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Medicine Personal Statement Examples – Cambridge (Lucy)

Home » Application Guide » Medicine Personal Statement Examples – Cambridge (Lucy)

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Welcome to our collection of Medicine Personal Statement Examples! We’ve searched far and wide to find personal statements from successful applicants all around the UK and asked them to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of their work for your own inspiration. Today’s subject is from Lucy, who studies Medicine at the University of Cambridge.

Lucy applied to study medicine in 2020 at some of the top Universities in the UK, including Imperial and Birmingham , and subsequently received offers from three of her four choices, of which she chose Cambridge.  

Let’s read the personal statement that got her a place at the University of Cambridge , or skip straight to her feedback to learn what made her personal statement a success!

Please be aware that these examples are meant purely for the sake of inspiration, and should absolutely NOT be used as a model around which to base your own personal statement. UCAS have a rather strict system that detects plagiarism .

Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement Example

Whole personal statement.

My interest in medicine stems originally from my fascination with science and its relation to the human body, and the opportunity to apply medical research to improve people’s lives. However, it was volunteering in a nursing home for a year and realising how much joy just offering care and empathy can give that motivated me to pursue a medical career.

Watching one of the residents with whom I had built a bond gradually showing the unrelenting impacts of ageing highlighted the difficulty in maintaining emotional resilience in medicine. This inspired me to read ‘Being Mortal’ which shed light on the roles of a doctor in end of life care whilst making me increasingly aware of the ethical dilemmas in supporting an ageing population. To enhance my interpersonal skills, I also volunteered at a charity shop where facing difficult customers has made me more confident and versatile in my interactions with the public.

Shadowing a GP emphasised to me the incredible demand put on primary care services but also the efficacy of triage and good organisation. Nurses ran minor illness clinics, freeing up GPs to see more urgent or complex patients which enabled the practice to run smoothly and efficiently. Despite having a backlog of patients to see, the GP’s calm and sensitive manner towards each individual was inspiring. A high level of care I aspire to achieve as a doctor. My hospital work experience reiterated the value of cohesive team-work during an anterior cruciate ligament replacement and I was impressed by how team members’ roles and responsibilities complemented each other. Team-work and leadership are integral to my role as a Prefect and as co-secretary in BAYouth, the Welsh NHS’ youth advisory panel, ensuring that minutes are written and projects completed. Sitting on interview panels has given me an insight into the diversity of roles within healthcare and the importance of each member in a multidisciplinary team.

I thoroughly enjoyed doing my Extended Project on nanomedicine as it showed how the scientific disciplines of physics, biology and chemistry overlap each other in medicine. Synthesising complex scientific literature taught me valuable critical thinking and extended writing skills. Through time-consuming amendments, challenging me to deal with uncertainty and situations not going to plan, I found that effective organisation made the research process much more manageable, allowing me to complete my EPQ to a high standard in one year. The scientific principles that underpin medicine continue to fascinate me, and therefore, I arranged work experience in the Centre for Nanohealth. It was exciting to successfully make and test my own glucose microneedle biosensor and assist in cutting-edge medical research.

As a naturally curious person, I enjoy investigating medical advancements in the New Scientist magazine. Since coming across a patient with fibromyalgia in my work experience, I have also been interested in topics surrounding neuroscience. The prospect of utilising scientific innovation in clinical contexts excites me and I look forward to furthering my understanding of science throughout my career.

As a Grade 8 pianist, I relish in performing in concerts and competitions under pressure. However, music, alongside badminton, mainly helps me to relax. I enjoyed completing my Bronze Duke of Edinburgh award and the UKMT Mathematics challenges which made use of my problem-solving skills, and doing Grade 8 LAMDA examinations enhanced my communication skills. I believe effective time-management enables me to integrate academia with relaxation so that I can maintain a good work-life balance.

My resolve to study medicine is the result of long contemplation. I know that it will often be gruelling and will involve sacrifices, but I believe it will offer a sense of satisfaction like no other job. My intrinsic scientific curiosity along with my desire for social interaction drive a commitment to medicine as a life-long endeavour.

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Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement Example Analysis

Now, let’s go section by section and see what Lucy has to say about what she wrote:  

INTRODUCTION

Introduction

The introduction is simple & clear, with no filler or frills. My intention was simply to state why I wanted to go into healthcare rather than a purely scientific career . It’s always good to hone in on what is about medicine in particular that interests you, as it is very easy to discuss topics that could apply to other subjects like Biology, Chemistry, etc. It was also backed by evidence from my time in the care home. It is not too long which is important for maintaining attention, but gets across a lot of points and provides topics for further discussion in the main body of the statement.

It does feel a bit cliched to speak about medicine in such a noble and positive way, but it is how I genuinely felt when writing this statement. This can be seen in some of my choices of words, such as ‘joy’, which could have been a bit more sincere and less idealistic. The admissions team want to see people with an actual desire to enter medicine, but it can perhaps seem naive to describe experience like this in such a way. It also reads as if the nursing home was the only reason for me to pursue medicine rather than an accumulation of experiences, which wasn’t the case.  

Paragraph 1

This paragraph follows on from the introduction very directly as it goes into my experience in a nursing home which linked to my reading of ‘Being Mortal’, indicating that I have followed up on my interests and reflections. You should always be looking to demonstrate you understanding of the subject by discussing the connections between different experiences, as well as discussing how they link with medicine as a whole. Not only does it show an understanding of the things you do, but it also tells a story, which makes the statement more interesting to read. I also stated what steps I had done to improve on the skills I saw/read, another key element of writing a personal statement; reflection of one’s experiences.

I was a bit too vague with my discussion of ‘ ethical issues ‘ but it does give some room for exploration in the interview. However, the biggest flaw with this paragraph is the last sentence. While the connection between difficult customers and difficult patients may seem fairly obvious, this is still the type of thing that I should have actually explored in writing. Even with this in mind though, trying to connect retail experience with medical work was a very big stretch, one that makes me seem even more naive as the two fields are on completely different levels. This was a case of me having experience I wanted to mention without thinking about how it would work in the statement as a whole.  

Paragraph 2

Here, I delve into my most relevant work experience , which is essential for any medical personal statement. Through my description of the things I saw and did, I was able to express the various lessons and values I learnt from my time there. Showing how meaningful the experience was to my development is important for showing my commitment and engagement with the subject. As a more general example, I emphasised the importance of teamwork and showed appreciation for all healthcare workers I had encountered rather than just the doctor, further displaying my appreciation of the work it takes to enter the medical field.  

My first major issue isn’t really with the paragraph itself but with the format of the statement as a whole. This should have been my first main body paragraph, as it is a much stronger introduction to my abilities and understanding compared to my experience in care or retail. Those two things are important to mention, but I didn’t start with my best foot forward, which is a definite mistake. In terms of the actual writing here, I didn’t go into detail of specific experiences/things I saw that showed teamwork and was quite vague in ‘complemented each other’- in what way? Instead of describing that I saw a lot of teamwork, I could have cut down the experiences and went into one specific one in more detail.  

Paragraph 3

This paragraph emphasises my scientific interest which is an important skill to demonstrate,   especially for Oxbridge applications. Since I sought out work experience in an area related to my EPQ, it shows I am truly interested and dedicated in the topic. While you need to be prepared to branch out into other area throughout your studies, demonstrating that you have already formed an interest in a specialist subject is great for showing that you are proactive and independent.  

Instead of just saying I arranged work experience, I should have reflected more on what I gained from it or learnt from it. I could have also described a more specific area of nanomedicine or an interesting case I saw to guide/predict interview questions more easily. The amount of detail I went into was decent, but you can always go deeper into topics, provided you’ve got the word count for it. Either way, it creates a good discussion point at you interview.  

Paragraph 4/5

These two paragraphs delve deeper into my research and extra-curricular activities , which is always an important thing to discuss in the latter half of your personal statement. The research especially further demonstrates my interest in the subject, while my extra curricular activities help to portray me as a hard-working, well-rounded and multi-skilled individual, something that’s always important for admissions teams.

While my research shows further dedication and understanding for the medicine, I have not linked any of my extra-curricular activities to the subject in anyway. I do mention so very general skills that have been developed from these activities, but the best personal statements would link these activities back to medicine in some way, even just with a brief sentence or passing mention. How do my piano or badminton skills make me a better medical student? This is the type of question you should aim to answer.  

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This conclusion is short and sums up my reasons to study medicine nicely, which is exactly what a good conclusion should do. However, it also describes how I appreciate the challenges that come with it, which show a level of self-awareness and realism that I perhaps missed in my introduction. It follows from the paragraph about my work/life balance which demonstrates appreciation of the sacrifices made in medicine, while demonstrating that these are sacrifices I would happily make for a chance to study, and eventually work, in medicine.

I think that ‘ social interaction’ could have been replaced by something more specific to medicine such as saving lives or advancing medicinal technology, as social interaction could encompass quite a lot of professions. Overall though, I feel this is a very solid conclusion!

Final Thoughts

I have covered practically everything that is expected of a good personal statement in some form here. Despite a couple of structural issues, I believe I have prioritised the the most important and most effective parts of my experience in order to create a statement that paints me in a very good light. From almost all of my work experiences, I have tried to improve certain skills and I showed that I took action to do so. The introduction is as clear as I could make it which is important to convey my key reasons to study medicine while the conclusion sums everything up nicely without repeating too much from the rest of the statement.

There are various smaller issues scattered around this personal statement, but nothing that makes it become a weak piece of work. For one, some of the statements I made were unnecessary and vague. Rather than aiming for quantity of experiences/skills, I think that delving into the most important ones with good reflection and understanding of their relevance would have been better. I could have also removed the section about LAMDA exams and piano exams as they would have been described in my UCAS application anyway, and don’t link to medicine in any meaningful way in my writing.  

As I said before, I didn’t start the discussion of my experiences with the most impressive and important part, my work experience, which undervalues all the work I did during the time somewhat. My final paragraph about my extra-curricular activities was also a bit weak looking back at it, as the admissions team will only be so impressed by these achievements if I haven’t explained how they have improved my abilities in medicine.  

So there you have it! This personal statement helped Lucy get 3/4 offers in her application, which is an incredibly desirable position for any applicant to be in!

Everyone has different experiences and abilities, so you may not be able to relate to everything that was said in this personal statement. However, the information and advice provided by Lucy is universal and will help any applicant write a better personal statement!  

Be sure to check out more Medicine Personal Statement Analyses to see advice from all different kinds of applicants, including Ali Abdaal himself, who also attended Cambridge! Or if you want to get started on your own statement, check out 6med’s Personal Statement Bundle for all the support and resources you’ll ever need! If you want full support on every part of your application and a guaranteed place at med school, the Complete Bundle will be perfect for you.  

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Successful Personal Statement For Medicine At Cambridge

Last Updated: 31st March 2020

Author: Rohan Agarwal

Table of Contents

Welcome to our popular Personal Statement series where we present a successful Personal Statement, and our Oxbridge Tutors provide their feedback on it. 

Today, we are looking through a Medicine applicant’s Personal Statement that helped secure a place at Cambridge University. The Medicine Course at Cambridge aims to educate students to become compassionate, thoughtful, skilled members – and leaders – of the medical profession.

Read on to see how this candidate wrote a Personal Statement that demonstrates the qualities to work in a medical profession. 

Here’s a breakdown of the Personal Statement:

SUCCESSFUL?

The universities this candidate applied to were the following:

IMPERIAL COLLEGE

INTERVIEW + REJECTED

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Medicine Personal Statement

I realise that medicine may not always have positive outcomes, having witnessed two deaths at a young age. However, the inevitable fallibility of the human body has driven my desire to acquire a better understanding of the complicated processes and mechanisms of our body. I am captivated by the prospect of lifelong learning; the rapid and ceaseless pace of change in medicine means that there is a vast amount of knowledge in an astonishing number of fields.

Work experience and volunteering have intensified my desire to pursue the profession; it gave me the chance to observe doctors diagnosing problems and establishing possible routes of treatment; I found the use of monoclonal antibodies in kidney transplantation fascinating. A doctor needs to be skilled, dexterous and creative. Medicine is a scientific discipline that requires a profound understanding of the physiology of the body, but the application of medicine can be an art, especially when communications between the doctor and the patient can influence the outcome of the treatment. I admire the flexibility of doctors; an inpatient needs to be approached with sensitivity and reassurance, whereas an acute admission patient would benefit more from hands-on assessments. I have been volunteering at Derriford Hospital since 2010. The most valuable part is taking time to converse with the patients to alleviate their stress and appreciate their concerns, demonstrating my understanding of the importance of listening. I appreciate that the quality of life is more important than the quantity of years, as a recent death at the ward made me realise that despite all the technological advances and our increasing understanding of the human body, there is a limit to what we can achieve.

My Nuffield Bursary project was based on finding potential medical treatments for sepsis by working on the molecular genetics of bacteria-infected cells. Using theory to interpret laboratory experiments allowed me to show how an enzyme was involved in the inflammatory response mechanism. My skills of organisation and time management were recognised by the Individual Achievement Award for my role as Finance Director in the Young Enterprise team. I used my leadership skills to assign team members to tasks to which their talents were best suited and demonstrated effective communication and teamwork to meet the deadlines. I took part in the British Mathematical Olympiad after receiving the Gold and Best in School prize for the Senior Maths challenge last year. Regular participation in the Individual and Team Maths Challenge enhanced my lateral thinking. The numerous awards I have won such as Best Results at GCSE and Bronze in the Physics Olympiad not only show my ability in a range of subjects but also my commitment to my academic career. As a subject mentor, I developed my ability to break down problems, explaining them in a logical, analytical yet simpler way. I cherished the opportunity to work with the younger pupils; enabling them to grasp new concepts, and I believe that discussing ideas, problems or case studies with colleagues will be even more rewarding.

A keen pianist, I have been playing for 14 years. At the age of 12, I became the pianist for the Children’s Amateur Theatre Society. Perseverance was essential as I was learning numerous songs each week showing commitment, resilience and attention to detail, which are transferable skills applicable to medicine. Playing in front of 300 people regularly helped me to build my confidence and taught me to stay calm under pressure. Playing the piano is a hobby that I love and I will continue to pursue it to balance my academic life.

I believe I possess the ability, devotion, diligence and determination required for this course that demands a holistic understanding of both the sciences and the arts. I will relish the challenges on an academic and personal level and I look forward to following this vocation in the future.

For more inspiration, take a look through our other successful Personal Statement a nalysis articles:

Successful Personal Statement For Natural Science (Physical) At Cambridge

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Good Points Of The Personal Statement

A well-written statement that guides the reader from one point to the next, delivering good insight into personal development and the motivations to becoming a doctor. The student shows that they have a very diverse background, both academically as well as work experience. One of the strongest parts of the statements is that the student recognises the limitations of medicine and acknowledges the challenges in delivering medical care under those limitations. The student is also able to demonstrate experiences made in non-medical fields and how they contributed to their personal development. This is important as some of the skills necessary to becoming a good doctor are transferable from other professions.

Bad Points Of The Personal Statement

The student provides extensive detail on awards and prizes won. This part is somewhat unnecessary as it does not add anything to the quality of the statement itself. Most, if not all students applying for medicine will have a history of academic excellence, therefore, listing awards and achievements is less relevant. This space could be better used to provide more insight into lessons learned from work experience.

UniAdmissions Overall Score:

A strong statement with a lot of information on the student’s development and academic achievements. The statement succeeds at raising interest in the student and providing an overview of the individual’s development. There are a few minor weaknesses that could be optimised in order to improve the overall strength of the statement even further.

And there we have it – a Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement with feedback from our expert tutors. 

Remember, at Cambridge, the Admissions Tutors are often the people who will be teaching you for the next few years, so you need to appeal directly to them.

Our Free Personal Statement Resources page is filled with even more successful personal statements and expert guides.

Our expert tutors are on hand to help you craft the perfect Personal Statement for your Cambridge Medicine application.

