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Mechanical Engineering

Position opening: offshore wind turbine energy, graduate research assistantship for a phd student in, safe and efficient installation methods for offshore wind turbine components and systems.

phd student position in dynamic response of offshore wind turbines

Installation of offshore wind turbines is a highly demanding task and is a significant cost driver for offshore wind energy. Currently, jack-up crane vessels are used in shallow waters to install fixed offshore wind turbines, where the sensitive turbine components are lifted and assembled piece by piece. This installation method is complex, time-consuming, and allows a limited weather window for installation. However, the rapidly growing size of offshore wind turbines, their deployment in deeper waters, and rapid growth in floating offshore wind turbine technology question the current industrial practices.

This PhD position aims to develop novel, safe, and cost-effective solutions for installing bottom fixed and floating offshore wind turbines. The PhD student will work with experiments and develop and validate numerical models and tools for dynamic response analysis of offshore wind turbine components and systems during installation. In addition, efficient methodologies for operability and safety assessment of installation methods will be developed. The project may include case studies to install individual blades and integrated rotor-nacelle assembly onto bottom-fixed foundations and floating foundations using jack-up and floating installation vessels. The PhD position will be financially supported. For details about the position, please contact Dr. Amrit Verma ( [email protected] ).

Required Qualifications

  • Background in the field of offshore wind engineering, ocean engineering, marine structures, hydrodynamics, naval architecture or thesis in a closely related field
  • Demonstrated research and academic excellence
  • Good experience with computing languages such as Python or MATLAB
  • Basic experience with ocean engineering software such as OrcaFlex, Wamit, or SIMA
  • Hard-working, self-motivated and independent

To apply, please send to Dr. Amrit Verma ( [email protected] ) (as one PDF file):

1) One-page cover letter addressing the motivation for the position

2) Curriculum vitae and sample publications

3) Unofficial transcripts (undergraduate and MS)

4) GRE scores (if available)

PhD in Offshore Wind Energy Engineering

The PhD in Offshore Wind Energy Engineering is the highest level of study and requires a serious commitment. Students who have excellent academic backgrounds and demonstrated capability for independent study/research are encouraged to apply to the doctoral program. Students entering the doctoral program are expected to meet the general admission requirements of the graduate school; gain acceptance into the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and hold a bachelor's or master's degree in engineering or a related field.

The program provides interdisciplinary training in offshore wind engineering, transmission infrastructure, maritime studies, ocean resource characterization, and environmental permitting. Students receive world-class training in wind policy, technical applications, and project management to prepare them for jobs in global industry, academia, and the public sector.

Potential research areas include:

  • Infrastructure and transmission
  • Site characterization and permitting
  • Foundation design and monitoring

Courses include the Offshore Wind Energy Engineering MS curriculum described below, plus five additional courses, chosen in consultation with the program advisor, consisting of technical training, policy, economics, and management courses. Master's degrees require a minimum of 30 SHUs and the fulfillment of at least 10 courses at the 100-level or above with grades of S (satisfactory) or at least a B-.

Requirements

  • CEE-101 The Energy Transition
  • CEE-105 Finite Element Analysis
  • CEE-106 Structural Dynamics
  • CEE-123 Advanced Structural Analysis
  • CEE-127 Structural Health Monitoring
  • CEE-146 Foundation Engineering
  • CEE-220 Offshore Wind Structures
  • CEE-242 Advanced Soil Mechanics
  • CEE-244 Laboratory and In-situ measurements of Soil Properties
  • CEE-245 Geomechanics
  • CEE-260 OSW Ports and Supply Chain
  • ECE-170 Power Systems
  • CEE-132 Data Science for Sustainability
  • CEE-187 Geographic Information Systems
  • CEE-188 Building Information Modeling
  • CEE-227 Reliability
  • CEE Courses from the Technical Core listed above and other CEE courses in consultation with advisor
  • Up to two courses from the ECE Department in consultation with advisor
  • Up to two courses from the ME Department in consultation with advisor
  • Up to two courses from the CS Department in consultation with advisor
  • CEE-261 OSW Workforce Safety and Equity
  • DHP-205 Global Maritime Affairs
  • DHP-P251 Energy, Entrepreneurship & Finance
  • DHP-P254 Climate Change Policy and Law
  • DHP-P255 International Energy Policy
  • Courses from the Economics Department
  • Courses from the Department of Urban & Environmental Policy & Planning
  • Courses from the Gordon Institute

Doctoral students are required to take five additional courses, chosen in consultation with their program advisor, consisting of technical training, policy, economics, and management courses.

