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Each year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology receives nearly 20,000 applications from high school hopefuls. Only 8% of them get a MIT acceptance letter. For example, in 2014, MIT accepted 1,447 applicants from 18,356 candidates . That’s a small 7.9% admission rate. Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of applicants get a rejection letter. “I'm very sorry to inform you…” When I was in high school, I was one of the lucky few to apply to MIT and receive an acceptance letter in the mail. This validated years of hard work, especially in the sciences and research. It was inspiring to know that they wanted me to be a part of their amazing community. Here’s my complete, official MIT acceptance letter.

Want to learn what it takes to get a MIT admit letter yourself?

Read my How to Get Into Harvard, MIT and the Ivy League guide . I'll take you through the philosophy behind how to become the world-class student that schools like MIT, Harvard, and Princeton are looking for. You'll learn what it means to develop an application Spike, why being well-rounded is the path to rejection, and how to craft a compelling application yourself. Read this guide now before it's too late .

Here's a scan of the original admissions letter sent to me by the Office of Admissions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Even though I attended Harvard as an undergrad, MIT holds a special place in my heart because I attended Research Science Institute as a high school student at MIT. I also later joined the MD-PhD program at the Health Sciences and Technology program run between Harvard and MIT. You can learn more about RSI in my complete college application .

Afterward, I'll give you tips on what it takes for you to get an acceptance letter like this for yourself.

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Even though MIT uses its own application form, the elements of the application are pretty much the same.

Even more importantly, my Spike was deep achievement in the sciences. I ranked #6 in the US National Chemistry Olympiad as a junior, and I participated in Research Science Institute at MIT. Both those things made me a very attractive candidate to MIT admissions. I discuss all these details and how I achieved them here .

I've never seen anyone else provide this level of analysis and detail , so I believe you'll get something out of it.

3) How to Get a 4.0 GPA and Better Grades

Your coursework is a critical component of your college application. Not only do you need great grades, you need great grades in what MIT says is " the most stimulating courses available to you ." For MIT, you especially need strong grades in the toughest AP science and math courses.

Thus it's no surprise that a lot of high school students are stressed out and anxious.

The biggest problems I see in the students I work with are in mindset, habits, and strategy . Thus I've written a complete guide on how to excel in high school coursework.

I take you through three levels of detail , from high to low:

  • Mindset and Psychology : Do you have the confidence to know you can even improve? Are you prepared to work hard?
  • Overall Planning and Habits : Do you make the most out of every hour? Do you understand what teachers care about, and how to give them what they want? Do you know how to avoid procrastination?
  • Individual Class Strategies : How do you excel in English classes? How is this different from math and science classes?

I learned a lot of these lessons the hard way, throughout high school and college. This is the guide I wish I had before starting high school .

Take the time to read it and you might get better grades while saving hundreds of hours of study time.

4) How to Get a Perfect SAT Score  / How to Get a Perfect ACT Score

Besides GPA, the other critical number on your application is your SAT/ACT score. This score is so important because it compares you to high school students across the country on a level playing field.

Top schools like MIT expect you to be in the top 1 percentile of the country. You especially need near-perfect scores in math and science (for the ACT). If you don't show this, MIT will doubt whether you can really thrive in their super tough academic environment.

In my perfect SAT score  and perfect ACT score  guides, I share the major strategies to boost your score above a 2100 on the SAT and 32 on the ACT - and edge closer to a perfect score.

Also, check out my series on getting perfect scores in each of the sections on the SAT/ACT:

SAT 800 Series: Reading | Math | Writing  - Learn important strategies to excel in each section of the SAT.

ACT 36 Series: English | Math | Reading | Science - Learn how to get a perfect 36 on each section of the ACT.

Want to improve your SAT score by 160 points or your ACT score by 4 points?  We've written a guide for each test about the top 5 strategies you must be using to have a shot at improving your score. Download it for free now:

Get eBook: 5 Tips for 160+ Points

As co-founder and head of product design at PrepScholar, Allen has guided thousands of students to success in SAT/ACT prep and college admissions. He's committed to providing the highest quality resources to help you succeed. Allen graduated from Harvard University summa cum laude and earned two perfect scores on the SAT (1600 in 2004, and 2400 in 2014) and a perfect score on the ACT. You can also find Allen on his personal website, Shortform , or the Shortform blog .

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Academic Transcript

Current students and alumni can request electronic or paper copies of transcripts through the  MIT Registrar’s Office . The Registrar’s Office has  detailed instructions  on requesting transcripts for current students and alumni.

Letters of Recommendation

If you are applying while in an undergraduate program or if you are a recent graduate, recommendations from professors and tenured faculty who are familiar with your academic work have the most impact compared to letters from TAs or employers. Three recommendations are commonly requested, but check with each individual program for details.

How and when do you ask for recommendation letters? You’ll want to prepare in advance for this by building relationships with potential recommenders over the course of your academic career.

To organize your letters, you may want to use a dossier service, such as  Interfolio , or ask the recommender to send them in the manner required by that particular application. Law schools require the use of  Credential Assembly Services  for this purpose. If you are a prehealth student, you can use the MIT  Prehealth Advising Credential Service .

Standardized Admissions Exams

Most graduate programs require completion of a standardized exam such as the  GRE ,  GMAT ,  LSAT , or  MCAT . Search online or ask the programs you are interested in what the typical range of scores is for admitted students.

Be sure to study for these tests, which can involve elements that you may not have learned in your academic career. You can take preparatory courses or study on your own with books or online materials including practice tests. Many test providers and prep companies, such as  Kaplan  and  The Princeton Review , have free practice tests and resources on their websites. Because the scores are valid for a couple of years, you can take these exams when you are feeling most prepared. Many students, even if postponing graduate studies, will elect to take the exams while still undergraduates.

You will be required to submit a  personal statement or essay  when applying to graduate school. Graduate programs want students with clear commitment to the field. Graduate school application essays typically ask applicants to discuss their previous experience, future professional goals, and how the program can help them in achieving those objectives. The personal statement gives the applicant the chance to articulate these goals and display strong writing skills. Remember to tailor your essay to each school and the committee that reviews your application.

Your essay should be thoughtful, concise, compelling, and interesting. Remember, admissions officers read hundreds of essays.

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Admissions Requirements

The following are general requirements you should meet to apply to the MIT Sloan PhD Program. Complete instructions concerning application requirements are available in the online application.

General Requirements

  • Bachelor's degree or equivalent
  • A strong quantitative background (the Accounting group requires calculus)
  • Exposure to microeconomics and macroeconomics (the Accounting group requires microeconomics)

A Guide to Business PhD Applications by Abhishek Nagaraj (PhD 2016) may be of interest.

Application Components

Statement of purpose.

Your written statement is your chance to convince the admissions committee that you will do excellent doctoral work and that you have the promise to have a successful career as an academic researcher. 

GMAT/GRE Scores

We require either a valid GMAT or valid GRE score. At-home testing is allowed. Your unofficial score report from the testing institution is sufficient for application. If you are admitted to the program, you will be required to submit your official test score for verification.    

We do not have a minimum score requirement. We do not offer test waivers. Registration information for the GMAT (code X5X-QS-21) and GRE (code 3510) may be obtained at www.mba.com and www.ets.org respectively.

TOEFL/IELTS Scores

We require either a valid TOEFL (minimum score 577 PBT/90 IBT ) or valid IELTS (minimum score 7) for all non-native English speakers. Your unofficial score report from the testing institution is sufficient for application. If you are admitted to the program, you will be required to submit your official test score for verification.    Registration information for TOEFL (code 3510) and IELTS may be obtained at www.toefl.org and www.ielts.org respectively.

The TOEFL/IELTS test requirement is waived only if you meet one of the following criteria:

  • You are a native English speaker.
  • You attended all years of an undergraduate program conducted solely in English, and are a graduate of that program.

Please do not contact the PhD Program regarding waivers, as none will be discussed. If, upon review, the faculty are interested in your application with a missing required TOEFL or IELTS score, we may contact you at that time to request a score.

Transcripts

We require unofficial copies of transcripts for each college or university you have attended, even if no degree was awarded. If these transcripts are in a language other than English, we also require a copy of a certified translation. In addition, you will be asked to list the five most relevant courses you have taken.

Letters of Recommendation

We require three letters of recommendation. Academic letters are preferred, especially those providing evidence of research potential. We allow for an optional  fourth recommendation, but no more than four recommendations are allowed.

Your resume should be no more than two pages. You may chose to include teaching, professional experience, research experience, publications, and other accomplishments in outside activities.

Writing Sample(s)

Applicants are encouraged to submit a writing sample. For applicants to the Finance group, a writing sample is required. There are no specific guidelines for your writing sample. Possible options include (but are not limited to) essays, masters’ theses, capstone projects, or research papers.

Video Essay

A video essay is required for the Accounting research group and optional for the Marketing and System Dynamics research groups. The essay is a short and informal video answering why you selected this research group and a time where you creatively solved a problem. The video can be recorded with your phone or computer, and should range from 2 to 5 minutes in length. There is no attention — zero emphasis! — on the production value of your video.  

Nondiscrimination Policy: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education and employment. For complete text of MIT’s Nondiscrimination Statement, please click  here .

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Application for PhD studies in BE

Applying to the Biological Engineering PhD program

Thank you for your interest in MIT BE - we want to receive your application! This page explains the application process and provides information specific to our program that you may use to strengthen your application. Our intensive evaluation process begins with your electronic application folder and proceeds through an on-site interview.

We believe that our diverse, welcoming, and collaborative community fosters the most effective environment for PhD students to learn from our faculty how to meet the challenges of conducting path-breaking research in Biological Engineering. To maintain and further strengthen our culture, it is important that we continue to receive applications representing a broad range of academic backgrounds and individual experiences. From 2019-2022, we invited applicants from 64 different undergraduate institutions holding and expecting bachelors degrees in many different disciplines to interview for admission. Of applicants invited to interview from 2019-2022, about 52% self-identified as female, and more than 18% self-identified as underrepresented minorities (as defined by MIT prior to 2023). Many students join the program immediately after completing their undergraduate studies, while others have already received advanced degrees or acquired post-baccalaureate professional experience.

The guidance below is intended to help prospective students understand the aspects of academic preparation and individual experience that poise applicants for success in our program and how to present this information effectively in their application materials. This guidance is not intended to describe any “ideal” application profile or minimum standards for admission (no quantitative standards exist). Every complete application received is reviewed holistically by BE faculty.

Application to MIT BE is very competitive, with approximately 5% of applicants receiving an invitation to interview in recent years (we offer admission to the majority of interviewees). Applicants holding international undergraduate degrees may apply, and such applicants received about 3% of the interview invitations made from 2019-2022. Interview invitations are communicated asynchronously to applicants in January and February each year. Many domestic and international applicants with interests in quantitative and applied biological research at MIT also consider the PhD programs in  Computational and Systems Biology , Chemical Engineering , Biology , Chemistry , and Health Science and Technology . MIT allows applications to more than one program in the same year, and we recommend that applicants indicate all the programs they are applying to on their BE application to maximize their chances for a successful match.

Evaluation of applications for PhD study in BE particularly focuses on:

  • Evidence of strong academic preparation and demonstrated interest in both a quantitative discipline and a biological discipline
  • Evidence of aptitude for and experience/accomplishment in scientific or engineering research
  • Explanation of interest in pursuing a career that leverages PhD-level training in Biological Engineering under the guidance of MIT BE faculty advisors

Academic preparation.  Success in the challenging coursework and research components of the MIT BE PhD program requires a strong academic background in both biology and quantitative engineering or science. While many successful applicants expect undergraduate engineering degrees and have completed substantial coursework in biology, there are many different ways to demonstrate the academic preparation needed. Applicants whose principal degree is quantitative, computational, engineering, or in the physical sciences can bolster their training in biology by taking core biology courses like biochemistry, genetics, and cell biology. Applicants whose principal degree is in a life science field can acquire quantitative training in courses beyond calculus, biostatistics, and programming/informatics such as differential equations, linear algebra, and advanced courses in probability, statistics, analysis, and computer science.

As each applicant’s personal and college experience is unique and grading practices differ, BE has no minimum grade point average (GPA) requirement. We strongly consider the factors other than GPA described here in our admissions process. However, essentially all applicants receiving an interview invitation have a GPA in the A range (>3.6 on an A = 4.0 scale), and from 2019-2022 the median GPA of interviewees was 3.94. Many applicants with GPAs above 3.9 do not receive interview invitations, and applicants with GPAs below the A range may be competitive for admission in our holistic evaluation process given other extraordinary aspects of an individual applicant’s academic record, experiences, and achievements detailed in their application materials.

Research experience . MIT BE PhD students spend most of their time in the program conducting research in partnership with faculty advisors. Conducting impactful research is a challenging endeavor, and most successful applicants describe a strong track record of research experience and accomplishment. At the same time, we recognize that the nature of accessible research projects and opportunities to publish varies widely across the experiences of individual applicants. We value the skills and personal characteristics important for success in research - including initiative, creativity, and determination - evidenced by any type of work or personal experience. As a result, there are no specific requirements for the duration or number of research experiences, publications, or awards resulting from the research. Some applicants invited to interview have not yet completed any research publications. Successful applicants focus on why they selected the projects and mentors they chose to commit time with, what they did in their major project experiences, and the outcomes of the work including results of the projects themselves and how the experiences influenced the applicant’s evolving academic and career interests.