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Top Tips for a Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement

Cambridge medicine personal statement – top 10 tips : dos and don’ts.

The Cambridge Personal Statement is a crucial component of your university application. It presents a unique opportunity for you to differentiate yourself from other applicants. You should be able to articulate your story and explain your interests beyond that of numbers on an admissions test. Furthermore, it gives the interviewer a chance to understand who you are, providing a platform to bounce off questions during your Cambridge Medicine interview . 

They can tailor questions on your personality, interests, and commitment to who you are as a person and your amalgamation of experiences before you. Our Oxbridge application experts have compiled a list of top 10 Medicine Personal Statement Cambridge tips. This includes dos and don’ts– for your Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement for the 2024/25 application cycle.

medical personal statement cambridge

General Advice for your Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement

Medicine is a course that integrates both the theoretical aspect of sciences as well as the human aspect of everyday life. Hence, it is a potential choice for scientists who is passionate in wanting to apply research findings to improve the lives of people and patients. However, Medicine also offers a breadth of experiences beyond that. With that comes realistic and not as glamorised aspects of the profession. It can be stressful, arduous, bureaucratic and frustrating. 

Hence, it is important for you to demonstrate in your Cambridge Medicine personal statement that you have a realistic understanding of the profession and that Medicine is the right choice for you. This means that you should demonstrate how you are a good fit for the subject. Not because it is expected of you, or that you are attracted to the prestige of it. Your motivations have to be well-reasoned and thought through. 

Moreover, when planning out your Cambridge Medicine personal statement, make sure you research the University’s achievements in their relevant fields. Use it as a guide to illustrate your interest in Medicine. 

Additionally, when you are crafting your Cambridge Medicine personal statement, you would most likely also be applying to four other university courses. This may result in your statement being vaguer. The University of Cambridge is aware of such and will require you to fill out an ‘Online Supplementary Application Questionnaire (SAQ)’. This is shortly after submitting the UCAS application, so make sure you’ve created another condensed version of your Cambridge personal statement that you can directly submit to Cambridge.

oxbridge personal statements

Top 5 Tips for your Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement

Explain why you are interested in medicine.

Cambridge tutors are looking to teach students with genuine interest and passion for their course. Hence, make this the focus of your Cambridge Medicine personal statement. Explain why you want to study your chosen subject. Especially for a course such as Medicine, you would have to ensure that your motives are well reasoned and well thought through. This means that your motivations should not be rooted around the fact that it is secure, well-paid, or prestigious. You should explain to the tutor that you want to study Medicine because you are innately interested in the course and that you are a well fit for it. For example, stating that you want to pursue medicine because you are passionate about the sciences and find that the application of it to help people is meaningful and fulfilling, is a solid reason for wanting to apply to the Medicine course. Using concrete examples that display your interest will go a long way in demonstrating this interest. For example, this could include participating in biology or chemistry competitions or partaking in research projects. It could also be reading up on the latest innovations published in articles or books. Do not worry if you do not have a specific example or time where your ambition became crystal clear to you. Your decision in choosing to study Medicine can be illuminated through an amalgamation of your experiences or understanding of yourself and your strengths. Take your time in explaining why you align well with the course!

Display a good understanding of the course

Understand the course that you are applying for, and ensure that you do not have a superficial or misguided view of what the course entails. Most people’s perception of a course is from what they see in the media or through their high school subjects. Particularly in the case of medicine, most people’s impression of the course is shrouded by its prestige and the fact that it is well-paid. However, this is not always the case – there are difficult aspects of the course! It leads to a one-dimensional view of the course.  Try to talk to graduates or people currently working in the field to gain a better understanding of the course and your options post-graduation. You can demonstrate this understanding in your Cambridge Medicine personal statement by linking similarities in your past experiences to aspects of Medicine (if applicable). Or you can elaborate on personal qualities or traits that make you suitable for Medicine. For example, Medicine also aims to cultivate students to be clinician-scientists, where research work would be involved. Hence, perseverance is a good quality for an applicant to have when partaking in research or difficult aspects of the course. Furthermore, medicine in particular favours medicine-related experience. It signals to the tutors that you have a realistic understanding of your future profession. Try and include any hospital attachment or medical-related work that you were involved in. Also reflect on your experience. Volunteering is also another key experience to mention.

Read around the subject you’re applying for

Of course, in your medicine personal statement Cambridge does not expect you to be an expert in your field of study. You are going to university to study the material after all. However, being well-read in your course and reading ahead is a great way of demonstrating your interest in it. If you are genuinely interested in your course, you would also naturally want to learn more and explore the topic on your own. Reading does not only include books. This could also include podcasts, magazine articles, or even Netflix documentaries. Listening to a podcast on your ride home from school can be a nice way to ease such material into your lifestyle. There are some good articles in Nature, Scientific American and New Scientist that publishes the latest innovations in Medicine. You can also visit Cambridge’s recommended reading list for some book inspirations: Cambridge Medicine Sciences You can include the books in your Cambridge Medicine personal statement by reflecting on the ideas and drawing similarities to your personal life or experiences. This would show a deep understanding of the content that you read through. Actually reflect on the material as you are reading through it.

Have a good structure for your Cambridge Medicine personal statement

The points listed above give you a lot of content to write about. However, all of that information can be difficult to get through for the reader if it’s not organised well! Try and follow a fixed overall structure for your Medicine personal statement Cambridge. Also include paragraphs to enhance readability. For example, your introduction could be a short 2-3 lines outlining your interest in Medicine. Or your starting point could show how you first started considering it as a potential career. In your body paragraphs, you can use it to explain specific traits that you have that make you suitable for the course. For example, if you are empathetic, or if you enjoy academic rigour. You can also use some body paragraphs to explain specific aspects of medicine that you are drawn to. Explain how you pursued this interest. You can conclude by wrapping up the points mentioned above! For individual paragraphs, start off the paragraph with a point (such as your interest in the research aspect of medicine). Next, use concrete real-life experiences and examples to support this, before reflecting on these examples.

Ask your friends and family to proofread your Cambridge personal statement

Sometimes, we are not able to be objective about our own work, especially when we are telling our own story. Oxbridge Mind offers a medicine personal statement check . You can also try and approach friends, family, or seniors to proofread your Cambridge Medicine personal statement. They can provide you with feedback. They can comment on the structure and readability of your Cambridge Medicine personal statement, which could be really valuable! That being said, don’t share your Cambridge personal statement in case it gets plagiarised by someone else.

medicine personal statement Cambridge

Top 5 things to AVOID for your Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement

Writing a list of achievements.

Even though one might assume that Cambridge wants to choose the most decorated candidate that applies, this is not necessarily the case. They are looking for students who are genuinely interested in the course, and students who are a good fit for it. This means that you could have started a non-profit and dedicated 10,000 hours to volunteering. But if you don’t show how this is relevant to your study in Medicine, the Cambridge tutors may not necessarily think you are suited for the programme. When talking about your achievements, always link back to how this is relevant to either your interest or your suitability for Medicine. Hence, try not to make your Cambridge Medicine personal statement a laundry list of all your previous experiences. Less is more in you taking more time to explain and elaborate on a couple of experiences.

Valuing vocabulary over conciseness

Some students feel the need to use bombastic words or flowery language in order to impress Cambridge tutors and use it as a way to demonstrate their strong command of the English language. However, this usually works against them. The Cambridge Medicine personal statement comes off as sounding unnatural and difficult to read. Try and understand that the Cambridge Medicine personal statement is a medium for you to tell your story and your passion. If using a thesaurus is getting in the way of that, opt for simple language. Cambridge tutors value ones they can read with ease and understand! If you’re not familiar with certain words, don’t use them as it might work against you instead!

Not showing the link to medicine

When it comes to your medicine personal statement Cambridge tutors are not looking for students with the most awards. They are looking for students who are a good match for the course. Hence, try and focus on relevant experiences that would be useful in you studying medicine. When you mention these experiences, don’t assume that the tutors can immediately understand why it is relevant or impressive. Always elaborate on how it is relevant to your passion for medicine or how it makes you a good fit for the course.

Misunderstanding what the course is about

Make sure you thoroughly research the course. This includes the course syllabus, what the career would entail, and so on. You can find out more information by attending seminars or speaking to seniors who are currently studying medicine (preferably at Cambridge!) or have graduated from the course. A simple google search and thoroughly reading all university brochure materials is a good start on understanding what you are in for! Try to forget all previous assumptions you have about the course. Make sure you thoroughly understand what you would be studying. Furthermore, especially for medicine, it would be good if you can involve yourself in any hospital or clinical attachments, and to mention such experiences in your personal experience. This is because it is a direct way of showing that you have first hand experience in what you would be studying.

Being cliché

When talking about your interest and passion for medicine, try to explain it in a genuine and authentic way. You don’t need a movie-like moment, such as your whole life changing because of applications in medicine. Don’t feel the need to mention a close family member who was saved because of medicine, or the like. These anecdotes are often overplayed– so definitely do not mention them unless it is authentic to your story. A simple explanation of how unique aspects of medicine intrigues you or draws you in, although seemingly simple and ordinary, would be even more valuable if explained well. Try to be authentic and original, and really understand why YOU would love to study medicine!

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The Aspiring Medics

Cambridge medicine personal statement (zute).

In this series of blogs, medical students and medicine offer holders share and explain their personal statements so that you can learn from our experiences and reflections. Zute is an undergraduate medical student at the University of Cambridge.

Disclaimer: Please do NOT be tempted to use our personal statements as a model/foundation/plan. UCAS is very strict about plagiarism, more information can be found here .

Please remember that there is no such thing as a model personal statement. By definition, it is supposed to be unique and there is no "golden formula".

In an overcrowded and understaffed ward, I joined the only junior doctor on her ward round. With a compassionate bedside manner, she won over the trust and gratitude of her patients despite the high volume of demands. This resilience under stress, while remaining compassionate, exemplified the meaning of being a doctor for me. My experiences have highlighted the personal fulfilment I could have in delivering effective healthcare, and it has become clear that medicine is my vocation.

medical personal statement cambridge

This paragraph details my motivation for why I want to do medicine. It’s very important to show admissions tutors that going for medicine is something you’ve thought about thoroughly – a clear motivation helps with this. Opening with an anecdote is a good way to make your personal statement sound interesting and most of all personal. I made sure to appropriately reflect on what I thought about that doctor-patient interaction by extracting traits desirable in doctors

e.g. resilience and compassion .

Eager to explore my interest further, I shadowed an orthopaedic surgeon for a week, which exposed the problem-solving and practical nature of medicine. By observing him analyse the presence of osteophytes and cartilage degeneration from a knee X-ray, I learned how acute analytical skills are vital in making correct diagnoses. Moreover, seeing first-hand the interplay between each member of the team during the knee arthroplasty stressed the value of strong teamwork and communication skills, which I have developed as a pastoral prefect.

It's good to have a transition between your paragraphs to build a narrative of how you’ve found out more about what medicine entails. Here, I didn’t just say I did work experience, but I gave an example of specific skills I deemed important such as teamwork and analytical skills. I furthered this by giving an example of where I demonstrated these skills i.e. as a pastoral prefect. Teamwork is essential to medicine, so I wanted to reflect on where I saw this in action during my work experience.

Additionally, volunteering weekly in a urology ward over the past year has deepened my insight into how other healthcare professionals work in tandem with doctors, all of whom are integral to the holistic treatment of patients. From feeding to offering a listening ear for patients' worries, I have been confronted with the emotional demands of caring for the sick. From this, my communication skills have matured by adopting an empathic approach to patients and their families; I learned that alleviating their concerns can enhance patient recovery.

I decided to talk about my volunteering because it showed that I had a long-term commitment to medicine. I also made sure to show that other members in the healthcare profession have an important role to play in patient care – it’s good to get across that you understand doctors don’t do everything. It’s also important to show that you understand the emotional challenges associated with being a doctor. Following this up with why you still want to do medicine is a good way to show you’ve come to a reasoned conclusion .

A placement in a fast-paced A&E department gave an enlightening contrast. The doctors handled sensitive issues professionally, allowing me to appreciate the utility in being composed in the face of emotionally challenging clinical situations, such as ineffective CPR delivery. Whilst it is frustrating that not everyone can be saved, reading Henry Marsh's ‘Do No Harm’ helped me realise that doctors must reflect on their limits, and palliating symptoms instead of attempting curative treatment may at times be the best plan.

medical personal statement cambridge

Adding your thoughts from a book is a good way to reflect on things you haven’t physically experienced. It doesn’t have to be long, just choose one main takeaway from the book and explain what you learnt from it. I chose to talk about the idea of choosing when and when not to operate as this was something I didn’t fully appreciate before.

Intrigued by the neurological cases from the book, I researched more into the brain and evaluated the evidence behind differences between teenage and adult brains, which gained me a national finalist place in a national essay competition. From this, I sharpened my critical thinking skills and engagement with scientific research, equipping me with essential tools for practising evidence-based medicine in the future. Following a lesson on stem cells, I investigated the use of them in epidermal sheet transplants as treatment for epidermolysis bullosa for a young boy. I found the pathology behind the disease fascinating, which inspired me to write an article on how the insertion of LAMB3 cDNA into cells regenerated his epidermis. The drastic improvement to his quality of life physically and psychologically showed me how medical research is critical in improving patient care.

Since I was applying to Cambridge, I wanted to put more emphasis than most personal statements on how much I was interested in the science behind medicine. Firstly, I was proactive by entering an essay competition and then saying which skills I gained from it. The foundation of all treatments and guidelines in medical practice is evidence so I wanted to show I understood that aspect. If you have a specific example of where you’ve gone beyond your A Level specification to research something, then definitely put that in. However, don’t just leave it in a vacuum, try to link it back to medicine to show that ultimately all the science you learn is to benefit patients in some way.

As a keen scientist, I enjoy problem-solving, especially in novel scientific contexts, evidenced through achieving a Gold award in the Cambridge Chemistry Challenge and Intermediate Biology Olympiad. Alongside my academics, I tutor KS2 children weekly which has refined my ability to effectively convey complex information to others, a useful skill in discussing diagnoses and clinical decisions with patients. From tutoring six children at a time and giving tailored feedback to their parents, I have managed the high workload by prioritising tasks. As a dedicated athlete, I have competed regionally for my athletics club for the past three years which has taught me the value of perseverance during difficulty.

It's easy to forget to mention what things you do outside of medicine. I made sure to include my hobbies and other passions , not to tick a box but because it’s useful for admissions tutors to know that you have a life outside medicine. Burnout is real! If you have something that you do on the side then keep on doing it, your entire life doesn’t have to be devoted to medicine. For me, athletics is something that I still take seriously while at university because it helps me to maintain a good balance between studying and having fun.

Informed by my experiences, my drive to study medicine is stronger than ever and I embrace both the emotional and intellectual challenge it brings. Crucially, I aim to embark on a lifetime of learning, equipped with the tenacity, diligence and compassion needed to be a successful doctor.

For my conclusion, I chose 3 qualities that would summarise the traits I have that make me a suitable applicant. This made sure the ending was concise and impactful enough. There isn’t necessarily a right way to write one, but I intentionally kept it short so I could use most of my characters in the main body to talk about other more important things.

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Medicine personal statement example (cambridge university).

I want to be able to understand the human body and repair it when it malfunctions. During my work experience at King's College Hospital in the liver transplant unit, I saw much open surgery carried out on the abdomen. One of the most amazing moments was when I saw the small intestine moving outside the body by the process of peristalsis. This has led me to start reading the 'Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology' by Gerard J. Tortora and Bryan Derrickson. While at King's I learned about the lengthy and vital process of scrubbing up, as I was allowed to feel the heart beating by touching the underside of the diaphragm, an incredible experience as I could feel the human body in action.

The first surgery I saw was a "lap chole" which was brilliant as I understood the steps in the procedure as I had read about it in 'Complications' by Atul Gawande; it was astounding to witness what I had read. By reading this book I have learnt more about the surgical profession and how medicine is in the grey zone, far more often than black and white, in accordance to certainty and decision making. Being a doctor is like being a detective. In medicine everything has to be taken into account with diligence, as every patient scenario is different. For example a transplant patient was given a liver that was not in the best condition, but as the patient was Hepatitis C positive it was deemed advantageous.