  • Laurie Gaskins Baise : Geosystems Engineering, GIS Mapping
  • John (Jack) Germaine : Geomaterials and Systems, Testing Methods
  • Eric M. Hines : Project Leadership, Structural Design, Large-Scale Testing, Integrated Planning
  • Daniel A. Kuchma : Design, Behavior, and Modeling of Foundation Structures, Large-Scale Testing, Design Life, Corrosion and Fatigue
  • Jonathan Lamontagne : Decision-Making Under Uncertainty, Electric Grid Integration, Integrated Global Change Assessment
  • Babak Moaveni : Structural Health Monitoring, System and Damage Identification of Civil Structures, Experimental Modal Analysis, Signal Processing, Uncertainty Quantification
  • Masoud Sanayei : Structural Engineering, Health Monitoring of Bridges, Nondestructive Testing, Structural Dynamics, Floor Vibrations for Human Comfort and Sensitive Equipment

Learn more about Offshore Wind Energy Engineering at Tufts University

As governments race to reduce carbon emissions and avert the impact of climate change, Tufts University is preparing tomorrow’s renewable energy leaders through its School of Engineering’s  Offshore Wind Energy Engineering  program.

Meet five OWEE graduate students.

Offshore Wind Energy Engineering

The PhD program in offshore wind energy engineering provides interdisciplinary training in offshore wind engineering, transmission infrastructure, maritime studies, ocean resource characterization, and environmental permitting.

The program is offered through the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering .

Program Highlights

At Tufts, you’ll earn a student-centered education at a top-notch research university, with small classes and cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research led by innovative faculty who are here to help you succeed. Common research areas include:

  • Infrastructure and transmission
  • Site characterization and permitting
  • Foundation design and monitoring

The PhD program curriculum includes the MS program course requirements, plus five additional courses, chosen in consultation with the program advisor, consisting of technical training, policy, economics, and management courses.

Career Highlights

Offshore wind energy plays a critical role in the world’s transition to an electricity-based, clean energy economy. Standing at the intersection of infrastructure, manufacturing, and ocean science, offshore wind engineers work effectively with a wide range of partners to deliver technical excellence in the context of evolving markets, policies, and regulations.

As the wind energy industry continues to rapidly grow, your career possibilities as an offshore wind energy engineer will grow with it. Renewable energy is a key piece of the “green economy” puzzle—and wind power (which provides thousands of jobs in the United States every year) is the fastest growing sector in renewable energy.

Our faculty offer perspectives rooted in research and industry experience, so you’ll receive world-class training in wind policy, technical applications, and project management to prepare you for jobs in global industry, academia, and the public sector.

Offshore Wind Energy Engineering

Application Requirements

The PhD in Offshore Wind Energy Engineering is the highest level of study and requires a serious commitment. Students who have excellent academic backgrounds and demonstrated capability for independent study/research are encouraged to apply to the program.

Students entering the PhD program are expected to meet the general admission requirements of the graduate school; gain acceptance into the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and hold a bachelor's or master's degree in engineering or a related field.

  • Application Fee
  • Personal Statement
  • Transcripts
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Official TOEFL, IELTS, or Duolingo test scores (if applicable)
  • GRE General Test scores not required for applicants who will have received a degree from a U.S. or Canadian institution by time of enrollment. GRE scores required for all other applicants.
  • Portfolio (optional)

Tuition and Financial Aid

We recognize that attending graduate school involves a significant financial investment. Our team is here to answer your questions about tuition rates and scholarship opportunities .

Please contact us at [email protected] .

Offshore wind farm Denmark

Offshore Wind Power Opportunities Fuel Aspirations of Tufts Graduate Students

Person Placeholder

Laurie Gaskins Baise

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John Germaine

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Daniel Kuchma

Person Placeholder

Jonathan Lamontagne

Person Placeholder

Babak Moaveni

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Masoud Sanayei

Related programs, civil and environmental engineering.

Portsmouth University Logo

Dynamic analysis of offshore wind turbines foundations

Funded (UK/EU and international students)

Project code

SCES5890521

Start dates

October 2021

Application deadline

4 May 2021 (12.00pm GMT)

Applications are invited for a fully-funded three year PhD to commence in October 2021. 

The PhD will be based in the School of Civil Engineering and Surveying and will be supervised by Dr Mehdi Rouholamin and Dr Nikos Nanos .

Candidates applying for this project may be eligible to compete for one of a small number of bursaries available; these cover tuition fees at the UK rate for three years and a stipend in line with the UKRI rate (£15,609 for 2021/22). Bursary recipients will also receive a £1,500 p.a. for project costs/consumables. 

The work on this project could involve

  • Experimentally investigate dynamic soil-structure interaction behaviour of offshore wind turbines supported by different foundations. 
  • Soil element testing to characterise the soil properties. 
  • Evaluating the performance and behaviour of offshore wind turbines foundations during transient phase.

Entry requirements

General admissions, specific admissions, how to apply.

We’d encourage you to contact Dr Mehdi Rouholamin ( [email protected] ) or Dr Nikos Nanos ( [email protected] ) to discuss your interest before you apply, quoting the project code.

When you are ready to apply, you can use our online application form . Make sure you submit a personal statement, proof of your degrees and grades, details of two referees, proof of your English language proficiency and an up-to-date CV.  Our ‘ How to Apply ’ page offers further guidance on the PhD application process. 

If you want to be considered for this funded PhD opportunity you must quote project code SCES5890521 when applying.

