemplification essay, primarily consists of informative writing to demonstrate the existence of a particular thing using empirical data. You do not have to discover something novel. Instead, you have to offer a fresh view of the same thing using vivid examples. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • The primary focus of an illustration essay is not on the topic but on the examples that you use to illustrate the issue.
  • The main motive would be to demonstrate in such a manner that a reader can imagine the setting and the situation.
  • You must use examples from real-life experiences, situations and people to explain your findings.

Now, if you want to write a successful illustration essay and boost your GPA, we have a comprehensive guide awaiting you. Read on for some fantastic tricks from the best essay writers at Essaygator.com , along with outlines, topics, examples and more.

How to Write an Illustration Essay? Basic Structure

Like a generic essay, an illustration essay starts with an introduction, flows into the body paragraphs, and ends with an impactful conclusion. What sets the essay structure apart from other types of essays is the nuances of each part.

Here is a complete breakdown of what an illustration essay’s outline should look like.

1. The introduction:

2. the body paragraphs.

Every paragraph must have the following components:

  • A topic sentence that introduces the supportive argument for the section in question
  • Background sentences that illustrate the argument for the paragraph with examples
  • The research sentence that quotes evidence and data to justify the background sentences
  • The analysis that explains how the idea of the paragraph is related to the topic
  • A transitional sentence to wrap up one paragraph and move onto the next smoothly

3. The conclusion

If you think you need more assistance in writing any of the parts of an illustrative essay, feel free to contact the brilliant essay writers of Essaygator.com.

We have also shared a few tips and tricks with you in the next segment.

Tips for Writing an Illustration Essay

Choose a good topic.

Consider the attention span of your readers and go for a topic that arouses curiosity among the audience for your essay.   Search for a controversial article, or a quote from a book. Pay attention to what happens around you, and you will have several things to write about.

Dig deep to research

Go beyond the traditional sources of newspapers, books and articles to make your examples more realistic and diverse. Dive deep into the vibrant world of social media. Read and watch what people say about the issue on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube or Twitter.

Keep it short

Usually, you will find the word count for the essay in the requirements. However, if you have no such limitation, do not go beyond five body paragraphs or three pages, whichever is shorter. And, if you feel you do not have enough examples, cut it short.

Use clear examples

An illustrative essay should not make the reader go too much into symbolism. Therefore, make sure to use examples that are vivid and straightforward. You can also use shocking and realistic examples that trigger emotions within a reader and make an impression on them.

Always work with an outline.

An illustration essay must be informative, meaning you will have to deal with several arguments, ideas and facts. So, create an outline right in the beginning to figure out how to fit the most-relevant examples or ideas.

Proofread and edit

First, read the essay out loud to detect areas where the tone affects the flow of your writing. Then, use a grammar checking tool to trace and edit grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Also, make sure to check whether there are any plagiarism issues in your essay.

If you need help with proofreading and editing your illustration essay, you can also hire the experts at Essaygator.com for professional assistance.

Illustrative Essay Example with the Outline

The structural nuances may differ as per the topic or the number of examples and arguments you want to include. Irrespective of such factors, you can use this illustration essay example as a template to write your piece.

The essay topic that we have chosen is  –

How to select a good college?

Introduction:  Your choice of college impacts your career’s future in several ways. You must choose a good program from a good college that suits your skills to achieve career success.

Paragraph I:  The focus should be on one’s academic goals.

Example 1: In hindsight, it will be easier to shortlist suitable educational establishments with one's academic goals.

Example 2: When one knows the academic goals they want to achieve, they also understand what they want to do as a career in the long run.

Paragraph II:  Seek suggestions from reliable sources.

Example 1: You can ask your school seniors who study in a college you have shortlisted about the pros and cons of the institution.

Example 2: Getting insights from college insiders can help you make a better choice.

Paragraph III:  Attend a college fair.

Example 1: It is better to communicate with real people to find out the truth instead of relying on online rankings or advertising brochures.

Example 2: A college fair gives you the taste of the real-life experience and atmosphere.

Conclusion:  Selecting a college is a major decision – one that solidifies the foundation of your future. When you know what to focus on, you will be able to make a list of the most suitable colleges for you.

You can check out more examples of illustration essays on the website of Essaygator.com or hire our writers for personalized assistance.

20 Illustration Essay Topics for an A-grade Paper

Choosing a good essay topic means half the battle is won. To that end, here is an illustration essay topic’s list ideas for consideration.

  • What are the most significant challenges that a student faces throughout their academic lives?
  • How to stay connected with your friends after college life is over?
  • How to stop bullying and peer pressure in high school and college proactively?
  • A proper budget plan for college students living on campus based on real-life experiences.
  • Illustrate how you adjusted to a new college with examples.
  • A step-by-step guide on learning how to swim with examples
  • How to prepare for an interview and get a job in New York?
  • An ordinary day from the life of a waiter
  • How to turn your hobby into a profitable side-hustle?
  • How to choose the right profession as per your skills?
  • How can a college-goer balance part-time work and studying?
  • How does technology affect the latest generation?
  • Use examples to prove that global warming and climate change are real.
  • Explain how an individual’s lifestyle and background affect their decision-making strategies.
  • How can bonds of love friendship change a person’s life? Explain with real-life experiences.
  • A plan for society to help helpless and homeless people.
  • How can procrastination affect the academic performance of students?
  • Why should every student find time for sports and leisure activities every day?
  • Why should students question what they are taught in the classroom?
  • Use your college-going experience to state ways to stay motivated during the final year in college.

Writing an illustrative essay should not be as challenging as it was with this guide. Bookmark this guide for easy access to the step-by-step guidelines, outline and topics.

However, if you need more assistance, do not hesitate to fall back on the essay writers of Essaygator.com.

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  • What Is an Illustration Essay
  • How to Write an Illustration Essay: Examples and Useful Tips

How to Write an Illustration Essay: Examples and Useful Tips

  • Illustration Essay Definition

The Purpose of Illustration Essays

Essay topics, how to write an illustration essay.

  • Types of Illustrative Examples

Illustration Essay Outline

Paragraph structure.

  • Essay examples

Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1. What are some good sources for illustration essay?
  • 2. What are some examples of an illustration essay?

Learning how to write an illustration essay is crucial for academic success. There is a number of writing styles that require the skillful use of illustrations. In fact, it is a properly chosen illustrative evidence that helps a writer communicate their main idea. For that reason, students should be able to demonstrate their vision through meaningful examples . In this article, we will discuss what illustrative essay is, give inspiring topic ideas and explain each step of the writing process. On top of that, you will find a professionally-written example of the paper to see what can make your writing brilliant. Whether you need a guide on completing any assignment or extra help, remember that you can always count on Write My Essay 4 Me .

