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Okay, this is the hardest part of the whole project…picking your topic. But here are some ideas to get you started. Even if you don’t like any, they may inspire you to come up with one of your own. Remember, check all project ideas with your teacher and parents, and don’t do any project that would hurt or scare people or animals. Good luck!

  • Does music affect on animal behavior?
  • Does the color of food or drinks affect whether or not we like them?
  • Where are the most germs in your school? ( CLICK for more info. )
  • Does music have an affect on plant growth?
  • Which kind of food do dogs (or any animal) prefer best?
  • Which paper towel brand is the strongest?
  • What is the best way to keep an ice cube from melting?
  • What level of salt works best to hatch brine shrimp?
  • Can the food we eat affect our heart rate?
  • How effective are child-proof containers and locks.
  • Can background noise levels affect how well we concentrate?
  • Does acid rain affect the growth of aquatic plants?
  • What is the best way to keep cut flowers fresh the longest?
  • Does the color of light used on plants affect how well they grow?
  • What plant fertilizer works best?
  • Does the color of a room affect human behavior?
  • Do athletic students have better lung capacity?
  • What brand of battery lasts the longest?
  • Does the type of potting soil used in planting affect how fast the plant grows?
  • What type of food allow mold to grow the fastest?
  • Does having worms in soil help plants grow faster?
  • Can plants grow in pots if they are sideways or upside down?
  • Does the color of hair affect how much static electricity it can carry? (test with balloons)
  • How much weight can the surface tension of water hold?
  • Can some people really read someone else’s thoughts?
  • Which soda decays fallen out teeth the most?
  • What light brightness makes plants grow the best?
  • Does the color of birdseed affect how much birds will eat it?
  • Do natural or chemical fertilizers work best?
  • Can mice learn? (you can pick any animal)
  • Can people tell artificial smells from real ones?
  • What brands of bubble gum produce the biggest bubbles?
  • Does age affect human reaction times?
  • What is the effect of salt on the boiling temperature of water?
  • Does shoe design really affect an athlete’s jumping height?
  • What type of grass seed grows the fastest?
  • Can animals see in the dark better than humans?

Didn’t see one you like? Don’t worry…look over them again and see if they give you an idea for your own project that will work for you. Remember, find something that interests you, and have fun with it.

To download and print this list of ideas CLICK HERE .

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

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50 of the Best Science Fair Project Ideas for Kids

  • February 10, 2021

So you have a science fair coming up at school and want to make a project that’s sure to win a prize ribbon? Well, you’ve come to the right place. Choosing the right project requires plenty of research. That’s why we’ve rounded up the best science fair projects ideas to help you along your search.

50 STEM Experiment Ideas for Kids

These 50 science fair project ideas are all great for kids- early and older elementary school students, with a few suitable for middle school students as well. Make a topic that fascinates you, come up with a hypothesis, and see what happens next!

Plus, once you’ve chosen your topic, use this science fair project how-to video from NASA as a helpful guide.

Important note: Some of these science fair projects require the help or supervision of an adult. Always make sure an older family member is nearby and knows what you’re doing as you work on these projects.

1. With this science fair experiment , you can learn what factors affect melting ice.

2. Try this magic milk experiment for an easy science fair project that younger students can accomplish.

3. How much sun does a seed need to sprout? Discover the answer by trying this project you can easily complete from home.

4. Build your own water clock and see how well you can get it to measure time.

5. If you’re interested in a little microbiology, try out this egg cell experiment .

6. What’s the best way to prevent apples from browning? Find out for yourself and make sure to record the results.

7. Do birds eat more food if it is a certain color? Find out with this intriguing experiment .

8. Discover how clouds turn water vapors into rain and diagram a few common types of clouds through this kid-friendly science fair project .

9. Make your own plant cell model using styrofoam and playdough.

10. Learn about aerodynamics by experimenting with paper airplane shapes and seeing which one flies best.

11. Learn how to accelerate the rusting process with this quick and thought-provoking science project .

12. Want to learn about water and density for your project? Perform this floating egg experiment and try out the follow-up questions at the bottom.

13. This project about bending light is perfect for older elementary school students who want to dip their toes into physics.

14. This biology-based science experiment asks, “Will plants grow towards a specific light source?”

15. Learn about greenhouse gases with this science fair idea .

16. Experiment with what makes fruit ripen quickly and write down your results to present at your science fair.

17. Use this hands-on experiment to explore how carbonated drinks affect teeth.

18. Which factors affect evaporation? Find out for yourself with this project that’s perfect for students who can complete it with a little adult supervision.

19. Find out which types of toothpaste work the best and, after measuring your results, try and come up with a conclusion.