University of Bristol logo

Faculty of Engineering

Current opportunities, offshore wind turbine vibration suppression and load alleviation, nvh performance enhancement for electric vehicles, novel liquid-based vibration control devices, damping for aeroelastic tailoring in wings and blades, a combined experimental and numerical investigation on nonlinear whirl flutter, design for performance and dynamics of novel electrical rotary wing uavs, design and modelling of electromagnetic vibration suppression devices, model updating for nonlinear dynamic structures, numerical modelling of impact and friction, identification of reduced models of mechanical systems from vibration data.

  • Computational flight mechanics - analysis of control law sensitivity for aircraft control
  • Experimental flight dynamics – multi-DOF dynamic wind tunnel testing of aeroelastic models

Hybrid modelling and nonlinear dynamics in aircraft design

Online learning for tactile robotics, surrogate modelling and machine learning for electrical power systems, nonlinear aeroelastic wing benchmark evaluation and modeling.

Supervisors:  Professor Jason Zheng Jiang ( [email protected] ), Dr Tom Hill ( [email protected] ), Professor Simon Neild ( [email protected] )

This PhD project will focus on using advanced control methods (passive, semi-active or active) for offshore wind turbine (OWT) vibration suppression and load alleviation. The current trends of increasing turbine size and locating OWTs to deeper water result in important vibration issues to be solved. To this end, this project will develop advanced control methodologies to suppress OWT vibrations, so as to extend service life and reduce Levelized Energy Cost (LEC). The focus of this project will be on mitigating vibrations in one or more of the following OWT components, gear box, nacelle, blade, tower as well as floating wind turbine platforms. Both numerical and experimental work will be carried out during the project. Mathematical computing software Matlab, and industrial software FAST and/or Romax wind will be used. The PhD student will not only have the opportunity to build a wide range of skills including vibration control theory, mechanical and aerodynamic modelling & simulation, but also gain experience of working with relevant industrial partners.

Supervisors:  Professor Jason Zheng Jiang ( [email protected] ), Professor  Simon Neild ( [email protected] )

For electric vehicles, new challenges such as low masking noise and non-standard driveline vibration modes arise, which can potentially be solved by using high performance vibration absorption systems. This project aims to effectively reduce the noise transmitted to the chassis, and as a result enhance the noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) performance. Through the project, the PhD student will build solid skills in wide range of dynamics and control theory, mechanical modelling & simulation. We also anticipate the student will work together with industrial partners (vibration absorber manufacturers and OEM companies). This project is part of a wider body of work under the Digitwin project ( http://digitwin.ac.uk/ ) across 6 UK institutions (University of Sheffield, Bristol, Cambridge, Liverpool, Southampton & Swansea). The student will have the opportunity to give presentations at regular Digitwin project meetings.

Funding:  EPSRC Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) is available for this project.

Supervisor: Dr Brano Titurus ( [email protected] )

This research aims to develop, theoretically and experimentally, a new class of controllable liquid-based devices for vibration mitigation in aerospace applications.

Titurus, Branislav. Generalized Liquid-Based Damping Device for Passive Vibration Control . AIAA Journal 56, no. 10 (2018): 4134-4145.

Increasing the flight stability margins and enabling higher performance lifting surfaces through embedded dynamic damping is the main focus of this project.

Szczyglowski, Christopher P., Simon Neild, Brano Titurus, Jason Z. Jiang, and Etienne Coetzee. Passive Gust Load Alleviation In a Truss-Braced Wing Using an Inerter-Based Device. In 2018 AIAA/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference, p. 1958. 2018.

Titurus, Branislav. Vibration control in a helicopter with semi-active hydraulic lag dampers . Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics 36, no. 2 (2013): 577-588.

Supervisor s : Dr Djamel Rezgui ( [email protected] ) and Dr Brano Titurus ( [email protected] )

The dynamic interaction between rotating and stationary structures in the presence of nonlinearity and uncertainty (structural, material, aerodynamic, etc.)  is a complex problem. In rotorcraft, one of the current problem is the poor prediction of the whirl flutter instabilities for tiltrotor [1] and novel multi-rotor configurations. This project aims to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of the coupled rotating-stationary system for the case of the tiltrotor aircraft, through a combined experimental and numerical (bifurcation theory) approach.

[1] Mair C, Rezgui D, Titurus B, Nonlinear stability analysis of whirl flutter in a tiltrotor rotor-nacelle system , ERF 2017 - 43rd European Rotorcraft Forum, 12-15 September 2017, Milan, Italy

Supervisors: Dr Djamel Rezgui ( [email protected] ) and Professor Dorian Jones ( [email protected] )

Drones and Unmanned Aircraft vehicles (UAVs) are now extensively considered by major manufactures and operators in a wide range of civilian and military applications. Of a particular interest are those of multi-rotor configurations, which are considered as the future mobility vehicles as in the “Air Taxi” or “Personal Flying Car” concepts. This project aims to investigate the complex design strategies and tools of the future electric multi-rotor UAV’s, from performance and dynamics aspects using advanced efficient modelling and analysis tools.

Supervisors: Professor Simon Neild ( [email protected] ) and Professor Jason Jiang ( [email protected] )

This project will focus on vibration suppression via electromagnetic devices. We will use a general passive mechanical controller to replace the conventional spring/damper system and optimise it to show the potential benefits. An electromagnetic device will then be built and tested in the context of the structure it will be deployed in. This will be achieved using hybrid testing, where the structure is modelled and the device is physically tested with real-time coupling between the two to emulate the dynamics of the full system.