Illustration Essay Definition 

An illustration essay, or otherwise called an example essay, is an informative essay writing genre that clarifies a specific situation or object through demonstrative evidence . This type of paper provides specific details that prove a thesis statement or a key point in the form of exemplification. The skillful use of demonstrative examples allows a writer to present the main idea in an expository manner so the reader can understand the broader context of the selected topic. Knowing how to write an illustration essay is critical in an academic environment since many other essay types also require the use of demonstrative examples. Whether you are assigned to create a separate illustrative paragraph or develop an entire example paper, the ability to illustrate a point of view substantially improves text comprehension. Furthermore, the proper use of evidence helps the target audience imagine things and, as a result, grasp the message. 

The main objective of an illustration essay is to provide expository examples that prove a thesis statement . In case you still have questions on how to write a thesis statement  open and read one more blog in our library. Illustrative writing requires being imaginative and attentive to specific details. Generally, the writer's primary task is to find supporting textual material that may exemplify the main idea. 

Illustrative writing may benefit both a writer and readers. On the one hand, this type of assignment can improve student's creativity and comprehensive skills. On the other hand, illustrative writing boosts the reader's imagination since they will need to create a visual picture in their mind.

When it comes to the writing process, the first thing to consider is to decide on a topic. Here is the list of illustrative paper examples to give you an idea of what topics you may choose from. Feel free to select the one given below to write a brilliant illustration paper.

  • Discuss why a sports team of your preference (basketball, football) is underrated; why the soccer team you dislike is overrated.
  • Illustrate the stages a college applicant should take in writing a winning college entrance text to join the target educational institution.
  • Explain what an HR manager does; write down several examples from your personal interaction with the representatives of this profession.
  • Write about the city, which used to survive some natural disaster (an earthquake, tsunami, tornado, hurricane , etc).
  • The topic on how society can support children who became the victims of school bullying/hate crimes/home violence.

Browse our compare and contrast essay ideas , they will inspire you to some interesting ideas.

Once you've got a compelling topic to develop, it's time to move on to the writing process. Creating an outstanding illustration essay involves 5 simple steps specified below. Use the following guide prepared by our experienced writers for reference.

  • Build a powerful thesis statement. This step involves identifying the object of writing (a.k.a. the main illustrative topic). Figure out the main points that need to be proved in the illustration paper. Pick a minimum of three crucial things and explain whether you support or deny the idea. Not only will a carefully written thesis help present a specific idea in the introduction, but it also will serve as the path for developing thoughts in the body paragraphs. Consider the following example: "Gender stereotypes exist in the professional world. Many business companies prefer having men as their CEOs."
  • Collect evidence. The next step after writing a thesis statement requires gathering expository material. Do in-depth research of the chosen topic to determine the finest examples for your illustration essay. To find related evidence, refer to a literary work, historical events, scientific findings, or use your own experience as the main source of demonstrative facts. Select as many examples as possible, then pick the best options to illustrate.
  • Outline a paper. Your writing should be concise and organized. However, setting thoughts in the right direction might be somewhat struggling. That's where a well-prepared essay outline comes in handy. Write down all key points and ideas to structure all descriptions so that the composition is easy to follow. We have a whole blog that will help you find out how to write an outline for an essay .
  • Populate a paper with examples. Depending on the size of an essay, list separate points in each body paragraph. Explain why you have chosen a specific illustrativeexample at the beginning of each sentence, and then support it with the meaningful evidence retrieved from the prior research.
  • Proofread your essay. Double-check the entire text for grammar and stylistic mistakes. Do not hesitate to use any online proofreading service for that purpose. Even if you know how to write an illustration essay well, do not ignore this stage. After all, you want to submit an error-free essay that satisfies all academic requirements.

Types of Illustrative Examples 

There is a wide range of unique methods that can take your illustrative writing to a whole new level. Some of the most effective ways of evidence presentation are listed as follows: 

  • using personal experience; 
  • referring to historical facts or current events;
  • comparing the objects; 
  • including the results of scientific research in a related niche; 
  • giving statistical information. 

Now let's have a closer look at the examples taken from personal experience. You will need to find enough details to populate the body paragraphs with the vivid examples from your personal experience. Below are several useful methods to get inspired: 

  • Personal observation has to do a lot with investigating a specific object related to your chosen topic. Describing any event, situation, location, or a person you have observed and sharing your thoughts on the matter can make for a good illustration essay example. When describing your observational experiences, be sure to include sensory expressions. Remember your audience has to observe the situation themselves as if they were witnessing it. 
  • Personal memories are a good source of fresh ideas that you can share with the readers to support the main argument. After all, you are the one who can interpret the meaning of your experiences in your essay. Think about meaningful life lessons from your personal experience. It makes sense to describe the most recent memories since they are the most significant. In particular, such impressions should seem reasonable to you at the moment of writing so that you can present a situation in the same way as you used to perceive it back then. 
  • An interview means having a face-to-face conversation with the experts in the fields related to your topic. These people can share exciting examples that potentially can make your writing stand out from the rest of the papers. Make sure to conduct thorough research and prepare a list of all concerns and questions before contacting a professional in the domain of your choice. 

No matter what method you choose to clarify your point, make sure that the reader can get the picture. In a nutshell, examples serve as a solid foundation of an illustrative essay, so the more powerful exemplification is, the better a textual interpretation will be. One of our blogs on how to write a personal essay may come in handy.

Before starting your illustrative essay, make sure to prepare an outline. It is recommended to create a 5-sentences outline where each sentence briefly describes the main focus of each paragraph. Outline the main ideas of your essay , and then all you need to do is develop your thoughts further.

Below you can find essential parts your illustration essay outline should include:

  • 1-2 sentences that introduce the topic and provide background information
  • 1-2 sentences explaining the relevance and value of the topic
  • A strong thesis statement giving a brief overview of the illustrative essay
  • 1 transitional sentence 
  • An argument that sets one idea per body paragraph
  • Demonstrative example  
  • 1 linking sentence 
  • 1 sentence restating a thesis statement
  • A brief summary of main ideas
  • 1-2 concluding sentences

When writing an illustration essay, make sure that the paragraphs are balanced. This way your paper will look coherent and consistent. It means they should include enough information to cover all the necessary components. Follow the tips below to structure your writing properly :

  • Start each paragraph with the topic sentence that represents the main idea of each section
  • Discuss only one idea per paragraph
  • Each paragraph should resonate with the thesis statement
  • The paragraph should end with a concluding sentence that briefly summarizes it.

Essay examples 

Now that you have gained a deep understanding on how to create an illustration essay, take a look at the paper sample attached below. Use the following illustrative essay example shared by professional writers to practice your writing skills. 

Conclusion 

Writing an illustrative essay should no longer be challenging. Follow the guidelines specified in the article to practice how to write an illustration essay with ease. Make sure to apply the tips and provide meaningful demonstrative examples to prove your point. And remember to refer to the sample to see how a perfect paper should look like. 