I saw a man become an empty carcass as his major organs were taken out. The retrieval procedure was very similar to major surgery, as it was carried out with dignity although the donor was dead. This was unexpected as I had earlier asked the transplant surgeons whether they would put themselves on the Donor list. They said "no", and when questioned further said they were uncomfortable with the way you are treated. After witnessing the procedure I disagree. The man's heart was to be used in warm heart beating transplant trials.

I witnessed Dr Jassem tell the relatives of a post-operative patient, who was deteriorating rapidly in the ICU, the probable outcome of death. Dr Jassem spoke with honesty, patience and most importantly with compassion. If compassion is lost then a doctor should probably no longer practice medicine.

I believe lateral and forward thinking in medicine is vital. It is wonderful to learn by shadowing a specialist, however it is crucial to evaluate the clinical methods currently used and to always be able to justify the choice for specific treatments and not rely on the fact that it has been used for many years by experts or because it has always been done that way.

Dr Jassem taught me the importance of taking one's field further through research. After reading 'How Doctors Think' by Dr Jerome Groopman I understand the importance of good bedside manners when diagnosing patients, since the majority of medical mistakes are medical misdiagnosis rather than technical mistakes. Another vital component to take into account when choosing the best treatment for a patient is the patient's values, therefore good communication is vital as a doctor. Becoming a reflective practitioner is essential.

As Head Girl I help organise Sixth Form Society, a debating society held after school. Currently I am also head of the fundraising committee and we have pledged to raise at least £180 to keep supporting a child in Burundi.

I realise that medical school is only the first step in becoming an excellent doctor, but the experiences I have undergone so far have reinforced my appetite to succeed in this course.

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How Universities Use Your Medicine Personal Statement

Check our table to see how every Medical School uses your Personal Statement - and find out which ones place a strong emphasis on this part of your application.

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You need to understand how universities use your Medicine Personal Statement because you’ll need to know whether it can make – or break – your UCAS application .

How Do Med Schools Use Personal Statements?

In general, there are five main ways that your Personal Statement could be used by Medical Schools:

  • Not used in any part of the selection process at all
  • Read but not assessed
  • To shortlist candidates to invite to interview
  • To form the basis of questions at interview
  • To help decide between two candidates who are otherwise equally tied

For example, Brighton and Sussex say they will not use your Personal Statement in the selection process – whereas others, like King’s College London , will look at it when considering applicants to shortlist for interview.

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Why Do I Need to Know This?

It’s important that you know how your target Medical Schools will use your Personal Statement, so you can decide how much effort to put into it.

For example, if you’re applying to universities that won’t use the Personal Statement for shortlisting candidates at all, you may be wiser to dedicate more time to preparing for the UCAT or BMAT . Likewise, if you’re applying to universities that place a greater emphasis on your Personal Statement for Medicine, you’ll need to really scrutinise how you structure and how you write your Personal Statement to boost your chances.

How Every Med School Uses Personal Statements

This table sums up what Medical Schools are currently saying about how they will use your Personal Statement. For more detail, and for the most up-to-date information, make sure you check their websites directly.

Once you understand how your Personal Statement for Medicine will be used, it’s time to start planning it to ensure your application is as strong as possible.

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Last updated: 29/6/2023

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The personal statement is changing to a series of free text questions for 2026 entry onwards, however it remains unchanged for 2025 entry. Keep an eye on our live updates page for guidance on these changes.

Your UCAS personal statement is a chance to showcase the skills, attributes, and experiences which make you suited to studying medicine. This can be quite a daunting prospect, especially when you have to boil all that down to just 4,000 characters, or 47 lines. 

In this article, we will:

  • Examine examples of strong and weak medicine personal statements (interested in dentistry? Check out dentistry personal statement examples )
  • Help you learn what you should and shouldn't include in your medicine personal statement
Want to explore more examples? Our Personal Statement Course has over 100 personal statement examples to help you find your voice.

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What you'll find in this article:

Personal statement example 1 – introduction

Personal statement example 2 – introduction, personal statement example 1 – main body, personal statement example 2 – main body, personal statement example 1 – conclusion, personal statement example 2 – conclusion, strong personal statement example, weak personal statement example, what should your personal statement include.

To get into medical school , your personal statement should:

  • Demonstrate meaningful insight into the profession, in the form of work experience or independent research. This could be partly based on medical books or podcasts when medical work experience is not possible
  • Reflect on your strengths, weaknesses, and experiences
  • Mention your extracurricular activities
  • Discuss your academic interests and achievements
'At the moment I am working towards A-Level Chemistry, Biology and Maths. I achieved my AS-Level in Spanish but decided to drop it to focus on my more medically relevant subjects. I’ve been dreaming of studying medicine since I was a young child, and this was only reinforced when I contracted measles during my primary school exams. This affected my performance, but I found that this motivated me rather than discouraged me. A particularly inspiring doctor was heavily involved in helping me deal with the pressure. I was inspired by her to become a doctor myself and help others in a similar way. I am particularly interested in science and as such the practical side of medicine interested me. I’ve always enjoyed chemistry and biology the most, and have best learned when trying to link the pure science I learn in school back to it's practical and useful real-world applications. This is what is particularly interesting about medicine to me - you can apply pure, evidence-based science in a clinical and practical setting to have an obvious positive effect. Inspired by this interest, I invested in a subscription to the New Scientist magazine. I’ve read about a huge number of fascinating discoveries and how they’ve been applied in medical settings.'

This introductory section has some promising features, but there are areas the author could improve:

  • The introductory sentence doesn’t catch the reader’s attention or hold much relevance for a medical personal statement. This sentence would be better suited to a subsequent section on the author’s academic achievements, and it would need to be supplemented with a suitable explanation as to why the chosen subjects are relevant for medicine. 
  • The author uses an anecdote to illustrate why they first developed an interest in medicine. This is a good idea, but the anecdote they've chosen is not the most suitable. It references ‘primary school exams’, which uses the cliché of wanting to do medicine from a young age. This is not only overused, but is also underdeveloped. 
  • The applicant mentions feeling under pressure for these primary school exams. This won’t fill the reader with confidence that the author will be able to cope with the demands of medical school and a career as a doctor. 
  • The introduction should open with the anecdote rather than academic achievements. A strong and memorable opening line will catch the admission tutor’s attention, and gives the student an opportunity to summarise why they want to study medicine.
  • It is far too long. A good introduction should be around 4-6 lines.

There are some parts of the introduction that are more effective:

  • The part discussing why they enjoy chemistry and biology is useful – it links their love for pure science back to the passion they mentioned earlier for helping people. This demonstrates the blend of empathy and interest in science that medical schools will be looking for. 
  • The same part also introduces the candidate’s reading of medical literature, which they could choose to discuss in more depth later in the statement, or which might be something that interviewers could choose to examine in more detail.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement introduction example 1

'From a young age, my real fascination in life has been science - in particular, the incredible intricacy of the human body. My passion to discover more about its inner workings fuelled my motivation to study medicine, and the challenging yet rewarding nature of the job leaves me certain that I want to pursue it as a career. I think that my chosen A-Levels have only made me more determined to become a doctor, while simultaneously allowing me to develop and improve my skills. I have become a better problem-solver by studying physics and maths, while also learning the importance of accuracy and attention to detail. I’ve particularly enjoyed chemistry, which has again helped me improve my problem solving skills and my ability to think rationally and logically. Throughout my chemistry and biology A-Levels, I’ve been required to engage in practical work which has taught me how to design and construct an experiment. I’ve also become better at communicating with other members of my team, something I witnessed the importance of during my work experience in A&E. During recent months, I’ve started reading more medical publications such as the Lancet and the British Medical Journal. I’ve been particularly interested in how this evidence-based science can be applied to clinical practice to really make an impact on patients.'

This introduction contains some useful reflection and demonstrates some insight, but is quite jumbled. The main areas of weakness are as follows:

  • The content is good but much of it would be better suited to a later section and should be explored in more detail while being linked back to medicine (for example, the whole second half could be included in a longer segment on academia). 
  • The applicant mentions that they improved their problem-solving skills. How did they do this? Why is this important in medicine? 
  • They say that medicine is demanding but that this attracts them to the job. What experiences have they had to show the demanding nature of it? Why does this attract them to it? 
  • The author also briefly mentions a stint of work experience in A&E, but the rushed nature of the introduction means that they can’t go into detail about the experience or reflect on what exactly they learned from it. 
  • Similar to example 1, this introduction includes some clichés which detract from the author’s overall message. For example, that they have wanted to do medicine from a young age or that they love science (with no further explanation as to why). 
  • It is far too long. Again, an introduction should be a succinct summary of why you're interested in medicine, and not a brief account of all of your experiences.

The stronger parts of this introduction include the following:

  • The author does demonstrate that they can reflect on the skills they’ve improved through experience. For example, the analytical and problem-solving skills they gained from chemistry.
  • The candidate shows an understanding of the link between evidence-based science and clinical application when discussing how they did further research around their physics course. This shows a good level of curiosity and insight.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement introduction example

'I first became interested in studying medicine when I carried out a work experience placement with my father an elderly care specialist. I really enjoyed the experience and it gave me a deeper insight into the challenges doctors face. I now believe that I better understand the resilience - both mental and physical - that doctors need to cope with the heavy workload and emotional challenges. A few months ago I was given the opportunity to attend work experience in St Mary’s hospital in Manchester where I visited and observed many different specialties and areas of the hospital like A&E and the labs and witnessed how doctors carried out their jobs. For the past year I’ve been doing some other volunteering work too, such as, taking meals around to patients on the ward, asking them about their experience in the hospital and just chatting with them about how they’re feeling. They’re often delighted to have someone to talk to especially during Covid when they weren’t allowed to receive visitors. I saw how my communication and empathy made a real impact on the mood of the lonelier patients. I spent a few days working in the same hospital, shadowing doctors and Allied Health professionals in the stroke ward. I became much more familiar with the process doctors used for treating stroke patients, and developed an understanding of the role that physiotherapists and occupational therapists have in their rehabilitation. On top of that I organised a placement with the emergency medicine doctors and spent time in the haemapheresis unit at St Mary’s.'

This example does contain some of the features we look for in a complete main body section but could definitely be improved: 

  • The main issue with this is the list-like presentation, which goes hand-in-hand with a general lack of reflection or insight. Although it is good to discuss your work experience in your personal statement, it would be far better if the candidate focused on just one or two of the experiences mentioned, but went into far more detail about what they learned and the insight they gained. For example, after mentioning the role of Allied Health Professionals in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, they could go on to discuss how they came to appreciate the importance of these healthcare workers, and how the contribution of all these individuals within the multidisciplinary team is so important to achieving good outcomes.
  • Statements like ‘I [...] witnessed how doctors carry out their jobs’ make it seem as if the candidate really wasn’t paying attention. They need to explain what they mean by this. Were they impressed by the doctors’ effective teamwork and communication skills, or perhaps by their positive attitude and morale? Did they seem well-trained and effective? What did they learn from this that might help them in the future?  ‍
  • Similarly, the student simply states that they saw the effect of empathy on patients: ‘I saw how my communication and empathy made a real impact on the mood of the lonelier patients.’ This adopts a ‘telling’ approach, when the student needs to adopt a ‘showing’ approach. Simply telling us that they saw something does not adequately demonstrate an understanding of why those qualities are important, or what they actually mean. What does it mean to have empathy? What does that look like in real terms? How did they use it? What was the effect? Showing the tutor that you are empathetic is important, but simply saying it is disingenuous and shows a lack of understanding.
  • The candidate spends a number of characters name-dropping the exact hospital they visited and its location, which isn’t the best use of valuable space, as it has no real impact on the message they’re trying to convey.
  • Generally, it isn’t a good idea to talk about work experience with family members. Of course, this might be the reality, but try to have some other placements that you’ve organised yourself so that it doesn’t appear as if your family are doing all the hard work for you. At the very least, you could simply leave this information out.
  • There are a few grammatical errors here, especially regarding the use of commas. It’s important to use a spell checker or to ask an English teacher to check your work for you before submitting your statement.

The better features of this example are:

  • The candidate does show some insight into the role of a doctor when they talk about the resilience required by doctors to cope with the hard hours and challenging conditions. They just need to reflect in this way in other parts of the section, too.
  • The author has clearly done a lot of work experience and is right to discuss this in their personal statement. Just remember that you don’t need to squeeze in every single little placement.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement main body example main body

'I was pleased to be appointed as head boy in my last year of school, and as part of this role I headed up the school safety office. I carried out inspections of the dormitories, roll calls and helped in the running of school festivals and activity days. The office I was in charge of needed to ensure the safety of every student in the school and I helped plan and lead drills to prepare the students for storms, floods and fires. This role has made me a far better leader, and I also believe that I am now far more calm and logical when working under pressure or in uncertain situations. I’ve been an editor on the online school blog for over 2 years now and the experience has taught me how to work effectively in a team when under time pressure. In order to meet my deadlines I needed to remain motivated even when working independently, and I think that the diligence and work ethic I’ve developed as a result will be incredibly useful to me as a medical student. I took on the role of financial director for both the table tennis club and Model United Nations at my school. At first I struggled with the weight of responsibility as I was in charge of all of the clubs’ money and expenditures. However, I am now a far more organised individual as I came to appreciate the value of concise paperwork and of keeping a record of my actions. I not only manage the funds of the table tennis club but am also a regular member of it. I often play independently, and the lack of a specific coach means that I have to identify my own strengths and weaknesses. I am now far better at being honest about my weaknesses and then devising strategies for working on them. The sport has also allowed me to demonstrate my ability to work well in a team, but also to get my head down and work independently when necessary.'

This example is generally well written and showcases some of the features of a good main body section. However, there are some areas that can be improved:

  • This section would benefit from the ‘show, don’t tell’ approach. Instead of explaining specific situations or events through which the candidate demonstrated certain attributes, they simply state them and then link them vaguely to a more general role or activity.
  • The bigger problem, however, is that the author mentions a wide range of skills but falls short in linking these back to medicine.  ‍ For example, after reflecting on their role in the school safety office and the leadership skills they developed as a result, the author could talk about the senior role that doctors have within the multidisciplinary team and the importance of good leadership in a medical setting.  Similarly, the author mentions their ability to work independently but should really round this off by describing how this would benefit them in medical school, as the ability to progress your learning independently is crucial to success there. The student mentions an understanding of and proficiency with paperwork and recording their actions. Doctors must constantly do this when writing notes for each patient, so the candidate should really try to mention this in their statement to explain why their skills would be useful. The mention of teamwork could be followed by an explanation of why it is important in a medical setting and how the applicant witnessed this during their medical work experience. Finally, when the student talks about being able to identify and work on their weaknesses, they could use this as an opportunity to demonstrate further insight into the medical profession by discussing the importance of revalidation and audit in the modern NHS, or talking about how important it is for doctors to be able to work on their areas of weakness. 

Better aspects of this example:

  • The applicant doesn’t simply list the activities they have been a part of, but also explains what they learned from these and the skills and attributes they developed as a result. This reflective ability is exactly what assessors will be looking for.
  • The tone of the section is appropriate. The applicant doesn’t appear arrogant or over-confident, but at the same time, they manage to paint themselves in a good light, highlighting their range of skills relevant to medicine.
  • This example uses the character count effectively. Unlike the earlier examples, almost all of the sentences serve a purpose and are succinct.
  • They demonstrate a wide range of skills, most of which are very relevant to medicine.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement main body example 2

' I am a resilient and empathetic individual and I think that I have the qualities to thrive despite the social and academic challenges of university. Through my work experience I’ve gained an insight into the difficulties doctors face but this has not dampened my enthusiasm. My placements and voluntary work have only strengthened my commitment and dedication to studying medicine.'