20. If the weather is warm out during your science fair, try building a solar oven .

21. For a simple chemistry project , you can make sugar crystals and see what material works best for growing them.

22. Which common material is the best heat conductor? Find out with this science fair project that can be done with adult supervision, as it needs boiling water.

23. Craft your own thermos bottle and test it out for a project all about insulation.

24. Make a DIY thermometer and test it out for a practical and hands-on science project.

25. Try this celery experiment to learn how plant capillaries work.

26. How does the air temperature affect movement? Try one of these fun science fair project ideas as a model for your own experiment.

27. If you’re passionate about the environment, try this recycling experiment for your science fair project

28. How does paint color affect drying time? Make your predictions and test it out for yourself.

29. Learn which soil is best for growing tomatoes if your science fair takes place during warm weather.

30. Build your own lemon battery and see if you can get it to work to learn about electricity.

31. If you want to try the epitome of science fair projects, try making a science fair volcano.

32. How much sugar is in different popular foods? If you’re interested in health science, try this fascinating experiment .

33. If you’d rather look at prompts and create your own project, use these science fair questions for inspiration.

34. Does music affect plant growth? Discover for yourself with this project .

35. Do you need science fair project ideas that will encourage others to recycle? Learn about how to make your own paper .

36. If you have a few furry friends in your neighborhood, consider testing if dogs are colorblind with this project .

37. How does temperature affect air pressure in a ball? Find out the answer with this sporty science project .

38. Build your own pulley and see what kinds of objects you can make it carry.

39. Learn a little about chemistry with this science fair experiment that asks which paper towels are the most absorbent.

40. What is the dirtiest spot in the average home? Find the answer by cultivating bacteria growth in this experiment .

41. Discover how to test thermal energy by observing water temperature.

42. Can you grow seeds with liquids other than water? Find out with this kid-friendly science experiment .

43. This Sun or Shade science fair projec t is perfect for elementary school students.

44. This cool science fair project asks an intriguing question about insect biology: what sweetener do ants prefer?

45. Make a working model of lungs for a science fair project that’s sure to fascinate.

46. Want to try a science fair project that can only end with tasty treats? Bake some cookies and try one of these sweet experiments .

47. Interested in astronomy? Try out this experiment that teaches why the moon’s shape seems to change every day.

48. What are the effects of disinfectant on germs? Use this science fair project as inspiration for your own.

49. Put your math skills to the test with this science fair project centered around the game tic tac toe.

50. What’s stronger: magnetism or gravity? Find out with this science fair experiment that’s perfect for early elementary students.

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Hypothesis Examples

Hypothesis Examples

A hypothesis is a prediction of the outcome of a test. It forms the basis for designing an experiment in the scientific method . A good hypothesis is testable, meaning it makes a prediction you can check with observation or experimentation. Here are different hypothesis examples.

Null Hypothesis Examples

The null hypothesis (H 0 ) is also known as the zero-difference or no-difference hypothesis. It predicts that changing one variable ( independent variable ) will have no effect on the variable being measured ( dependent variable ). Here are null hypothesis examples:

  • Plant growth is unaffected by temperature.
  • If you increase temperature, then solubility of salt will increase.
  • Incidence of skin cancer is unrelated to ultraviolet light exposure.
  • All brands of light bulb last equally long.
  • Cats have no preference for the color of cat food.
  • All daisies have the same number of petals.

Sometimes the null hypothesis shows there is a suspected correlation between two variables. For example, if you think plant growth is affected by temperature, you state the null hypothesis: “Plant growth is not affected by temperature.” Why do you do this, rather than say “If you change temperature, plant growth will be affected”? The answer is because it’s easier applying a statistical test that shows, with a high level of confidence, a null hypothesis is correct or incorrect.

Research Hypothesis Examples

A research hypothesis (H 1 ) is a type of hypothesis used to design an experiment. This type of hypothesis is often written as an if-then statement because it’s easy identifying the independent and dependent variables and seeing how one affects the other. If-then statements explore cause and effect. In other cases, the hypothesis shows a correlation between two variables. Here are some research hypothesis examples:

  • If you leave the lights on, then it takes longer for people to fall asleep.
  • If you refrigerate apples, they last longer before going bad.
  • If you keep the curtains closed, then you need less electricity to heat or cool the house (the electric bill is lower).
  • If you leave a bucket of water uncovered, then it evaporates more quickly.
  • Goldfish lose their color if they are not exposed to light.
  • Workers who take vacations are more productive than those who never take time off.

Is It Okay to Disprove a Hypothesis?

Yes! You may even choose to write your hypothesis in such a way that it can be disproved because it’s easier to prove a statement is wrong than to prove it is right. In other cases, if your prediction is incorrect, that doesn’t mean the science is bad. Revising a hypothesis is common. It demonstrates you learned something you did not know before you conducted the experiment.