Applicant statement.  Application statements are free-form opportunities to introduce yourself in writing to the admissions committee, explain your interest in Biological Engineering at MIT, and contextualize other application components including your academic record, research experience, personal experience, and letters of recommendation. The admissions committee wants to hear why PhD-level training in Biological Engineering under the mentorship of MIT BE faculty is right for you, which research groups you may be interested in joining, how you have prepared to receive PhD training, and how this training may power your aspirations for the future. The MIT BE Communications Lab CommKit has additional content on writing statements of purpose . While not a particular focus of our evaluation, statements are opportunities to directly demonstrate your writing skills and attention to detail.

Letters of recommendation  provide crucial evidence of research aptitude in successful applications. The most impactful support letters come from your faculty research supervisor(s) who know you well and have substantial experience advising PhD students. Support letters from other research supervisors, academic advisors, or course instructors may also be included. You can find general guidance (not specific to applications to study in the BE PhD program) on requesting letters of recommendation and on support letter content from the Biological Engineering Communication Lab.

To apply , go to the online application and create a user id and password. You do not need to complete the entire application in one sitting. You may begin the application, save it, and return to it at a later time using your user ID and password.

Applicants are encouraged to submit their applications ahead of the deadline and are responsible for ensuring that all admissions credentials are submitted on time. Your application will not be reviewed until all materials have been received. There is no separate application for financial support; all admitted applicants are offered a full support package.

MIT BE does not require standardized Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores as part of our application process, but will consider scores if provided by the applicant.

How is the COVID pandemic impacting admissions?

MIT's admissions committees and offices for graduate and professional schools will take the significant disruptions of COVID-19 into account when reviewing applicants’ transcripts and other admissions materials as part of their regular practice of performing individualized, holistic reviews of each applicant. BE expects to hold interviews on-site in March after a timely review of public health concerns and applicable governmental and institutional policies and requirements for travel and events.

To apply follow these steps.

1. Fill out the online application by 23:59, EST, December 15.

You will be providing the following information:

  • Field(s) of interest
  • Personal information/addresses
  • International student data
  • Three or more names and email addresses of letter writers
  • Scanned copies of your College Transcripts
  • For international students, scanned copies of your IELTS scores
  • Academic preparation and research/work experience
  • Applicant statement
  • Credit card payment of $75 (Information on requesting a fee waiver is here )

2. Arrange for submission of the following (official reports only):

Scanned PDF transcripts and IELTS scores are considered unofficial documents but are sufficient for review purposes. Official documents are required before an admissions decision can be made. Please have any test scores electronically transmitted to MIT Admissions and mail official copies of your transcript(s) to:

77 Massachusetts Avenue, Bldg. 16-267

Cambridge, MA 02139

For international students:

IELTS scores should also be electronically sent directly to MIT.

  • To register for a test, visit http://www.ielts.org
  • IELTS does not require a code. Please write "Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology". No address is required as scores are reported electronically.
  • If you are an international student, you should take the IELTS test by November 15. The Department of Biological Engineering does not waive this requirement.

The IELTS is waived for applicants who are citizens of Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Nigeria, Singapore, or the United Kingdom, or for applicants who have or will earn a BS degree at a US university.

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Make your home at MIT

MIT is made of people. The Class of 2028 will build more than just rockets, or apps, or econometric models; you will build a home, together. And this is what you should look for in a college: a good match, which fits you well, and where you'll feel at home. The official reply form is now available!  Please note:  You still need to submit this form even if you submitted the preliminary reply form way back when. You have until May 1 to officially accept or decline your offer of admission.

How we built the Class of 2028

Ask any admissions officer at MIT, and they will tell you that while grades and scores are important, it’s really the match  between the applicant and the Institute that drives our selection process.

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Application instructions, program specific requirements, graduate admissions.

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Learn more about our programs

View our 2023-2024 MIT Architecture Graduate Student Program guide

Admissions Timeline

September 15: Applications open for all programs November 7 (9 a.m. - 12 p.m. EST): Fall Open House (virtual) January 7 (11:59 p.m. EST): Applications due for all programs  —PhD, SMBT, and SMArchS applicants have until January 12 due to the updated statement of objectives question.— Dec. 23—Jan 3: Staff on break (no email responses during this time) March 15—April 1: Application results released April 2, 2024: Admitted Students Open House April 15 (5 p.m. EST): Decisions due from admitted students There are no rolling admissions. Applications for all degrees are reviewed in January for programs beginning the following September.

Application Links

Applicants to the Department of Architecture can create a user profile with MIT, then create an application in that system for our programs. To create your profile, go to apply.mit.edu/apply .

If you have reviewed the admissions information on this site, and find that you have additional questions, we have developed an interactive form to help you better understand our programs:  Architecture Admissions Information Portal

We have a team of dedicated students who conduct tours of the Department during the academic year, both in-person and virtual. You can request a tour here: Tour Request Form

Admissions Information

Applying to more than one program.

You may apply to two different programs within the Department of Architecture. If you are considering two programs, it may be useful for you to discuss your plans with our admissions staff.

Before applying to two programs, here are some guidelines for you to consider:

  • The career path of an MArch applicant is to become an architect. The SMArchS degree is for advanced research, usually after the MArch or other advanced degree.
  • If you are unclear which SMArchS program is right for you, contact the discipline group of your choice, and discuss your goals. If you wish to apply to two or more SMArchS programs, just make one application, and indicate your preferences in that application. If faculty think your work better suits another area, they will circulate your application among the different SMArchS admissions committees. You may be admitted to a different area than the one to which you applied.
  • If you wish to apply to a SMArchS and a PhD program in the same area, just apply to the PhD program. The admissions committees may choose to admit some PhD applicants to the SMArchS program, but they will not admit SMArchS applicants to the PhD program.

Dual Degree Options

The only formal dual degree program is between the Department of Architecture, and the Department of Urban Studies and Planning: the dual Master of Architecture and Master of City Planning degree. Other dual degrees have been crafted by qualified students already in the program, by arrangement with their advisors.

Applicants to the MArch/MCP program have two choices for applying: • Apply to both programs simultaneously. Application must be accepted by both programs in order for student to enroll, but one program must be chosen to begin first. • Apply to either the MArch or the MCP program. Once admitted, at the end of the first year, apply to the second program. Admission to the second program is not guaranteed. • Students already enrolled in a graduate program at MIT need to have their study plans approved by both Architecture and their home departments. Applicants will need two letters of recommendation from MIT faculty. Be aware that the Architecture application deadline is December 31. 

STEM Classifications

The majority of our programs are classified as STEM. This allows international students to extend their Optional Practical Training an additional two years, for a total of three. The only programs NOT classified as STEM are: • SMACT (Master of Science in Art, Culture and Technology) • HTC SMArchS • HTC PhD • AKPIA SMArchS

Transferring Into MIT

The graduate program does not allow transfer students to enter the program. Applicants who have begun another program may qualify to waive required courses they have already taken and instead take free electives. There is no option to shorten the 3.5-year MArch program.

Taking Classes Outside of a Degree Program

You can take courses within the MIT Architecture Department without being admitted to a degree program. There are two ways you can do this: (both require an application) - You can apply to be a special student - Or you can apply to join the MIT Advanced Study Program

Summer and Online Courses

No programs or courses offered during the summer; however you may be interested in Harvard’s Career Discovery program . MIT also provides online course content through MIT OpenCourseWare . Search for Department of Architecture courses by choosing "course 4." These courses are not for credit.

Financing Your Education The philosophy of the Department of Architecture is based upon a desire to maintain a diverse student body and encourage those who have the interest and ability to succeed in the profession, regardless of their financial resources. The Department wants to make it possible for all of our students to graduate with a debt no larger than they can reasonably expect to repay while working in their profession. Financial aid from the Department is in the form of direct tuition awards and Departmental employment. Additional resources and information is available from MIT's Student Financial Services Office. Financial aid awards for incoming students are on a merit basis and are made upon admission. In general, PhD students are funded on financial aid packages that consist of a Teaching Assistantship (TA) or Research Assistantship (RA) salary component, plus a tuition component. TA or RA assignments are made by the faculty Discipline Group Director at the beginning of each term.

Financial aid awards to Master's degree students are in the form of a partial tuition award. Master's degree students are also eligible to compete for work opportunities in the form of Teaching or Research Assistantships, or hourly positions available in the department.

Students are eligible for financial support from the Department, both tuition and/or Departmental employment, for the period of the standard residency requirement of the degree program. For PhD students this is up to a maximum of ten semesters. For MArch students the maximum number of semesters of eligibility is seven. SMArchS, SMBT and SMACT students are eligible for a total of four semesters of financial aid. Students in all degree programs must be registered as a full-time resident graduate student for the period of the award, and be in good academic standing in order to be eligible for continued financial aid.

In all cases, students should refer to the details laid out in their offer of admission.

Tuition MIT tuition and fees are posted by the MIT Registrar's Office . TA, RA and hourly rates are set by the Institute and the Department.

For more detailed information regarding the cost of attendance, including specific costs for tuition and fees, books and supplies, housing and food as well as transportation, please visit the SFS website:

  • Undergrad link:  https://sfs.mit.edu/undergraduate-students/the-cost-of-attendance/annual-student-budget/
  • Grad link:  https://sfs.mit.edu/graduate-students/guide/grad-cost-of-attendance/

Students are also assessed a Student Life Fee per year which cannot be paid by MIT funds. The tuition component of a financial aid award is applied directly to the student's account in the Bursar's Office. Academic year awards are divided equally between the Fall and Spring terms.

Payment in full, or a satisfactory arrangement for payment, is due in advance of Registration Day of each term. Students may opt for a Bursary Payment Plan to pay tuition in monthly installments. This plan involves a finance charge.

The office of Student Accounts coordinates the billing and collects payment for the official Institute charges, including on-campus housing, medical insurance, tuition, and the Student Activity Fee. Questions or concerns about student accounts, billing, charges and/or payments should be directed to the Student Financial Services / Student Services Center, 11-120.

Additional Fellowships To research additional fellowship opportunities, please sign up and check out MIT’s online financial literacy platform iGrad, where you will find a searchable scholarship database. Some other good databases can be found at:  https://www.petersons.com/  and  http://college.usatoday.com/2016/01/06/best-scholarship-resources/  (some may require registration).

Financial Aid for MArch and SMArchS Programs Financial Aid Information for Master of Science in Art, Culture, and Technology

The Department of Architecture is committed to building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive environment. We are pursuing actions to increase the diversity of our student population and to create an environment that welcomes and empowers all members of our community. This work includes new initiatives in outreach, admissions, support programs, and increased student participation in department governance. Our current population of students is a balance of half US-based and half international students, representing over forty-five countries. A fifth of our US-based graduate students identify as POC. 57% of graduate students are women, 43% are men. The Department will continue working purposefully to improve these numbers in the belief that broad perspectives and multiple role models are necessary for the future of the architectural profession.

  • Applicant Mentorship Program (AMP)  The Applicant Mentorship Program (AMP) pairs prospective applicants with current students who can offer guidance and answer questions throughout the application process. We especially encourage applicants from underrepresented backgrounds and those lacking support or facing other challenges in their pursuits of graduate studies to sign up for AMP!   

GradCatalyst Program

Part of MIT's GradCatalyst. Student-led workshops to help undergraduates plan their academic trajectories. This interactive webinar covers the unwritten rules to preparing for, applying to, and succeeding in graduate school. Sessions are open to anyone exploring the option of graduate education in architecture and similar fields.

Once Admitted

We send all notifications of admission and waitlist status by email, and many students will also receive telephone calls, beginning in early to Mid-March and running until April 1. All admitted applicants will have until April 15 to let us know if they accept our offer. If we do not receive notification that you accept our offer by April 15, the offer is rescinded. Because we may not hear from some admitted applicants until April 15, those admitted from waitlist status may not receive notification of admission before April 15.

We will send admissions letters to admitted and waitlisted applicants along with a link to a response form. Those planning to enroll will need to have official, unopened copies of their transcripts sent to our office before enrolling.

Additional information for newly admitted students is provided by the Institute.

Requirements

​​​​​​ Council of Graduate Schools Resolution Regarding Graduate Scholars, Fellows, Trainees and Assistants Acceptance of an offer of financial support (such as a graduate scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship) for the next academic year by a prospective or enrolled graduate student completes an agreement that both student and graduate school expect to honor. In that context, the conditions affecting such offers and their acceptance must be defined carefully and understood by all parties.

Students are under no obligation to respond to offers of financial support prior to April 15; earlier deadlines for acceptance of such offers violate the intent of this Resolution. In those instances in which a student accepts an offer before April 15, and subsequently desires to withdraw that acceptance, the student may submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15. However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student not to accept another offer without first obtaining a written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made. Similarly, an offer by an institution after April 15 is conditional on presentation by the student of the written release from any previously accepted offer. It is further agreed by the institutions and organizations subscribing to the above Resolution that a copy of this Resolution or a link to the URL should accompany every scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, and assistantship offer.