The effectiveness of a conclusion depends on the rest of the statement before it, so it is hard to judge how good a conclusion is without seeing what the candidate has mentioned in the rest of their statement. Assuming this follows on logically from the statement, however, we can say that this conclusion is generally good for the following reasons:

  • It is brief, to the point, and highlights that the student holds some of the skills doctors need (this would of course need to be backed up with examples in the rest of the statement). 
  • The author doesn’t introduce any new ideas here, as that would be inappropriate, but rather reiterates their determination, which is exactly what admissions tutors want to see. 
  • The author demonstrates a balanced understanding of the demands of a medical career, illustrating this is a decision they have made rationally while considering the implications of their choice. 

As is always the case, this conclusion could still be improved:

  • The mention of the social challenges of university is a bit too honest, even though these exist for everyone. Mentioning them could give the impression that the student struggles socially (which is not something they would want to highlight), or that they intend to dive into the social side of university at the expense of their studies. 
  • If the candidate really insists on mentioning the social side, they should at least do this after discussing academics, and they should do it in the body of the statement, where they have space to explain what exactly they mean.
  • The student describes themselves as empathetic. This should be avoided, as it should be evident from the statement itself.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement conclusion example 1

'Over the years I have built up a large and extensive set of medical work experiences and volunteering opportunities. These have allowed me to demonstrate my ability to communicate effectively and work in a team, and they will allow me to become a more diligent student and effective doctor. I think that this, alongside my ability and strength of character mean that I should be considered for this course. I am excited to get started and begin to put my skills to good use.'

This is a reasonably strong conclusion. It provides a to-the-point summary of why the author believes they should be selected to study medicine and shows their excitement for starting this journey. However, there are some parts of this example that could be improved: 

  • The author mentions 'ability' and 'strength of character.' These are nebulous terms and not specific to medicine or a medical degree in any way.
  • The mention of a 'large and extensive range of medical work experiences' indicates overconfidence. Medical applicants are not expected to have any medical ability or any 'large and extensive range' of medical experience, nor is it probable that this candidate actually does (otherwise they wouldn’t need to go to medical school in the first place). Rather, medical students need a suitable set of skills and attributes in order to make the most of their medical education and become an effective doctor.
  • On a similar note, the applicant says that their range of medical work experience will make them a better student and doctor, but this is only true if they can reflect on their experience and learn from it. Impassively watching an operation or clinic without properly engaging with it won’t make you a better doctor in the future.

Key takeaways from Medicine personal statement conclusion example

We’ll now go on to look at an example of a strong personal statement. No personal statement is perfect, but this example demonstrates a good level of reflection, engagement and suitability to study medicine (we know this because the writer of this statement went on to receive four offers). 

It goes without saying that plagiarism of any of these examples is a bad idea. They are known to medical schools and will be flagged up when run through plagiarism detection software. 

Use these as examples of ways you could structure your own statement, how to reflect on experiences, and how to link them back to medicine and demonstrate suitable insight and motivation. 

'It is the coupling of patient-centred care with evidence-based science that draws me to medicine. The depth of medical science enthrals me, but seeing complex pathology affecting a real person is what drives home my captivation. As a doctor, you are not only there for people during their most vulnerable moments but are empowered by science to offer them help, and this capacity for doing good alongside the prospect of lifelong learning intrigues me. In recent years I have stayed busy academically - despite my medical focus I have kept a range of interests, studying Spanish and German to grow my social and cultural awareness and playing the violin and drums in groups to improve my confidence when working in teams and performing. This is similar to the team-working environment that dominates in medical settings, and I have found that my awareness of other cultures is a great help when interacting with the hugely diverse range of patients I meet during my volunteering work. The independent projects I am undertaking for my A-levels teach me how to rigorously construct and perform experiments, process data and present findings, developing my written communication. My work experience showed me the importance of these skills when making patients’ notes, and of course, medical academia must be concisely written and well constructed and communicated. Maths teaches me to problem-solve and recognise patterns, vital skills in diagnosis. Over the past two years, I have actively sought out and planned work experience and volunteering opportunities. My time last year in Critical Care showed me the importance of communication in healthcare to ensure patients understand their diagnosis and feel comfortable making decisions. I saw the value of empathy and patience when a doctor talked to a patient refusing to take her insulin and suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis. They tried to understand her position and remain compassionate despite her refusal. My experience deepened my insight into the realities of a medical career, as we were at the hospital for more than ten hours a day with breaks and lunches cut short by bleeps or calls from the ward. This helped me understand the physical resilience required by staff as I also came to appreciate the immense emotional burden they often had to bear. Despite this, the brilliant staff remained motivated and compassionate which I found inspirational. The Brighton and Sussex Medical School work experience and Observe GP courses I completed put emphasis on the value of holistic, patient-centred care, introducing me to specialities I had not previously considered such as geriatrics and oncology. Inspired by my experience I explored a variety of specialisms, reading memoirs (Do no harm) and textbooks (Oxford handbook of clinical medicine) alike. I investigated medical politics with my English persuasive piece, discussing the ethics behind the junior doctor strikes of 2016. I have been volunteering in a hospital ward since January, which helps improve my confidence and communication skills when talking to patients and relatives. I showed my ability to deal with unexpected situations when I found a patient smoking whilst on oxygen, and acted quickly to tell nurses. Over lockdown I felt privileged offering lonely patients some tea and a chat and seeing their mood change - it taught me that medicine is about treating patients as individuals, not a diagnosis. My work on the hospital door taught me to stay calm and interact assuredly with visitors, vital skills in public-service jobs like medicine. I coach tennis at a local club, planning and running sessions for younger children. I am responsible for players' safety and must manage risk while showing leadership qualities by making the sessions fun and inclusive. As a player, I am part of the self-run performance team, which forces me to better my ability without coaching. This means developing self-reflection and insight into my weaknesses, which I know to be integral skills for medics. One of the doctors I shadowed during my work experience was just starting her revalidation process and I saw the importance of self-awareness and honest reflection in meeting her targets and becoming a better doctor. I achieved my Gold Duke of Edinburgh certificate of achievement (and the Bronze and Silver awards), exhibiting my commitment and ability to self-reflect and improve. On our Silver expedition, we experienced severe rain, showing resilience by continuing when our kit was wet from day one. My diligence and academic ability will allow me to thrive in medical school, and I have the prerequisite qualities to become a compassionate and effective doctor. Despite the obstacles, I am determined to earn the privilege of being able to improve peoples' health. This is something that excites me and a career I would happily dedicate my life to.'

Strong personal statement example analysis

Introduction.

This statement is a good example of how a personal statement should be constructed and presented. The introduction is short and to the point, only dealing with the candidate’s motivations to study medicine while also demonstrating an insight into what the career involves. 

They demonstrate their insight briefly by mentioning that medicine involves lifelong learning. This is often seen as one of the challenges associated with the career but here they present it as an advantage which makes them seem more suited to the career. It also show they're a curious and interested individual who enjoys learning. 

The introduction's final sentence offers an opportunity for interviewers to probe the candidate further, to explore their curiosity, and ask them to explain what exactly attracts them to lifelong learning. An astute candidate would recognise this and try to think of a suitable answer in advance.

Paragraph 2 

The second paragraph opens the body of the statement by exploring the author’s academic interests. As with some of the previous example body paragraphs, the writer shows their reflective ability by explaining what each of their subjects taught them, and the skills they developed and demonstrated as a result. They improve upon this further by linking these skills back to medicine and explaining why they are important for doctors. 

This paragraph demonstrates the author’s work-life balance by showing their varied interests in languages and music, all without wasting characters by saying this directly. They also mention the diverse range of patients they encountered during their volunteering, which again implies an empathetic and conscientious nature while showing an insight into a medical career (particularly regarding the vast diversity of the patient cohort treated by the NHS). 

Their explanation of the relevance of maths could be more detailed, but again this could be something the applicant is hoping to be questioned on at interview. The candidate comes across as thoughtful and multi-talented, with the ability to reflect on their decisions and experiences, and with a suitable insight into how their strengths would play well into a medical career. 

In this particular paragraph, there isn’t much explanation as to how they drew their inferences about what a medical career entails from their volunteering and work experience (and what exactly these entailed), but these are explored in more detail later in the statement.

P aragraphs 3 and 4 

The next two paragraphs discuss the candidate’s work experience, beginning with a single work experience placement in detail. This is a better approach than the large lists of placements seen in the previous example body paragraphs. The author talks about a specific scenario and shows that they paid attention during their shadowing while also illustrating their ability to reflect on these experiences and the precise skills involved. 

The skills they mention here – communication, empathy, resilience – are skills that they specifically talk about developing and demonstrating through their activities in other parts of the statement. This shows that they have taken their learning and used it to inform the focus of their personal development. They also not only state that these skills are important for medics, but also explain why this is. For example, they explain that communication is important in helping patients relax and engage with their healthcare, and that resilience is required to deal with the antisocial hours.

In this section, the applicant briefly mentions a specific medical condition. This shows that they were engaging with the science during their placement and also provides interviewers with an opportunity to test the applicant’s scientific knowledge. Knowing this, the candidate would likely research diabetic ketoacidosis in order to be able to impress the panel. 

The author mentions some other virtual work experience opportunities they’ve been involved with and sets themselves up to discuss what these placements taught them. They then go on to explain the actions they took as a result of this, showing that they really engaged with the virtual placements and could identify what they learned and their areas of weakness. This is linked well to further reading and research they carried out, which illustrates their curiosity and engagement with medical science and literature. 

The reference to the junior doctor strikes at the end shows that they have engaged with medical news as well as the ethical side of medicine, which is something that many medical schools place a lot of emphasis on at interviews. Ideally, this section would explain how exactly they explored these different specialties and illustrate what they learned and how they developed their learning from the books mentioned.

Paragraphs 5 and 6 

These paragraphs discuss the applicant’s hospital volunteering and other extracurricular activities. The applicant doesn’t just state that they’ve volunteered in a hospital but goes into depth about the precise skills they developed as a result. They include an anecdote to illustrate their ability to react quickly and calmly in emergency situations, which is a great way to show that they’ve been paying attention (though this should really be backed up with an explanation as to why this is important in medicine). 

The candidate also shows their patient-centred approach when discussing how they cared for demoralised patients (again illustrating empathy and compassion). This style of healthcare is something that the modern NHS is really trying to promote, so showing an awareness of this and an aptitude for applying it practically will really impress your assessors. 

The author demonstrates another core attribute for medical students when talking about how their work on the front door of the hospital improved their confidence in communication, and they once more link this back to medicine. This last section could benefit from further explanation regarding the nature of their work on the hospital door and exactly how they developed these skills. 

In the second of these sections, the candidate simultaneously reflects on the skills they learnt from their tennis and explains how these apply to medicine, showing insight into the profession by mentioning and showing awareness of the process of revalidation. This will show assessors that the candidate paid attention during their work experience, reflected on what they learned, and then identified a way they could work on these skills in their own life.

The author name-checks the Duke of Edinburgh Award but then goes on to explain how exactly this helped them grow as a person. They link back to resilience, a skill they mentioned in an earlier section as being important for medics.

The conclusion is succinct and direct. Although clichéd in parts, it does a good job of summarising the points the candidate has made throughout the statement. They demonstrate confidence and dedication, not by introducing any confusing new information, but rather by remaking and reinforcing some of the author’s original claims from the introduction.

The following example illustrates how not to approach your personal statement. Now that you’ve read through the analysis of previous example passages and a complete example statement, try going through this statement yourself to identify the main recurring weaknesses and points for improvement. We’ve pointed out a few of the main ones at the end. You can even redraft it as a practice exercise.

' ‍ The combination of science with empathy and compassion is what attracts me most to a career in medicine. However, I wanted to ensure that the career was right for me so I attended a Medic Insight course in my local hospital. I enjoyed the course and it gave me new insight - the lectures and accounts from medical students and doctors helped me realise that medicine was the career for me. I was also introduced to the concept of the diagnostic puzzle which now particularly interests me. This is the challenge doctors face when trying to make a diagnosis, as they have to avoid differential diagnoses and use their skills and past experiences to come to a decision and produce the right prognosis. In order to gain further insight into both the positives and downsides of being a doctor, I organised some work experience in my local GP’s surgery. I managed to see consultations for chest pain, headaches, contraception and some chronic conditions which was very interesting. I also sat in on and observed the asthma clinic, which proved to be a very educational experience. During my experience, I tried to chat to as many doctors as possible about their jobs and what they enjoyed. I recently took up some work volunteering in a local elderly care home. Many of the residents had quite complex needs making it arduous work, but I learned a lot about caring for different people and some appropriate techniques for making them feel comfortable and at home. I became a better communicator as a result of my experience Nevertheless I really enjoyed my time there and I found it fulfilling when the patients managed to have fun or see their family. I appreciated how doctors often have high job satisfaction, as when I managed to facilitate a resident to do something not otherwise available to them I felt like I was making a real difference. My academic interests have also been very useful in developing skills that will be crucial as a doctor. I chose to study Physics and business at a-level and these have helped me develop more of an interest in scientific research and understanding; I’ve also become a more logical thinker as a result of the challenging questions we receive in physics exams. I know how important communication is as a doctor so I chose to study Mandarin, a language I know to be spoken widely around the globe. I was the lead violin in my school orchestra and also took part in the wind band, showing that I was willing to throw myself into school life. I really enjoyed our school’s concert, in which I had to perform a solo and demonstrate that I could stay calm under pressure and cope with great responsibility and i think that I’m now a better leader. This skill has also been improved in roles within my school on the pupil council and as form captain, which have improved my self-confidence. I needed to work hard in order to achieve my bronze and Silver Duke of Edinburgh awards, and have dedicated much of my time outside school to this endeavour over the past few years. I endured weekly sessions of Taekwondo, worked voluntarily in the charity shop Barnardo’s and took part in violin lessons.  As I’ve demonstrated throughout this statement I have an affinity for music, and so at university I plan to get involved with orchestras and bands. I also want to widen my horizons and discover new interests and hobbies, while trying to make new friends and cultivate a good work-life balance. I’m also keen to hike in the university’s surrounding territories. If I were allowed to study medicine, it would not only allow me to achieve one of my life goals, but to prove to you that I can become an effective, and successful doctor. I am absolutely dedicated to the study of medicine and know that I have the prerequisite skils and qualities to thrive in medical school and become a credit to your institution.”

Weak personal statement example analysis

  • This personal statement does have some promising features, but overall it isn’t well structured and lacks appropriate reflection and insight. You can see this by comparing it to the strong example above. The author in this weak example very rarely describes what exactly they learned or gained from an experience and rarely links this back to medicine. 
  • It reads quite like a list, with the candidate reeling off the experiences they’ve had or activities they’ve taken part in, without going into any real depth. They also use some vocabulary that implies that they really weren’t enjoying these experiences, such as when they speak of ‘enduring’ their time doing taekwondo, or of caring for residents being ‘arduous’ work. You don’t have to enjoy every activity you take part in, but implying that caring for people (a huge part of the job you are applying for and claiming to enjoy) is something you consider a chore isn’t a great start. This statement also has some questionable grammar and punctuation errors, which raises a red flag. Don’t forget to proofread your statement carefully before you submit it.
  • The candidate often starts off their sections in a promising way. For example, by stating that they started volunteering in a local GP practice to gain more insight into the profession, but they rarely actually follow through on this. You never find out what insight the candidate actually gained or how they used this to inform their decision to apply for medicine. 
  • Such lack of explanation and specificity is a theme throughout the statement. In the introduction, they say that personal accounts and lectures confirmed their wish to become a doctor, but they don’t actually explain how or why. They mention that their school subjects have helped them think more logically or improved their communication skills (which is good), but then they never go on to explain why this is relevant to medicine. They talk about leadership and self-confidence but again don’t link this back to the importance of self-confidence and the prominence of leadership in a medical setting.