1. What are some good sources for illustration essay? 

Media is one of the most useful sources of ideas and examples for illustration essay. You may want to use social networks (Facebook, YouTube, Instagram) and other services as the main source for your illustrations. Talk to different people who can share their unique experience in their meaningful posts or videos. You can use examples from social media to prove any point you make in your body paragraphs. Pick the best essay topics examples for your illustration paper from the following sources:

2. What are some examples of an illustration essay? 

An illustration essay provides your vision on a specific topic and explains why you support a certain idea. For example, if you are assigned to write an illustrative paper on a literary work, your professor most likely wants you to share your thoughts on any character from a book. At this point, you need to create a strong thesis statement about the character and then demonstrate examples that prove your argument. 

Categorizing data based on particular properties has never been easy for an average student. Unless a student is doing well in statistics, he or she will not find it difficult to conduct research, analyze data, and break down the information into several categories. Other students keep wondering how...

Understanding the basics of writing a personal essay is essential for any student who wants to succeed at college admission. In 99% cases, the applicants enter the colleges of their dreams thanks to a well-crafted admission paper, and a brilliant personal essay is all you need to stand out from the ...

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150 fascinating illustration essay topics of any level.

October 13, 2021

If in your English class you’re asked to create illustrative essay ideas, what do you write? Some students don’t know that illustrative writing is similar to descriptive writing. There is no switch to it. However, for a more precise understanding, you’ll learn what an illustrative essay means.

illustration essay topics

What is an Illustrative Essay?

An illustrative essay is detailed and informative writing which reflects the knowledge of a particular thing the way it is. Otherwise known as an exemplification paper or essay, it includes accurate data and stories.

An illustrative essay doesn’t only provide ideas on human experiences. It offers relevant examples and statistics to demonstrate the event and situations as a fact. This is why an illustrative essay is the reimagination of an event by both the writer and the reader to publicize human experiences. This is why it is the same as descriptive essays.

However, how do you write an illustrative essay? What about illustration paragraph topics, and how are they all structured? As you already know, an illustrative essay must demonstrate an event through the use of facts and evidence. To write one, you need to consider what’s below:

Outline of How to Write Illustrative Essays

Creating illustration topics or topics for illustration essays is sometimes difficult for students. Aside from this, it becomes more Herculean to write the article due to a lack of knowledge about the process. However, it’s been discovered that it is the simplest form of essays to write. This is because you’re translating previous experiences into reality. To write an illustrative essay, observe:

  • Introduction This is the first part of an essay where your readers learn what the essay is all about. Even after getting good illustration essay topics, you need to explain what the essay will be about. This is the paragraph that is considered the attention-getter. Many believe that you can only keep your readers hooked with a strong first paragraph. You can do this by stating relevant and essential facts, quoting any scholar, and making personal anecdotes. By providing background information, you can have a final sentence stating the question(s) your essay will answer.
  • Body Paragraphs This is where you keep different pieces of evidence to support your perspectives on the essay. This is where you analyze everything you know about the essay. Already, you must have had an outline on how each point will be elucidated. You must have also concluded how you’ll keep your readers glued to you through each paragraph. While you do all these, do not forget that you’re illustrating. You must always support each statement of fact with a piece of evidence. You can also attempt storytelling. These examples make it possible to believe everything you write in your essay.
  • Conclusion This is the final part of illustrative writing. At this point, you’ll repeat the most vital points of your argument. This shows that readers have assessed these points in the essay, and they’re like the takeaways. Thus, they must be short, detailed, brief, and focus on what the reader must’ve learned.

To follow this structure, these are illustration essay topics listed for you.

Topics for Illustration Essays

You may need to develop creative illustration topics or custom illustration essay ideas as an academic requirement for your next assignment. Rather than comb through different pages on the internet, you can write on any of these:

  • Illustrate fundamental career prospects of students you’ve spoken with, including their Plan Bs
  • How do you think people view their beauty since the rise of Instagram?
  • Would you rationalize why students survive on little to no pocket fee?
  • What do you think should make up a good resume?
  • What are the thoughts youths consider before joining a peer group?
  • What is your worst experience of religion yet?
  • What is your worst experience in school yet?
  • What was the most embarrassing time for you as a student?
  • What do you think about people with disability who believes they could do great things too?
  • Examine the impact of any food of your choice on the body
  • What do you think is the most effective teaching method for your teachers?
  • What do you think about cultural diversity, and how can traveling enhance it?
  • Describe an activity you meticulously did
  • Describe the extent to which the environmental hazards can impact you
  • Describe a natural disaster you’ve once experienced
  • Describe the events of 9/11 and its significance to America
  • The French and its allies have been said to have created ISIL. What do you think about the occupation of North Africa, especially Libya, in 2010?
  • Explain the method involved in doing facial beauty
  • Examine the factors to be considered while creating a professional profile
  • What is your experience with cloning, and should it be banned?
  • Divorce: drawing on the story of anyone, do you think there should be liberal laws about divorce?
  • Explain what you understand by responsible studenthood
  • Examine the challenges faced by children everyday outside school
  • Examine the problems faced by students within campus and outside the campus
  • Write about an experience of bullying
  • Do you think smoking in public places is okay?
  • What are the steps involved in applying for a student loan?
  • Describe your family’s favorite vacation spot and why
  • Describe the potential job you want to do and why
  • Describe the process of getting a licensed firearm
  • Describe the role of your favorite character in your favorite role
  • Demonstrate the cruelty sexual violence is all about
  • Describe how movies impact your perspectives about life
  • Do you think the film you see affects how you feel?
  • Describe how some youths became strong drug use
  • Describe the advertisement you consider exceptional and why?
  • Describe the process of shopping online in a store of your choice
  • Examine why some people still opt for the physical retail store over online ones
  • Describe how education help equip yourself?
  • Examine the difference between a college degree and a diploma degree
  • What are your views about any recent political issue?
  • Write the factors an average father consider when buying a car
  • Describe what you understand by a tornado from previous events
  • Describe the factors leading to the success of the American evolution
  • Describe how women play leading roles in a society that keeps them away
  • Describe the activities of a charity you’d like to bankroll
  • Examine the benefits of robot engineering
  • Examine the processes involved in child reproduction according to biology
  • Describe any theory in science according to your thoughts
  • Why did Karl Marx call religion “the opium of the masses,” and why did Sigmund Freud say it is the “return of the repressed”?