Test yourself with a Scientific Method Quiz .

  • Mellenbergh, G.J. (2008). Chapter 8: Research designs: Testing of research hypotheses. In H.J. Adèr & G.J. Mellenbergh (eds.), Advising on Research Methods: A Consultant’s Companion . Huizen, The Netherlands: Johannes van Kessel Publishing.
  • Popper, Karl R. (1959). The Logic of Scientific Discovery . Hutchinson & Co. ISBN 3-1614-8410-X.
  • Schick, Theodore; Vaughn, Lewis (2002). How to think about weird things: critical thinking for a New Age . Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education. ISBN 0-7674-2048-9.
  • Tobi, Hilde; Kampen, Jarl K. (2018). “Research design: the methodology for interdisciplinary research framework”. Quality & Quantity . 52 (3): 1209–1225. doi: 10.1007/s11135-017-0513-8

35 Easy Science Experiments You Can Do Today!

Looking for easy science experiments to do at home or in the classroom? You’re in luck because we’ve got over 35 easy science activities for kids that will help you make science fun for all ages. 

Most of these simple science experiments for kids are easy to prepare, quick to perform, and use household items or inexpensive materials you can find almost anywhere. To connect the fun to the “why it works” you’ll find an easy to teach explanation with every experiment!

Musical Jars Science Experiment 

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

This super easy experiment is simple as it is fun! Kids make their own musical instruments with clear jars and water then investigate sound waves, pitch, and more.

When the experiment is complete, use the colorful new “instrument” for a fun music lesson. Kids can play and take turns to “name that tune”!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Musical Jars Science Experiment

Viscosity of Liquids Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Viscosity may be a confusing term for kids at first, but this super easy experiment can help them see viscosity in action!

With marbles, clear jars, and a few household materials, kids will make predictions, record data, and compare the results while they test high and low density liquids.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->   Viscosity Science Experiment

Floating Egg Science Experiment

Floating Egg Science Experiment

Can a solid egg float? Kids can find the answer and understand why with this quick science experiment. 

Discover just how easy it can be to make a raw egg float while testing the laws of density. We’ve included additional ideas to try so kids can make predictions and test the concept further.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->   Floating Egg Science Experiment

Paper Towel Dry Under Water Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Is it possible to keep a paper towel dry even when submerging it under water? The answer is a surprising “yes,” if you use science to help!

Start with the properties of your materials, make a prediction, then explore matter, density, volume, and more.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->   Paper Towel Dry Under Water Experiment

Mixing Oil & Water Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

This simple experiment for kids helps them better understand density and the changes that happen when adding an emulsifier to the mix. 

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->   Mixing Oil & Water Experiment

Will it Float or Sink Science Experiment

Will it sink or will it float? This fun experiment challenges what students think they know about household items!

Students record their hypothesis for each item then test it to compare what they think will happen against their observations.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Float or Sink Science Experiment

Water Temperature Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

What does thermal energy look like? In this easy science experiment, kids are able to see thermal energy as they explore the concept in action.

With clear jars and food coloring, students can quickly see how molecules move differently through hot and cold water.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Water Temperature Science Experiment

Balloon Blow-up Science Experiment

Balloon Blow Up Science Experiment

Kids will discover how matter reacts when heated and cooled as they watch with surprise as baking soda and vinegar blow the balloon up before their eyes.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Balloon Blow-up Science Experiment

Floating Ping Pong Ball Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Kids will giggle with joy with this super easy experiment. With only a ping pong ball and a hair dryer, students will have a great time while exploring Bernoulli’s Principle in action. 

We’ve included additional ideas to further explore the concept with different objects and observe the change in results.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Floating Ping Pong Ball Science Experiment

Hair Stand on End Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

It’s especially fun for those who’ve never seen static electricity in action before!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Hair Stand on End Science Experiment

Oil Bubbles in Water Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Kids explore density and experience some chemistry when creating oil bubbles in water with everyday household items.

This experiment is particularly fun when kids see that they’ve made what looks like a lava lamp!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Oil Bubbles in Water Science Experiment

Color Changing Water Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Kids will be surprised as they watch a new color being “created” without mixing! Using only a clear bowl and glass, some food coloring, and water, this super easy science experiment is quick and easy with a huge wow factor. 

Try it with yellow and blue to follow along with our demonstration video then try different primary color combinations and explore the results.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Color Changing Water Science Experiment

Magnetic Paper Clip Chain Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

It may seem a bit like magic but it’s actually science! It’s not hard to capture your kids’ attention with this quick and easy science experiment as they watch paper clips “stick” together and form a chain!