To create an effective medicine personal statement, you need to provide plenty of detail. This includes concrete experiences demonstrating qualities that make a good doctor. If you can do this authentically, humbly and without selling yourself short, your personal statement will be in very good shape.

‍ ‍ If you're looking for more inspiration to craft a compelling medicine personal statement, check out our Personal Statement Online Course . It has over 100 personal statement examples, in-depth tutorials, and guidance from admissions experts, to help you create a ready-to-submit personal statement in just three days.

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The Best Cambridge Personal Statement Examples

Cambridge Personal Statement Examples

A deep perusal of Cambridge personal statement examples can help you understand how to go about crafting your own finely honed statement. You can also look at college letter of intent samples, diversity essay examples – also called diversity secondary essays – or the Common App essay for inspiration.

Writing college essays is tough. Whether you need help with how to start a college essay or how to structure your college essay, reading essay samples written for Cambridge will help you navigate this intimidating process and submit a personal statement that impresses the admissions committee. Now let’s dive in!

>> Want us to help you get accepted? Schedule a free strategy call here . <<

Article Contents 8 min read

Cambridge personal statement examples, example no.1.

Working as a private tutor has changed my life dramatically. I started out because some of my peers wanted assistance with their studies, but I quickly became frustrated. Tutoring seemed like an easy way to make money. All I had to do was explain some concepts – or so I thought. When I started tutoring, I would read out a lesson or concept, then go over problems with my student until I knew they could handle that particular problem, and I would be back for the next session. However, I couldn’t shake the feeling that there was something deeper to teaching a subject.

I was working with my friend Eli on math every week. What frustrated me with Eli was that, although he could grasp concepts, he was always in need of help. I realised that I wasn’t helping Eli; I was only teaching him one concept at a time. What I needed to do was teach Eli how to learn. It wasn’t enough to show him answers and equations; I had to teach him how to spark his curiosity. I had to teach him how to think, not what to think. This was the missing element in my instruction. It wasn’t enough that I should help a student grasp a difficult concept, but rather to acquire the tools he would need to grow in his curiosity and approach to studying.

Want to learn easy ways to make your college essay standout? Watch this video:

When next I taught Eli, I changed my methods. Instead of just telling Eli when to use a specific calculus formula, I started bringing in oddly shaped containers and showing him how calculus would be useful in determining their volume. Giving him physical mysteries to solve and showing him the applicability of calculus fired Eli’s imagination and engaged him far more. I was on my way to teaching Eli how to think.

Eli needed fewer sessions after that, which became my measurement of success. Strangely enough, doing my work optimally would put myself out of a job. While there will always be new students to help, the goal of a teacher or tutor should not be to keep working with one student, but to help that student move beyond the teacher and then to seek out the next growing mind to aid.

I felt like I was ready to throw my computer monitor out the window or give up entirely on coding. I was trying to learn how to programme a video game, but I was becoming frustrated with my project. Our deadline was looming, and I felt like I had taken on a bigger project than I could handle.

Fortunately, I learnt the most valuable lesson that day. My friend, Kaylee, noticed my frustration and asked, “Can I help?”. I showed her what was wrong, and she helped me move past my hurdles and smooth out my code. I shared some of my ideas, and we both went away with a better understanding of computer coding. Along with improving my own project and getting over my own frustrating hurdle, I was also able to help Kaylee. Our conversations throughout the day had me suggesting several shortcuts to tighten up her coding language, making it more efficient and precise. While I hadn’t intended to help Kaylee, our collaboration benefited her as well.

The lesson was to stay connected. We live increasingly in a virtual world, from social media to online work-from-home jobs, and it is harder than ever to maintain connections with actual human beings. This led Kaylee and me to found the “Human Programming Club,” which emphasised human interaction, along with collaboration and a team effort. The club grew to include several schools in our area, which improved the programming experience of a lot of computer science students in our city.

Your Computer Science programme emphasises these human and collaborative elements. In second year, students work on a group project “…which reflects current industrial practice.” This emphasis on working together attracted me to your programme and is the reason I am applying. The Cambridge Ring, which emphasises social, career and community, is something I would love to be a part of. This is also because I have long-term goals that I believe will be best served with this type of education.

My plan is to bring the liveliness of the Human Programming Club to our current computing technologies, both in programming environments and through the interactions we have with machines and with apps in our day-to-day lives. I want our interactions with computers to serve relationships and human society, not replace them. Most importantly, I want to bring an inclusiveness and sense of belonging to the world of programming. When we emphasised these aspects of our Human Programming Club, we saw an increase in underrepresented persons among the membership. Making marginalised persons feel more accepted in the world of coding and computer science would be amazing. You also offer positive action programmes for women and LGBTQ+ computer science students, and I find this encouraging and something I would like to support.

I believe your programme is optimal for me to work towards those goals, and I hope to hear from you – and connect – soon.

Want to learn strategies to increase your chances of getting into an Ivy League School? Check this out:

Example No.3

The sky seemed smaller when I saw the eagle pass across the sun. I immediately pulled out the nature journal I had with me. These journals have kept track of every scientific discovery I have experienced. I did a quick sketch of the bird – some extras of the wings – and wrote down my observations. I also recorded questions about the bird – mostly diet and habitat – that occurred to me while sketching. My journals, based on Kipling’s “six honest serving men” (What, Why, When, How, Where and Who), guided and augmented my insatiable curiosity. I returned from my US vacation with two full journals of sketches and questions about everything. Fascinated with how a bird’s wing works, it became an obsession at the library for weeks.

These questions gave me purpose in another favourite place of mine: the lab. I couldn’t wait to get home and get into the science labs of my school, which would provide me the opportunity to ask my questions and get answers. My teacher, Mr. Shepherd, books the lab for me after school to allow me to go deeper into research. He has helped me set up experiments in aerodynamics, lift and velocity, which would help me to understand a bird’s wing better.

I also used my shop class time to build different gliders to test. I tried one that really flapped, but it never got off the ground. Still, I learnt why it couldn’t work – the wood was too heavy for the small engines I used. That failure became as informative as a success would have been.

I love all aspects of scientific inquiry, and it is for this reason that I have applied to your Biological Sciences programme, which is both comprehensive and focused. I am particularly interested in your research projects on organisms, evolution and ecology. How do new species arise? How did we get to the species we have now? Birds’ wings didn’t come from nowhere, and I’d love to explore the past, present and future of the evolution of species. I believe your programme will allow me this opportunity.

Cambridge recommends that you follow the UCAS advice on personal statements when writing your own. While acceptance to Cambridge is based solely on academic criteria (ability and potential), your personal statement may be discussed during the interview, so it is an important aspect of your college interview prep .

When writing your personal statement, consider the following 4 points highlighted by Cambridge:

It will also be helpful to keep Cambridge’s core values and mission statement in mind and reflect those ideals in your essay.

Also remember that every essay is, to some extent, a “ why this college” essay . You should always use that as a baseline for how to write a college essay .

Mission Statement

“The mission of the University of Cambridge is to contribute to society through the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."

Core Values

Freedom of thought and expression

Freedom from discrimination

Integrating Values

You don’t need to specifically use the exact wording Cambridge chooses, but your essays should reflect these goals. Here’s what every essay can include:

  • Something to show that you think about your community and the global community, to correspond with the stated goal of contributing to society
  • A focus on education and research – mentioning your curiosity or pursuit of knowledge
  • Expressing yourself and telling your story to fulfil one half of the core values
  • Are there any ways you represent diversity? This could be in your personal profile or experiences, but more important will be ways you might have contributed to assisting diversity, progress, or the advancement of underrepresented persons.

All Cambridge personal statements have a 4,000-character cap, which includes spaces, and must be no longer than 47 lines. Some universities might have college essay topics , but Cambridge’s personal statements are not prompt-based.

These three examples should give you a good sense of the structure, tone and content you can consider in your Cambridge personal statement.

If you still need more examples, you can get good insights from different institutions’ requirements, such as the Oxford personal statement . Columbia Medical School secondary essay examples or Brown Medical School secondary essay examples might not seem germane to your Cambridge essays, but they will still provide you with the structure and focus you need. Looking at other essay systems, such as the one that applies to the AMCAS personal statement , might also give you ideas.

Cambridge University personal statements should be no more than 4,000 characters, and this number includes spaces.

No. If you express yourself well, it doesn’t really matter if you have a shorter personal statement. Brevity is a good thing, provided you have fully communicated why you are the perfect candidate for the programme to which you are applying.

Give examples of your connection to the programme you are interested in, and remember the rule of “Show, don’t tell” when communicating this. Traits you want to show include curiosity, passion, and personal growth. You might choose to highlight some of your extracurriculars for college , too.

Anything irrelevant, which has no bearing on your goals or accomplishments, as well as anything negative. You don’t want to cast yourself in a negative light or just be perceived as a negative person. 

Stay very focused on one or two main points. You must show your greatest strengths and connect yourself to the programme. You don’t need to include everything, so just focus on one, driving point.

Start with a good “hook” sentence and use your opening paragraph to set up the rest of the essay. Keep to one theme per paragraph and link everything together with your conclusion for the perfect essay.

They will want to see creativity, curiosity, persistence, a good work ethic, a connection to the material and some sense of goals and aspirations. College admissions consulting , such as a college essay review service , can give you excellent advice on your personal statement. 

Two or three weeks, working daily on your statement, to give you the chance to not only write, but re-write, refine, edit, proofread and find someone to read and critique your paper.

Brainstorming for a few minutes will help. Take two or three minutes and a blank page and write down everything you love about your chosen subject. Free-associate, and you’ll almost definitely have something when your time is up.

Want more free tips? Subscribe to our channels for more free and useful content!

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  • Concept of ethical preparedness: benefits for clinical laboratory scientists
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  • Marta Szabat
  • Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Philosophy and Bioethics , Jagiellonian University Medical College , Krakow , Poland
  • Correspondence to Dr Marta Szabat, Health Sciences, Philosophy and Bioethics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland; mszab{at}poczta.fm

https://doi.org/10.1136/jme-2024-110017

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The concept of ethical preparedness (EP), defined as a set of practices in genomic medicine aimed not only at efficiently managing sensitive issues in the laboratory but also at ensuring adherence to ethical principles, 1 has potential benefits for clinical laboratory scientists, contingent on three key conditions.

First, fostering cooperation and mutual support between commercial and non-commercial laboratories in cases involving moral dilemmas or the uncertain nature of variants identified in the laboratory is crucial for establishing the best practices in genomic medicine. Medical codes emphasise regulations aimed at maintaining the authority of colleagues and avoiding patient and family misunderstandings, as well as promoting a culture of mutual trust and support within the medical profession. 2 Such practices among laboratories would benefit both patients/clients and scientists. The important thing is to recognise that while laboratory results may possess prospective value for future generations, genomic medicine addresses the clinical needs of present and potentially vulnerable patients. Therefore, when interpreting the clinical relevance of the information provided to patients, the potential risk of harm should be weighed alongside the access to comprehensive explanations, including the possibility that the laboratory may refuse to disclose information to the patient. Patients/clients should be assured that any decision to withhold access to such information is reasonably justified and intended for their well-being. Medical research and clinical practice must prioritise evidence-based data over uncertain outcomes, ensuring any doubts are resolved before communicating with patients/clients. This is the reason why it is important to consider the commercial aspect of genetic laboratories once the patient’s best interests are established, paying attention to ethical attitudes while at the same time recalling the first rule of medicine ‘first, do no harm’. 3

Second, priority should be given to facilitating the translation of test result terminology taken from the lexicon of genetic/genomic specialists into the language of mainstream practitioners while at the same time assessing the additional risks associated with genetic counselling. Of course, the crucial issue is how to ensure this translation is effective in practice. The concept of EP could encourage discussions between genetic/genomic experts and mainstream clinicians on specialised forums, integrating case-based analysis and deliberations into daily work routines. While this approach is voluntary, allowing professionals to engage at their discretion, it also risks limiting the spread of ethical awareness regarding ethical issues in genomic medicine to select expert groups only, which may result in extended waiting times for patients in cases where results are difficult to interpret for one laboratory team and as a consequence there is a need to seek the additional opinion of external experts. In such a case, patients/customers may feel upset or even suffer as a result of the long waiting time. Another example of an ‘unclear’ situation is when a laboratory refuses ‘to release a sample to parents that a commercial laboratory could use in PGT-M on the grounds that VUS testing’ served no useful purpose. In such a case, parents might see the former laboratory’s actions as obstructive, especially as the other laboratory is ready to use this sample in PGT-M. The existence of common national and international standards and guidelines regulating unclear and uncertain ethical issues between laboratories would reduce the number of similar situations arising. Service quality could be enhanced by adhering to the best practices, whereby responsibility for conveying the implications of genetic test findings to patients/clients is shared by different specialists. These examples also show that sensitivity to context is crucial, such as taking into account individual and cultural differences, including religious beliefs and professional competencies. More cooperation and education in this area could help overcome these challenges and improve the quality of interpersonal communication between medical, laboratory staff and patients/clients.

Third, efforts should be made to standardise professional procedures and ethical guidelines in laboratories. Standardisation would encourage practitioners of medical genetics and non-genetic/genomic specialists to educate each other, thereby fostering common understanding and translatability between fields. Regular meetings, workshops and conferences can facilitate translational practices based on clinical scenarios, ultimately improving consistency and coherence in laboratory and clinical practices. Such collaboration mitigates ethical quandaries, particularly when it comes to interpreting variants whose significance is unclear and also limits misinterpretations, which in turn enhances overall efficacy and reliability, and ultimately improves patient safety.

Ethics statements

Patient consent for publication.

Not applicable.

  • Carley H , et al
  • Desmond H ,
  • Svendsen MN

Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

Competing interests None declared.

Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

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  • Feature article Ethical preparedness in genomic medicine: how NHS clinical scientists navigate ethical issues Kate Sahan Kate Lyle Helena Carley Nina Hallowell Michael J Parker Anneke M Lucassen Journal of Medical Ethics 2024; - Published Online First: 06 Feb 2024. doi: 10.1136/jme-2023-109692

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What consumers should know as Philips agrees to $1.1 billion CPAP settlement

Bill Chappell

medical personal statement cambridge

The medical device maker Philips has agreed to a $1.1 billion settlement to address claims brought by thousands of people with sleep apnea who say they were injured by the company's CPAP machines. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

The medical device maker Philips has agreed to a $1.1 billion settlement to address claims brought by thousands of people with sleep apnea who say they were injured by the company's CPAP machines.

Millions of CPAP sleep apnea machines made by the medical device maker Philips and a subsidiary were found to have a dangerous problem, triggering consumer lawsuits and a massive recall in 2021. Now, Philips has reached a $1.1 billion deal to settle claims from people who say they were injured. A portion of the funds will also go toward medical monitoring.

Some 15 million Philips CPAP and ventilator machines worldwide are affected by the Class I recall, a designation reflecting "a reasonable probability that the use of, or exposure to, the products will cause serious adverse health consequences or death," according to the Food and Drug Administration .

The devices were sold between 2008 and 2021 in the U.S. under the Philips Respironics brand, according to Philips' recall notice .

"Since April 2021, the FDA has received more than 116,000 MDRs [Medical Device Reports], including 561 reports of death," that were either reported or suspected to be related to problems with insulating foam in the Philips devices, the FDA said earlier this year.

"Philips and Philips Respironics do not admit any fault or liability, or that any injuries were caused by Respironics' devices," the company said as it announced the new settlement agreement.

Here's an overview of the recall and where consumers stand:

Settlement money will likely flow next year

The $1.1 billion deal — which includes $25 million for medical monitoring — stems from mediation by retired magistrate judge Diane M. Welsh, but it's not yet final, as the agreement must be filed with a federal court in Pennsylvania — a main state where the machines were produced.

Philips announced the new settlement on Monday, along with its first-quarter financial results. The Dutch-based corporation then saw its stock price vault to a likely one-day record gain, as investors welcomed news that the recall issue seems to have been resolved at a lower cost than analysts predicted.