When you enroll in the program, the academic administrator will review your final transcripts to see if have already completed required courses in the program. If so, you may not waive the credits, but you may waive the requirement. Instead, you can take an elective of your choice. Additionally, you may qualify to TA for classes you have taken previously. You will be granted access to an online TA application system before the semester begins. Some students will receive TAs as part of their admissions package. They will be assigned to their TA position by the program area.

  • Letters of recommendation (3-4)
  • Transcripts for all relevant degrees
  • IELTS, TOEFL, or Cambridge English exam score (if English is not your first language)

Curriculum Vitae

Statement of objectives.

  • $75 application fee
  • Portfolio (or writing sample as appropriate, such as SMArchS HTC, and PhD programs)
  • The GRE is NOT required for any Architecture program

Letters of Recommendation

Letters from instructors are preferred unless you have been working for several years, in which case supervisors may be included. The application can be submitted on the deadline with fewer than three letters, but be sure to remind your instructors to complete their letters. 

We encourage you to ask for three letters of recommendation, but do not penalize applicants for missing letters; applications with fewer than three letters will be considered without a penalty. Applicants may include up to four recommenders if necessary. Notify your letter writers as early as possible to let them know you will be requesting letters. This will give them time to prepare and submit their letters by the deadline. Letters submitted one year may not be used to apply again in subsequent years unless uploaded by the recommender.

If your recommender has trouble with the online system, be sure to complete their contact information and have them email the letter to  [email protected] . In this case make sure that you have completed the form in the system with their information and check whether or not you have waived your right to view the letter. Inform the recommender of your choice. 

You should return to your online application to check the status of your letters, and remind your recommenders. You may submit your application even if all your recommendation letters have not yet been submitted. Review begins about a week after the deadline, so any letters not received by then will not be viewed.

Transcripts

Transcripts for all relevant degrees,  official or unofficial, must be uploaded to the application system. PDFs must be clearly readable and oriented correctly on the screen. Only those applicants who are accepted for admission will be required to send a hard copy of an official, sealed transcript (with English translation) from each school attended. Please do not have official copies of transcripts sent to our office unless you are admitted. Certificates, study abroad, and community college transcripts do not need to be sent unless the courses are  not  also listed on your primary college transcripts. Non-English transcripts must be translated into English, and if necessary, signed by a licensed notary and accompanied by the original version. If you have taken studios, indicate this on the Test Scores/Experience/Electronic Portfolio section.

We expect you to scan your personal, unofficial copies to the online application. Only those applicants who are accepted for admission will be required to send a hard copy of an official, sealed transcript (with English translation) from each school attended. Any discrepancy between the scanned transcripts and official transcripts may result in a rejection or withdrawal of our admission offer. Applicants should NOT send any supplemental material with their application by mail, and only provide those documents required in the application. You do not have to have completed your degree when you apply, but the final transcripts and certification of the degree will be required before you may enroll, if you are admitted.  Applicants who have begun another program may qualify to waive required courses they have already taken and instead take free electives. There is no option to shorten the 3.5-year MArch program. The graduate program does not allow transfer students to enter the program.

English Test Scores

Applicants whose first language is not English are required to submit an International English Language Testing System ( IELTS ) score (Academic test), a Test of English as a Foreign Language ( TOEFL ), or the Cambridge English Exams upon admission. Starting for the Fall 2024 admissions cycle, the Institute will accept official scores from two Cambridge English exams: the C1 Advanced assessment and the C2 Proficiency assessment. The admissions committee regards English proficiency as crucial for success in all degree programs. In order to meet the admissions deadline, it is recommended that candidates take their test on the earliest possible date. We do accept the Home Version of both IELTS and TOEFL.  NOTE: Official scores do not need to be sent unless you are admitted, and intend to enroll.

You must take an English test if:

-       You did your undergraduate studies in the US but are from a non-English speaking country you DO need to take a test. -       You are from the US but were raised speaking another language, you DO need to take a test.

You do not need to take it if you were raised in a non-English speaking country but have spoken and been educated in English all your life.

Only admitted   applicants must request that an official copy of their test results be sent directly to MIT by IELTS International or Educational Testing Service. Scores must be no older than two years as of the date of application. To avoid delays, please use the following codes when having your scores sent to MIT: 

  • Institutional Code: 3514
  • Department Code: 12

The minimum score required for the IELTS is 7 and the minimum TOEFL score is 600 (250 for computer-based test, 100 for Internet-based test). While either test score is accepted, the IELTS score is preferred. (HTC PhD requires a TOEFL score of 110.) If your scores do not meet the minimum required for admission we are not able to admit you. Applications with scores lower than 100 on the TOEFL or 7 on the IELTS, or missing test scores, will not be reviewed. We will NOT have access to your "My Best Scores" from ETS. We will see all your test scores you have sent to us.

All students whose first language is not English are required to take the  English Evaluation Test (EET)  prior to registration at MIT. Even students who satisfy the IELTS/TOEFL requirement for admission may be required to take specialized subjects in English as a Second Language (ESL), depending on their EET results. These subjects do not count toward the required degree credits. If you do not believe you need to provide a TOEFL or IELTS score, you may use the language test waiver choice in the application, and explain your situation to the faculty in the space provided. No official waiver will be granted unless you are admitted, so the application will not show whether or not the waiver was approved.

Some MIT fellowships are available to MIT Departments. The CV is used by our administrative staff to learn additional information about you in order to apply for MIT scholarships on your behalf. 

The Statement requested by the Department will vary depending on the program to which you are applying. MArch applicants will answer these two questions: 

Statement 1 Our department encompasses architecture, design, history, and the arts; all have a social and cultural meaning and purpose. How does your background and life experience inform your understanding of that purpose? (500 word limit)

Statement 2 Given your values and goals, why is this degree from MIT the best next step for you right now? What will you contribute to our community, and how will our community support your specific future contributions to the world? (500 word limit) SM and PhD applications will answer these two questions: Personal Statement Our department encompasses architecture, design, history, technology, and the arts; all have a social and cultural meaning and purpose. How does your background and life experience inform your understanding of that purpose? (500 word limit) Research Statement Please share a research statement, considering the following: What research questions matter to you, and how might they shape what you want to accomplish at MIT? Who would you consider working with and why? (700 word limit)

Financial Support

Aside from fully funded programs, such as the PhD and SMBT programs, the majority of students receive Departmental support. Be sure to check off whether or not you wish to be considered for financial support. No preference is given to either answer. If you need money to attend grad school, be sure to say "yes." Department aid is distributed on a combined basis of merit and need. The Department will review admitted applicants to see if any additional MIT scholarships may apply. If an admitted applicant to an Architecture program is eligible for an MIT scholarship, the Department will apply on your behalf and detail this in the admission letter.

Application Fee

A non-refundable Application Fee of $75 USD is required to submit your application. You will need to submit a credit card number on the Architecture Graduate Application to process this fee. If submitting an application fee provides any challenge in submitting an application, prospective students are asked to submit a fee waiver application through the  Office of Graduate Education . A fee waiver request is entirely independent of the admissions process itself and is not seen by the admissions committee. Note that those applying to the PhD programs will automatically be considered for the SMArchS program in that area. SMArchS applicants may choose to be reviewed by more than one SMArchS program. 

A portfolio is required for the following programs:

-       MArch -       All SMArchS programs -       Encouraged but not required for Computation PhD -       Optional for SMBT (writing sample instead) -       Optional for BT/PhD (writing sample instead)

The portfolio should include evidence of recent creative work, whether personal, academic or professional. Work done collaboratively should be identified as such and the applicant's role in the project defined. Your name, and program to which you are applying should also be included. We expect the portfolio to be the applicant's own work. Applicants whose programs require portfolios will upload a 30-page maximum (10 pages for ACT) including cover pages and contents), PDF file to the online application system. The dimensions should be exported for screen viewing. Two page "spreads" are counted as one page.

The MArch is the first professional degree preparing students for a career as an architect. The program takes 3.5 years, comprising six studios, followed by a semester working on thesis. Courses are drawn from each of our discipline groups, as well as electives from the Department and throughout MIT.

Degree Prerequisites

The MArch program requires the following academic preparation: • A Bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized institution or, in the judgment of the department, the equivalent of this degree. • One semester of satisfactory study in college-level mathematics (such as, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, pre-calculus, calculus). • One semester of satisfactory study in college-level natural sciences (such as, physics, biology, chemistry). • Two semesters of satisfactory study in college-level humanities and/or social sciences.

Students may be admitted with limited deficiencies in 2, 3, or 4 above, but this deficiency must be removed prior to entry into the first year of graduate study in the department. Pre-requisites may be taken at any accredited institution of higher learning, including on-line courses. Natural science classes with a lab are not required. Upon completion, provide an official transcript showing the final passing grade to the Department of Architecture. AP credit will be accepted if the undergraduate transcript includes institutional credit for each subject taken. The Advanced Placement track has been discontinued, so all applicants apply to the full 3.5-year program. If you have taken any courses in another school, you may petition to waive the required courses and instead take free electives.

Interviews are NOT required for MArch applicants. If you would like to arrange for a student-led virtual tour of the Department, please complete this form  Tour Request .

A digital portfolio is required of all MArch applicants, including those who do not have a previous architecture degree or background. The portfolio file should be exported as PDF for screen viewing. The file should contain no more than 30 pages. Two-page spreads are allowed, but each spread counts as one of the 30 pages.

Our goal is to constitute a diverse community that includes a wide range of interests and talents. We do this for many reasons, including our understanding that, particularly in a community like ours, we all learn from each other. To better understand your creative voice and background, please share a PDF portfolio that best reflects who you are. We review portfolios from a variety of backgrounds; we are seeking the potential to explore and engage architectural questions, but not necessarily previous experience with architecture. We want to understand your potential to think and operate visually and in three dimensions, at any scale. Please share with us any work that best illuminates how you perceive and structure the world that surrounds you. If some of your work cannot easily be understood in a static pdf, please include a link to a sample for review. This field is intended to augment the portfolio submission with audio files from composers and musicians, or video files from performance art, interviews from journalists, etc. If time-based media is not central to your work, there is no problem with leaving this field blank.

If some of your work cannot easily be understood in a static pdf, please include a link to a sample for review. This field is intended to augment the portfolio submission with audio files from composers and musicians, or video files from performance art, interviews from journalists, etc. If time-based media is not central to your work, there is no problem with leaving this field blank.

The Master of Science in Architecture Studies (SMArchS) is a two-year post-masters program of advanced study founded on research and inquiry in architecture as a discipline and as a practice. The program is intended both for students who already have a professional degree in architecture and those interested in advanced non-professional graduate study. We offer this degree in each of our discipline groups, with some overlap between groups. Our goal across the SMArchs programs at MIT is to bring together a diverse set of voices and research interests where students conduct their research through discipline-specific skills, abilities, tools, and media.  We do this for many reasons, and it enables us to create a community at MIT and construct a larger dialogue across disciplines in which we learn from each other. So that we may better understand your creative voice and background, please present a PDF portfolio that reflects your experience and preparation for the specific SMArchs program you are applying to. Interviews are NOT required for SMArchS applicants. All prospective students are welcome to visit the Department. If you would like to visit the campus for a student tour of the Department, please contact in advance of your trip.

Writing samples are required for the MIT SMArchs programs that engage history and theory as research in these programs is presented primarily through the vehicle of writing. Writing samples may be submitted optionally in other SMArchs Programs. If you chose to provide an optional writing sample one for the admissions committee to consider, please share a document that shows how you structure and articulate your views on a subject that matters to you. 

For admission to the SMArchs AKPIA program, a writing sample of a research paper length (15-20 pages) is required of all non-architectural applicants and is an important component of the application. Publications are welcome, but they are not expected. For students of design background, an explanation of how designs presented in the portfolio have prepared the applicant for the intended research project can be submitted in the place of a writing sample. 

Note: The GRE is NOT required or reviewed for any program in the Department of Architecture.

SMArchS Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture 

This program is focused on the history of Islamic art and architecture, Islamic urban and landscape history, and critical history and theory of urban heritage and conservation, especially in conflict- and post-disaster contexts. AKPIA SMArchS students come from diverse backgrounds – from the humanities, architectural, art historical, historical, or curatorial practice or individuals with professional architectural degrees from outside the US who want to continue research in topics related to Islamic architecture. We welcome portfolios so that applicants with design training can communicate their design intelligence and show their capacity for research within a design context. Applicants without design training are not required to submit a portfolio. 

The SMArchS AKPIA program requires the following academic preparation: BArch or BA in architecture or any related field (Art history, planning, landscape, archeology, etc.) Areas of study: architectural and art history, urban history, urban studies, design inquiry, with a special focus on the Islamic world.

SMArchS Architectural Design

This program advances research on a broad range of concerns through the vehicle of design—through fabrication, model making, drawing and representation, prototyping, exhibition design, mapping, digital analysis, and more. A portfolio is a required component of the SMArchs Architecture Design application: it should reflect who you are, include distinctions between individual work and work done in groups, and contain examples of academic projects and/or professional work and community projects that demonstrate your experience in architectural design. 

The SMArchS AD program requires the following academic preparation: • A professional degree in Architecture (Master of Architecture or 5-year accredited Bachelor of Architecture) with high academic standing from a recognized institution or, in the judgment of the department, the equivalent of this degree.