Supervisors: Dr Tom Hill ( [email protected] ) and Professor Simon Neild ( [email protected] )

Engineers often model complex mechanical structures using Finite-Element (FE) models. However, due to uncertainties in the design, modelling and manufacturing processes, the results of these FE models do not always match experimental measurements from the real structures. To correct for this, certain features of these FE models can be updated, using experimental data, so that they better reflect the true structure. For traditional structures, which exhibit linear behaviour, this model updating process is well-established; however, many modern, high-performance structures exhibit nonlinear behaviour. Existing model updating processes cannot account for nonlinearity, creating a significant bottleneck that prevents engineers from improving the performance of modern structures and operating beyond the linear regime.

This PhD project will investigate new methods that allow FE models to be tuned, so that their dynamic behaviour matches the nonlinear phenomena seen in real structures. These methods will be developed and tested using relatively simple structures, so a detailed knowledge of FE software is not required; instead, it will require a strong grasp of dynamics and numerical analysis using software such as Matlab. This project will be associated with a larger collaboration “Digital Twins for Improved Dynamic Design” – http://digitwin.ac.uk/ . This £5M grant brings together six leading universities and ten major industrial partners and will provide the opportunity to regularly meet and work with these collaborators.

Supervisors: Dr   Robert Szalai ( [email protected] ) and Professor Alan Champneys

This project is part of a research theme investigating dynamic behaviour of frictional contact. The project will focus on numerical simulation of frictional contact. Simulation of frictional contact is problematic, because most methods predict non-unique solutions. These numerical methods are also badly conditioned due to the multiple time and length-scales present in the problem. In contrast, theory tells us that the continuum contact problem has unique solutions. This means that there is room for improvement. A recent result [1] addresses this issue in an analytical setting and for point contact only. There is now a rigorous model reduction technique that retains uniqueness and other essential qualitative features of continuum contact problems. The task is therefore to extend this new method so that it can be implemented in numerical schemes. 

The main task is to adapt a finite element, boundary element or collocation method using the rigorous model reduction technique [1]. The project does not aim to implement the method in a full-featured finite element software, instead we will take a semi-analytical approach and focus on simple examples, initially. We will start with a classical problem, when an elastic rod hits a rigid surface so that impact and friction needs to be considered simultaneously. (This is one representation of Painleve's paradox.) Further tasks involve extending the method to surface-surface contact to study how frictional contact ruptures. 

[1] R. Szalai, Model reduction of infinite dimensional piecewise-smooth systems, https://arxiv.org/abs/1509.08040 [2] O. Ben-David, G. Cohen, J. Fineberg The Dynamics of the Onset of Frictional Slip, Science, 330(6001), pp. 211-214, (2010)

Supervisor: Dr Robert Szalai ( [email protected] )

In order to gain understanding of the dynamics of a mechanical system it is useful to have a reduced order model. The best reduced models are exact: they describe the motion exactly for a specific set of initial conditions. For other initial conditions the dynamics will exponentially tend to the solution described by the reduced model. Finding such reduced models is equivalent to finding invariant manifolds with certain properties. In a recent paper [1] we have shown that it is possible to find such unique reduced models from experimental data. We have used the most general model that was constructed using a least squares method. This model then was analysed using analytical techniques. It is however desirable that the model being identified has low number of parameters, which is possible to achieve if the fitting and analysis of the model is carried out in one step. The task in the PhD project is to develop this method with the minimum number of parameters required to obtain a reduced model. In order to test the method, we will use various experimental data and data from finite element simulations to test the method.

 [1] R. Szalai, D Ehrhardt, G. Haller. Nonlinear model identification and spectral submanifolds for multi-degree-of-freedom mechanical vibrations. Proc. R. Soc. A 2017 473 20160759   

Computational flight mechanics - analysis of control law sensitivity for aircraft control and active load alleviation

Supervisors: Professor Mark Lowenberg ( [email protected] ) and Professor Simon Neild ( [email protected] )

Aircraft controllers are typically designed using linear techniques at a number of operating points, and combined into a gain-scheduled (nonlinear) controller.  The design requirements are usually based on linear design techniques and include frequency response criteria: the assumptions involved in applying these in the presence of significant nonlinearity and uncertainty (such as aircraft flying near their envelope limits) may be questionable.  This project aims to exploit numerical continuation techniques to explore this problem, including periodically-forcing the system to extract nonlinear frequency responses.  The study will consider sensitivity of the periodically-forced system stability to perturbation/uncertainty and aims to provide a new perspective on the stability and robustness of control law design where the dynamics is especially nonlinear.

The initial focus will be on rigid aircraft models under nominal and off-nominal design conditions (such as in the vicinity of upset, loss-of-control), with an extension to incorporate aeroelastic influences and active load control if feasible.

Funding restrictions: none (note: studentship funding needs to be sought for this project).