Perfect for younger children, the experiment only takes a few minutes and is a fun way to explore the concept of magnetic transference.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Magnetic Paper Clip Chain Science Experiment

Is it Magnetic Science Experiment

With only a magnet and a few household items, kids will make and record their predictions, test and observe, then compare what they think is magnetic against the results.

Simple and quick, but some of the results may surprise your students!

Cloud in a Jar Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

This simple experiment only requires a few materials but really holds student attention as a cloud forms before their eyes!

Kids will learn new weather vocabulary as they explore how physical changes and reactions happen as clouds begin to take form. We’ve also included a helpful chart on the types of clouds.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Cloud in a Jar Science Experiment

Magic Milk Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Create a dancing rainbow of colors with this easy science experiment for kids!

Using only a few ordinary kitchen items, your students can create a color explosion in ordinary milk when they add our special ingredient. (Hint: The special ingredient (soap!) includes hydrophilic and hydrophobic molecules that make the magic happen!)

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Magic Milk Science Experiment

Walking Water Science Experiment

Walking Water Science Experiment

Water can’t really walk upwards against gravity, but this cool science experiment makes it seem like it can! 

Kids are able to see the capillary action process and learn how attraction and adhesive forces in action allow water to move out of one glass into another. 

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Walking Water Science Experiment

Light Refraction Science Experiment

Light Refraction Science Experiment

The results of this easy science experiment are so amazing, it makes kids (and adults) think it must be magic!

Young scientists watch in surprise while they see an arrow change directions instantly. Investigating refraction couldn’t be more fun!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Light Refraction Science Experiment

Dancing Raisins Experiment

Dancing Raisins Science Experiment - Step (3)

Learn about the reactions of buoyancy and density in this simple science activity for kids. 

They may not need dancing shoes, but give them a glass of soda pop and the raisins in this fun experiment love to dance!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Dancing Raisins Science Experiment

See Sound Experiment

How to See Sound Science Experiment

Kids love this experiment because they are encouraged to drum loudly so they can “see” sound waves in action!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> See Sound Science Experiment

Elephant Toothpaste Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Grab some giant brushes and get ready to make elephant toothpaste! Although you might not be able to get an elephant excited by this super easy experiment, kids love it!

The impressive and quick results created by the chemical reaction and the heat released in the process makes an abundant amount of fun and colorful foam!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Elephant Toothpaste Science Experiment

Upside Down Glass of Water Science Experiment

Upside Down Water Glass Science Experiment

We all know what happens when we turn a glass of water upside down, but what if I told you you can do it without the water spilling out?

The experiment only requires a few common items and you’ll be amazed by the results of air pressure in action!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Upside Down Glass of Water Science Experiment

Pick up Ball with a Jar Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

It almost seems like magic but with the help of science, you can pick up a ball with an open jar!

Instead of magic, this easy science activity uses centripetal force and practice to do what seems like the impossible. 

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Pick up Ball with a Jar Experiment

Will It Melt Science Experiment

Can you guess which items will melt? This easy outside experiment challenges what students think they know about the effects of the sun.

Pepper Move Science Experiment

Pepper Move Science Experiment

Can you make pepper move and zoom away with just a light touch of your finger? With science you can!

This experiment only takes a few quick minutes from beginning to end, but the reaction caused by surface tension makes kids want to do it over and over. 

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial ->  Pepper Move Science Experiment

Crush a Plastic Bottle Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Go for it, crush that bottle, but don’t touch it! Although it usually can’t be seen or touched, air pressure is pushing against all surfaces at all times.

With this easy science activity kids can see air pressure at work when they watch a bottle crushes itself!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Crush a Plastic Bottle Science Experiment

Egg in Vinegar Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

This vinegar science experiment will have your eggs and kids bouncing (with excitement!) before you know it!

Kids can watch and explore the results of chemical reactions as the egg changes from something that seems solid into what feels like something bouncy!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Egg in Vinegar Science Experiment

Straw Through a Potato Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Can you make a normal plastic straw go into a raw, solid potato? It seems like something impossible, but science can easily make it possible!

Pick your potatoes then let kids try their strength as they explore air pressure with this super easy experiment.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Straw Through a Potato Science Experiment

Rainbow in a Jar Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

With only a few household items, they’ll explore mass, volume, and density with every color layer!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Rainbow in a Jar Experiment

Tornado in a Bottle Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Kids can have fun while learning more about centripetal force with this fun experiment.

With a little muscle and science, kids watch with amazement as they create their own glitter cyclone in a bottle as the centripetal force vortex appears.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Tornado in a Bottle Science Experiment

Why Doesn’t the Water Leak Science Experiment

Water Doesn't Leak Science Experiment

Can you poke holes in a plastic bag full of water without the water leaking out? With this super easy science activity you can!