"The remediation of the sleep therapy devices for patients is almost complete," said Roy Jakobs, CEO of parent company Royal Philips, in a statement. He added, "We do regret the concern that patients may have experienced."

"We are pleased to have reached a resolution" of personal injury claims, the plaintiffs' co-lead attorneys, Sandra L. Duggan; Kelly K. Iverson; Christopher A. Seeger; and Steven A. Schwartz, said in a joint statement to NPR.

The money will go to "users of the now-recalled CPAP and other respiratory devices who suffer from significant physical injuries," and to fund research into treating their injuries, the attorneys said. Philips says some 58,000 people have filed claims or registered for the settlement.

As for when consumers could see money from the deal, Philips said it expects to make the payments in 2025.

This isn't the only settlement

News of the personal injury settlement comes a week after Philips settled a class-action lawsuit over economic damages from the recall.

That settlement is worth a minimum of $613.3 million, including $94.4 million in attorneys' fees. It offers reimbursement to users and "payers" — e.g., insurance companies — for recalled machines they had bought or leased.

The deal was approved last Thursday by senior U.S. district judge Joy Flowers Conti in the federal Court in western Philadelphia. The judge had previously appointed Welsh to serve as mediator in the injury-related class-action suit.

Philips says it expects to pay that money out this year.

What can consumers do?

Under the financial-loss settlement, users are entitled to a $100 award if they return their recalled device by Aug. 9, 2024 — the claim deadline.

People who suspect they own or use one of the affected devices should act soon to verify that if they haven't already, the FDA says . The agency notes that Philips' recall page offers ways to check serial numbers and register a product.

A specially dedicated website is accepting claims for the financial-loss settlement , and it notes that taking part in that deal "does not affect or release any claims for personal injuries or medical monitoring relief."

Under the financial-loss settlement, users are also eligible for a payment for each recalled device they purchased, leased, or rented — and if they paid out of their own pocket to replace a recalled machine, they could be entitled to a device replacement award, according to the website.

The arrangement includes a prepaid shipping label, although the administrators also warn users to consult with their doctor before returning a device they're still using.

A similar claims process will likely emerge for the injury-related deal once its terms are finalized.

Defective machines can send particles, VOCs into airways

The recall was triggered by thousands of health complaints from CPAP users. An investigation found that a polyester-based polyurethane foam built into the devices to dampen sound and vibration also had a risk of breaking down — especially when used in warm and humid conditions.

"If the foam breaks down, black pieces of foam, or certain chemicals that are not visible, could be breathed in or swallowed by the person using the device," the FDA said.

The agency said in a letter to Philips in 2022 that the foam also "may degrade and/or emit harmful chemicals, potentially resulting in toxic and carcinogenic effects and other significant harms to device users," listing formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, or VOCs.

"Philips has acknowledged that, in a worst-case scenario, exposure to VOCs as a class may cause possible toxic and carcinogenic effects, as well as irritation of the respiratory tract, eyes, nose, and skin, nausea or vomiting, hypersensitivity reactions, dizziness, and headache," the FDA said.

Resulting problems "could potentially result in serious injury and may require medical intervention to prevent permanent injury," the agency said.

The plan to fix machines with the problem call for replacing the polyester-based foam with one that uses silicone as its base .

What is the current status of Philips CPAP machines?

U.S. sales of Philips' popular DreamStation and other respiratory units are currently on hold; the company says it plans to resume selling the devices once it has satisfied the terms of a consent decree with the U.S. government .

Philips also says it will continue to service units that are still in use, including by providing replacement parts.

You Snooze, You Lose: How Insurers Dodge The Costs Of Popular Sleep Apnea Devices

Shots - Health News

You snooze, you lose: how insurers dodge the costs of popular sleep apnea devices.

Lawsuits against the company contend that Philips designed its CPAP machine poorly and put it on the market without appropriate warnings.

The FDA accuses Philips of not taking appropriate action about the dangers of the degrading foam in its CPAP and ventilator devices despite learning about the risk as early as 2015. That year, the FDA said in a letter to the company, a Philips subsidiary began a preventative procedure because of complaints about the foam breaking down. The agency says it learned about the matter when the FDA inspected a manufacturing plant in Murrysville, Pa., in 2021.

When asked about the 2015 revelation, a company representative said the only documentation of the issue was a single email, with other communications handled over the phone, the FDA said in its letter.

What is sleep apnea, and how much do CPAP machines cost?

Sleep apnea is a disorder that prevents people from getting enough oxygen while they're sleeping — it's often characterized by long pauses in breathing, and loud snoring. People diagnosed with the disorder rely on continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, machines to keep their airways open and help them stay asleep.

Last June, the White House said President Biden was using a CPAP machine to help with sleep apnea.

Prices for many units range from around $500 to more than $1300.

"The average cost of a CPAP machine is about $800 among those we reviewed," the National Council on Aging said last year.

The recall also covers some models of Philips' more complicated BiPAP ventilators, which facilitate both inhalation and exhalation and routinely cost hundreds of dollars more.

Many apnea and ventilator devices' users also face additional costs, from replacements parts and upkeep to buying an additional machine for travel.

Suggestions or feedback?

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Navigating longevity with industry leaders at MIT AgeLab PLAN Forum

Three people sit on a stage, one of them speaking. Red and white panels with the MIT AgeLab logo are behind them.

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How can people better imagine and plan for their future selves? A two-day event hosted at MIT featured two chief executives at the forefront of an emerging industry centered around helping the public prepare for longer lives. Karen Lynch, CEO of CVS, and Penny Pennington, managing partner at Edward Jones, were the opening speakers for an MIT AgeLab symposium highlighting how new technologies, changing consumer preferences, and increasing life expectancy will shift the financial advisory profession into a new industry called longevity planning.

As described by MIT AgeLab Director Joseph Coughlin, longevity planning is the transformation of the financial services and retirement planning industries into a holistic business of advice and services to help people navigate a 100-year lifespan.

The first step toward ensuring quality of life over 100 years is to know how to prepare for it. Is it possible to predict how long each of us can expect to live? Are there tools available that can help people better imagine and empathize with their future selves? Can we imagine advice and planning that is better tailored toward realizing our goals for later life?

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The fireside chat between Lynch of CVS and Pennington of Edward Jones brought together major leaders in health care and finance, two bookends of longevity. “We can help people on their journey to live better, longer,” Lynch said. “The health care system has many entry points. CVS Health brings them together to deliver better health at lower costs through simpler, more convenient experiences. We engage consumers and connect people to care when, where, and how they want it.”

According to research from Edward Jones, financial advisory clients have four main priorities, in order of importance: their health, their family, their purpose, and finally, their financial plan. "During our conversation, Karen and I agreed that longevity planning for both the health and wealth industries has to be transformational, not transactional,” Pennington said. “Our industries need to be focused on advancing wellness — physical, emotional and financial — for our clients and our communities to help more people thrive in every stage of life.” 

A follow-up panel of experts in real estate and retail highlighted trends in consumer behavior. Brian Beitler, founder of Sune, an online retail company, said that contemporary consumers are defined by three qualities: They are more exploratory (and so less loyal), more discerning (due to being more information-saturated) and more influential (that is, more capable of generating success for their preferred products). Janice Dumont, CEO of Advisors Living, a residential real estate company, talked about the importance of crafting immersive experiences for customers who are considering making a large purchase like buying a home — not just providing information, but engaging people.

Two people wearing lanyards stand on a stage, one of them in a virtual reality headset

The second day of the symposium focused on new technologies that have potential to guide longevity planning. Virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and health prediction technologies, among others, are tools that can help people imagine and predict their futures. Each panel was accompanied by a reflection session of financial advisors, who discussed how these new technologies might impact their industry.

In a panel on cutting-edge health diagnostic testing, Li - Huei Tsai, director of MIT's Aging Brain Initiative, discussed the potential of genetic testing to identify patients’ predispositions toward Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease, which remains without a cure, could be better managed if identified as a risk earlier in life. Rita Shaknovich, vice president of medical affairs at Grail Inc., a health diagnostic company, discussed the development of technologies that can detect cancer at early stages through a blood test, with the aim of rendering the emperor of maladies a manageable chronic condition instead of an often fatal one.

A later panel focused on applications of artificial intelligence in medicine and health care and its implications for other industries, including financial services. Pranav Rajpurkar, assistant professor of biomedical info r matics at Harvard Medical School, discussed recent studies finding that when it came to providing medical advice online, an AI chatbot was viewed as more empathetic than a human doctor. For financial advisors and other professionals, this finding suggests both the promise and portent of AI-driven chatbots in client-facing industries.

Joe Kvedar, professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School, former president of the American Telemedicine Association, and a self-described telemedicine evangelist, highlighted a key limit for new technologies to transform patient care in medicine: reluctance from patients, who may be protective of their privacy and autonomy, to adopt them, even if they are proven effective.

Sheng-Hung Lee stands with Lisa D’Ambrosio with posters behind them and presentation materials and specialized tools in front of them

The last session of the symposium discussed the use of virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) to help people imagine their future selves. Sheng-Hung Lee, a PhD candidate with the MIT AgeLab, outlined his project called Design for Longevity, which uses AR and service design principles to enhance conversations between financial advisors and clients. Sara Wilson, a PhD student with the AgeLab, showcased a VR game that shows people how the future — in this case, the future of the biosphere — might be affected by their choices and behaviors.

The symposium was sponsored and attended by members of the Preparing for Longevity Advisory Network, or PLAN, an MIT AgeLab research consortium that aims to transform the financial services industry to become more engaged in helping people better prepare for and enjoy longer lifespans. PLAN members span advisory firms and financial product manufacturers from around the world. 

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Miss USA's resignation letter accuses the organization of toxic work culture

The Miss USA who gave up her crown and title this week accused the pageant’s CEO of failing to take an incident of sexual harassment seriously and creating a toxic work environment, according to a copy of her resignation letter obtained Thursday by NBC News.

“There is a toxic work environment within the Miss USA organization that, at best, is poor management and, at worst, is bullying and harassment,” Noelia Voigt wrote in the letter. “This started soon after winning the title of Miss USA 2023.”

Voigt announced Monday on Instagram that she was relinquishing her crown, citing her mental health. Two days later, Miss Teen USA UmaSofia Srivastava, 17, announced she was also stepping down in a statement that said her “personal values no longer fully align with the direction of the organization.”

Fans who were shocked by the unprecedented resignations noticed that the first letter in every sentence of Voigt’s online statement spelled out “ I am silenced .”

UmaSofia Srivastava and Noelia Voigt,

In her resignation letter, Voigt said that Miss USA CEO and President Laylah Rose consistently failed to communicate and that when she did, she was “often cold and unnecessarily aggressive.”

“It’s incredibly jarring to be trying to do my job and constantly be threatened with disciplinary action, including taking away my salary, for things that were never discussed with me and, if it related to a public-facing post for example, were causing no issue other than not meeting her personal preference,” Voigt wrote.

Representatives for the Miss USA organization did not immediately respond to request for comment Thursday evening.

Rose said in a statement Wednesday that “the well-being of all individuals associated with Miss USA is my top priority.”

“All along, my personal goal as the head of this organization has been to inspire women to always create new dreams, have the courage to explore it all, and continue to preserve integrity along the way. I hold myself to these same high standards and I take these allegations seriously,” she said.

Voigt included in her letter details about an alleged incident of sexual harassment at a Christmas event in Florida. She wrote that she was left alone in a car with a man who “made several inappropriate statements to me about his desire to enter into a relationship with me.”

Voigt said that when Rose was made aware of the situation, she told Voigt, “We cannot prevent people saying things to you at public appearances, it is, unfortunately, part of the role you’re in as a public figure.” 

Rose is also accused in the letter of badmouthing Voigt to others in the organization and painting her as “uninterested” in her job.

“I have heard that comments have ranged from her describing me as difficult to work with for various untrue reasons, to weaponizing my mental health struggles brought on by my experience as Miss USA 2023, calling me ‘mentally ill’ in a derogatory way, to expressing that she hoped I would get hit in the face by a baseball at an event where I would throw out the first pitch at a baseball game,” Voigt wrote in her letter.

Despite the environment, Voigt said, she was committed to the Miss USA brand, but her mental and physical health continued to erode.

“I am now diagnosed with Anxiety and have to take two medications daily to manage the symptoms due to consistently being on edge, worrying about what Laylah will pop up with and choose to harass me about daily,” the letter said.

She wrote that she had flare-ups of a pre-existing condition that is worsened by stress and that she is experiencing “heart palpitations, full body shakes, loss of appetite, unintentional weight loss, loss of sleep, loss of hair, and more.”

Voigt cited a toxic work environment at Miss USA that she said is unsafe for future Miss Universe Organization title holders.

“Every statement you have ever put out about MUO’s morals and integrity directly contradicts what is happening within the USA organization,” the letter said.

Claudia Michelle, a former social media manager who said she submitted her resignation last week, echoed similar sentiments about Miss USA management in an interview with NBC News on Thursday.

“Leaders in women’s empowerment organizations need to be held accountable,” Michelle said. “How do you not take the mental health of the face of your brand seriously?”

Michelle said she was aware that Voigt had raised concerns over her safety and traveling alone and that she began to travel more with Miss USA in March and April.

Michelle said that Rose was inconsistent with her communication and that the organization’s management was unprofessional.

Brittany Lane is a booker for NBC News.

Doha Madani is a senior breaking news reporter for NBC News. Pronouns: she/her.

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Note for Media: The statement below can be attributed "to an Ascension spokesperson".

May 15 - 4:23pm CT

Ascension continues to make progress towards restoration and recovery following the recent ransomware attack. We continue to work with industry leading forensic experts from Mandiant to conduct our investigation into this attack and understand the root cause and how this incident occurred. In parallel, we have brought in additional cybersecurity experts from Palo Alto Networks Unit 42 and from CYPFER to help supplement our rebuild and restoration efforts. We are focused on getting systems back up and running as safely and as quickly as possible. We are also working on reconnecting with our vendors with the help of our recovery experts. Please be aware that it may still take some time to return to normal operations.

Our priority remains providing quality patient care and relaying up-to-date information when available as we work through this recovery process. Please continue to refer to this website page along with the regional update pages for more information. We encourage anyone seeking information surrounding the incident or with questions about the operational status of Ascension facilities to visit this page for the latest updates.

As we continue to progress in these recovery and restoration efforts, we want to express a sincere thank you to our patients and community for your patience and support through this difficult time.

Regional Updates

District of Columbia

General - Frequently Asked Questions

On May 8, Ascension detected unusual activity in our network systems, which we have determined is due to a ransomware attack. We continue to diligently investigate and address this ransomware attack, working closely with industry-leading cybersecurity experts to assist in our investigation and recovery efforts.

Systems that are currently unavailable include some electronic health records systems, some patient portals (which enables patients to view their medical records and communicate with their providers), some phone systems and various systems utilized to order certain tests, procedures and medications. We have implemented established protocols and procedures to address these particular system disruptions in order to continue to provide care to patients.

Downtime procedures are safe clinical practices born out of necessity. They are predefined steps that all healthcare organizations follow during a system or network failure developed in case of a potential threat. We are taking all necessary precautions at this time and our downtime procedures require our highly qualified, dedicated medical, nursing and clinical teams to utilize manual processes to ensure patients are properly cared for.

Manual processes including moving to paper records and processing everything by hand are being utilized for varying clinical processes including dispensing medication, inputting health medical records, ordering and completion of diagnostic tests and procedures, contacting patients and sharing information securely.

Our restoration work will take time, and we do not have a timeline for completion. We will continue to provide updates as appropriate.

Investigations of this nature take time to complete. While we are not able to provide an exact timetable, we will continue to provide updates as appropriate. These updates can be found on our website at https://about.ascension.org/cybersecurity-event.

If we determine sensitive data was potentially exfiltrated or accessed as part of this incident, we will notify applicable individuals and parties in accordance with our obligations.

Patient - Frequently Asked Questions

Caring for our patients remains our highest priority. We understand there may be concerns, but our workforce is well trained in providing patient care with established downtime procedures.