Experimental flight dynamics – multi-DOF dynamic wind tunnel testing of aeroelastic models

Supervisors: Professor Mark Lowenberg ( [email protected] ), Professor Simon Neild ( [email protected] ) and Dr Djamel Rezgui ( [email protected] )

The 5-DOF ‘manoeuvre rig’ has been developed at the University of Bristol to investigate the aerodynamics and flight mechanics of model aircraft motions, driven by on-board control surfaces or externally via the rig, that involve nonlinear and unsteady flow phenomena.  To date, only rigid models have been tested.  This PhD will extend the use of the rig to complement previous work on modelling, analysis and testing of flexible wings that exhibit nonlinear behaviour.  The objective is to develop a new experimental approach to the study of dynamics of coupled wing-plus-airframe aeroelastics in the presence of nonlinearity.  It will incorporate multi-degree-of-freedom dynamic testing with compensation of rig effects to allow physical simulation of highly flexible air vehicles in flight, and will also involve modelling and numerical analysis of the coupled systems.

Supervisors: Professor David Barton ( [email protected] ), Professor Mark Lowenberg ( [email protected] )

There is a drive towards high-efficiency and high-performance aircraft. This requires lighter and more fuel-efficient structural designs, which are often more flexible than traditional rigid designs. This flexibility can result in disastrous nonlinear behaviour; for example, the destruction of the NASA Helios prototype. This project seeks to develop new approaches to nonlinear behaviour in aircraft and so enable a new generation of low-carbon aircraft.

Within our well-equipped test facilities at the University of Bristol, Prof Mark Lowenberg and colleagues have developed a manoeuvre rig based on a scale model of a Hawk trainer aircraft. This 5 degree-of-freedom model provides an ideal test bed for investigating nonlinear aerodynamic behaviour. To explore the complex nonlinear dynamics, Prof David Barton has developed a range of experimental techniques known as Control-Based Continuation (CBC) that can track the onset of instabilities as system parameters change (e.g., the onset of flutter at a critical airspeed, Lee et al, 2023 ). As such, CBC can be used to investigate behaviour in the physical system that would have previously been out of reach. The combination of the manoeuvre rig and CBC opens up many possibilities for exploitation.

The data generated from these experiments is ideal for building new models and can be used in combination with scientific machine learning to create hybrid models: high-fidelity models that combine physics-based modelling with data-driven approaches. These models will then enable further design work to either mitigate or take advantage of the nonlinear behaviour in the experiment.

The overall aims are threefold:

  • To generate industrially-relevant insights from the manoeuvre rig.
  • To extend CBC to multi-degree-of-freedom systems, with application to other engineered structures.
  • To develop a hybrid modelling approach for aerospace systems that combines machine learning with physics-based models.

See other projects with Professor Barton .

Funding restrictions:  none (note: studentship funding needs to be sought for this project).

Supervisors:  Professor David Barton ( [email protected] ), Professor Nathan Lepora ( [email protected] )

Machine learning (ML) equips robots with the ability to learn from and adapt to new environments, enhancing autonomy and efficiency in complex tasks. However, many ML approaches rely on extensive data for training. This heavy reliance on large volumes of data can hamstring a robot’s ability to function in dynamic real-world conditions—imagine a robotic assistant in a home struggling to recognize new types of objects because it was trained on a limited set of household items. Such data dependency limits the robots’ effectiveness in diverse real-world applications. We seek to overcome this problem in the context of tactile robotics by exploiting generative online learning, enabling robots to learn ‘in the moment’ and adapt swiftly to the unpredictability of real-world tasks.

Online learning is where new data is continuously integrated into a model as a task is being performed. As such, the performance of the robot increases over time. Joint with Prof Nathan Lepora, I have previously demonstrated a generative online learning approach ( Learning to live life on the edge ) that uses predictions of the tactile sensor output to track the edges of objects. This has been implemented on a robot arm and a quadruped robot.

Significant improvements are needed enable this generative online learning approach to be used on both a broader suite of tasks (not just edge following) and within a higher dimensional space (not just a plane). This will require non-trivial generalisation of the current machine learning approach (a Gaussian Process-Latent Variable Model) and exploration of other computationally efficient generative methods. Insights into the geometry of the tasks of interest are likely to be key to creating an effective approach.

This approach to online learning has the potential to greatly expand the use of tactile sensors and enable them to be used in novel contexts, bringing us closer to building robots that can both touch and feel, and interact safely with the environment around them.

See  other projects with Professor Barton .

Supervisors: Professor David Barton ([email protected]), Dr Ian Laird

Designing new devices, particularly in electrical power conversion for renewable energy, is often challenging because of constraints on mass, volume, and cost. Designers must innovate within these boundaries, making trade-offs to meet specifications without compromising performance. This PhD project will employ surrogate modelling and machine learning to improve the efficiency of design processes.

Power electronic device design involves choosing from a limited library of existing parts as well as dealing with behaviors across timescales, from nano-second switching to bulk behaviour over several seconds. Commercial simulation tools, such as Plex, offer accuracy but lack the computational speed needed for quick iterative design. Collaborating with Dr. Ian Laird, who brings extensive experience in power system design optimisation, this project aims to provide the fundamental research developments needed to create rapid design tools.