Kids are stunned as they learn about polymers and how they can do what seems to be impossible.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Why Doesn’t the Water Leak Science Experiment

Use a Bottle to Blow-up a Balloon Experiment

Use a Bottle to Blow-up a Balloon Science Experiment

Is it possible to blow up a balloon with only water and science? 

In this super easy experiment, kids learn more about how matter behaves as they watch a balloon inflate and deflate as a result of matter being heated and cooled.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Use a Bottle to Blow-up a Balloon Experiment

Orange Float Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Kids explore buoyancy as they learn about and test density in this sink or float science activity.

While it only takes a few minutes, this super easy experiment invites kids to predict what they think will happen then discuss why the heavier orange floats!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Orange Float Science Experiment

Pick up Ice with String Science Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

With only a few household items, kids learn about freezing temperatures and the results they create in saltwater versus freshwater.

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Pick Up Ice with String Science Experiment

Color Changing Walking Water Experiment

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Using the concepts explored in our popular Walking Water Science Experiment, kids will see color walk from one glass to another and change colors as it goes!

The quick experiment seems to defy gravity like magic, but don’t worry, kids can find out how science makes it work!

Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Color Changing Walking Water Experiment

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Teach Beside Me

100+ Easy & FUN Science Fair Project Ideas

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science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Looking for FUN   science projects for kids ? Science is one of our favorite subjects around here. I have a huge list of over 100 easy science experiments for kids. You can use these classic science fair ideas when helping your child create their next science fair project. Kids will love these fun projects and experiments!

100 Fun and Easy Science Fair Project Ideas for kids

See my Scientific Method Worksheets and Posters to help teach the process of the scientific method including these 6 steps:

  • Ask a question
  • Make a hypothesis
  • Record Data

These science fair project ideas can be used for may grade levels including elementary school aged kids, middle school aged kids and some would even work for high school. Many of these science activities are quick and easy to put together and will not break the bank either.

I divided the science fair project ideas out the best I could by topic and category for you. That way if there is a certain interest, you can find just what you are looking for. You will find science fair experiment ideas in biology, physics, chemistry, electricity, magnetism, earth science, and more!

All of these simple experiment ideas can be used in some way to create an awesome science fair project. Most are from my site, but many are from some other great bloggers! Click the links to get instructions and demonstrations on how these projects work.

Want more ideas? See also my post with 200 + Elementary STEM Projects .

Easy Energy and Physics Science Fair Projects

Kinetic Energy with Rubber Band Boats – this science project is a blast to create with kids!

Kinetic Energy- Shooting Star Spinner – This is a fun one on kinetic and potential energy

Kinetic Energy Gravity Spinner  – Do this experiment to show gravity!

Candle Seesaw Science STEM project

Perpetual Motion Candle See Saw – This is a cool way to learn about motion!

How Does a String Telephone Work?  ~Raising Life Long Learners

Which Cup Will Keep Water Cold the Longest?  ~ Really, Are you Serious?

Light Refraction Science Experiment  ~ Look We’re Learning

Heat Conduction Experiment  ~ Look We’re Learning

Color Changing Sensory Bottle  ~ The Science Kiddo

Exploring Magnetic Fields

Magnet Pendulum - STEM Experiment

Magnet Pendulum

Levitating Magnets

Train Chain Reactions

Static Electricity Slime

What are Electrolytes?

Color and Light Reflection and Refraction Experiments

Simple Machines- Gears

Light Box Magic  ~ True Aim Education

Balloon Air Pressure Experiment  ~ Darcy and Brian

Make A Giant Catapult

Technology & Mechanical Science Projects for Kids

Is it Conductive? – test different objects to see if they conduct electricity.

How to Make a Coin Battery  – use coins to power a light!

lemon battery science project for kids

How to Make a Lemon Battery – the power of lemon juice is pretty amazing.

What to Make a Dirt Battery – a battery out of dirt?  yup!

How do you Make a Potato Battery? ~from STEAM Powered Family

Story book STEM- Hydraulic Elevator science experiment

How to Make a Hydraulic Elevator ~ Make a water powered elevator

How to Make a Bubble Blower Machine

Paper Circuits – learn about circuits and electricity with this simple project.

Solar Powered Lego Car – harness the power of the sun!

Make an EASY Water Pump Sprinkler

Chemistry Science Projects for Kids With Chemical Reactions

Cabbage Juice pH Experiment – test different chemicals and substances to see their pH levels.

volcano science experiment for kids

How too Make an Erupting Volcano (with salt dough)

How Do you Clean Pennies?

Why Do Baking Soda and Vinegar React?

dry ice bubble science experiment

How to Make Dry Ice Bubbles

Does it Dissolve?

