Reported commands and requests in English

1. reported commands.

  • affirmative commands → to + infinitive
  • negative commands → not + to + infinitive

1.1. Affirmative commands

  • Direct Speech → Dad, “Do your homework.”
  • Reported Speech → Dad told me to do my homework.

1.2. Negative commands

  • Direct Speech → Teacher, “Do n't talk to your friend.”
  • Reported Speech → The teacher told me not to talk to my friend.

1.3. The introductory sentence in commands

The word tell in introductory sentences in Reported Commands can be substituted with other words, e.g.

There is no backshift of tenses, no matter which tense is used in the introductory sentence.

Direct Speech

  • Dad, “Do your homework.”
  • Reported Speech
  • Dad tells me to do my homework.
  • Dad told me to do my homework.

2. Suggestions

  • Father, “Let's watch a film.”
  • Father suggested watching a film.
  • Father suggested that they should watch a film

Do not use the infintive after suggest . Father suggested to watch a film.

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Reported Commands and Requests in English

Reported Commands and Requests! Learn how to use Reported Commands and Requests in English with examples.

Table of Contents

Reported Commands and Requests

  • Reported Orders, Commands and Requests  are formed using the to-infinitive and  not to-infinitive .
  • The reporting verbs for the orders/ commands/ requests are: order , shout , demand , warn ,  beg , command , tell , insist , beseech , threaten , implore , ask , propose , forbid …
  • When we change from direct to  indirect speech , the pronoun and tense changes that are also needed.

Direct speech: “ Open the door! ”

Reported speech: He ordered me to open the door .

Direct speech: “ Don’t answer the phone. ”

Reported speech: She told me not to answer the phone.

Direct speech:  “ Don’t be back late. ”

Reported speech: He ordered me not to be back late.

Direct speech: He said to me “ Come with me .”

Reported speech: He  told me to go  with him.

Direct speech: He said to me, “ Don’t lie to me .”

Reported speech: He  told me not to lie  to him.

Direct speech : “ Turn the music down! I’m trying to get to sleep. “

Reported speech: He told us to turn the music down as he was trying to get to sleep.

Direct speech: “ I think you should leave now. It’s very late.” 

Reported speech: She ordered us to leave as it was very late.

Reported Commands and Requests | Picture

Reported speech: useful rules & examples.

Reported Speech in English

  • Verb Tense Changes in Reported Speech
  • No Change in Verb Tenses in Indirect Speech
  • Changes in Time and Place in Reported Speech
  • Introductory Verbs  List
  • Pronouns in Reported Speech
  • Reported Questions
  • Reported Commands & Requests
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Reported Speech (Part 2) – Requests, Orders, and Questions

Reported Speech (Part 2) - Requests, Orders, and Questions Espresso English

My colleague asked me to help him update his computer.

Read Reported Speech (Part 1) to learn how to make reported statements.

In Part 2, we will focus on requests, orders, and questions.

1. Requests/orders

  • “Asked me to”  is used for requests.
  • “Told me to” is stronger; it is used for orders/commands.
  • The main verb stays in the infinitive: She asked me to make copies. He told me to go to the bank.

2. Yes/no questions

  • “Asked if” and “wanted to know if” are equal.
  • The main verb changes according to the rules for reported statements : “ Did you turn off the TV?” (past simple) She asked if I had turned off the TV (past perfect)
  • We don’t use the auxiliary verbs “do/does/did” in the reported question.

3. Other questions

  • “Asked”  and “wanted to know” are equal.
  • We don’t use the auxiliary verb “do” or “does” in the reported question: “Where does he work?” She wanted to know where he works .
  • In questions with the verb “to be,” the word order  changes in the reported question: “Where were you born?” (Question word + [to be] + subject) He asked where I was born (Question word + subject + [to be]) He asked where was I born

Reported Speech (Part 2) Quiz

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Reported Speech (Part 2) - Requests, Orders, and Questions Espresso English

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Reported Speech Requests Commands/Exclamations

Reported Speech Yes/No Questions Video

Reported Requests/Commands

Indirect speech exclamations.

reported speech request and command

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IMAGES

  1. Reported Commands and Requests in English

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  2. English Grammar: Reported speech

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  3. English Honori Garcia: REPORTED SPEECH. COMMANDS AND REQUESTS

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  4. Reported Speech: A Complete Grammar Guide ~ ENJOY THE JOURNEY

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  5. Reported Speech: A Complete Grammar Guide ~ ENJOY THE JOURNEY

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  6. Reported commands and requests

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VIDEO

  1. Reported speech part1 (reported statements)

  2. indirect speech

  3. Reported Speech Part 5

  4. commands in reported speech الأوامر

  5. REPORTED SPEECH (NARRATION)

  6. Reported Speech part 4#reportedspeech #easy #englishgrammar #studytips #englishspeaking #highschool

COMMENTS

  1. Reported commands and requests in English

    1. Reported Commands There is no backshift of tenses with commands/requests in Reported Speech. You only have to change the person and shift expressions of time/place descibed on our page Reported Speech – Summary . Form affirmative commands → to + infinitive negative commands → not + to + infinitive 1.1. Affirmative commands

  2. Reported Commands and Requests in English • 7ESL

    The reporting verbs for the orders/ commands/ requests are: order, shout, demand, warn , beg, command, tell, insist, beseech, threaten, implore, ask, propose, forbid … When we change from direct to indirect speech, the pronoun and tense changes that are also needed. Examples: Direct speech: “ Open the door! ”

  3. Reported Speech Requests Commands/Exclamations

    What a shot! Below are some common ways of reporting these speeches. Reported Requests/Commands When we put direct commands or requests into indirect speech we usually follow the below structure: a. We use introductory verbs: order, ask, tell, want and request, etc. b. We use indirect objects after those introductory verbs. c.

  4. Reported speech: orders, requests & suggestions

    The pattern is verb + indirect object + to-clause. The indirect object is the person spoken to. Other verbs used to report orders and requests in this way are: command, order, warn, ask, advise, invite, beg, teach, & forbid.