Illustration Paper Topics

You may additionally need topics for an illustrative essay or a paper. You may need this for a presentation or your undergraduate long essay. You can consider the following illustration topic ideas:

  • Describe a religious ceremony and practice you once witnessed and its importance to sociology
  • Explain what it feels like to be homeless in contemporary America
  • Examine the history of any city and explain how you connect with its past
  • Describe the process in which women can protect themselves from men
  • Describe a few signs of friendship in romantic relationships
  • Examine the operation of any natural disaster in two cities of your choice
  • Illustrate the course of any of the world wars in history
  • Illustrate your experience of any museum dedicated to black art
  • Describe a significant part of the history of any native town
  • Examine the processes involved in investigating a murder case
  • Illustrate the considerable difference between print media over digital media, which makes it the best choice
  • Assess the significance of teamwork spirit
  • Describe the problems of teachers in education today
  • Take a trip to the football stadium and illustrate the ecstasy fans feel for their favorites
  • What do you think about celebrities and the respect they command?
  • Describe how effective transportation is in America
  • Discuss the basic concepts of democracy and how it has been achieved in America
  • What are the basic features of antiquity?
  • Describe the significance of coffee houses in incubating their minds during the period of Enlightenment in Europe
  • “The customer is always right,” examine how it ruins business
  • Give an assessment of a week in the life of s surgeon
  • Give an account of how to determine career interests
  • Why is science the end of religion?
  • Why is Mechanical Engineering the end of humans?
  • Which profession is most indispensable?
  • Illustrate how aircraft engage in capacity planning for their customers
  • Detail the experiences of a construction worker
  • Illustrate the law of karma
  • Examine work challenges with difficult employees
  • Illustrate the activity of any NGO of your choice
  • Examine the history and prospects of 5G technology
  • What do you think about the transition to digital banks?
  • Give an overview of the entertainment industry in the UK
  • Discuss why an international prize of your choice is overrated
  • Illustrate the typical gay life in America
  • Illustrate the challenges of multiple cultures in America
  • Illustrate the challenges of religion in America
  • Examine the process of adopting a child in America and its role in relieving orphanage homeowners
  • Discuss the purpose of dog rescue
  • With concrete examples, illustrate five native American cultures

Illustration Essay Topics on Parents

Writing an illustrative essay may also require you to generate one of the best illustration topics for your professor. As college students, you can consider the following about parenthood:

  • Give an overview of parenting according to your experience of parents
  • What do you know about single mothers?
  • Detail the experiences of childbirth for many American women
  • Explain the sense of responsibility from parents with relevant samples
  • Examine how difficult it is to manage work and life together
  • Illustrate a time your mum was delighted
  • Illustrate your encounter of parents fighting for the right of their respective kids
  • Examine the American Tradition that commands respect for parents
  • How can parents and children develop practical communication skills?
  • How can parents care for their LGBTQ kids?
  • Do the research and describe parents’ response to the LGBTQ community.
  • Examine how social development involves parents and guidance
  • Examine why some kids run away from this
  • Examine the significance of having a parent
  • Illustrate the everyday challenges of kids in the family
  • Examine what you understand about class struggle
  • Illustrate why parents often have conflict amongst themselves
  • Citing any family movie, why does either partner start a fight?
  • What does domestic abuse in the home mean to you?
  • Go to a market and illustrate any problem you see take place

Exemplification Essay Topics for College Students

Other illustrative essay ideas may be considered for high grades as a college or university student. You can consider the following to craft an intelligent essay:

  • What is your view of the series Captain America?
  • What is your opinion of the series Squid Game?
  • Examine why studying is important to college students
  • Illustrate your worst date experience
  • Illustrate the significance of teachers on student development
  • Illustrate a few ways to ask someone out
  • Illustrate a prank you pulled and you never could again
  • Examine challenges and fear of students in growing older?
  • What has changed your view of religion over the years as a college student?
  • What has inspired the traditions of football and other sports in the world today?
  • Describe in detail how social media has affected relationships
  • Illustrate how the COVID-19 pandemic affected relationships
  • Examine how students can embrace personal branding
  • Illustrate the story of Freddie Mercury as a rock star
  • Write the biography of any music legend of your choice
  • Discuss the challenges of any of your heroes or heroine
  • Illustrate the traveling process and its benefits
  • What are the stages personal branding must undergo?
  • What are your ideas on religion, and how did you arrive at them?
  • Examine the phases of the Homecoming event on campus
  • Speak with one of your most demanding professors and document his lifestyle
  • Examine the history of your campus motto and its significance today
  • Write the experiences of a student like you without a social lifestyle
  • Describe the last elections into your school’s Executive offices
  • Speak with any tutor and illustrate his challenges
  • Speak with any pastor and Buddha priest and examine their different ideologies
  • Examine the feeling of taking classes outside campus walls
  • Describe the factors that could lead to academic excellence
  • Describe any building in America and tell the story behind it
  • Tell the story behind the fall of the Twin Tower
  • Illustrate the average eating habit of anyone of your choice
  • Illustrate how hard it is to relate with strangers and love them
  • Examine the state of things for international students in your school
  • Illustrate the genesis of the Black Lives Matter movement and document your thoughts on the campaign?
  • Illustrate the importance of s convenient dorm
  • Why is the lack of good communication a threat to coexistence?
  • Illustrate the persistent cold war between America and China
  • Describe the experience of any of your teachers and how they have coped with oppressive bosses
  • Describe how procrastination affects students
  • Examine the various strategies of studying for a professional exam

Need Essay Writing Help?

With these topics for an illustrative essay, you can develop brilliant illustration essay topic ideas for your project or short college essay. It’ll be easy to wow your professors through this and gain high grades in class.

However, if you want freelance US writers to write for you, you should consider our online ENL writing services. Our writing services offer professional and top-notch essays. Our writing help is fast, cheap, and well-tailored to meet your university’s request.

We create custom essays and offer you top-notch essays. Regardless of the choices you make, you can develop one of the best illustrative essays from your class with our professional ideas.

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141+ Illustration Essay Topics (Plus a Great Template!)

This post will provide Illustration essay topics for college, high school and university students.

To write your essay, I recommend these three steps:

  • Get a clear understanding of what an Illustrative essay is;
  • Pick a topic;
  • Use my template to quickly write your essay .

Feel free to navigate the post through the following table of contents:

Part 1: Definition of an Illustrative Essay

An illustrative essay provides an explanation and examples of a specific topic or idea.

It is distinct from an argumentative essay because it does not have an agenda to convince someone of your position. Instead, you are simply demonstrating your own depth of understanding.

This means that you do not need to try hard to present a thesis.

Simply, you need to demonstrate how deep your knowledge is of a topic.

In order to do this, I recommend:

  • Providing many clear explanations of all key features of your topic;
  • Providing many clear examples that show you understand how your topic works in real life.

You will still need to follow essay format, with an introduction, body and conclusion – see the template at the end of this post for an example!

Part 2: Choose your Topic

Below is a list of great illustration essay topics. I’ve listed them in categories for your ease of navigation. Once you have selected a topic, jump to Part 3 where you can grab a template for writing the essay.

Topics for Children, Middle School and High School

  • Illustrate your school’s behavior policy.
  • Show the life cycle of butterflies with illustrations and explanations.
  • Provide an illustration of your local library’s loans policy.
  • Write a 5 paragraph essay illustrating how volcanoes form.
  • Illustrate the rules of your favorite sport.
  • Explain with examples the values that you believe are important to your country.
  • Provide an illustration of the Dewey Decimal System.
  • Illustrate your daily routine before school with clear explanations.
  • Outline how food gets from the farm to your table.
  • Explain with examples the concept of democracy.