How Do you Grow Crystals? (borax crystals)

elephant toothpaste experiment for kids

Elephant Toothpaste with Two Types of Peroxide

What is Non-Newtonian Fluid?  (Oobleck Experiments)

Does it Rust? Oxidation Experiment

Rainbow Absorption

Film Canister Rockets

Blooming Paper Flowers experiment in Water

Blooming Paper Flowers

Dancing Acorns  ~ Hands-on Teaching Ideas

States of Matter Experiments – solids, liquids and gases

Rubber Bouncing Egg Experiment

Color Changing Flowers Experiment  ~ Messy Little Monster

Paper Burning Experiment  ~ Preschool Powol Packets

How to Make a Paper Mache Erupting Volcano  ~ Red Ted Art

Mentos and Soda Geysers

Anatomy Science Fair Projects

How Do Ears Work?

Human Anatomy with Play Dough

Play Dough Anatomy

Animal Digestion Experiment  ~ Schooling a Monkey

Why We Need Muscles & Bones  ~ I Can Teach My Child

How Do Lungs Work?   ~ Sciene Sparks

DNA Experiment

Earth Science and Nature Science Fair Projects

How do Earthquakes Happen ?

Can You Build a House to Resist an Earthquake?

Make your Own Crystal Rock Candy Geodes

Colored convection currents science experiment

What are Convection Currents?

Study surface tension with Water Strider Insects

How are Rainbows made?

How to Clean Dirty Water

Geology Experiment: Stalactites and Stalagmites Formation

testing water- science experiment

What’s In My Water? 

What are Shells Made of?

How Can We Stay Dry During the Rain  ~ Pink Stripey Socks

What Surfaces in my House are the Dirtiest? Mold Science

Density Experiment with different liquids, also tests buoyancy!

leaf chromatography science project for kids

Why Do Leaves Change Colors? Leaf Chromatography Experiment

Rising Tide Experiment

Soda Bottle Compost  ~ Busy Mommy Media

Build a Sun Shelter  ~ Buggy and Buddy

Hurricane Model Experiment  ~Preschool Powol Packets

Easy Condensation Experiment  – Look We’re Learning

Salt Water Density Experiment  ~ The Science Kiddo

Plant Science- Observing Bulb Growth  ~Buggy and Buddy

How to Make a Compass  ~ Parenting Chaos

Why do Pinecones Open & Close?  ~ Parenting Chaos

Leaf Transpiration science Experiment

Leaf Transpiration Experiment – how leaves breathe, use a plastic bag to collect the moisture from a tree.

Pumpkin Petri Dishes  ~ Hands-on Teaching Ideas

Rainy Day Science – learn about filtering rain water

Making a Solar Still – harness the power of the sun with this cool science experiment!

Make Your Own Human Sun Dial

How are Sedimentary Rocks & Fossils Made? 

How Do Sharks Float?  ~ Preschool Powol Packets

Square Bubbles

How to Make Square Bubbles

What Soil is Best for Growing Seeds?  ~ Schooling a Monkey

Simple Food Science Fair Project Ideas

Want a food-based science fair project?  These ideas are fun and edible, too!  Who doesn’t love learning with food?

Food Science: Make a Loaf of Bread in a Bag

Why Does Gelatin Not Set with Certain Fruits ?

What Foods will Grow the most Mold?

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Cake Chemistry Experiment

Popcorn and Salt Science Experiment  ~ Awe Filled Homemaker

What Prevents Apples from Browning?

How to Make Plastic with Gelatin  ~ STEAM Powered Family

Melting Ice Science Experiment  ~ The Chaos and the Clutter

Pie Crust Experiment

Food Chemistry Turn Juice into Noodles! science experiment

Food Chemistry~ Turn Juice into Noodles !

Green Eggs Food Chemistry (no food coloring required!)

How Strong are Eggs?  ~ Hands-On Teaching Ideas

Make Solar S’mores

Hot Chocolate Science Experiment  ~ Creative Family Fun

Bread Mold Science Project  ~ Schooling a Monkey

Other Fun & Easy Science Project Ideas

Toilet Paper Comparisons   ~ Pink Stripey Socks

Egg Drop Challenge 

Press n’ Seal vs. Saran Wrap

Hockey Science Experiment  ~ Creative Family Fun

I hope you found an idea that will work for your little scientists next science fair project. I’d love to hear what you did and see pictures of the finished project!

Former school teacher turned homeschool mom of 4 kids. Loves creating awesome hands-on creative learning ideas to make learning engaging and memorable for all kids!