SMArchS Building Technology

This program is focused on technical and scientific research to improve the sustainability of the built environment and the health of its inhabitants.  A portfolio is required for the SMArchs BT program, with projects that speak to the applicants’ design experiences and sensibilities. We welcome portfolios that demonstrate applicants’ knowledge of environmental performance analysis workflows and their application to design.

The SMArchS BT program requires the following academic preparation: • A professional degree in Architecture (Master of Architecture or 5-year accredited Bachelor of Architecture) with high academic standing from a recognized institution or, in the judgment of the department, the equivalent of this degree.

SMArchS Computation

The SMArchS Computation program requires the following academic preparation: • An undergraduate or higher degree in architecture or related field with high academic standing from a recognized institution. 

SMArchS Urbanism

This program is focused on the exploration of a broad range of concerns that advance design and research at the larger scales of city, community, and territory. For this reason, the portfolio is a required component of your application: it should reflect who you are, include distinctions between individual work and work done in groups, and contain examples that demonstrate urban thinking: through a design component on the urban scale and a research/ analytical part applied to the urban scale.

The SMArchS Urbanism program requires the following academic preparation: • A professional degree in Architecture (Master of Architecture or 5-year accredited Bachelor of Architecture) with high academic standing from a recognized institution or, in the judgment of the department, the equivalent of this degree.

SMArchS History Theory + Criticism of Architecture and Art

This group is focused on the history of architecture, art and design, as well as the theoretical and political presuppositions informing that history. We place a strong emphasis on historiography and on interdisciplinary analytical methodologies as means to explore the philosophical, social, and material contexts for works of art, architecture, and design. While not a requirement, we welcome portfolios so that applicants with design training can communicate their particular design intelligence and show their capacity for research and thought within a design context. Applicants without design training are not required to submit a portfolio.

The SMArchS HTC program requires the following academic preparation: • A professional degree in Architecture (Master of Architecture or 5-year accredited Bachelor of Architecture) with high academic standing from a recognized institution or BA in architecture or any related field (Art history, planning, landscape, archeology, etc.). For admission to the SMArchs HTC program, a writing sample of at least 15 pages is required of all applicants and is an important component of the application. For those who have them, publications are welcome, but they are not expected. 

The Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT) facilitates artist-thinkers’ exploration of art’s broad, complex, global history and conjunction with culture, science, technology, and design via rigorous critical artistic practice and practice driven theory. ACT emphasizes experimentation and transdisciplinary approaches to studio production in both traditional and new media. Students are encouraged to consider both the physical and the cultural context of their artworks/projects as central to their interpretation. Presentations on contemporary art as well as discussions in theory and criticism, and an understanding of research-based artistic practice complement studio production and the development of projects.

Zoom interviews are only arranged with candidates after the faculty have made an initial assessment of the applicant pool.

The SMACT program requires the following academic preparation: • A bachelor's degree.

What should I put in my portfolio? The portfolio should include evidence of your recent creative work, whether personal, academic, or professional. Collaborative projects should be identified accordingly, and your role must be clearly defined.

What are the portfolio specifications?

  • Images and Documentation - Submit one PDF document, maximum of ten 8.5x11 pages, including documentation and/or images of your projects. - Include captions/descriptions for each image: title, artist, year, material, and/or project description.
  • Time-based media - Submit no more than seven minutes of material - This means seven minutes if you add the runtime of all your files together, not seven minutes for each file. Video:  High quality QuickTime .mov files only Audio:  high quality .mp3 or .aiff files only
  • Technical notes - Portfolios will be reviewed digitally using computer monitors and digital projectors. Do NOT send slides or printouts. - Make sure that all files are able to open on a Mac. - Double-check your files to make sure they open before submitting

May my portfolio include other items as well? The portfolio may also include the following optional items, which are considered secondary material, and will be reviewed only if time permits: Writing sample – five page PDF maximum.

Webpage URLs: I prefer to submit weblinks instead of a portfolio. Is that OK? Yes. If you submit a link or website, you can enter it in Section 3 of the application, under Personal Information: Web page URL (optional).

Can I get advice on the content of my portfolio? No. Your portfolio should reflect the range and depth of your artistic practice. As you prepare it, you may wish to view the profile pages of ACT faculty members to see how your projects may intersect with their research.

How are portfolios submitted? Applicants are encouraged to provide a web link to their online portfolios. Web links can be provided in Section 3 of the application, under Personal Information: Web page URL (optional). Portfolios that are CD or DVDs can also be accepted as an alternative to links. Portfolios are not returned to you.

The disk should be labeled “Attention: Admissions ACT” and include your name and address.

Please do not mail any materials directly to ACT.

Send your portfolio to the Department of Architecture at this address: MIT Department of Architecture 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 7-337 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 Attn: Admissions ACT

The Master of Science in Building Technology (SMBT) provides a focus for graduate students interested in the development and application of advanced technology for buildings. Students in this program take relevant subjects in basic engineering disciplines along with subjects which apply these topics to buildings. The program accepts students with undergraduate degrees in a variety of engineering disciplines, in the physical sciences, or in architecture with a suitable background in technology. Students also come to the program with diverse job experiences, from the design of space-conditioning equipment for buildings to the Peace Corps. All share both a keen interest in buildings and a thorough education in mathematics, physics and other technical subjects.

Because of the small size of the program, interviews with faculty are recommended, but not required. It is advantageous for applicants to meet with the Building Technology faculty member doing research most closely aligned with the research interests of the applicant. Faculty schedules vary, so it is best to contact the Building Technology office several weeks prior to an intended visit.

Arrangements can also be made to sit in on final reviews (mid-May) or attend an Open House (mid-November).

The SMBT program requires the following academic preparation: • A bachelor's degree. Research papers or a portfolio of the applicant's work (maximum of 30 pages) may be uploaded to the Architecture Graduate Application to aid the admissions committee but are not required.

The Department of Architecture offers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture (PhD), which may be pursued in any of these disciplines:

  • Building Technology
  • Computation
  • History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art
  • Concentration in Advanced Urbanism

Each student admitted into the doctoral program will work closely with one faculty advisor in their area to develop a plan of study. The minimum residence required by the Institute for the doctorate is two full academic years. Completion of all of the requirements for the doctorate, including the dissertation, is usually accomplished in five or six years. Progress toward the PhD follows required coursework, minor and major declaration, qualifying paper, general examination, and dissertation research, writing, and defense. Students are encouraged to take relevant courses in other departments at MIT and at Harvard University.

The PhD programs require the following academic preparation: • A master's degree is required for a PhD application in Building Technology and Computation, but is not required for a PhD application in HTC.

Research papers or a portfolio of the applicant's work (maximum of 30 pages) may be uploaded to the Architecture Graduate Application to aid the admissions committee but are not required.

Interviews with faculty are recommended but not required. It is advantageous for an applicant to meet with the Building Technology faculty member whose research is most closely aligned with the applicant's interests. Faculty schedules vary, so students should contact faculty members directly at least two weeks prior to an intended visit.

PhD Computation

A portfolio is strongly suggested for PhD applicants. Research papers or a portfolio of the applicant's work (maximum of 30 pages) may be uploaded to the Architecture Graduate Application to aid the admissions committee but are not required.

The portfolio should include evidence of recent creative work, whether personal, academic or professional. Choose what you care about, what you think is representative of your best work, and what is expressive of you. Work done collaboratively should be identified as such and the applicant's role in the project defined. Your name, and program to which you are applying should also be included. We expect the portfolio to be the applicant's own work. Applicants whose programs require portfolios will upload a 30-page maximum) PDF file to the online application system. The dimensions should be exported for screen viewing. Two page "spreads" are counted as one page. Because of the small size of the program, interviews with faculty are highly recommended, but not required. It is advantageous for applicants to meet with the Computation faculty member doing research most closely aligned with the research interests of the applicant. Faculty members have varying schedules, and travel when school is not in session. Thus it is best to contact the faculty member directly at least two weeks prior to an intended visit.

All applicants should submit evidence of recent work: scholarly and/or professional. A 15 to 30 page writing sample is required of all HTC/AKPIA PhD applicants. In addition to the writing sample, a portfolio can be submitted if it demonstrates intellectual direction, scholarly interests, or design capability. Writing sample(s) should illustrate research interests and capacities.

If you choose to submit a portfolio, it should include evidence of recent creative work, whether personal, academic or professional. Select what you care about, what you think is representative of your best work, and what is expressive of you. Work done collaboratively should be identified as such and the applicant's role in the project defined. Your name, and program to which you are applying should also be included. We expect the portfolio to be the applicant's own work. Applicants whose programs require portfolios will upload a 30-page maximum PDF file to the online application system. The dimensions should be exported for screen viewing. Two page "spreads" are counted as one page.

We encourage you to meet with an HTC faculty member by phone or Zoom in the Spring or Fall prior to applying. Applicants are also open to sit in on a class if an in-person visit is possible. Contact  [email protected]  to discuss the HTC faculty you are interested in meeting. Interviews with faculty are not required and should take place well before the application deadline.

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Admissions Information for Prospective Graduate Students

Thank you for considering the PhD program in Physics at MIT. Information regarding our graduate program and our application process can be found below and through the following webpages and other links on this page. If your questions are not answered after reviewing this information, please contact us at [email protected] .

Here are some links to pages relevant to prospective students:

  • Material Required for a Complete Application , and information about When/How to Apply can be found below on this page.
  • We have an FAQ which should help to answer many questions, and we provide Application Assistance from staff and students if you don’t find what you need in the FAQ.
  • Additional Guidance about the application itself, along with examples, can be found on a separate page. The graduate application is available at https://apply.mit.edu/apply/ .
  • General information about the graduate program and research areas in the physics department may also be of use.
  • MSRP (MIT Summer Research Program) is designed to give underrepresented and underserved students access to an MIT research experience, pairing each student with a faculty member who will oversee the student conducting a research project at MIT.

Statement regarding admissions process during COVID Pandemic (Updated Summer 2023)

MIT has adopted the following principle: MIT’s admissions committees and offices for graduate and professional schools will take the significant disruptions of the COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 into account when reviewing students’ transcripts and other admissions materials as part of their regular practice of performing individualized, holistic reviews of each applicant.

In particular, as we review applications now and in the future, we will respect decisions regarding the adoption of Pass/No Record (or Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail) and other grading options during the unprecedented period of COVID-19 disruptions, whether those decisions were made by institutions or by individual students. We also expect that the individual experiences of applicants will richly inform applications and, as such, they will be considered with the entirety of a student’s record.

Ultimately, even in these challenging times, our goal remains to form graduate student cohorts that are collectively excellent and composed of outstanding individuals who will challenge and support one another.

Questions or concerns about this statement should be directed to the Physics Department ( [email protected] ).

Also, to stay up-to-date on the latest information on MIT and the COVID-19 pandemic at now.mit.edu .

Applying to the MIT Department of Physics

We know that the application process can be time-consuming, stressful, and costly. We are committed to reducing these barriers and to helping all applicants receive a full and fair assessment by our faculty reviewers. Help is available from the Physics Graduate Admissions Office at [email protected] and additional assistance from current students is offered during the admissions season. Further details are described at the end of this page in our Assistance for Prospective Applicants section.

The list below describes the important elements of a complete application. Please reach out to us at [email protected] if you have a concern or logistical difficulty that could prevent you from providing your strongest application.

Required for a Complete Application

1. online application and application fee.

  • MIT Graduate Admissions Online Graduate Application
  • Application Fee: $75 NOTE: Applicants who feel that this fee may prevent them from applying should send a short email to [email protected] to describe their general reasons for requesting a waiver. We will follow up with information about how to apply for a formal ‘application fee waiver’. Additional documents may be required, so additional time will be necessary to process requests. Either the fee or a formal fee waiver is required with a submitted application.

2. University Transcript(s)

Unofficial transcripts are sufficient for our initial review, with final transcripts required as a condition of matriculation for successful applicants. Applicants should include a scan of their transcript(s) and, if a degree is in progress, should include a list of the class subjects being taken in the current semester. The GradApply portal will allow applicants to log back into the application after the deadline to add their Fall term grades when they are available.

Note: We will respect decisions regarding the adoption of Pass/No Record (or Credit/No Credit or Pass/Fail) and other grading options during the unprecedented period of COVID-19 disruptions, whether those decisions were made by institutions or by individual students.

3. Standardized Test Results

  • GRE Tests are not required for graduate applications submitted in 2023. The Physics subject GRE (PGRE) will be optional in 2023 and our department does not require results from the General GRE test.
  • TOEFL or IELTS Test or a waiver is required for non-native English speakers. MIT’s TOEFL school code is 3514; the code for the Department of Physics is 76. IELTS does not require a code. Eligibility for TOEFL/IELTS waivers is in our FAQ section .
  • Self-reported scores are sufficient for our initial application screening, with official scores required for admitted students as a condition of their offer. Applicants should attach a scanned copy of their test score report.

4. Letters of Recommendation

Letters should include any individual work applicants have done and/or areas where they have special strengths. It is possible to submit up to 6 total letters, but 3 are sufficient for a complete application and committee members may evaluate applications based on the first three letters that they read.