I’ve found my idea! Take me to the template.

Topics about University, College and School

  • Write an illustrative essay on the process of applying for college.
  • Write an essay showing the key benefits of higher education .
  • Show how your university education will set you up for life in 1500 words or less.
  • Demonstrate with examples the procedure required for preparing a lab experiment n college.
  • Provide your reader with an in-depth illustration of the ways learning happens at college level.
  • Illustrate the key features of the early childhood sector in your country or state.
  • Illustrate the process of studying for a standardized test.
  • Demonstrate with examples the key features of online education .
  • Show with examples the key reasons you qualify for a merit-based scholarship.
  • Outline the ways your school motto reflects the values of your local community.

Topics about Sports

  • Present three key benefits of water sports for elderly people.
  • Illustrate the five most important things you should do before exercising.
  • Write an essay that gives at least three examples of how the Olympics has brought the world closer together.
  • Write an essay that shows and gives examples of the ways sports can help troubled youth develop positive social values.
  • Provide an illustration of the ideal recovery process for sportspeople suffering ACL damage.
  • Illustrate how the Major League Baseball draft system works.
  • Explain with examples the rules for a sport that you have invented.
  • Show the ways participation in sporting activities can help people recover from depression.
  • Illustrate the ways sports journalism has progressed in the past 25 years.
  • Demonstrate the ways adaptive sports presents people with disabilities as powerful social actors.

Topics about Media and Communication Studies

  • Illustrate the ways television has contributed to the development of your country’s unique national identity.
  • Demonstrate the ways television advertisements promote gender norms.
  • Show how laws governing bias in media are undermined by the rise of social media.
  • Outline the key benefits of ‘new’ media technologies.
  • Demonstrate the ways the internet helps promote social interactions between people of different backgrounds.
  • Outline how media has changed in the past 25 years.
  • Write an illustrative essay on the ways the dark web has undermined the war on drugs.
  • Describe how and why the newspaper industry has declined in the past 20 years.
  • Explain the key features of Anderson’s theory of ‘imagined communities’ and its relationship with the printing press.
  • Illustrate the processes required for protecting whistle blowers prior to publishing leaked data.
  • Show how free press is good for democracy.

Topics about Technology

  • Demonstrate how the smart phone has changed the ways we consume the internet.
  • Write an essay describing how technology has been central to globalization.
  • Demonstrate the ways the internet helps improve economic growth.
  • Outline the three most important technological advances of the past ten years.
  • Demonstrate the ways technology has changed the ways we learn.
  • Explain how technology will change the world in the next ten years.
  • Use Media Richness Theory to illustrate how people need to match technologies to the tasks at hand.
  • Illustrate the key features of the theory of technological determinism .
  • Write an illustration essay that paints a clear picture of how the Central Processing Unit functions.
  • Outline the ways technology can help solve the climate change problem.

Topics about Ancient History

  • Illustrate how democracy worked in the Roman Empire.
  • Outline the key events that occurred in England in the Middle Ages.
  • Provide clear examples of how Greek philosophy continues to shape the modern world.
  • Show your understanding of the Socratic method .
  • Explain Aristotle’s key contributions to philosophical thought.
  • Illustrate the key features of the decline and fall of Rome.
  • Write an essay that illustrates the key achievements of Caligula.
  • Outline why the Romans found it so hard to conquer Britain, with examples.
  • Illustrate the key features of classical antiquity.
  • Outline the key elements that led to the development of the first city-states in Mesopotamia.

Topics about Modern History

  • Explain with examples how the Supreme Court of the United States has shaped American history.
  • Outline the key features of the gilded age.
  • Illustrate with examples the conditions that led to the great depression.
  • Show the key events that led to World War One.
  • Explain the economic conditions that precipitated the rise of fascism in Europe in the 20 th
  • Demonstrate how Communist economies bred inefficiencies during the 20 th
  • Illustrate the major arguments for the United States’ withdrawal from the Vietnam War.
  • Outline the contribution of Northern England’s technological innovations to the Industrial Revolution.
  • Illustrate the key features of first wave feminism and its effects on life today.
  • Write an essay demonstrating how the formation of the European Union has been integral to keeping the peace in Europe.

Topics about Geography and Travel

  • Outline the ways the Suez Canal has improved trade and economics between the East and West.
  • Explain with examples how travel can impact peoples’ ideological perceptions towards the ‘Other’.
  • Demonstrate how Edward Said’s theory of Orientalism is visible in 20 th Century travel literature.
  • Outline the geographical conditions underpinning one of the most influential natural disasters of the past 50 years.
  • Write an essay demonstrating your understanding of tectonic plates.
  • Write an illustrative essay that demonstrates your understanding of Volcanoes and their formation.
  • Outline the ways farming practices in the Pacific have evolved with climate change.
  • Illustrate how the great barrier reef has impacted upon tourism in Queensland, Australia.
  • Explain the concept of poverty tourism.
  • Illustrate the key features of Peru’s plan to protect Machu Pichu from damage from tourism.

Topics about Transport

  • Illustrate the key benefits of electric vehicles for the future of the world.
  • Demonstrate your knowledge of the conditions that have prevented faster uptake of electric vehicles.
  • Outline how improved transportation facilitated the rapid growth of Globalization in the 20 th
  • Write an essay exploring the ways transportation will change in the next 20 years.
  • Explain how the invention of hydraulics facilitated the development of bridges capable of sustaining heavy traffic.
  • Outline the key urban development policies that can support increased bicycle transportation and decreased use of cars in cities.
  • Explain with examples the benefits of free public transportation for equality and social justice in society.
  • Write an illustration essay outlining how SpaceX has changed space travel.
  • Give examples that demonstrate how Uber has changed the Taxi industry.
  • Explain the key reasons behind the grounding of the Concorde fleet of airlines.

Topics about Psychology

  • Illustrate the key features of Freud’s psychoanalytic theory.
  • Outline the three major psychological theories of the 20 th
  • Write an essay showing how psycho-social theories are used in clinical practice today.
  • Demonstrate with examples how cognitive behavioural therapy helps people with anxiety.
  • Outline how Kohlberg’s theory of moral development can be used in classrooms.
  • Show how and why the theory of behaviorism declined in popularity in the 2 nd half of the 20 th Century, with examples.
  • Demonstrate your understanding of the theory of humanism.
  • Outline how cognitive psychology is adapted in to support children with autism.
  • Illustrate the four major personality types, with clear examples.
  • Show the key contributions of Karl Jung to Psychoanalytic theory.