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5th Grade Science Project Ideas with Hypothesis

5th Grade Science Project Ideas with Hypothesis

Are you a 5th grader on a quest to discover the wonders of science? Well, you’re in luck! We’ve compiled a list of the top 100 5th grade science project ideas with hypothesis to help you embark on your scientific journey. These projects are not only fun but also educational, giving you the opportunity to learn while having a blast.

Science projects are a great way to explore your curiosity, test hypotheses, and better understand the world around you. So, let’s dive right into our list of exciting science project ideas and start making hypotheses!

Top 100 5th Grade Science Project Ideas with Hypothesis

1. The Color-Changing Milk Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing milk, dish soap, and food coloring will create a mesmerizing display of color.

2. The Vinegar and Baking Soda Volcano Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: When vinegar reacts with baking soda, it will create a volcanic eruption.

3. The Seed Germination Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different types of seeds will germinate at different rates.

4. The Balloon Rocket Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Launching a balloon rocket will demonstrate Newton’s third law of motion.

5. The Lemon Battery Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A lemon can be used to generate electricity and power a small LED light.

6. The Egg Drop Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Creating a protective structure for an egg will prevent it from breaking when dropped from a height.

7. The Water Cycle in a Bag Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: By creating a closed system in a bag, you can observe the water cycle in action.

8. The Solar System Model Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Building a model of the solar system will help understand the arrangement of planets and their sizes.

9. The Density Tower Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Liquids with different densities can be layered in a container, forming a colorful tower.

10. The Magnetic Slime Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing magnetic particles with slime will result in a magnetic slime that can be controlled with a magnet.

11. The Paper Airplane Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different designs of paper airplanes will have different flight patterns.

12. The Rainbow in a Jar Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Layering liquids of different densities in a jar will create a colorful rainbow effect.

13. The Homemade Compass Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A homemade compass can accurately determine the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field.

14. The Germs on Surfaces Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different surfaces may harbor varying amounts of germs, and some may be cleaner than others.

15. The Pendulum Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: The length of a pendulum affects the time it takes to swing back and forth.

16. The Water Filtration Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Various materials can be used to filter dirty water and make it clean.

17. The Lava Lamp Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing oil and water with food coloring will create a mesmerizing “lava lamp” effect.

18. The Static Electricity Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Rubbing balloons against different materials will generate static electricity and make objects cling to them.

19. The Rainbow Paper Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Water and sunlight can combine to create a stunning rainbow on white paper.

20. The Music and Plant Growth Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Playing different types of music to plants will affect their growth patterns.

21. The Vinegar and Eggshell Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Soaking an eggshell in vinegar will demonstrate the effects of acid on calcium.

22. The Moldy Bread Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Bread exposed to different conditions will develop mold at varying rates.

23. The Potato Battery Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Potatoes can be used to generate electricity and power a small digital clock.

24. The Dissolving Candy Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different types of candy will dissolve at varying speeds in water.

25. The Osmosis in Gummy Bears Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Gummy bears placed in different solutions will absorb or release water, changing their size.

26. The Melting Ice Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Various substances, such as salt or sugar, can be used to melt ice at different rates.

27. The Color-Changing Carnations Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Carnations can absorb colored water, changing the color of their petals.

28. The Rock Candy Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Crystals can be grown on a string by dissolving sugar in water.

29. The Invisible Ink Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Writing with invisible ink will reveal a hidden message when exposed to heat.

30. The Magic Milk Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Swirling dish soap on the surface of milk will create beautiful, colorful patterns.

31. The Egg in a Bottle Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: An egg can be placed inside a bottle without breaking it using heat and air pressure.

32. The Popcorn Popping Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Popcorn kernels will pop when heated due to the buildup of pressure inside.

33. The Density of Liquids Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different liquids have different densities, which can be determined by their ability to float or sink in each other.

34. The Lemonade Stand Profit Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Running a lemonade stand on different days will yield varying levels of profit.

35. The Homemade Stethoscope Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A homemade stethoscope can be used to listen to different sounds within the body.

36. The Salt and Ice Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Salt can be used to lower the freezing point of ice, allowing you to create ice sculptures.

37. The pH of Household Substances Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different household substances will have varying pH levels, and they can be tested using pH strips.

38. The Rainbow Fire Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Burning different metal salts will produce colorful flames.

39. The Raisins and Soda Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Raisins placed in a glass of soda will exhibit a dancing effect as they move up and down.

40. The Paper Chromatography Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different colors in markers can be separated by capillary action on paper.

41. The Slime Time Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing glue and Borax solution will create a stretchy, gooey slime.

42. The Skittles Rainbow Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Placing different colored Skittles in water will create a colorful rainbow pattern.

43. The Magic Sand Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Magic sand repels water and can be used to create underwater structures.

44. The Baking Soda and Vinegar Balloons Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Inflating balloons with the gas produced by the reaction between baking soda and vinegar.

45. The Water and Oil Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Water and oil do not mix, and their separation can be observed in a homemade lava lamp.