5. Statement of Objectives

Research is central to graduate study in physics. The Statement of Objectives/Purpose should include descriptions of research projects, aptitude and achievements as completely as possible. This important part of the application provides an opportunity to describe any interests, skills, and background relative to the research areas selected on the application form. Applicants should share anything that prepares them for graduate studies and describe their proudest achievements.

Additional Application Materials

  • Research, Teaching, and Community Engagement – Any special background or achievement that prepares the applicant for Physics graduate studies at MIT. This may include research at their undergraduate school as part of their Bachelor or Master degree, or summer research at another program or school.  We also value our student’s contributions to their community on a variety of scales (from institutional to societal) and we encourage applicants to tell us about their teaching and community engagement activities.  The “experience” questions are intended to provide a CV-like listing of achievements, some of which may be elaborated on in the “Statement of Objectives” and/or the optional “Personal Statement”.
  • Publications, Talks, and Merit Based Recognition – Recognition of success in research, academics, and outreach can take many forms, including publications, talks, honors, prizes, awards, fellowships, etc.  This may include current nominations for scholarships or papers submitted for publication.
  • Optional Personal Statement – Members of our community come from a wide variety of backgrounds and experiences. We welcome any personal information that will help us to evaluate applications holistically and will provide context for the applicant’s academic achievements. This statement may include extenuating circumstances, significant challenges that were overcome, a non-traditional educational background, description of any advocacy or values work, or other information that may be relevant.
  • Detailed instructions for each application section, and many examples , can be found on the “ Additional Guidance ” page.  The detailed instructions are lengthy, and are intended to be read only “as needed” while you work on your application (i.e., you don’t need to go read the whole thing before you start).

When/How to Apply

When : Applications can be submitted between September 15 and December 15 by 11:59pm EST for the following year.

How : The application is online at https://apply.mit.edu/apply/

Application Assistance

Faculty, students, and staff have collaborated to provide extensive guidance to prospective applicants to our graduate degree program. Resources include several department webpages to inform prospective applicants about our PhD degree requirements and to help applicants as they assemble and submit their materials. In addition to staff responses to emails, current graduate students will answer specific individual questions, give one admissions-related webinar, and provide a mentorship program for selected prospective applicants.

During the application season, prospective students may request additional information from current students about the admissions process, graduate student life, or department culture, either as a response to a specific individual email question or for more in-depth assistance. Applicants will benefit most from contacting us early in the process, when current students and staff will be available to respond to questions and mentor selected applicants. After mid-November, department staff will continue to field questions through the admission process.

Here are some resources for prospective applicants:

  • Our website provides answers to many frequently-asked admissions questions .
  • Admissions staff are available for questions at [email protected] .
  • Current students collaborate with staff to answer specific questions emailed to [email protected] .
  • PhysGAAP Webinars are designed to provide student perspectives on the application and admissions processes in an interactive format. This year’s webinar will take place on Wednesday, Nov 1st, 2023 from 10am to 12pm EDT. Sign up here: https://mit.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ah13eCcEh0cKW7I
  • PhysGAAP Mentoring provides in-depth guidance through the application process.

Student-led Q&A Service

A team of our current graduate students is available to share their experience and perspectives in response to individual questions which may fall under any of the following categories:

  • Coursework/research (e.g., How do I choose between two research areas and how do I find a potential research advisor?)
  • Culture (e.g., What is it like to be a student of a particular identity at MIT?)
  • Student life (e.g., What clubs or extracurriculars do graduate students at MIT take part in?)

To request a response from the current students, please send an email to [email protected] and indicate clearly in the subject line or first sentence that you would like your email forwarded to the PhysGAAP student team. Depending on the scope of your question, department staff will send your email to current students.

We encourage you to reach out as early as you can to maximize the benefit that this help can provide to you. While the admissions office staff will continue to field your questions throughout the admissions season, current students may not be available to respond to questions sent after November 15.

This student email resource is designed for individual basic questions. More in-depth guidance, especially about the application itself, will be available through the PhysGAAP Webinars and/or PhysGAAP Mentorship Program described below.

Student-led Webinar

A panel of our graduate students hosted a 2-hour long Zoom webinar in late October of 2022 to present information about the application and admissions processes, and to respond to questions on these topics. The webinar addressed general questions about preparing, completing, and submitting the application; what the Admissions Committee is looking for; and the general timeline for the admissions process.

Below is video from our latest webinar that took place on Wednesday, Nov 1st, 2023. Check back here in Fall 2024 for information on our next webinar.

Note: We have  compiled a document  containing supplementary material for previous PhysGAAP webinars.

Webinar Recordings

Past PhysGAAP Webinars

Please note that the two webinars below are from prior years and may contain outdated information about some topics, such as GRE requirements.

  • October 2022
  • December 2021
  • September 2021

Mentorship for Prospective Applicants

In addition to the materials available through this website, answers to emails sent to the department, or from our graduate student webinars, we also offer one-on-one mentoring for students who desire more in-depth individual assistance. Prospective applicants may apply to the PhysGAAP Mentoring program,, which pairs prospective graduate school applicants with current graduate students who can assist them through the application process, provide feedback on their application materials and insight into graduate school and the MIT Physics Department.

We welcome interest in the PhysGAAP Mentorship program and mentorship applications are open to any prospective applicant. However, our capacity is limited, so we will give preferential consideration to PhysGAAP Mentorship applicants who would most benefit from the program and can demonstrate that they are a good fit.

PhysGAAP Mentoring may a good fit for you if you

  • feel like you lack other resources to help you navigate the graduate school application process,
  • find the other forms of assistance (online webinars, email at [email protected] ) insufficient to address your needs, and
  • think you could benefit from one-on-one application mentorship.

PhysGAAP Mentoring may not be a good fit for you if you

  • only have one or two questions that could be answered elsewhere (online webinars, email at [email protected] , or online FAQs), or
  • feel like you already have sufficient resources to complete your application (e.g., the PhysGAAP webinars, access to other mentoring services or workshops)

poster advertising PhysGAAP Mentoring

Please note that:

  • PhysGAAP Mentoring is only open to students who are planning to apply to graduate schools in Fall 2024 .
  • Participation in PhysGAAP is not considered during admissions review. It helps applicants put forward their strongest materials, but does not guarantee admission into our graduate program.
  • Any information you submit in the PhysGAAP Mentoring application will only be seen by the PhysGAAP team and your matched mentor.

Admissions/Application FAQs

Our Frequently Asked Questions provide further information about degree requirements, funding, educational background, application deadlines, English language proficiency, program duration, start dates and deferrals, and fee waiver requests.

The MOST Frequently Asked Question…

What is included in a strong graduate application for physics at mit.

Applications are assessed holistically and many variables are considered in the application review process. The following four main factors are required for a complete application.

  • the applicant’s statement of objectives or purpose,
  • transcripts of past grades,
  • score reports of any required standardized tests,
  • three letters of reference.

In addition, any past research experience, publications, awards, and honors are extremely helpful, particularly if they are in the area(s) of the applicant’s interest(s). Applicants may also include a personal statement in their application to provide context as the materials are assessed.

Applications are routed to admission committee members and other faculty readers using the “areas of interest” and any faculty names selected from the menu as well as based on the research interests included in the statement of objectives. Please select the areas of interest that best reflect your goals.

Instructions are available in the application itself , with further guidance on our Additional Guidance page. The Physics Admissions Office will respond to questions sent to [email protected] .

General Questions Regarding the PhD Program in Physics

Must i have a degree in physics in order to apply to this graduate program.

Our successful applicants generally hold a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics, or have taken many Physics classes if they have majored in another discipline. The most common other majors are astronomy, engineering, mathematics, and chemistry. Bachelor of Science degrees may be 3-year or 4-year degrees, depending on the education structure of the country in which they are earned.

What are the requirements to complete a PhD?

The requirements for a PhD in Physics at MIT are the doctoral examination, a few required subject classes, and a research-based thesis. The doctoral examination consists of a written and an oral examination. The written component may be satisfied either by passing the 4 subject exams or by passing designated classes related to each topic with a qualifying grade; the oral exam will be given in a student’s chosen research area. The Physics Department also requires that each student take two classes in the field of specialization and two physics-related courses in fields outside the specialty. Research for the thesis is conducted throughout the student’s time in the program, culminating in a thesis defense and submission of the final thesis.

Can I take courses at other schools nearby?

Yes. Cross-registration is available at Harvard University and Wellesley College.

How many years does it take to complete the PhD requirements?

From 3 to 7 years, averaging 5.6 years.

How will I pay for my studies?

Our students are fully supported financially throughout the duration of their program, provided that they make satisfactory progress. Funding is provided from Fellowships (internal and external) and/or Assistantships (research and teaching) and covers tuition, health insurance, and a living stipend. Read more about funding .

Note: For more detailed information regarding the cost of attendance, including specific costs for tuition and fees, books and supplies, housing and food as well as transportation, please visit the Student Financial Services (SFS) website .

How many applications are submitted each year? How many students are accepted?

Although the number varies each year, the Department of Physics usually welcomes approximately 45 incoming graduate students each year. Last year we received more than 1,700 applications and extended fewer than 90 offers of admission.

What are the minimum grades and exam scores for admitted applicants?

There are no minimum standards for overall grade point averages/GPAs. Grades from physics and other related classes will be carefully assessed. Under a special COVID-19 policy, MIT will accept transcripts with a variety of grading conventions, including any special grading given during the COVID-19 pandemic. GRE Tests are not required for graduate applications submitted in 2023. The Physics subject GRE (PGRE) will be optional in 2023 and our department does not require results from the General GRE test.

Our program is conducted in English and all applicants must demonstrate their English language proficiency. Non-native English speakers should review our policy carefully before waiving the TOEFL/IELTS requirements. We do not set a minimum requirement on TOEFL/IELTS scores; however, students who are admitted to our program typically score above the following values:

  • IELTS – 7
  • TOEFL (computer based) – 200
  • TOEFL (iBT) – 100
  • TOEFL (standard) – 600

The Application Process

When is the deadline for applying to the phd program in physics.

Applications for enrollment in the fall are due each year by 11:59pm EST on December 15 of the preceding year. There is no admission cycle for spring-term enrollment.

The COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult for me to take tests in person. Can I still apply?

GRE Tests are not required for graduate applications submitted in 2023. The Physics subject GRE (PGRE) will be optional in 2023 and our department does not require results from the General GRE test.Non-native English speakers who are not eligible for a test waiver should include their results from either an in-person or online version of the TOEFL or IELTS test.

Does the Department of Physics provide waivers for the English language exam (TOEFL/IELTS)?

An English language exam (IELTS, TOEFL, TOEFL iBT, or the C2 Cambridge English Proficiency exam) is required of all applicants who are from a country in which English is not the primary language. Exceptions to this policy will be considered for candidates who, at the start of their graduate studies in 2022, will have been in the US or in a country whose official language is English for three years or longer and who will have received a degree from a college or university in a country where the language of education instruction is English. An interview via telephone, Zoom, or Skype may be arranged at the discretion of the Admissions Committee. More information on a possible English Language Waiver Decision (PDF).

Does the Department of Physics provide application fee waivers?

Although we do not want the MIT application fee to be a barrier to admission, we cannot provide application fee waivers to all who request one.  Under-resourced applicants, and applicants who have participated in the MIT Summer Research Program (MSRP), Converge, or another MIT program or an official MIT recruiting visit are eligible for a fee waiver from the MIT Office of Graduate Education (OGE). Please check MIT Graduate Diversity Programs for further details.  Departmentally, we have allotted a small number of waivers for applicants who have completed an application (including transcript uploads, and requests for letters of recommendation), but do not qualify for a waiver from the OGE. Fee waiver requests will be considered on a first-come-first-served basis, and not after December 1. Furthermore, applications lacking the paid fee or a fee waiver by 11:59pm EST on December 15 will not be reviewed or considered for admission. Please complete the  MIT Physics Departmental Fee Waiver Application Form  when you are ready to apply for a departmental waiver. Waivers are not awarded until the application is complete.

Can I arrange a visit to the Physics Department or a specific research area?

Update as of September 23, 2021: In an effort to keep our community safe and healthy, we are not currently hosting or meeting with outside visitors in person, nor are we facilitating visits to our classrooms. Current graduate students and prospective applicants should direct any questions by email to [email protected] .

Applicants are invited to send specific questions to the Physics Admissions Office and some questions may be forwarded to current students for further information.

Can I receive an update on the status of my application?

Candidates will receive email acknowledgments from the Physics Academic Programs Office informing them whether their application is complete, is missing materials, or if further information is needed. Due to the high volume of applications that are received, no additional emails or telephone inquiries can be answered. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all items are sent.

When will I be notified of a final decision?

Applicants will be notified via email of decisions by the end of February. If you have not heard from us by March 1, please send email to [email protected] .

We do not provide results by phone.

Can admitted students start in a term other than the next Fall semester?

Applications submitted between September 15 and December 15 by 11:59pm EST are assessed for the following Fall semester. We do not provide a separate admission review cycle for the Spring semester. Individual research supervisors may invite incoming students to start their research during the summer term a few months earlier than their studies would normally begin. All other incoming students start their studies in late August for the Fall term.

Once admitted, applicants may request a one-year deferral to attend a specific academic program or for another approved reason, with single semester deferrals for the following Spring term granted only rarely.