Topics about Education Studies

  • Illustrate how childhood has changed since the 1950s.
  • Outline how to teach phonics to children.
  • Illustrate the key features of online learning.
  • Show the key characteristics of a quality teacher .
  • Write an essay illustrating the key features of student-centered teaching.
  • Explain with examples how civics education supports democracy.
  • Provide examples to show the key benefits of using communication technology in the classroom.
  • Explain how to teach English as a Second Language using social interactionist approaches.
  • Demonstrate your understanding of the best ways to manage behavioural difficulties in the classroom.
  • Show how curriculum differentiation helps to improve outcomes in classrooms.

Topics about Philosophy

  • Demonstrate your understanding of Immanuel Kant ’s perspective on duty.
  • Provide an explanation of Nietzsche’s perspective of power, with examples.
  • Illustrate how the Scottish Enlightenment philosophers informed modern Liberalism.
  • Outline how Michel Foucault influenced post-structuralist philosophy.
  • Write an essay outlining the philosophy of existentialism.
  • Explain with examples the complex relationship between philosophy and religion.
  • Outline how the philosophy of Confucius has shaped Chinese philosophy.
  • Illustrate the key contributions of Schopenhauer’s The World as Will and Representation to philosophy.
  • Write an illustrative essay that paints a clear picture of Anna Ardent’s perspective of totalitarianism.
  • Show how Thomas Aquinas influenced Christian philosophy.

Topics about Business

  • Illustrate your understanding of Michael Porter’s five competitive forces.
  • Explain with examples the importance of emotional intelligence for business owners.
  • Outline how the strength-based leadership theory can improve business practice.
  • Illustrate how capitalism causes tensions between owners and workers in businesses.
  • Explain with examples the four major leadership styles.
  • Demonstrate your understanding of Simon Sinek’s people over profit concept, with examples.
  • Illustrate with examples five ways leaders can stimulate motivation within workplaces.
  • Show the importance of business ethics with clear real-life examples from the past 10 years.
  • Illustrate business people’s social responsibilities and how they can clash with or underpin long-term profitability.
  • Illustrate how the Six Sigma approach to business was applied in General Electric in the 1990s.

Topics about Health and Medicine

  • Illustrate your local government’s changes in health policies over the past 10 years.
  • Explain with examples the top key preventative health measures that can prolong people’s lives.
  • Illustrate the process that led to the invention of penicillin.
  • Outline how viruses can spread through human contact with clear illustrations.
  • Show a clear understanding of the concept of population health and how it is implemented by federal governments.
  • Outline the key risk factors that stem from smoking tobacco.
  • Demonstrate with examples the relationship between exercise and long-term health.
  • Illustrate your understanding of the germ theory of disease.
  • Outline the economies of scale benefits of universal single payer healthcare.
  • Write an essay illustrating the relationship between climate change and population health.

Part 3: Illustration Essay Template

Now you have a topic, use the below template to write your essay.

This template comes from my detailed post on how to write an illustration essay.

Did you know I provide you with an example of a completed Illustration essay? Click here to go to my post that provides an example.

illustration essay topics

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 100 Consumer Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 30 Globalization Pros and Cons
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 17 Adversity Examples (And How to Overcome Them)

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Hippocampus Magazine

CRAFT: Let’s Get Graphic: A Look at the Visual Essay by Nicole Breit

August 1, 2018.

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If you’re keen to tell new kinds of stories – or old stories in new ways – consider these ten “visual” approaches to writing short-form memoir.

1. The Photo Essay

The art of the photo essay lies in the writer’s careful selection of images balanced with the inclusion of text. Will the photos drive the narrative, or will they fill in textual “gaps” to move the story forward? Vivek Shraya strikes an elegant balance of “showing” and “telling” in her compelling photo narrative, “ Trisha .”

2. The Concrete Essay

This form is the next evolution of concrete poetry (A.K.A. shape or pattern poems), reincarnated as CNF. Jennifer Wortman’s “ Worst-Case Scenario ” presents the story of her husband’s 35-feet fall into a gap while rock climbing, visually – via text shaped like the rocks he fell through.

3. The Illustrated Essay

There’s something so charming about a notebook doodle – perhaps because sketches convey the character of the artist in such an immediate way. I love the narrator’s personality as it comes through Randon Billings’ Noble’s drawings in “ Accidental Notes on the Syllabus .”

4. The Graphic Essay

Check out the masters of graphic memoir – Maggie McKnight , Riad Sattouf , Alison Bechdel , Marjane Satrapi, Kristen Radtke, Nicole Georges and Ellen Forney – and understand how powerful comics can be as a medium for personal storytelling.

5. The Paper Craft Essay

If you’re wondering what to do with your stockpile of scrapbooking supplies, look no further than Erica’s Trabold’s “ Swedish Rye Bread ”– an essay constructed as a collage of typed index cards, digital scans, the pages of a vintage cookbook, and scrapbooking paper.

6. The Quilted Essay

Quilting has a long history of embodying narrative in carefully chosen patterns, colours, and symbols. Learn more about textile-based narratives in Sarah Minor’s article “ What Quilting and Embroidery Can Teach Us about Narrative Form ” and by reading her visual essay, “ Log Cabin Quilt .”

7. The Schematic Essay

The Process of Becoming Informed is a found schematic essay  published by The Diagram and credited to Michael K. Buckland of Library Services in Theory and Context,  Pergamon Press, 1983. Where might you find a visual essay just waiting to be discovered?

8. The Graphic Hermit Crab

The hermit crab essay appropriates a found text – also known as a “false document” – as a “shell” to protect the vulnerable story it contains. The textual form’s logical progression is visual, in which a found graphic is adopted as the essay’s structure. J. Robert Lennon’s “ Turnabout: A Story Game ” is a graphic hermit crab essay that can be read starting at any point, proceeding in any direction.

9. The Video Essay

Video is a natural medium for personal narrative, and John Breslund is known as a pioneer of the visual essay form. This article includes a Q and A with Bresland and his collaborator, poet and essayist, Eula Biss, with links to some of their groundbreaking work including “Ode to Every Thing.”

10. The Interactive Essay

“Hypertext is spatial in every direction, truly nonsequential—nothing follows by necessity anything else in the essay” write Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola in Tell It Slant . Exemplary interactive hypertext CNF include Dinty W. Moore’s “ Mr. Plimpton’s Revenge: A Google Map Essay ,” Christine Wilks’ “ Fitting the Pattern ” and the work of Eric LeMay .

I hope this survey of the visual essay, in all its weird and wonderfully varied forms, inspires you to try a new approach to telling your stories. No matter your level of skill, experience, or talent with the visual arts, you can start including visuals in your work easily – and to great effect – incorporating images or multi-media collage.

Which visual essay format appeals to you the most? I’d love to hear which visual essays inspire your next project!

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Illustration essay

Table of contents

Illustration

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An illustration essay is a type of writing that uses specific examples to illustrate a general idea or an abstract concept. The primary goal of illustration writing is to use proper examples to prove  the main point of the essay.