Our teams are working directly with any patient whose appointment or procedure will need to be rescheduled. Unless instructed otherwise by their care team, patients should continue to attend appointments as scheduled.

Yes. Our hospitals and facilities remain open and are providing care. Caring for our patients remains our highest priority. We understand there may be concerns, but our workforce is well trained in providing patient care with established downtime procedures.

Our hospitals and facilities remain open and are providing care. However, due to downtime procedures, several hospitals are currently on diversion for emergency medical services in order to ensure emergency cases are triaged immediately. Safely caring for our patients remains our highest priority as we navigate this cybersecurity incident.

Our hospitals and facilities, including emergency departments, remain open and are providing care. Caring for our patients remains our highest priority. We understand there may be concerns, but our workforce is well trained in providing patient care with established downtime procedures.

If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please contact 911 and your local emergency services will bring you to the nearest hospital emergency room.

Previous Media Statements

May 13 - 4:30pm CT

Ascension previously reported that it experienced a ransomware attack that has caused disruptions to patient care in its network. Our priority remains on providing safe patient care. Ascension, with the support of leading cybersecurity experts, worked around the clock over the weekend to respond to the ransomware incident affecting our systems. We are focused on restoring systems safely. We are making progress, however, it will take time to return to normal operations. As systems and services come back online, we will share those updates so that our patients and communities can plan accordingly. We have established a dedicated website to share any updates we have across our system. We will be expanding the site this week to provide updates related to healthcare services as they relate to specific regions.

May 11 - 2:00pm CT

We continue to diligently investigate and address the recent ransomware incident, working closely with industry leading cybersecurity experts to assist in our investigation and restoration and recovery efforts. Additionally, we have notified law enforcement, as well as government partners including the FBI, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the American Hospital Association (AHA). We remain in close contact with the FBI and CISA, and we are sharing relevant threat intelligence with the Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center (H-ISAC) so that our industry partners and peers can take steps to protect themselves from similar incidents.

While our restoration work continues in earnest, our focus is on restoring systems as safely as possible. While we expect this process will take time to complete, we are making progress and systems are being restored in a coordinated manner at each of our care sites. We will continue to share updates on our recovery process.

On May 8, Ascension detected unusual activity in our network systems. We have determined this is a cybersecurity incident. We are working around the clock with internal and external advisors to investigate, contain, and restore our systems following a thorough validation and screening process. Our investigation and restoration work will take time to complete, and we do not have a timeline for completion.

Safely caring for patients remains our highest priority as we navigate this cybersecurity incident. We are actively supporting our ministries as they continue to provide safe, patient care with established downtime protocols and procedures, in which our workforce is well trained. It is expected that we will be utilizing downtime procedures for some time. Patients should bring to their appointment notes on their symptoms and a list of current medications and prescription numbers or the prescription bottles so their care team can call in medication needs to pharmacies.

Systems that are currently unavailable include our electronic health records system, MyChart (which enables patients to view their medical records and communicate with their providers), some phone systems, and various systems utilized to order certain tests, procedures and medications. We have implemented established protocols and procedures to address these particular system disruptions in order to continue to provide safe care to patients. Out of an abundance of caution, however, some non-emergent elective procedures, tests and appointments have been temporarily paused while we work to bring systems back online. Our teams are working directly with any patient whose appointment or procedure will need to be rescheduled. We understand the frustration this may cause and sincerely regret any inconvenience to our patients.

Due to downtime procedures, several hospitals are currently on diversion for emergency medical services in order to ensure emergency cases are triaged immediately. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please contact 911 and your local emergency services will bring you to the nearest hospital emergency room.

We are beyond grateful for the hard work and dedication of our care teams across the system, and their continued commitment to our patients. We also thank our patients and our community for their continued support and patience during this time as we work through a diligent, time-intensive process to restore systems as quickly, and as safely, as possible. To ensure all patients, staff, and stakeholders are kept informed during this event, we will continue to post updated information on our website as it becomes available.

Note for Media: The statement below can be attributed "to an Ascension spokesperson". For updates, please visit about.ascension.org/cybersecurity-event

On Wednesday, May 8, we detected unusual activity on select technology network systems, which we now believe is due to a cybersecurity event. At this time we continue to investigate the situation. We responded immediately, initiated our investigation and activated our remediation efforts. Access to some systems have been interrupted as this process continues.

Our care teams are trained for these kinds of disruptions and have initiated procedures to ensure patient care delivery continues to be safe and as minimally impacted as possible. There has been a disruption to clinical operations, and we continue to assess the impact and duration of the disruption.

We have engaged Mandiant, a third party expert, to assist in the investigation and remediation process, and we have notified the appropriate authorities. Together, we are working to fully investigate what information, if any, may have been affected by the situation. Should we determine that any sensitive information was affected, we will notify and support those individuals in accordance with all relevant regulatory and legal guidelines.

We are reaching out to our business partners to ensure they are aware of the situation so they can take appropriate steps to safeguard their systems. We encourage all business partners to coordinate with the Ascension Technology partners to address any specific questions.

This is an ongoing situation and we will provide updates on our website as we learn more.

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Broad Public Support for Legal Abortion Persists 2 Years After Dobbs

By more than 2 to 1, americans say medication abortion should be legal, table of contents.

  • Other abortion attitudes
  • Overall attitudes about abortion
  • Americans’ views on medication abortion in their states
  • How statements about abortion resonate with Americans
  • Acknowledgments
  • The American Trends Panel survey methodology

Pew Research Center conducted this study to understand Americans’ views on the legality of abortion, as well as their perceptions of abortion access. For this analysis, we surveyed 8,709 adults from April 8 to 14, 2024. Everyone who took part in this survey is a member of the Center’s American Trends Panel (ATP), an online survey panel that is recruited through national, random sampling of residential addresses. This way nearly all U.S. adults have a chance of selection. The survey is weighted to be representative of the U.S. adult population by gender, race, ethnicity, partisan affiliation, education and other categories. Read more about the ATP’s methodology .

Here are the questions used for the report and its methodology .

Nearly two years after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision guaranteeing a national right to abortion, a majority of Americans continue to express support for abortion access.

Chart shows Majority of Americans say abortion should be legal in all or most cases

About six-in-ten (63%) say abortion should be legal in all or most cases. This share has grown 4 percentage points since 2021 – the year prior to the 2022 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that overturned Roe.

The new Pew Research Center survey, conducted April 8-14, 2024, among 8,709 adults, surfaces ongoing – and often partisan – divides over abortion attitudes:

  • Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (85%) overwhelmingly say abortion should be legal in all or most cases, with near unanimous support among liberal Democrats.
  • By comparison, Republicans and Republican leaners (41%) are far less likely to say abortion should be legal in all or most cases. However, two-thirds of moderate and liberal Republicans still say it should be.

Chart shows Partisan divide over abortion has widened over the past decade

Since before Roe was overturned, both parties have seen a modest uptick in the share who say abortion should be legal.

As in the past, relatively few Americans (25%) say abortion should be legal in all cases, while even fewer (8%) say it should be illegal in all cases. About two-thirds of Americans do not take an absolutist view: 38% say it should be legal in most cases, and 28% say it should be illegal in most cases.

Related: Americans overwhelmingly say access to IVF is a good thing

Women’s abortion decisions

Chart shows A majority of Americans say the decision to have an abortion should belong solely to the pregnant woman; about a third say embryos are people with rights

A narrow majority of Americans (54%) say the statement “the decision about whether to have an abortion should belong solely to the pregnant woman” describes their views extremely or very well. Another 19% say it describes their views somewhat well, and 26% say it does not describe their views well.

Views on an embryo’s rights

About a third of Americans (35%) say the statement “human life begins at conception, so an embryo is a person with rights” describes their views extremely or very well, while 45% say it does not describe their views well.

But many Americans are cross-pressured in their views: 32% of Americans say both statements about women’s decisions and embryos’ rights describe their views at least somewhat well.

Abortion access

About six-in-ten Americans in both parties say getting an abortion in the area where they live would be at least somewhat easy, compared with four-in-ten or fewer who say it would be difficult.

Chart shows About 6 in 10 Americans say it would be easy to get an abortion in their area

However, U.S. adults are divided over whether getting an abortion should be easier or harder:

  • 31% say it should be easier for someone to get an abortion in their area, while 25% say it should be harder. Four-in-ten say the ease of access should be about what it is now.
  • 48% of Democrats say that obtaining an abortion should be easier than it is now, while just 15% of Republicans say this. Instead, 40% of Republicans say it should be harder (just 11% of Democrats say this).

As was the case last year, views about abortion access vary widely between those who live in states where abortion is legal and those who live in states where it is not allowed.

For instance, 20% of adults in states where abortion is legal say it would be difficult to get an abortion where they live, but this share rises to 71% among adults in states where abortion is prohibited.

Medication abortion

Americans say medication abortion should be legal rather than illegal by a margin of more than two-to-one (54% vs. 20%). A quarter say they are not sure.

Chart shows Most Democrats say medication abortion should be legal; Republicans are divided

Like opinions on the legality of abortion overall, partisans differ greatly in their views of medication abortion:

  • Republicans are closely split but are slightly more likely to say it should be legal (37%) than illegal (32%). Another 30% aren’t sure.
  • Democrats (73%) overwhelmingly say medication abortion should be legal. Just 8% say it should be illegal, while 19% are not sure.

Across most other demographic groups, Americans are generally more supportive than not of medication abortion.

Chart shows Younger Americans are more likely than older adults to say abortion should be legal in all or most cases

Across demographic groups, support for abortion access has changed little since this time last year.

Today, roughly six-in-ten (63%) say abortion should be legal in all (25%) or most (38%) cases. And 36% say it should be illegal in all (8%) or most (28%) cases.

While differences are only modest by gender, other groups vary more widely in their views.

Race and ethnicity

Support for legal abortion is higher among Black (73%) and Asian (76%) adults compared with White (60%) and Hispanic (59%) adults.

Compared with older Americans, adults under 30 are particularly likely to say abortion should be legal: 76% say this, versus about six-in-ten among other age groups.

Those with higher levels of formal education express greater support for legal abortion than those with lower levels of educational attainment.

About two-thirds of Americans with a bachelor’s degree or more education (68%) say abortion should be legal in all or most cases, compared with six-in-ten among those without a degree.

White evangelical Protestants are about three times as likely to say abortion should be illegal (73%) as they are to say it should be legal (25%).

By contrast, majorities of White nonevangelical Protestants (64%), Black Protestants (71%) and Catholics (59%) say abortion should be legal. And religiously unaffiliated Americans are especially likely to say abortion should be legal (86% say this).

Partisanship and ideology

Democrats (85%) are about twice as likely as Republicans (41%) to say abortion should be legal in all or most cases.

But while more conservative Republicans say abortion should be illegal (76%) than legal (27%), the reverse is true for moderate and liberal Republicans (67% say legal, 31% say illegal).

By comparison, a clear majority of conservative and moderate Democrats (76%) say abortion should be legal, with liberal Democrats (96%) overwhelmingly saying this.

Views of abortion access by state

About six-in-ten Americans (58%) say it would be easy for someone to get an abortion in the area where they live, while 39% say it would be difficult.

Chart shows Americans vary widely in their views over how easy it would be to get an abortion based on where they live

This marks a slight shift since last year, when 54% said obtaining an abortion would be easy. But Americans are still less likely than before the Dobbs decision to say obtaining an abortion would be easy.

Still, Americans’ views vary widely depending on whether they live in a state that has banned or restricted abortion.

In states that prohibit abortion, Americans are about three times as likely to say it would be difficult to obtain an abortion where they live as they are to say it would be easy (71% vs. 25%). The share saying it would be difficult has risen 19 points since 2019.

In states where abortion is restricted or subject to legal challenges, 51% say it would be difficult to get an abortion where they live. This is similar to the share who said so last year (55%), but higher than the share who said this before the Dobbs decision (38%).

By comparison, just 20% of adults in states where abortion is legal say it would be difficult to get one. This is little changed over the past five years.

Americans’ attitudes about whether it should be easier or harder to get an abortion in the area where they live also varies by geography.

Chart shows Americans living in states with abortion bans or restrictions are more likely to say it should be easier than it currently is to obtain an abortion

Overall, a decreasing share of Americans say it should be harder to obtain an abortion: 33% said this in 2019, compared with 25% today.

This is particularly true of those in states where abortion is now prohibited or restricted.

In both types of states, the shares of Americans saying it should be easier to obtain an abortion have risen 12 points since before Roe was overturned, as the shares saying it should be harder have gradually declined.

By comparison, changes in views among those living in states where abortion is legal have been more modest.

While Americans overall are more supportive than not of medication abortion (54% say it should be legal, 20% say illegal), there are modest differences in support across groups:

Chart shows Across most groups, more say medication abortion should be legal than illegal in their states

  • Younger Americans are somewhat more likely to say medication abortion should be legal than older Americans. While 59% of adults ages 18 to 49 say it should be legal, 48% of those 50 and older say the same.
  • Asian adults (66%) are particularly likely to say medication abortion should be legal compared with White (55%), Black (51%) and Hispanic (47%) adults.
  • White evangelical Protestants oppose medication abortion by about two-to-one (45% vs. 23%), with White nonevangelicals, Black Protestants, Catholics and religiously unaffiliated adults all being more likely than not to say medication abortion should be legal.
  • Republicans are closely divided over medication abortion: 37% say it should be legal while 32% say it should be illegal. But similar to views on abortion access overall, conservative Republicans are more opposed (43% illegal, 27% legal), while moderate and liberals are more supportive (55% legal, 14% illegal).

Just over half of Americans (54%) say “the decision about whether to have an abortion should belong solely to the pregnant woman” describes their views extremely or very well, compared with 19% who say somewhat well and 26% who say not too or not at all well.

Chart shows Wide partisan divides over whether pregnant women should be the sole deciders of abortion decisions and whether an embryo is a person with rights

Democrats (76%) overwhelmingly say this statement describes their views extremely or very well, with just 8% saying it does not describe their views well.

Republicans are more divided: 44% say it does not describe their views well while 33% say it describes them extremely or very well. Another 22% say it describes them somewhat well.

Fewer Americans (35%) say the statement “human life begins at conception, so an embryo is a person with rights” describes their views extremely or very well. Another 19% say it describes their views somewhat well while 45% say it describes them not too or not at all well.

(The survey asks separately whether “a fetus is a person with rights.” The results are roughly similar: 37% say that statement describes their views extremely or very well.)

Republicans are about three times as likely as Democrats to say “an embryo is a person with rights” describes their views extremely or very well (53% vs. 18%). In turn, Democrats (66%) are far more likely than Republicans (25%) to say it describes their views not too or not at all well.

Some Americans are cross-pressured about abortion

Chart shows Nearly a third of U.S. adults say embryos are people with rights and pregnant women should be the ones to make abortion decisions

When results on the two statements are combined, 41% of Americans say the statement about a pregnant woman’s right to choose describes their views at least somewhat well , but not the statement about an embryo being a person with rights. About two-in-ten (21%) say the reverse.

But for nearly a third of U.S. adults (32%), both statements describe their views at least somewhat well.

Just 4% of Americans say neither statement describes their views well.