The project will focus on developing surrogate models using reservoir computing techniques to accelerate simulations for components like modular multi-level converters (MMCs), crucial in renewable energy systems. These models will enable faster design iteration, optimising systems to meet specific application constraints, such as those for offshore wind turbines. Key challenges include modelling the discrete switching of electrical components and the wide range of dynamic timescales. Addressing these challenges is essential for capturing sudden changes and complex interactions, with potential applications extending beyond power systems to fields like synthetic biology and electromagnetic sensing.

The anticipated result is a tool for rapidly designing optimized electrical power systems, streamlining resource use and cost in system deployment. The research has the potential to yield significant publications with broad impacts across multiple disciplines.

Supervisors: Professor Mark Lowenberg ( [email protected] ), Professor Simon Neild and Professor Jonathan Cooper

This PhD offers the opportunity to participate in research that the University has been carrying out with industry on aeroelastic behaviour of high aspect ratio wings. It will involve the comparison of computational modeling methods - developed at the University to account for the geometric and other nonlinear effects in highly flexible wings - and experimental results. The latter were obtained from a unique test campaign recently conducted in an industrial wind tunnel. Please see here for further information:  phd-benchmark-wing-evaluation-and-modeling (PDF, 88kB)

How to apply

If you are interested in applying, please contact the named supervisor(s) for the relevant project on this page. For further information on the application process, please see our postgraduate pages .

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PhD student position in Dynamic response of offshore wind turbines

Chalmers Tekniska Högskola AB – Göteborg

Publicerad 19/12 ( Slutdatum 31/1 )

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phd student position in dynamic response of offshore wind turbines

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phd student position in dynamic response of offshore wind turbines

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PhD Fellowship in Offshore Wind Energy - Stavanger, Norway

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Job description

The University of Stavanger invites applicants for a PhD Fellowship in Offshore Wind Turbines at the Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical and Structural Engineering and Materials Science. The position is vacant from August 2022.

This is a trainee position that will give promising researchers an opportunity for academic development through a PhD education leading to a doctoral degree.

The hired candidate will be admitted to the PhD program in Science and Technology. The education includes relevant courses to about six months of study, a dissertation based on independent research, participation in national and international research environments, relevant academic communication, a trial lecture and public defence. Read more about the PhD education at UiS on  our website.

The appointment is for three years with research duties exclusively.

The position is funded by The Research Council of Norway.

Research topic

The PhD Fellow will be affiliated with the following project: Large Offshore Wind Turbines (LOWT): structural design accounting for non-neutral wind conditions.

This project will develop new knowledge and models to improve the design basis for large floating wind turbines (LOWT)(>12MW) in free wind and wake conditions. Observations from Hywind Scotland have shown the thermal stratification of the atmosphere can substantially affect the structural response of a wind turbine to the incoming turbulent flow. The first objective is to use wind data from several offshore sites to characterise the wind field in nonneutral atmospheric conditions. The project will use high-frequency wind data combined with a brand-new remote sensing dataset (COTUR). In the COTUR campaign the incoming flow over the ocean was recorded, both within and above the surface layer, thus providing new insight on the applicability surface-layer scaling to model the turbulent wind loads on LOWT. This unique dataset will be analysed for the first time to indicate whether the turbulence models used in the standards, which mainly relies on surface-layer scaling, are appropriate or not. The final output will be to recommend suitable wind and coherence model for in non-neutral conditions as input to free wind aeroelastic simulations and Dynamic meandering wake model (DWM) models offshore. The second objective is to validate the simulated wind turbine response using full scale data from offshore wind farms (Alpha Ventus, Sheringham Shoal, and Zefyros/Hywind Demo). The validated simulation tools will then be used to quantify the effect of non-neutral atmospheric conditions on future LOWT (>12MW) to ensure safe and cost-effective design in the next generation of offshore wind farms in Norway and beyond. The final focus of the project is wake simulations of LOWT in non-neutral conditions using DWM model. High-fidelity CFD simulations will be used to include variable velocity shear in the DWM method and validate the wake meandering in non-neutral conditions. The non-neutral wind spectra and coherence from the data analysis work will be used as input for the DWM simulations.

Qualification requirements

We are looking for applicants with a strong academic background who have completed a five-year master degree (3+2) within Marine Technology, Offshore Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Cybernetics or Civil Engineering, preferably acquired recently; or possess corresponding qualifications that could provide a basis for successfully completing a doctorate.

To be eligible for admission to the doctoral programmes at the University of Stavanger both the grade for your master’s thesis and the weighted average grade of your master’s degree must individually be equivalent to or better than a B grade. If you finish your education (masters degree) in the spring of 2022 you are also welcome to apply.

Applicants with an education from an institution with a different grade scale than A-F, and/or with other types of credits than sp/ECTS, must attach a confirmed conversion scale that shows how the grades can be compared with the Norwegian A-F scale and a Diploma Supplement or similar that explains the scope of the subject that are included in the education.  You can use these conversion scales  to calculate your points for admission.

You should also have solid knowledge within aerodynamics and structures, wind turbulence and offshore meteorology, wind turbines, and developed skills in mathematical modelling and advanced programming.