This article will explain the purpose, importance, and structure of an illustration essay. Want to know how to write it step by step? Hop on and keep reading until you get to the actual guide. Soon you’ll be ready to write this kind of paper, from first sentences until last paragraphs. Let’s dive into it together!

What Is an Illustration Essay: Definition

The illustration essay concept lies in providing an initial introduction into the general research subject. Essentially, this is about proving that a particular object or notion exists, showing how it functions, and explaining why it is important for everyone involved. As an author, make sure you familiarize your readers with key ideas and important context. If necessary, detailed explanations must be provided, together with strong examples or evidence. It is easier to start an entire research project with this writing type. At this stage conducting some detailed research or analyzing numerous academic sources isn't necessary. An illustrative work should provide just an initial impression about future research in this field. It also helps a great deal with planning your further steps of exploring the main topic.

How to Write an Illustration Essay: Step-By-Step

It is important to compose an illustrative essay correctly as it will pave the road towards your main research goals. We’ll provide you with a quick and easy guide about writing a great essay. The key to success is getting a clear understanding of general direction and staying methodical. Make sure to pay close attention to our tips provided below. They will help you with creating a nice composition, thus boosting your research progress.

Step 1. Choose a Topic for Your Illustration Essay

The first step in writing an illustrative essay is finding a good topic. You need to be well aware of what you plan to research in future. Include this information into an illustrative work and show what further steps will be made towards this goal. Pick a specific topic that can help to provide good insights into this general research subject.  Besides, you should find some good materials supporting your work. In case it is too difficult to find them for your topic, consider picking an easier one.

Step 2. Conduct a Research for an Illustration Essay

The next step is to prepare for writing. Illustration text should give its readers proper understanding of the general problem’s context which is why you need to know this context well yourself.  Search for credible sources and evidence that could support all explanations. But it is not necessary to involve too many scholarly sources at this step. Instead, you just need to provide initial clarifications on future research works you will write so several descriptive books or articles would do.

Step 3. Create an Illustration Essay Outline

A great idea is creating an illustration essay outline before starting with actual writing. It might not be strictly necessary, as stated in your assignment. But in any case it would help you a lot in terms of avoiding serious mistakes or finding noticeable gaps in initial text. The idea of outline is to write down all important ideas and descriptions shortly. Instead of writing a full paragraph for a certain idea, give it just 1-2 phrases. Once done, you’ll review it yourself and correct all inconsistencies. Making such corrections is much easier at this step.

Step 4. Create Good Introduction for Illustration Essay

After reviewing and correcting the outline, it is time to proceed with an introduction of illustration essay. Begin with describing the general research subject and stating your main ideas which would be explained in this main body part later. Make sure to consult assignment you’ve received if not sure which ideas should be included. An important part of an introduction is adding a ‘hook’ at the end. This could engage your audience and thus ensure achieving great success after presenting the completed work.

Step 5. Write a Strong Illustration Essay Thesis

Don’t forget to compose your illustration essay thesis at its beginning. An effective thesis clearly identifies your main illustrative topic, making sure all readers understand what’s going on. Besides, it contains at least three crucial arguments that support or deny main ideas.  Other requirements for an illustrative thesis:

  • It presents the purpose of your text for its readers.
  • It serves as a path to developing explanations in main body paragraphs.
  • It formulates a question that is to be answered in concluding part.

Step 6. Create Body for Your Illustration Essay

The central part of the illustrative writing process is to compose paragraphs with actual descriptions, explanations and evidence for each main idea of current text. The body part should support opinions you’ve formulated in your thesis. All key facts should be presented in this part. It is crucial to make all paragraphs logically connected to each other. All necessary information must be included here but don’t make this part too wordy. Certain balance must be achieved between leaving readers informed and also keeping their attention. We recommend using a good body paragraph example while writing.

Step 7. Conclude Your Illustration Essay

Now it’s time for the final part of illustration essay: conclusion paragraph. It must summarize all explanations and effectively answer questions posed at your introduction. A good conclusion essay makes all main ideas clearer while keeping it short and concise. Don’t add any new facts here, just mention ones given in the main part. However, you can talk about next research steps in your conclusion so that audience gets prepared for some upcoming works on this subject.

Step 8. Proofreading Your Illustration Essay

Once you’re done with illustrative writing, it is time for reviewing and editing it. Even skillest writers make mistakes so it is highly likely current composition would have some inconsistencies left at first. You need to give it a second look and proofread it closely, e.g. next day after finishing with writing. Consider asking someone else to read it as well: your peers, friends, or family members. They might find some logical gaps where everything would seem quite clear for you.

Illustration Essay Examples

In case you would need some extra information in addition to our descriptions and explanations above, we’ve added several free illustration essay examples to illustrate it. These are the real world cases of this kind of writing. They include description of main research idea, explanation of its aspects and context, and informative conclusion.

An Illustration Essay: Final Thoughts

This is all about illustration paper writing process that you need to know. If you’ve finished this article, you’ll be better prepared for creation of strong illustrative materials and for conducting good research.

Illustration

Not sure about your writing skills or struggling with tight deadlines? Feel free to check out our essay service by StudyCrumb ! We are a team of professional writers with vast experience in various academic areas. So just let us know if you need help with any papers.

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Daniel Howard is an Essay Writing guru. He helps students create essays that will strike a chord with the readers.

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How to Write an Informative Essay

Frequently Asked Questions About Illustrative Essay

1. how many paragraphs should an illustration essay have.

The number of illustration essay paragraphs is expected to be at least five:

  • 1 paragraph for the introduction: its thesis statement and main ideas.
  • 3 paragraphs for main body: in most kinds of academic compositions, body paragraphs are where all supporting arguments must be included.
  • 1 paragraph for conclusion to summarize all of the above.

You can write more than that but keep in mind that an illustrative text is not expected to be too long.

2. What is an illustrated essay?

An illustration essay or an illustrated essay should provide an initial introduction into your research subject for your audience. It is structured around the goal of using examples to make valid points supporting the main ideas of your essay. Such an essay does not typically involve in-depth research but rather makes a broad examination of a research field and its context.

3. What is the purpose of illustration?

The purpose of illustration essay, also known as an example essay, is to clearly demonstrate and support a point by using evidence. It should help your audience better understand the context of your research subject and prepare them for your further works in that field. In addition to explaining the topic for your readers, such text helps you plan further steps. It serves as a quick and easy start for your research process.

4. Is an illustration a drawing?

By definition, it is a visualization or a depiction made by an artist, such as a drawing, sketch, painting, or photograph. An illustration essay however does not necessarily involve a painting or a photograph, nor does it have to revolve around an art theme. Its name means that it illustrates your chosen topic for your readers using detailed explanations and basic depictions.