PhD Admissions FAQ

If you have questions, not answered here or elsewhere on our web pages, send an email to  hst-phd-admissions [at] mit.edu (HST PhD Admissions staff) .

What is the MEMP PhD program?

The Medical Engineering and Medical Physics (MEMP) PhD program trains students to advance human health. The MEMP program is a unique combination of curriculum, practice and community that integrates:

  • A thorough graduate education in a classical discipline of engineering or physical science
  • In depth training in the biomedical sciences and the practice of medicine through preclinical coursework alongside medical students and clinical experiences in hospital wards
  • Access to research opportunities in labs at Harvard, MIT and Harvard teaching hospitals
  • A community of peers with career paths in medicine, science, engineering, business, and government
  • Original research in the form of a doctoral thesis

What makes MEMP unique?

The MEMP program differs significantly from many biomedical engineering (BME) doctoral programs because of its breadth and its depth in multiple dimensions. It not only emphasizes grounding in a classical discipline but also provides much more exposure to the medical sciences than most BME programs. This exposure comes in many forms, including biomedical sciences coursework in which MD students are peers, as well as through multiple clinical experiences. The MEMP program also provides an open environment that allows students to follow their interests even when they cross the conventional barriers between disciplines, professions and institutions.

Alumni tell us that the HST Introduction to Clinical Medicine (ICM), which is the capstone experience differentiating MEMP from traditional BME programs, is transformative and has a major impact on their careers.

  • The clinical experience is priceless.  Provides months of real-world exposure to the challenges - and rewards - of medicine, from diagnosis to treatment
  • Doing ICM also made my coursework relevant - I saw myriad applications for engineering expertise and abundant problems needing to be tackled. ICM brought these to life in a way lectures or textbooks never would have.
  • The types of students who are drawn to MEMP because of Intro to Clinical Medicine (ICM) are those who want to understand problems from many different angles, not just their engineering discipline, and builds the interdisciplinary culture that HST strives for right from the beginning .
  • From direct observation from my peers and colleagues, HST alumni, that have entered both academia and industry, the ICM experience has prepared them in ways that may have otherwise taken years to learn in order to interact with physicians and advance translation of ideas and products... Medicine is a culture and knowledge base that needs to be experienced in the clinic, learning with patients, and cannot be appreciated solely in the classroom.

Is my background appropriate for MEMP?

MEMP applicants should have an undergraduate (bachelors/baccalaureate) degree in an engineering discipline or a physical/quantitative science field (for example, chemistry, physics, computer science, computational neuroscience). A masters degree is not required. Successful candidates will have demonstrated a sustained interest in applications of engineering and physical science principles to biology or medicine through courses, research, and/or industrial experience.

When members of the admissions committee review submitted applications, they are assessing whether applicants are prepared to succeed in graduate courses in engineering or physical sciences at MIT. To determine if your background provides sufficient preparation for our program, you can review the program’s requirements for a concentration area here and here . Materials for many of the classes listed on the TQE form are available on MIT Open Courseware , which allows you to see the level at which the material is covered.

Does HST offer fee waivers?

Applying to graduate school can present a financial obstacle for many qualified applicants. Application fee waivers are available for US citizens and permanent residents who meet eligibility requirements set by the  MIT Office of Graduate Education . All requests are made through the MIT Office of Graduate Education process. 

How do I apply to MEMP?

All MEMP candidates are required to apply through MIT, using the MIT online Application for Graduate Admission. Note that MEMP students enrolled through MIT can work in the labs of any Harvard or MIT faculty member, including those at Harvard-affiliated hospitals and research institutes .

Can I apply to MEMP through via Harvard?

Candidates who have applied to MEMP via MIT and are simultaneously applying for graduate study with one of our partner units at Harvard – the Harvard Biophysics Graduate Program or the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) – may optionally follow these instructions to apply to participate in the MEMP curriculum in conjunction with their PhD at Harvard. This path is appropriate if:

  • you have a particular interest in the curriculum of Harvard's interdepartmental Biophysics Program; or
  • you are interested in joining the lab of a Harvard SEAS faculty member to work on a SEAS-based project. 

Successful applicants to MEMP through Harvard must be accepted by both their Harvard program and HST. If you are accepted to MEMP through both MIT and Harvard, you can choose which offer to accept.

Can I apply to multiple PhD programs in the same year?

Yes, you may apply to multiple MIT graduate degree programs in the same admissions cycle. HST encourages applicants to consider the suitability of programs at different institutions and in other MIT departments. Each application to MIT is considered separately, and MIT will charge a separate application fee for each program that you apply to.

How do MEMP students select their research advisors and thesis project?

MEMP PhD students admitted through MIT work in a wide variety of research areas and can work in the labs of any MIT or Harvard faculty member. This includes research labs located at many institutions affiliated  with Harvard  and  with MIT .   Faculty formally affiliated with the HST program are listed at http://hst.mit.edu/faculty-research/faculty , but MEMP students are not restricted to working with these individuals.

As part of the admissions process, promising applicants are invited for interviews. After offers of admission have been extended, admitted candidates will have opportunities to interact with faculty and current students as part of MEMP Open House in early March. Due to the large number of applications, we do not encourage candidates to contact potential research mentors prior to being invited to interview.

When can I begin an application?

The application website opens each year on August 1 for admission in fall of the following year.

What is the deadline to apply?

Application deadlines  are typically in early December preceding the fall term in which you intend to enroll.

We appreciate receiving all letters of recommendation by the application deadline, as that will expedite the processing of your application. We will accept letters of recommendation received up to 7 days after the application deadline. Applications will be considered incomplete and may not receive full consideration if the required three letters are not received by that extended deadline.

It is not possible to make changes to your application after the deadline, even if new information becomes available regarding publications, awards, grades, etc. If you are invited to interview, you can share those updates with members of the admissions committee at that time.

Is the GRE required?

No, GRE test scores are not required or accepted.

I'm an international student. Is an English proficiency exam required, and how do I submit exam scores?

HST places a high premium on both written and spoken communication skills. International students applying to HST should select one of the following options.

Option 1 : Submit IELTS, Cambridge English, or TOEFL exam scores. You must schedule your test so official results will be sent and received by our application deadline.

  • HST requires a minimum score of 7 on the IELTS test. IELTS does not use a code system; please designate Health Sciences and Technology (HST) as the MIT department for sending your scores. 
  • HST requires a minimum score of 185 for the Cambridge English C1 Advanced and C2 Proficiency assessments.
  • HST accepts all versions of the TOEFL iBT test and requires a minimum score of 100. Please have your official TOEFL test scores sent to MIT using institution code 3514 . A department code is not necessary. All scores received by MIT are matched to submitted applications. 

Option 2 : If you meet one of the following criteria, you are not required to submit IELTS, Cambridge English, or TOEFL scores:

  • English is your first (native) language;
  • You have received a degree from a high school, college, or university where English is the primary language of instruction;
  • You are currently enrolled in a degree program where English is the primary language of instruction

Please provide these answers in the  Personal Background  and Academic History  section of your MIT MEMP application. 

Option 3 : If you do not meet the criteria in Option 2 , but you believe that you have sufficient English proficiency for graduate study (for example, many years of professional activities reading, writing, and speaking English), you may choose not to submit test scores. In this case, you should do both of the following:

  • Describe your experience and skill levels in writing, reading, and speaking English in the Test Scores  section on your application. 
  • Ask one or more recommenders whose native language is English to include their subjective evaluation of your English language preparation for graduate study as part of their letter of recommendation.

If you cannot provide current IELTS, Cambridge English, or TOEFL scores and do not meet the criteria in Options 2 or 3 , you may apply to HST, but we cannot guarantee that your application will receive full consideration.

How do I convert international or letter grades to GPA?

Please include the cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) as reported on your transcript. You should not convert international or letter grades to a GPA. If there is no cumulative grade available, enter n/a for not applicable or 0 (zero).  

What supporting documents are required, and how do I submit them?

Specific instructions for submitting resumes/CVs,  transcripts,  and letters of recommendation  follow. Please do not send copies of journal articles, certificates, photographs, or any other materials; they will not be reviewed.

Test score reports: We do not accept GRE or MCAT scores. Detailed instructions for international applicants submitting TOEFL or IELTS scores can be found here .

Resumes/CVs:  The online application will prompt you to upload a resume or CV.

Transcripts: As part of the online application, you will upload grade reports or unofficial transcripts from each college or university where a degree has or will be earned.  Candidates who are offered admission and choose to enroll  will be asked to arrange for an official transcript to be sent directly from each school where a degree has been awarded.

Please do not send official transcripts until you are prompted to do so. We accept both paper and electronic transcripts. Transcripts that do not already include an English version must be accompanied by a certified English translation.

Letters of recommendation:  Three letters are required, and one or two additional letters (up to a total of five) will be accepted. At least two letters should be from people well acquainted with your academic work and research abilities. 

Each letter should be on institutional letterhead and include a legible signature. Letters should be received by the application deadline, but no later than December 9 .

Whenever possible, letters should be submitted online. We do not accept letters of recommendation by email or fax. If your recommender encounters difficulties, instruct them to  hst-phd-admissions [at] mit.edu (contact us) for assistance.

May I include a publication that has been submitted or is currently under review, in revision, accepted for publication or in press?

Publication information should be listed in the applicant's CV.

Applicants may refer to submitted manuscripts - such as journal articles or conference proceedings - at any stage of the publication process. Please clarify the current state of the review process. If you are invited to interview, you may be asked to provide an update on the current status of a manuscript. 

May I send additional supporting materials?

No, please do not send additional supporting materials. They will not be reviewed.

What happens after HST receives my application?

Once your application is complete, you will receive an email confirmation. Due to the high volume of activity near the deadline, it may take a few days to receive this confirmation. We appreciate your patience and understanding. If your application is incomplete (for example, due to missing letters of recommendation), you will receive status updates via email until the application is complete or through December 20, whichever comes first. 

Applications are reviewed by multiple members of the HST PhD admissions committee, and selected candidates are invited to participate in virtual interviews that occur in late January. Offers of admission are sent by mid-February and admitted candidates are invited to visit Cambridge for a series of Open House events in late February or early March. Admitted candidates must accept or decline their offer of admission by April 15.

Can I send an updated material after I submit my application?

Unfortunately, due to a large number of applications, we are not able to replace material within a submitted application unless there is an egregious error (i.e. wrong letter of recommendation, a file will not open, etc.)

It is not possible to make changes to your application after the deadline, even if new information becomes available regarding publications, awards, grades, etc. If you are invited to interview, you can share those updates with members of the admissions committee at that time. 

When will I know if I have been selected for an interview? When are the interviews?

In mid-January, promising candidates will receive an email invitation to partcipate in video conference interviews. Candidates who are not selected to interview will receive formal notification of their status as soon as possible.

The remote interviews will be scheduled to take place in late January. Interviews will be offered at a variety of times throughout the day, Monday thru Friday. The specific time slots will be shared with candidates when they are invited to interview, and each interviewing candidate will ultimately be assigned to a single two-hour block. As part of that process, we will make every effort to accommodate scheduling constraints and preferences. 

How will I know whether or not I have been accepted?

Applicants invited to interview will be notified by mid-February of HST's decision. All notifications are sent via email.

Candidates offered admission will be asked to let us know their decision as soon as possible, but no later than April 15th. 

What are my chances of being accepted to MEMP?

The admissions committee reviews applications holistically, considering all aspects of an applicant’s life experiences in addition to academic achievements, research experience, and letters of recommendation. Successful candidates typically have a grade point average of 3.6 or higher on a 4.0 scale, strong letters of recommendation from faculty or others with whom they have worked closely, and relevant prior research experience. We understand that not all applicants have had the same access to undergraduate research experiences. 

Admission to MEMP is competitive, with approximately 10% of applicants invited to interview and offers of admission extended to roughly half of the interviewed candidates.

What types of financial support are available?

HST MEMP is a fully-funded program. Students in good academic standing receive full financial support – consisting of living expenses, tuition, and health insurance - for the duration of their graduate studies.  Almost all incoming students receive departmental fellowship support for the first academic year. In subsequent years, students receive full financial support from a combination of  research assistantships (RAs) , teaching assistantships (TAs) , and fellowships . HST is proud that more than 1/3 of our students are supported by external fellowships. More information is available here: https://hst.mit.edu/academic-programs/financial-support/MEMPs . 

Where can I learn more about MIT’s tuition, fees, and estimated cost of living?

As described above, all students in good academic standing receive full financial support – consisting of stipend, tuition, and health insurance - for the duration of their graduate studies. For more detailed information regarding the cost of attendance, including specific costs for tuition and fees, books and supplies, housing and food as well as transportation, please visit the MIT Student Financial Services website at  https://sfs.mit.edu/graduate-students/guide/grad-cost-of-attendance/ .  

I'm an international student. How does that effect my chances of being admitted and receiving first-year funding?

All applications are evaluated without consideration of nationality or citizenship. Similarly, funding offers to admitted candidates are typically the same for domestic and international candidates.  International students comprise approximately 25% of currently enrolled MEMP students.

If I'm accepted, can I defer my admission until the following year?