Emphasis is also placed on your:

knowledge and experience of using SIMA, or similar aeroelastic simulation software

strong background in applied mathematics

good programming skills applied to numerical modelling

motivation and potential for research within the field

professional and personal skills for completing the doctoral degree within the timeframe

ability to work independently and in a team, be innovative and creative

ability to work structured and handle a heavy workload

having a good command of both oral and written English

Requirements for competence in English

A good proficiency in English is required for anyone attending the PhD program. International applicants must document this by taking one of the following tests with the following results:

TOEFL – Test of English as a Foreign Language, Internet-Based Test (IBT). Minimum result: 90

IELTS – International English Language Testing Service. Minimum result: 6.5

Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) from the University of Cambridge

PTE Academic – Pearson Test of English Academic. Minimum result: 62

The following applicants are exempt from the above requirements:

Applicants with one year of completed university studies in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, United Kingdom, USA

Applicants with an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma

Applicants with a completed bachelor's and / or master's degrees taught in English in a EU/EEA country

a PhD education in a large, exciting and socially important organisation

an ambitious work community which is developing rapidly. We strive to include employees at all levels in strategic decisions and promote an informal atmosphere with a flat organisational structure.

salary in accordance with the State Salary Scale, l.pl 17.515, code 1017, NOK 491 200 gross per year with salary development according to seniority in the position. A higher salary may be considered in special cases. From the salary, 2% is deducted as a contribution to the Norwegian Public Service Pension Fund.

automatic membership in the  Norwegian Public Service Pension Fund , which provides favourable insurance- and retirement benefits

favourable membership terms at a gym and at the  SIS sports club  at campus

employment with an Inclusive Workplace organisation which is committed to reducing sick leave, increasing the proportion of employees with reduced working capacity, and increasing the number of professionally active seniors

"Hjem-jobb-hjem"  discounted public transport to and from work

as an employee in Norway, you will have access to an optimal health service, as well as good pensions, generous maternity/paternity leave, and a competitive salary. Nursery places are guaranteed and reasonably priced

relocation programme

language courses : On this page you can see which language courses you may be entitled to (look up “language courses” under employment conditions)

University of Stavanger values independence, involvement and innovation. Diversity is respected and considered a resource in our work and learning environment. Universal design characterises physical and digital learning environments, and we strive to provide reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities.

You are encouraged to apply regardless of gender, disability or cultural background.

The university aims to recruit more women within the subject area. If several applicants are considered to have equal qualifications, female applicants will be given priority.

Contact information

More information on the position can be obtained from Associate Professor Charlotte Obhrai, tel: +47 51 83 21 64, e-mail:  [email protected]  or Professor Jasna Jakobsen, tel: +47 51 83 16 66, e-mail:  [email protected] .

Information about the appointment procedure can be obtained from HR-advisor Rosa Andrade, tel: +47 51 83 11 91, e-mail:   [email protected] .

Application

To apply for this position please follow the link "Apply for this job". Your application letter, relevant education and work experience as well as language skills must be registered here. In your application letter, you must state your research interests and motivation for the position.

The following documents must be uploaded as attachments to your application:

CV with a full summary of your education and experience

references, certificates/diplomas and other documentation that you consider relevant

Diploma Supplement or similar and a confirmed conversion scale if this is required

documentation on competence in English if this is required

publications or other relevant research work

Applications are evaluated based on the information available in Jobbnorge at the application deadline. You should ensure that your application shows clearly how your skills and experience meet the criteria which are set out above and that you have attached the necessary documentation. 

The documentation must be available in either a Scandinavian language or in English. If the total size of the attachments exceeds 30 MB, they must be compressed before upload.

Please note that information on applicants may be published even if the applicant has requested not to be included in the official list of applicants - see  Section 25 of the Freedom of Information Act . If your request is not granted, you will be notified.

UiS only considers applications and attachments registered in Jobbnorge.

General information

The engagement is to be made in accordance with the regulations in force concerning State Employees and Civil Servants, and the acts relating to Control of the Export of Strategic Goods, Services and Technology. If your application is considered to be in conflict with the criteria in the latter legislation, it will be rejected without further assessment.

Employment as PhD Fellow is regulated in " Regulations concerning terms and conditions of employment for the posts of post-doctoral research fellow and research fellow, research assistant and resident ".

Your qualifications for the position, based on documentation registered in Jobbnorge, will be assessed by an internal expert committee. Based on the committee's statement, relevant applicants will be invited to an interview before any recommendations are made. References will also be obtained for relevant candidates.  More about the hiring process on our website.

The appointee will be based at the University of Stavanger, with the exception of a stay abroad at a relevant centre of research.

It is a prerequisite that you have a residence which enables you to be present at/available to the academic community during ordinary working hours.

The position has been announced in both Norwegian and English. In the case of differences of meaning between the texts, the English text takes precedence.

UiS - challenge the well-known and explore the unknown

The University of Stavanger (UiS) has about 12,000 students and 2,200 employees. The university has high ambitions. We strive to have an innovative and international profile, and be a driving force in knowledge development and in the process of societal change. Our common direction is driven by consideration for green and sustainable change and equitable social development, through new ways of managing natural resources and facilitating better cities and local communities. Energy, health and welfare, learning for life are our focus areas.