IMAGES

  1. Illustration Essay: Guide to Writing an Excellent Piece of Work

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  2. How to Write an Illustration Essay : Complete Guide

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  3. Illustration Essay (400 Words)

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  4. How To Write Illustration Paper

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  5. How to Write an Illustration Essay: Examples and Useful Tips

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  6. 25+ Free Illustration Essay Examples Pics

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VIDEO

  1. Illustrated Essay

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  4. Life in a Big city _ Essay

  5. WRITING AN ESSAY

  6. The Edge of Everything

COMMENTS

  1. What Is an Illustration Essay? Definition, Tips & Examples

    To give you a clear idea of your first potential question on the concept of - what is an illustration essay - here is a simple definition from our essay writing service: Illustration papers serve as a form of written composition employed to present instances or examples of a particular concept or idea.

  2. Illustration Essay

    Illustration is a rhetorical style that uses examples to support the thesis or main idea of a paragraph or essay. Illustration is most often used at the paragraph level to help illustrate or support a point, but you may also encounter illustration essays of various types in your college courses.

  3. Illustration Essay: Definition, Topics, Examples and Tips

    An illustration essay is a type of essay that aims to present a compelling and vivid picture of a particular subject or personal experiences. Unlike other essays that may focus solely on presenting arguments or analyzing data.

  4. Illustration Essay: Topics, Tips and the Outline

    An illustration essay is a type of essay that uses examples to prove a particular point or argument. Learn the steps to write an illustration essay, from the introduction to the conclusion, with tips and examples from our writers. Find out how to use hooks, transitions, and research to make your essay clear and effective.

  5. Illustration Essays: Definitions, Templates and Examples

    An Illustration Essay is an essay designed to describe and explain with examples. You will be required to use examples to reveal details about the subject you are discussing. In many ways, it is the easiest form of essay because you don't have to come up with a thesis or argue a point.

  6. Illustration Essay Guide: Tips for Successful Writing

    An illustration essay is a kind of informative writing, whose purpose is to demonstrate that particular thing exists and acts in a certain way. An illustration essay is also known as exemplification paper. It means that an author needs to summarize empirical data and include their definition.

  7. 10.2 Illustration

    To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay clearly demonstrates and supports a point through the use of evidence. As you learned in Chapter 9 "Writing Essays: From Start to Finish", the controlling idea of an essay is called a thesis.

  8. Illustration

    Illustration is a rhetorical style that uses examples to support the thesis or main idea of a paragraph or essay. Don't be confused by the word "illustration" as the use of pictures or media.

  9. Writing for Success: Illustration/Example

    An effective illustration essay, also known as an example essay, clearly demonstrates and supports a point through the use of evidence. The controlling idea of an essay is called a thesis. A writer can use different types of evidence to support his or her thesis.

  10. 12.1: Why Write an Illustration Essay?

    12: Illustration. 12.2: Basic Structure. Illustration is often used as a mode of writing when the writer needs to clarify general statements or observations about perceived truths about society, nature, experiences, and behavior. Illustration is used to clarify abstract concepts by providing a demonstration of a concept with supporting examples ...

  11. Illustration/Example

    To illustrate means to show or demonstrate something clearly. An effective illustration essay clearly demonstrates and supports a point using examples and evidence. Ultimately, you want the evidence to help the reader "see" your point, as one would see a good illustration in a magazine or on a website.

  12. How to Write an Illustration Essay Perfectly

    An illustration essay is aimed at proving that a particular idea or thing exists through introducing the reader to valid statements that back up the existence of the subject. This type of essay serves as a fundamental introduction to deeper research to be made in an academic paper.

  13. Illustration Essay: Guide to Writing an Excellent Piece of Work

    An illustration essay, also known as an exemplification paper, needs you to sum up empirical data, make an explanation, and provide supporting evidence. This is why it is often confused with compare and contrast essays and cause and effect essays.

  14. What is an Illustration Essay?

    Illustration Essay Definition An illustration essay is a piece of writing that uses examples to support a thesis statement or main idea. It is also known as an exemplification essay because it provides specific instances that demonstrate or " exemplify " the writer's point. Importance of Illustration Essay

  15. 100 Easy Illustration Essay Topics

    What Is an Illustration Essay? Illustration essays explain a topic and provide concrete, interesting examples and descriptions so that the reader understands that subject better. Below are some topic ideas sorted by category. Sports Topics Detail how a football coach can turn a program around. Show how to do a baton handoff in a track race.

  16. A Comprehensive Guide to Writing an Illustration Essay

    Like a generic essay, an illustration essay starts with an introduction, flows into the body paragraphs, and ends with an impactful conclusion. What sets the essay structure apart from other types of essays is the nuances of each part. Here is a complete breakdown of what an illustration essay's outline should look like. 1. The introduction:

  17. How to Write an Illustration Essay: Examples and Useful Tips

    An illustration essay, or otherwise called an example essay, is an informative essay writing genre that clarifies a specific situation or object through demonstrative evidence. This type of paper provides specific details that prove a thesis statement or a key point in the form of exemplification.

  18. 150 Illustration Essay Topics For Every Student

    An illustrative essay is detailed and informative writing which reflects the knowledge of a particular thing the way it is. Otherwise known as an exemplification paper or essay, it includes accurate data and stories. An illustrative essay doesn't only provide ideas on human experiences.

  19. How To Write An Illustration Essay

    Writing the Illustration Essay The video teaches how to write the illustration essay. The illustration essay also known as exemplification, is an essay in wh...

  20. 141+ Illustration Essay Topics (Plus a Great Template!)

    Topics for Children, Middle School and High School. Illustrate your school's behavior policy. Show the life cycle of butterflies with illustrations and explanations. Provide an illustration of your local library's loans policy. Write a 5 paragraph essay illustrating how volcanoes form. Illustrate the rules of your favorite sport.

  21. CRAFT: Let's Get Graphic: A Look at the Visual Essay by Nicole Breit

    The Illustrated Essay. There's something so charming about a notebook doodle - perhaps because sketches convey the character of the artist in such an immediate way. I love the narrator's personality as it comes through Randon Billings' Noble's drawings in "Accidental Notes on the Syllabus." 4. The Graphic Essay

  22. Illustration Essay Guide: Tips & Outline & Examples

    An illustration essay or an illustrated essay should provide an initial introduction into your research subject for your audience. It is structured around the goal of using examples to make valid points supporting the main ideas of your essay. Such an essay does not typically involve in-depth research but rather makes a broad examination of a ...

  23. The Infinity of Lists: An Illustrated Essay

    — National Review "...a splendidly illustrated monograph, The Infinity of Lists: An Illustrated Essay (Rizzoli) ...is, in essence, a tour through art, literature, and music based on the theme of lists, an investigation of the phenomenon of cataloging and collecting. Additionally, Eco maintains that the impulse to accumulate, to collect, is a ...

  24. Patriots' Matthew Slater Announces Retirement ...

    Longtime New England Patriots special teams ace and team captain Matthew Slater announced his retirement from the NFL on Tuesday in an essay he penned for the team's website. Feb 20, 2024 Video