You should apply to MEMP by the application deadline that immediately precedes the fall term in which you intend to enroll. HST does not grant deferrals for students to pursue business ventures, work experience, public service opportunities, travel or educational programs unrelated to medical engineering. HST will consider requests for deferrals in cases where applicants receive opportunities for international study via the Churchill Scholarship, Whitaker International Fellowship, Rhodes Scholarship and other similar programs.

Can I apply to MEMP if my undergraduate major is in the life sciences?

A traditional life sciences curriculum is generally not adequate preparation for MEMP.  However, some successful applicants have an undergraduate (bachelors/baccalureate) degree in life sciences augmented by extensive coursework in mathematics, physics, engineering, and/or computer science. This may take the form of a formal minor program or a less-formal collection of courses that provide a similar level of expertise in a quantitative field.

When the admissions committee reviews submitted applications, they are assessing whether applicants are prepared to succeed in the relevant graduate courses at MIT. To determine if your background provides sufficient preparation, you can review the program’s requirements for a concentration area and the classes that fulfill that requirement . Materials for many of the concentration area classes are available here , which allows you to see the level at which the material is covered and to assess your preparation.

Can I apply to MEMP if I already have a medical degree or if I am currently enrolled in medical school?

The MEMP curriculum combines training in engineering or a physical/quantitative science discipline with classes in biomedical sciences and clinical experiences. The admissions process generally favors candidates who would benefit from both elements of the training over those candidates who already hold a medical degree or are enrolled in medical school. If you choose to apply, your statement of purpose should specifically address the rationale for your proposed training in MEMP, as opposed to a more traditional science or engineering PhD program. How will the MEMP curriculum enhance your career path, given that you have already obtained biomedical sciences training and deep clinical perspectives?

Additionally, if you have not studied an engineering or physical/quantitative science discipline in addition to medicine, you should consult the FAQ here .

Can I apply if...

... I'm a first year grad student at MIT in Mechanical Engineering (or another engineering or physical/quantitative science discipline)? I didn't know about HST when I applied to graduate school, but now I'm really interested in MEMP.

Yes, you may. If admitted, you would transfer from Mechanical Engineering to MEMP. It's very likely that the coursework and research that you are doing in your first year of graduate school can be used to satisfy requirements towards your MEMP degree.

Will I have to take MEMP Quals if...

... I'm a first year grad student at MIT in Chemical Engineering ( or another engineering or physical/quantitative   science discipline ), I've already passed my quals in my department, and I've been accepted to MEMP for next year?

If you've already passed doctoral qualifying exams in another department at MIT, then you can submit a petition requesting to substitute that qualifying exam for your MEMP quals. The faculty committee that oversees MEMP quals will decide on your petition by reviewing your academic performance and comparing the ChemE quals to the MEMP quals.

Do MEMP students get a master's degree on the way to their PhD?

Master's degrees are not required in MEMP, and HST does not typically grant master's degrees to MEMP students. It is possible for MEMP students to earn a master's degree in a related field (for example, electrical engineering or mechanical engineering). If you are interested in this option, you must apply directly to the appropriate department for their master's program and notify HST if admitted.

In most cases, the coursework and research required for the master's degree can also be used to satisfy requirements towards your MEMP degree. Students will be assigned an Academic Advisor from both graduate departments and will complete master's degree requirements first.

Who do I contact for other questions?

We're happy to help. Just email us at  hst-phd-admissions [at] mit.edu (subject: MEMP%20Admissions%20question) (hst-phd-admissions[at]mit[dot]edu)

MIT Admissions Blog

Learn more directly from HST students via  MIT's Admissions Blog .

Five students on boat cruise, smiling

HST distinguished scholars, on a boat cruise 2022

  • Who’s Teaching What
  • Subject Updates
  • MEng program
  • Opportunities
  • Minor in Computer Science
  • Resources for Current Students
  • Program objectives and accreditation
  • Graduate program requirements
  • Admission process
  • Degree programs
  • Graduate research
  • EECS Graduate Funding
  • Resources for current students
  • Student profiles
  • Instructors
  • DEI data and documents
  • Recruitment and outreach
  • Community and resources
  • Get involved / self-education
  • Rising Stars in EECS
  • Graduate Application Assistance Program (GAAP)
  • MIT Summer Research Program (MSRP)
  • Sloan-MIT University Center for Exemplary Mentoring (UCEM)
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Artificial Intelligence + Decision-making
  • AI and Society
  • AI for Healthcare and Life Sciences
  • Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning
  • Biological and Medical Devices and Systems
  • Communications Systems
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Fabrication and Manufacturing
  • Computer Architecture
  • Educational Technology
  • Electronic, Magnetic, Optical and Quantum Materials and Devices
  • Graphics and Vision
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Information Science and Systems
  • Integrated Circuits and Systems
  • Nanoscale Materials, Devices, and Systems
  • Natural Language and Speech Processing
  • Optics + Photonics
  • Optimization and Game Theory
  • Programming Languages and Software Engineering
  • Quantum Computing, Communication, and Sensing
  • Security and Cryptography
  • Signal Processing
  • Systems and Networking
  • Systems Theory, Control, and Autonomy
  • Theory of Computation
  • Departmental History
  • Departmental Organization
  • Visiting Committee
  • Graduate programs
  • Graduate Admissions Information Letter
  • Past Terms' Subject Updates and WTW
  • Subject numbering
  • FAQ about Fall 2024 Changes
  • 2022 Curriculum Transition
  • 6-1: Electrical Science and Engineering
  • 6-2: Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • 6-3: Computer Science and Engineering
  • 6-4: Artificial Intelligence and Decision Making
  • 6-7: Computer Science and Molecular Biology
  • 6-9: Computation and Cognition
  • 11-6: Urban Science and Planning with Computer Science
  • 6-14: Computer Science, Economics, and Data Science
  • Requirements
  • Application, Acceptance, and Deferral
  • Thesis Proposal
  • MEng Thesis
  • UROP and SuperUROP
  • Study Abroad
  • USAGE Members, 2023-24
  • 6-A Industrial Program
  • Degree Audits and Departmental Petitions
  • Space on Campus
  • Resources for International Students
  • Resources for Incoming Double Majors
  • Resources for Advisors
  • Graduate Admissions FAQs
  • What faculty members are looking for in a grad school application essay.
  • Conditions of Appointment as a Teaching Assistant or Fellow
  • RA Appointments
  • Fellowship Appointments
  • Materials and Forms for Graduate Students
  • Subject Updates Spring 2024
  • Subject Updates Fall 2023
  • Subject Updates Spring 2023
  • Subject Updates Fall 2022
  • Subject Updates Spring 2022
  • Subject Updates Fall 2021

Dear prospective applicant,

Thank you for your interest in graduate study in EECS.

For information on EECS, please visit our web page:  http://www-eecs.mit.edu/ . The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department does NOT require GRE scores for admission purposes. Admission is determined by GPA (Grade Point Average) although there is not an official cut-off, letters of recommendation (we need three of them) and a “Statement of Objectives” in which you write an essay detailing your research interests. For more information about writing a Statement of Objectives, see  this article from the MIT EECS Communication Lab . A very strong background in math, physics, engineering, or computer science is a necessity. Admission for the limited number of openings is extremely competitive and each year we are forced to turn down hundreds of applicants with excellent credentials. Since we do not have a terminal Master’s program in EECS, everyone must apply for PhD. Applicants who gain admission pursue the Master’s degree on the way to the PhD. If a student already has a Master’s from another school, there is no need to do another Master’s degree here at MIT.

We use an online application system which you can access by going to  http://web.mit.edu  and link to admission. The online system becomes available around the middle of September.

Decisions on financial aid are made after admission decisions are reached. International students are eligible for research assistantships which pay a monthly stipend and full tuition. Research supervisors are determined after admission decisions are reached or shortly after registering in EECS in the Fall. Admitted students are also eligible for certain fellowships.

International students must take the TOEFL exam and earn at least a score of 100 (internet-based). In some cases, the TOEFL can be waived; such as if you’ve been in U.S. for at least two years, or if your country’s first language is English. International students can also take the IELTS exam if the TOEFL is not available to you. We need to see a score of ‘7’ on this test. It also can be waived for the same reasons as the TOEFL.

We do NOT offer spring term admission. The deadline for applying for Fall Term 2022 is December 15, 2021. The online application will be available between September 15, 2021 and December 15, 2021. 

Good luck with your application!

Admission FAQs

mit phd acceptance letter

Frequently Asked Questions

How do i apply.

Fill out the ChemE online application. The application is open from early-September to November 13.

  • Chemical Engineering Online Application
  • $75 Application Fee
  • Unofficial College Transcript(s)
  • Resume or CV
  • Three Letters of Recommendation
  • International students: Official TOEFL or IELTS Test Scores

Do you offer a Graduate Application Assistance Program?

Is the deadline the same for the application and supporting documents, how do i pay for the application fee, can the application fee be waived or deferred, i applied last year; how can i reapply, is it ok to send copies of awards, papers or extra letters of recommendation to supplement my application, i will be applying before i finish the fall term. should i update my application with a new transcript which includes my fall term grades, may i apply to other departments or programs outside of the chemical engineering department, are there any differences in the application requirements for the different graduate programs (ph.d., ph.d. cep, m.s. cep), will the department keep me informed of my application status, what are the selection criteria.

Understanding of the Chemical Engineering Fundamentals: The candidate’s core knowledge of chemical kinetics, transport phenomena, thermodynamics, and the underlying quantitative skills that form the core solution methods for Chemical Engineers.

Analytical and Scientific Preparation: A candidate’s background in chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, and computer science as relevant to the candidate’s area(s) of interest.

Drive and Persistence: A candidate’s commitment to education and research and ability to overcome adversity when challenges are encountered.

Excellence in Research: A candidate’s demonstrated accomplishment in scientific research, including scientific creativity and ability to formulate important scientific questions.

Character: A candidate’s integrity, leadership potential, and ability to work effectively on teams and as a community member within a diverse and multicultural environment.

Communication Skills: A candidate’s demonstrated effectiveness with scientific written and oral communication in English on technical and non-technical subjects.

My undergraduate experience was affected by COVID-19. What will this mean for my application?

Can i visit your department or contact faculty before being admitted, can i contact faculty, how can i submit my gre score, can i waive the ielts, toefl, cambridge english exams, how do i report my ielts, toefl, or cambridge english exam scores, when is the last date i can take the ielts, toefl, or cambridge english exam, what is the minimum requirement for the ielts, what is the minimum requirement for the toefl, what is the minimum requirement for the cambridge english exam, what degree programs do you offer in chemical engineering, can i apply to more than one degree program in your department, if i am not admitted to the phd program, will i be considered for the mscep program, since i have been in the workforce for the last few years, it will be difficult to obtain all letters of recommendation from faculty members. is it ok to ask my employer/supervisors to write letters in support of my application, are interdisciplinary programs available.

  • Technology and Policy Program (TPP)
  • Program in Polymers and Soft Matter (PPSM)
  • Leaders for Global Operations (LGO)
  • MIT Doctoral Program in Computational Science and Engineering (CSE)

Does the Department admit its own S.B. students to the graduate program?

Do i need to have research experience prior to applying, i do not have a background in chemical engineering, can i still apply, are there courses i should take to strengthen my engineering background.

  • Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering 10.34
  • Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 10.40
  • Analysis of Transport Phenomena 10.50
  • Chemical Reactor Engineering 10.65

Is there any way to pursue part-time study at MIT?

Do you offer financial support, does the stipend cover health insurance, do you offer spring or summer term admission, can i receive transfer credit for graduate courses i have already taken, what is the review process timeline, can you give me an idea of my chances for admission, based on scores or class rank, for example, if admitted, can i defer my admission, whom do i contact if i have questions about the application process.

Economics Department corridor

Have questions about applying? Please check our FAQ page  before emailing us at [email protected] . We partner with Harvard Economics to connect prospective students from underrepresented groups with graduate student mentors. Details of this Application Assistance and Mentoring Program are available below.

Application requirements

The application to our doctoral program is open annually from September 15-December 15 for admission the following September. The application for September 2024 admission is now closed.

Your application is considered complete when you have successfully submitted the following requirements by the December 15 application deadline:

  • Online application
  • $75 application fee
  • Scanned copy of college transcripts
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • TOEFL, IELTS, or Cambridge English Qualification (C1 & C2) test score (any one) for international students whose native language is not English
  • The GRE is NOT required as part of applications for the 2024-2025 cycle (for September 2024 admission)

To request a fee waiver, please complete MIT's application fee waiver form . You should carefully review the eligibility criteria prior to applying. A representative from MIT’s Office of Graduate Education will be in touch about the outcome of your request.

Transcripts

Please upload one copy of each transcript from all universities you have attended. If you're admitted to the program, we'll require you to have an official copy of your transcript(s) sent to us from the university's registrar. Your transcript will be verified upon receipt and any discrepancy between the transcript you uploaded and the official transcript will result in a withdrawal of our offer of admission.

Letters of recommendation

Letters must be submitted/uploaded by the letter writers by December 15. Please send the email request to your letter writers via the 'Letter Status' section in your application.

TOEFL, IELTS, or Cambridge English Qualification scores

International students whose first language is not English are required to submit   English language proficiency test scores unless they are a US citizen or permanent resident. The department will also waive the requirement for international non-native speakers of English who have spent three or more years studying in an accredited school or university where English is the language of instruction.  (Please note: verification of the institution’s language of instruction may be requested.)