In constant collaboration and dialogue with our surroundings, regionally, nationally and internationally, we enjoy an open and creative climate for education, research, innovation, dissemination and museum activities. Academic life at the University of Stavanger is organised into six faculties comprising various departments/schools and National Research Centres, as well as the Museum of Archaeology. We are a member of the European Consortium of Innovative Universities. The university is located in the most attractive region in the country with more than 300,000 inhabitants. The Stavanger region has a dynamic labour market and exciting cultural and leisure activities.

Together with our staff and students we will challenge the well-known and explore the unknown.

The Faculty of Science and Technology  offers study programs at bachelor, master and doctoral level. The faculty has established close cooperation on research with NORCE (Norwegian Research Centre AS) and the regional industry. A number of master's and doctoral theses are made in collaboration with the industry. The faculty has established research collaborations with universities in the US and Europe, and has developed several academic environments that are at the forefront internationally.The faculty has about 2,800 students and approximately 500 employees at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Structural Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Energy and Petroleum Engineering, Department of Energy Resources and the Department of Safety, Economics and Planning.

The Department of Mechanical and Structural Engineering and Materials Science  carries out research and offers study programs in Offshore Technology, Marine and Subsea Technology, Offshore Wind, Industrial Asset Management, Structural Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. The department has a high international profile with students and staff from around the world. There are currently 60 employees including research fellows and postdocs, and 660 students at the department.

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Effects of soil-structure interaction on real time dynamic response of offshore wind turbines on monopiles

Research output : Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaper › Journal article › Research › peer-review

Access to Document

  • 10.1016/j.engstruct.2014.06.006

T1 - Effects of soil-structure interaction on real time dynamic response of offshore wind turbines on monopiles

AU - Damgaard, Mads

AU - Zania, Varvara

AU - Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

AU - Ibsen, Lars Bo

N2 - Offshore wind turbines are highly dynamically loaded structures, their response being dominated by the interrelation effects between the turbine and the support structure. Since the dynamic response of wind turbine structures occurs in a frequency range close to the excitation frequencies related to environmental and parametric harmonic loads, the effects of the support structure and subsoil on the natural vibration characteristics of the turbine have to be taken into account during the dynamic simulation of the structural response in order to ensure reliable and cost-effective designs. In this paper, a computationally efficient modelling approach of including the dynamic soil–structure interaction into aeroelastic codes is presented with focus on monopile foundations. Semi-analytical frequency-domain solutions are applied to evaluate the dynamic impedance functions of the soil–pile system at a number of discrete frequencies. Based on a general and very stable fitting algorithm, a consistent lumped-parameter model of optimal order is calibrated to the impedance functions and implemented into the aeroelastic nonlinear multi-body code HAWC2 to facilitate the time domain analysis of a wind turbine under normal operating mode. The aeroelastic response is evaluated for three different foundation conditions, i.e. apparent fixity length, the consistent lumped-parameter model and fixed support at the seabed. The effect of soil–structure interaction is shown to be critical for the design, estimated in terms of the fatigue damage 1Hz equivalent moment at the seabed. In addition, simplified foundation modelling approaches are only able to capture the dynamic response reasonably well after tuning of the first natural frequency and damping within the first mode to those of the integrated model. Nevertheless, significant loss of accuracy of the modal parameters related to the second tower modes is observed.

AB - Offshore wind turbines are highly dynamically loaded structures, their response being dominated by the interrelation effects between the turbine and the support structure. Since the dynamic response of wind turbine structures occurs in a frequency range close to the excitation frequencies related to environmental and parametric harmonic loads, the effects of the support structure and subsoil on the natural vibration characteristics of the turbine have to be taken into account during the dynamic simulation of the structural response in order to ensure reliable and cost-effective designs. In this paper, a computationally efficient modelling approach of including the dynamic soil–structure interaction into aeroelastic codes is presented with focus on monopile foundations. Semi-analytical frequency-domain solutions are applied to evaluate the dynamic impedance functions of the soil–pile system at a number of discrete frequencies. Based on a general and very stable fitting algorithm, a consistent lumped-parameter model of optimal order is calibrated to the impedance functions and implemented into the aeroelastic nonlinear multi-body code HAWC2 to facilitate the time domain analysis of a wind turbine under normal operating mode. The aeroelastic response is evaluated for three different foundation conditions, i.e. apparent fixity length, the consistent lumped-parameter model and fixed support at the seabed. The effect of soil–structure interaction is shown to be critical for the design, estimated in terms of the fatigue damage 1Hz equivalent moment at the seabed. In addition, simplified foundation modelling approaches are only able to capture the dynamic response reasonably well after tuning of the first natural frequency and damping within the first mode to those of the integrated model. Nevertheless, significant loss of accuracy of the modal parameters related to the second tower modes is observed.

U2 - 10.1016/j.engstruct.2014.06.006

DO - 10.1016/j.engstruct.2014.06.006

M3 - Journal article

SN - 0141-0296

JO - Engineering Structures

JF - Engineering Structures

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VIDEO

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