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medRxiv

TILTomorrow today: dynamic factors predicting changes in intracranial pressure treatment intensity after traumatic brain injury

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Practices for controlling intracranial pressure (ICP) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) vary considerably between centres. To help understand the rational basis for such variance in care, this study aims to identify the patient-level predictors of changes in ICP management. We extracted all heterogeneous data (2,008 pre-ICU and ICU variables) collected from a prospective cohort (<em>n</em>=844, 51 ICUs) of ICP-monitored TBI patients in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in TBI (CENTER-TBI) study. We developed the TILTomorrow modelling strategy, which leverages recurrent neural networks to map a token-embedded time series representation of all variables (including missing values) to an ordinal, dynamic prediction of the following day's five-category therapy intensity level (TIL (Basic) ) score. With 20 repeats of 5-fold cross-validation, we trained TILTomorrow on different variable sets and applied the TimeSHAP (temporal extension of SHapley Additive exPlanations) algorithm to estimate variable contributions towards predictions of next-day changes in TIL (Basic) . Based on Somers' Dxy, the full range of variables explained 68% (95% CI: 65–72%) of the ordinal variation in next-day changes in TIL (Basic) on day one and up to 51% (95% CI: 45–56%) thereafter, when changes in TIL (Basic) became less frequent. Up to 81% (95% CI: 78–85%) of this explanation could be derived from non-treatment variables (i.e., markers of pathophysiology and injury severity), but the prior trajectory of ICU management significantly improved prediction of future de-escalations in ICP-targeted treatment. Whilst there was no significant difference in the predictive discriminability (i.e., area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]) between next-day escalations (0.80 [95% CI: 0.77–0.84]) and de-escalations (0.79 [95% CI: 0.76–0.82]) in TIL (Basic) after day two, we found specific predictor effects to be more robust with de-escalations. The most important predictors of day-to-day changes in ICP management included preceding treatments, age, space-occupying lesions, ICP, metabolic derangements, and neurological function. Serial protein biomarkers were also important and may serve a useful role in the clinical armamentarium for assessing therapeutic needs. Approximately half of the ordinal variation in day-to-day changes in TIL (Basic) after day two remained unexplained, underscoring the significant contribution of unmeasured factors or clinicians' personal preferences in ICP treatment. At the same time, specific dynamic markers of pathophysiology associated strongly with changes in treatment intensity and, upon mechanistic investigation, may improve the timing and personalised targeting of future care.

Competing Interest Statement

The authors have declared no competing interest.

Clinical Protocols

https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT02210221

Funding Statement

This research was supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Brain Injury MedTech Co-operative. CENTER-TBI was supported by the European Union 7th Framework programme (EC grant 602150). Additional funding was obtained from the Hannelore Kohl Stiftung (Germany), from OneMind (USA), from Integra LifeSciences Corporation (USA), and from NeuroTrauma Sciences (USA). CENTER-TBI also acknowledges interactions and support from the International Initiative for TBI Research (InTBIR) investigators. S.B. is funded by a Gates Cambridge Scholarship. E.B. is funded by the Medical Research Council (MR N013433-1) and by a Gates Cambridge Scholarship. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Author Declarations

I confirm all relevant ethical guidelines have been followed, and any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained.

The details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below:

The details of the IRB/oversight body that provided approval or exemption for the research described are given below: The list of sites, ethical committees, approval numbers, and approval dates can be found online: https://www.center-tbi.eu/project/ethical-approval. Ethikkommission der Medizinischen Universitat Wien of Medizinische Universitat Wien Universitatsklinik fur Unfallchirurgie gave ethical approval for this work; Ethikkommission der Medizinischen Universitat Innsbruck of Medizinische Universitat Innsbruck Universitatsklinik fur Neurologie gave ethical approval for this work; Centraal Ethisch Comite, Ethisch Comite Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen en de Universiteit Antwerpen of Antwerp University Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Centraal Ethisch Comite, Ethisch Comite Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen en de Universiteit Antwerpen Comite d'Ethique 412 of CHR Citadelle gave ethical approval for this work; Centraal Ethisch Comite, Ethisch Comite Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen en de Universiteit Antwerpen Comite d'Ethique hospitalo-facultaire niversitaire de Liege (707) of CHU gave ethical approval for this work; Centraal Ethisch Comite, Ethisch Comite Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen en de Universiteit Antwerpen Comissie Medische Ethiek UZ KU Leuven / Onderzoek of UZ Leuven gave ethical approval for this work; De Videnskabsetiske Komiteer for Region Syddanmark of Odense Universiteitshospital, Neurokirurgisk afdeling gave ethical approval for this work; De Videnskabsetiske Komiteer for Region Syddanmark of Region Hovedstaden Rigshopitalet gave ethical approval for this work; Varsinais suomen sairaanhoitopiirin kuntayhtyma, Eettinen Toimikunta of Turku University Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Varsinais suomen sairaanhoitopiirin kuntayhtyma, Eettinen Toimikunta of Helsinki University Central Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of APHP gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of CHRU de Besancon gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of Lille University Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of University Hospital of Grenoble gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of University Hospital Nancy gave ethical approval for this work; Agence Nationale de Securite du Medicament et des Produits de Sante ANSM of CHU Poitiers gave ethical approval for this work; Ethikkommission Medizinsche Fakultat Heidelberg of Universitatsklinikum Heidelberg Neurochirurgische Kliniki gave ethical approval for this work; Ethikkommission an der Medizinsche Fakultat Der rheinsch-Westfalischen Technischen Hocgschule Aachen of Charite | Campus Virchow Klinikum gave ethical approval for this work; Ethikkommission an der Medizinsche Fakultat Der rheinsch-Westfalischen Technischen Hocgschule Aachen of Uniklinik RWTH Aachen gave ethical approval for this work; Ethikkommission Medizinsche Fakultat Heidelberg of Klinikum Ludwigsburg gave ethical approval for this work; ETT TUKEB Egeszsegugyi Tudomanyos Tanacs Pecsi Tudomanyegyetem of Pecsi Tudomanyegyetem Klinikai Kozpont gave ethical approval for this work; ETT TUKEB Egeszsegugyi Tudomanyos Tanacs Szegedi Tudomanyegyetem of zegedi tudomanyegyetem orvostudomanyi kar Szent Gyorgyi Albert Klinikai Kozpont gave ethical approval for this work; Helsinki Committee, Rambam Health Care Campus of Rambam Medical Center gave ethical approval for this work; Hadassah Medical Organization IRB of Hadassah-hebrew University Medical Center gave ethical approval for this work; Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Direzione Scientifica Comitato Etico of Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico, Ospedale San Raffaele of Ospedale San Raffaele gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico Interaziendale A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, A.O. Ordine Mauriziano, A.S.L. of AOU Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico IRST IRCCS AVR of Bufalini Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico, Ospedale San Raffaele of Azienda Ospedaliera Universita di Padova gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico Della Provincia Monza Brianza of San Gerardo Hospital/ASST gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico Interaziendale A.O.U. 'Maggiore della Carita' of Maggiore Della Carita Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Comitato Etico, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda of Niguarda Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Ethics Commiitee for Clinical Research at Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital Development Society of Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Ethics Commiitee for Clinical Research at Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital Development Society of Riga Eastern Clinical University Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; Ethics Commiitee for Clinical Research at Pauls Stradins Clinical University Hospital Development Society of Rezekne Hospital gave ethical approval for this work; VILNIAUS REGIONINIS BIOMEDICININIU TYRIMU ETIKOS KOMITETAS of Vilniaus Universiteto Ligonine gave ethical approval for this work; KAUNO REGIONINIS BIOMEDICININIU TYRIMU ETIKOS KOMITETAS of LSMUL Kauno klinikos Skubio pagalbos skyrius gave ethical approval for this work; 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I confirm that all necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived, and that any patient/participant/sample identifiers included were not known to anyone (e.g., hospital staff, patients or participants themselves) outside the research group so cannot be used to identify individuals.

I understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).

I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines, such as any relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material, if applicable.

Data Availability

Individual participant data, including data dictionary, the study protocol, and analysis scripts are available online, conditional to approved study proposal, with no end date. Interested investigators must submit a study proposal to the management committee at https://www.center-tbi.eu/data. Signed confirmation of a data access agreement is required, and all access must comply with regulatory restrictions imposed on the original study. All code used in this project can be found at the following online repository: https://github.com/sbhattacharyay/TILTomorrow (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.11060742).

https://www.center-tbi.eu/data

https://github.com/sbhattacharyay/TILTomorrow

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  1. Medical Personal Statement

    medical personal statement cambridge

  2. Medical school personal statement tips. How To Write Medical School

    medical personal statement cambridge

  3. Personal Statement Examples for Medical Residency in 2022

    medical personal statement cambridge

  4. Personal Statement for Medicine at Cambridge Guide

    medical personal statement cambridge

  5. Medical school personal statement sample that will show you how it is

    medical personal statement cambridge

  6. Free example of a personal statement for medical school (medicine)

    medical personal statement cambridge

VIDEO

  1. Reading My Personal Statement

  2. How to write a medical personal statement

  3. Write an Incredible Personal Statement: 3 Steps with Examples

  4. Oxford personal statement (for Medicine)

  5. What personal statement will get you an interview? (Cambridge admissions officer explains)

  6. Example Cambridge SAQ || How to Write an SAQ personal statement

COMMENTS

  1. Medicine Personal Statement Examples

    Welcome to 6med's collection of Medicine Personal Statement Examples. Read through Lucy's successful medicine Personal Statement for the University of Cambridge, which earned 3/4 offers including Cardiff and Birmingham. She will analyse the strengths, weaknesses and overall quality of her statement to inspire your own writing.

  2. Successful Personal Statement For Medicine At Cambridge

    FIND YOUR OXBRIDGE MEDICINE PROGRAMME. Medicine Personal Statement. I realise that medicine may not always have positive outcomes, having witnessed two deaths at a young age. However, the inevitable fallibility of the human body has driven my desire to acquire a better understanding of the complicated processes and mechanisms of our body.

  3. Cambridge medicine personal statement

    UCAS - University and College Admissions Service - is the system used by Cambridge University to apply to their institution, and the personal statement section in UCAS is capped at 4,000 characters and/or 47 lines. That's roughly 850 words, but very roughly, and of course lines matter.

  4. Personal Statement for Medicine at Cambridge Guide

    Step 4: Draft and Revise. Start drafting your personal statement, keeping it concise and focused. Aim for a compelling introduction, a clear body that addresses the key points, and a strong conclusion. Review and revise your draft multiple times to ensure clarity and coherence.

  5. CAMBRIDGE MEDICINE PERSONAL STATEMENT EXAMPLE

    Join me as I go through my successful personal statement that got me an offer from EVERY medical school I applied to (Cambridge, Imperial, Birmingham and Gla...

  6. Top 10 Personal Statement Tips for Cambridge Medicine

    Try and follow a fixed overall structure for your Medicine personal statement Cambridge. Also include paragraphs to enhance readability. For example, your introduction could be a short 2-3 lines outlining your interest in Medicine. Or your starting point could show how you first started considering it as a potential career.

  7. Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement (Ayanfe)

    Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement (Ayanfe) In this series of blogs, medical students and medicine offer holders share and explain their personal statement so that you can learn from our experiences and reflections. Ayanfe is an undergraduate medical student at the University of Cambridge. Disclaimer: Please do NOT be tempted to use our ...

  8. Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement (Zute)

    Cambridge Medicine Personal Statement (Zute) In this series of blogs, medical students and medicine offer holders share and explain their personal statements so that you can learn from our experiences and reflections. Zute is an undergraduate medical student at the University of Cambridge. Disclaimer: Please do NOT be tempted to use our ...

  9. 6 Real Examples Of Successful Medicine Personal Statements

    Personal Statement Example 6. This Personal Statement comes from a student who got into Graduate Entry Medicine at King's - and also had interviews for Undergraduate Medicine at King's, QMUL and Exeter. Get some inspiration for your Medicine Personal Statement with these successful examples from current Medical School students.

  10. Medicine Personal Statement Example 2

    Check out this successful Medicine Personal Statement example for inspiration to help you plan and structure your Personal Statement. Shadowing surgeons racing against the clock to save a kidney was one of the most exciting experiences of my life. With only twenty-five minutes to resect an extensive tumour before the entire kidney was lost, I ...

  11. THE BEST PERSONAL STATEMENT I'VE EVER READ (Cambridge ...

    📌Watch for FREE my 2.5 Hour Personal Statement Masterclass: https://www.doctorshaene.com/personal-statement-masterclass📄FREE Personal Statement Guide: http...

  12. Medicine Personal Statement Example (Cambridge University)

    Medicine Personal Statement Example (Cambridge University) I want to be able to understand the human body and repair it when it malfunctions. During my work experience at King's College Hospital in the liver transplant unit, I saw much open surgery carried out on the abdomen. One of the most amazing moments was when I saw the small intestine ...

  13. How Universities Use Your Medicine Personal Statement

    In general, there are five main ways that your Personal Statement could be used by Medical Schools: For example, Brighton and Sussex say they will not use your Personal Statement in the selection process - whereas others, like King's College London, will look at it when considering applicants to shortlist for interview.

  14. Medicine Personal Statement Examples 2024

    The personal statement is changing to a series of free text questions for 2026 entry onwards, however it remains unchanged for 2025 entry. Keep an eye on our live updates page for guidance on these changes.. Your UCAS personal statement is a chance to showcase the skills, attributes, and experiences which make you suited to studying medicine. This can be quite a daunting prospect, especially ...

  15. The Best Cambridge Personal Statement Examples

    All Cambridge personal statements have a 4,000-character cap, which includes spaces, and must be no longer than 47 lines. ... such as the Oxford personal statement. Columbia Medical School secondary essay examples or Brown Medical School secondary essay examples might not seem germane to your Cambridge essays, ...

  16. Elektrostal

    In 1938, it was granted town status. [citation needed]Administrative and municipal status. Within the framework of administrative divisions, it is incorporated as Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction—an administrative unit with the status equal to that of the districts. As a municipal division, Elektrostal City Under Oblast Jurisdiction is incorporated as Elektrostal Urban Okrug.

  17. Concept of ethical preparedness: benefits for clinical laboratory

    The concept of ethical preparedness (EP), defined as a set of practices in genomic medicine aimed not only at efficiently managing sensitive issues in the laboratory but also at ensuring adherence to ethical principles,1 has potential benefits for clinical laboratory scientists, contingent on three key conditions. First, fostering cooperation and mutual support between commercial and non ...

  18. What consumers should know as Philips agrees to $1.1 billion CPAP ...

    The medical device maker Philips has agreed to a $1.1 billion settlement to address claims brought by thousands of people with sleep apnea who say they were injured by the company's CPAP machines.

  19. Navigating longevity with industry leaders at MIT AgeLab PLAN Forum

    The last session of the symposium discussed the use of virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) to help people imagine their future selves. Sheng-Hung Lee, a PhD candidate with the MIT AgeLab, outlined his project called Design for Longevity, which uses AR and service design principles to enhance conversations between financial advisors and clients.

  20. Elektrostal

    Elektrostal , lit: Electric and Сталь , lit: Steel) is a city in Moscow Oblast, Russia, located 58 kilometers east of Moscow. Population: 155,196 ; 146,294 ...

  21. Miss USA's resignation letter accuses the organization of toxic work

    The Miss USA who gave up her crown and title this week accused the pageant's CEO of failing to take an incident of sexual harassment seriously and creating a toxic work environment, according to ...

  22. Cybersecurity Event Update

    Due to downtime procedures, several hospitals are currently on diversion for emergency medical services in order to ensure emergency cases are triaged immediately. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please contact 911 and your local emergency services will bring you to the nearest hospital emergency room.

  23. Broad Public Support for Legal Abortion Persists 2 Years After Dobbs

    Jackson Women's Health Organization that overturned Roe. The new Pew Research Center survey, conducted April 8-14, 2024, among 8,709 adults, surfaces ongoing - and often partisan - divides over abortion attitudes: ... About a third of Americans (35%) say the statement "human life begins at conception, so an embryo is a person with ...

  24. Elektrostal

    Elektrostal. Elektrostal ( Russian: Электроста́ль) is a city in Moscow Oblast, Russia. It is 58 kilometers (36 mi) east of Moscow. As of 2010, 155,196 people lived there.

  25. TILTomorrow today: dynamic factors predicting changes in intracranial

    Practices for controlling intracranial pressure (ICP) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) vary considerably between centres. To help understand the rational basis for such variance in care, this study aims to identify the patient-level predictors of changes in ICP management. We extracted all heterogeneous data (2,008 pre-ICU and ICU variables ...

  26. File:Elektrostal, Moscow Oblast, Russia

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