We accept the following test scores:

  • Cambridge English C1 Advanced
  • Cambridge English C2 Proficiency

If you meet the criteria for a waiver, you can make a request to waive the English proficiency exam requirement on the online application, under the "test scores" section.

TOEFL, IELTS, and Cambridge English Qualification scores are valid or accepted for two years. Scores that expire while an application is under review will be considered valid.

Submitting your scores

Your online application will prompt you to attach a scanned copy of your test scores. Your scores must also be sent directly to MIT from ETS, IELTS, or Cambridge . MIT's school code for the TOEFL is 3514. The TOEFL code for the Department of Economics is 84. IELTS and Cambridge do not require a code. Please enter "Massachusetts Institute of Technology- Graduate Admissions."

Official scores must be received from ETS, IELTS, or Cambridge by December 15. Please take your proficiency exam of choice by November 30 to allow for proper reporting time. If your score report arrives shortly after the deadline, it will be accepted, but your application may not be reviewed until your scores are received.

Minimum score requirements

The minimum requirement for the TOEFL is PBT: 600, iBT: 100. The minimum requirement for the IELTS is 7.  The minimum requirement for the Cambridge English Qualifications is a CEFR score of 185.

GRE (optional)

The department is waiving the GRE requirement for the current application period, but you can report your scores if you wish.

Your online application will give you the option to attach a scanned copy of your test scores or a screenshot of the scores from the ETS website. You can also send a score report directly to MIT from ETS. MIT's school code for the GRE is 3514. The code for the Department of Economics is 1801.

If you would like your scores to be considered as part of your application, you should take the GRE by November 30 to allow for reporting time.

Personal statement (optional)

We encourage applicants to include a statement of objectives/personal statement with their application, though it is not required. The statement is an opportunity to explain what makes you a good candidate for the program. You should describe why you wish to attend graduate school, what you would like to study, and any research experience. Describe one or more accomplishments you are particularly proud of that suggest that you will succeed in your chosen area of research. You can also share any unique perspective or life experience that would contribute to the program.   Statements are typically two single-spaced pages.

Application Assistance and Mentoring Program

Many students interested in an economics PhD experience disparate degrees of support in the application process. The Application Assistance and Mentoring Program (AAMP) aims to mitigate these gaps by helping students from underrepresented groups connect with a graduate student mentor in MIT or Harvard’s PhD economics programs.

Mentors can provide:

  • Advice on graduate school and fellowship applications, including questions about the application process and feedback on application materials.
  • Information about economics research, life as a PhD student or in an academic career, for students who are deciding whether a PhD in economics is the right choice for them.

The AAMP aims to increase the pipeline of diverse talent in economics PhD programs and welcomes participation from all groups underrepresented in economics, including but not limited to: Black, Hispanic-Latinx, Native American, low-income, and LGBTQ+ students, women, students with disabilities, and students who are the first in their families to go to college. The AAMP welcomes participation among students at various stages of their economics studies, including undergraduates and college graduates. The AAMP is open to students who are curious about the academic economics experience and interested in figuring out if it’s right for them. 

Interested participants should fill out the application linked below. We will accept applications until July 17, 2023. Mentorship will begin over the summer and continue through Fall 2023. Mentees who prefer to meet for a single “coffee chat” may indicate their preference on the form. We will do our best to match all interested applicants with a mentor; however, demand may exceed the availability of mentors.

Please note that the MIT / Harvard Economics AAMP is a volunteer-based, student-run program. This program is not considered part of the admissions process for the Economics PhD at MIT or Harvard, nor will any student's participation in the AAMP be considered by the Graduate Admissions Committee at either school.

Please direct any questions to [email protected] . To join the program, please click the link below to fill out the form.

Click here for the application form If you are a faculty, program advisor/coordinator, or student interested in being notified when 2024-2025 AAMP applications open, please fill out this form .

GradApply

First-year applicants: Letters of recommendation

We require letters of recommendation from two teachers. We recommend one evaluation from a math/science teacher, and one from a humanities, social science, or language teacher. We also require materials from your school counselor (typically including your official transcript  and—when available—a School Profile and letter of recommendation).

You will be able to request recommendations in your MIT application portal . You can request these letters at any point before submitting your application, but we recommend sending the request as soon as you have determined who you would like to ask so that they have as much time as possible to write about you!

(If you’re a teacher looking for guides on how to write good letters of recommendation, visit  this page ) .

Please note: You will only be able to submit your application with two teacher evaluations and one school counselor/Secondary School Report. You may also include up to one optional supplemental evaluation. Please refer to the instructions on how to submit recommendations below.

Recommendations: Whom to ask

MIT requires two letters of recommendation from teachers. One recommendation should be from a math or science teacher, and one should be from a humanities, social science, or language teacher, although this is not a hard requirement.

You should ask a teacher who has taught you in an academic class in high school. Ideally, this will also be a teacher who knows you as more than just a student who does well on all the tests. We find that the best recommendations are written by teachers who know an applicant well as both a student and a person.

How to submit

Your school counselor (or equivalent) should submit the Secondary School Report, along with your transcript. Most counselors also attach a School Profile, describing your school’s curriculum and community. Some school counselors do not or cannot write letters on your behalf. We don’t hold this against you at all! We understand that there are different types of schools out there, and you will not be penalized in this case.

We are also able to accept a supplemental evaluation—we simply ask that it provides different or additional context beyond the two we’ve already requested. Most applicants and most admitted students do not submit any supplemental recommendations.

Applicants should enter their recommender information into the Recommendations section of the application regardless of how the recommender intends to submit their materials. Our preference is for recommenders to use our application portal to submit documents. However, they do have the option to submit their additional documents via Naviance, SCOIR, or other methods. Applications will not be disadvantaged if recommenders submit their recommendations through a third-party service other than the MIT application portal.

ISO Home

Materials Science and Engineering

Materials Science and Engineering

77 Massachusetts Avenue Building 6-107 Cambridge MA, 02139

617-253-3302

[email protected]

Website: Materials Science and Engineering

Application Opens: September 15

Deadline: December 1 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time

Fee: $75.00

Terms of Enrollment

Interdisciplinary programs, standardized tests.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

  • Minimum score required: 7
  • Electronic scores send to: MIT Graduate Admissions

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL)

  • Minimum score required: 100 (iBT) 600 (PBT)
  • Institute code: 3514
  • Department code: 69

Waiver of TOEFL/IELTS may be available.

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – Not required

Areas of Research

  • Archaeological Materials
  • Biomedical Materials
  • Computational Materials Science and Engineering
  • Electronic, Photonic, and Magnetic Materials
  • High-Performance Structural Materials and Alloys
  • Materials for Energy and the Environment
  • Materials Economics
  • Molecular and Polymeric Materials
  • Nanotechnology, Nanodevices, and Nanomaterials

Financial Support

S.M./Ph.D. students are generally supported by a variety of  fellowships , research assistantships, and teaching assistantships during their time at MIT. These appointments pay tuition, a competitive stipend, and health insurance. Students are encouraged to apply for outside fellowships to help finance their graduate studies. Some domestic students are supported by NSF, NDSEG, Hertz, and Whitaker fellowships, as well as other government and corporate sources. Some international students are supported by their government or a scholarship agency (e.g., Samsung scholarship, ILJU, Royal Thai government, Kwanjeong Scholarship, Canadian NSERC).

Application Requirements

  • Online application
  • Department of Materials Science and Engineering questions
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Transcripts
  • English proficiency exam scores

Special Instructions

The department is suspending the GRE requirement for this year’s application cycle for Fall 2024 admissions and will neither require nor accept GRE scores as supplementary material.

Applicants interested in an interdisciplinary program (e.g., PPSM, TPP) should also check with that particular program for additional requirements.

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COMMENTS

  1. MIT Acceptance Letter: Real and Official

    College Admissions. Each year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology receives nearly 20,000 applications from high school hopefuls. Only 8% of them get a MIT acceptance letter. For example, in 2014, MIT accepted 1,447 applicants from 18,356 candidates. That's a small 7.9% admission rate.

  2. When are decisions announced?

    Help. FAQ. First-year application. When are decisions announced? Decisions will be released mid-December for Early Action and mid-March for Regular Action. We'll email instructions for accessing the decision letters as soon as the official release date (s) and time (s) have been determined.

  3. Understanding How MIT's Ph.D. Application Process Works

    MIT's admission process involves a detailed evaluation of an applicant's prior academic records, test scores, letters of recommendation, statement of purpose among other elements that demonstrate an applicant's capability to contribute to their chosen field of study.

  4. Graduate School Application Materials

    Graduate School Application Materials. Academic Transcript. Current students and alumni can request electronic or paper copies of transcripts through the MIT Registrar's Office. The Registrar's Office has detailed instructions on requesting transcripts for current students and alumni. Letters of Recommendation.

  5. Frequently asked questions

    Graduate Admissions. Frequently asked questions. We have answered many of the most common questions in the sections below. Because of the decentralized nature of graduate admissions, most of these questions are answered in general terms and may not apply to all departments.

  6. Graduate Admissions

    MIT Office of Graduate Education 77 Massachusetts Avenue Room 3-107 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

  7. Admissions Requirements

    Letters of Recommendation. We require three letters of recommendation. Academic letters are preferred, especially those providing evidence of research potential. We allow for an optional fourth recommendation, but no more than four recommendations are allowed.

  8. Graduate Admissions FAQs

    What documents are necessary for applying to EECS? 7. I am an MIT undergraduate in EECS. Should I fill out the "Record of Subjects"? 8. Should I list the subjects that I am currently taking on the "Record of Subjects"? 9. Are there separate admission procedures for Master's and PhD programs? 10.

  9. Application for PhD studies in BE

    Research experience. MIT BE PhD students spend most of their time in the program conducting research in partnership with faculty advisors. Conducting impactful research is a challenging endeavor, and most successful applicants describe a strong track record of research experience and accomplishment.

  10. Admissions FAQ

    Send us an email at [email protected]. I applied last year; how can I reapply? May I include supplemental materials with my application? What degree do I need to apply? Can I apply if I already have another PhD or doctoral degree? Is it required or recommended that I complete any specific undergraduate coursework?

  11. admitted

    You have until May 1 to officially accept or decline your offer of admission. How we built the Class of 2028 Ask any admissions officer at MIT, and they will tell you that while grades and scores are important, it's really the match between the applicant and the Institute that drives our selection process.

  12. MIT's letter process

    Dear letter writer: MIT's process for asking letters of recommendation is designed to make submitting a letter as painless as possible and to avoid spam filters deleting requests for letters. To achieve these goals we ask the applicant to email you the link to submit a letter. Emails from the applicant are more likely to reach you.

  13. Graduate Admissions

    —PhD, SMBT, and SMArchS applicants have until January 12 due to the updated statement of objectives question.— Dec. 23—Jan 3: Staff on break (no email responses during this time) March 15—April 1: Application results released April 2, 2024: Admitted Students Open House April 15 (5 p.m. EST): Decisions due from admitted students

  14. Graduate Admissions » MIT Physics

    Application Assistance. Admissions/Application FAQs. Thank you for considering the PhD program in Physics at MIT. Information regarding our graduate program and our application process can be found below and through the links on this page.

  15. PhD Admissions FAQ

    Letters of recommendation: Three letters are required, and one or two additional letters (up to a total of five) will be accepted. At least two letters should be from people well acquainted with your academic work and research abilities.

  16. Graduate Admissions Information Letter

    Dear prospective applicant, Thank you for your interest in graduate study in EECS. For information on EECS, please visit our web page: http://www-eecs.mit.edu/ . The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department does NOT require GRE scores for admission purposes.

  17. Admission FAQs

    $75 Application Fee. Unofficial College Transcript (s) Resume or CV. Three Letters of Recommendation. International students: Official TOEFL or IELTS Test Scores. Do you offer a Graduate Application Assistance Program?

  18. Admissions

    Application requirements. The application to our doctoral program is open annually from September 15-December 15 for admission the following September. The application for September 2024 admission is now closed. Your application is considered complete when you have successfully submitted the following requirements by the December 15 application ...

  19. Hello Potential Applicant to the EECS PhD Program!

    This web site allows you to prepare and submit an application to MIT EECS for Graduate Admissions. Hello Potential Applicant to the EECS PhD Program! We want to welcome you as you consider applying to the doctoral program in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology!

  20. Doctoral Degrees

    Doctoral Degrees. A doctoral degree requires the satisfactory completion of an approved program of advanced study and original research of high quality.

  21. How to write good letters of recommendation

    Parents and educators. How to write good letters of recommendation. Because of our highly competitive applicant pool, letters of recommendation hold substantial weight in our admissions decisions. A well-written letter for an outstanding applicant can show impressive characteristics beyond their own self-advocacy.

  22. Letters of recommendation

    Apply. First-year applicants. Letters of recommendation. We require letters of recommendation from two teachers. We recommend one evaluation from a math/science teacher, and one from a humanities, social science, or language teacher.

  23. Materials Science and Engineering

    Website: Materials Science and Engineering. Apply here. Application Opens: September 15. Deadline: December 1 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time. Fee: $75.00.