46. The Solar Oven Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A homemade solar oven can be used to cook food using sunlight.

47. The Fizzing Lemonade Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing lemonade with baking soda will create a fizzing, carbonated drink.

48. The Magnet Maze Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Creating a maze with hidden magnets and using a magnetic wand will lead to exciting discoveries.

49. The Glow-in-the-Dark Slime Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Glow-in-the-dark paint can be added to slime to make it illuminate in the dark.

50. The Crystal Snowflakes Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Borax crystals can be grown on pipe cleaners in the shape of snowflakes.

51. The Wind Speed Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different shapes and sizes of windmills will affect the speed at which they spin.

52. The Paper Towel Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Paper towels from different brands will have varying absorption capabilities.

53. The Fruit Battery Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Various fruits can be used to generate electricity and power a small LED light.

54. The Growing Beans Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Growing beans under different conditions, like sunlight and water, will affect their growth.

55. The Mentos and Soda Explosion Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Dropping Mentos candy into soda will create a spectacular eruption.

56. The Tooth Decay Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different drinks will lead to varying levels of tooth decay when teeth are soaked in them.

57. The Rainbow Sugar Water Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Sugar water can be used to create colorful rainbow layers.

58. The Fingerprint Analysis Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Each person’s fingerprint is unique, and it can be analyzed and compared.

59. The Oil Spill Cleanup Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different materials can be used to clean up an oil spill, and their effectiveness can be tested.

60. The pH of Soil Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different types of soil will have varying pH levels, which can affect plant growth.

61. The Lemon Juice Clock Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Lemon juice can be used to power a clock with the help of electrodes.

62. The Separation of Mixtures Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Various mixtures can be separated into their individual components using different methods.

63. The Soundproofing Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different materials can be used to soundproof a room, and their effectiveness can be tested.

64. The Potato Clock Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Potatoes can be used to power a clock with the help of electrodes.

65. The Growing Crystals Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing water and sugar or salt will result in the formation of crystals.

66. The Toothpick Bridge Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Building bridges with toothpicks and glue will demonstrate the principles of engineering and physics.

67. The Egg Floatation Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: The density of water can be changed by adding salt, causing an egg to float.

68. The Homemade Lava Lamp Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A homemade lava lamp can be created using oil, water, and an effervescent tablet.

69. The Cornstarch and Water Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing cornstarch and water will create a substance that behaves like both a solid and a liquid.

70. The Magnetic Field Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different objects will be attracted or repelled by a magnet’s magnetic field.

71. The Coin Cleaning Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Various methods can be used to clean old, tarnished coins.

72. The Paper Bridge Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Building bridges with sheets of paper will test their strength and weight-bearing capacity.

73. The Homemade Volcano Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A homemade volcano model can erupt with the help of baking soda and vinegar.

74. The Earthquake Simulation Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Simulating an earthquake by shaking a container of sand will demonstrate the principles of seismic activity.

75. The Water Surface Tension Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different liquids will affect the surface tension of water, causing objects to float or sink.

76. The Vinegar and Egg Experiment Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Soaking an egg in vinegar will cause it to swell and change in texture.

77. The Fireproof Balloon Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A balloon can be made fireproof by filling it with water.

78. The Rainbow Fireworks Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Burning different metal salts will create a beautiful and colorful fireworks display.

79. The Mystery Substance Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A mystery substance can be identified by testing its properties, such as solubility and conductivity.

80. The Geyser Eruption Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing Mentos candy with soda will create a geyser-like eruption.

81. The Floating Orange Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: An orange can be made to float in water by changing the amount of salt in the water.

82. The Paper Cup Telephone Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A simple telephone can be made using two paper cups and string, allowing for communication over a distance.

83. The Ice Cube Race Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different shapes of ice cubes will melt at varying rates.

84. The Lemon Volcano Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: A lemon can be turned into a volcano by adding baking soda and creating a fizzy eruption.

85. The Light and Plant Growth Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Plants require different amounts of light for growth, and this can be tested using different light sources.

86. The Raisin Dance Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Raisins will “dance” in a glass of soda due to the carbonation.

87. The Rainbow Density Tower Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Liquids with different densities can be layered in a container, forming a colorful density tower.

88. The Rainbow Slime Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing various colors of slime will create a mesmerizing rainbow effect.

89. The Static Electricity Balloons Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Rubbing balloons against different materials will generate static electricity, making them cling to each other.

90. The Solar Eclipse Model Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Building a model of a solar eclipse will help understand the alignment of the Earth, Moon, and Sun.

91. The Chemical Reaction Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Mixing two or more chemicals will result in a visible chemical reaction.

92. The Heat Conduction Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Different materials will conduct heat at varying rates, which can be tested using a hot plate.

93. The Acid Rain Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Simulating acid rain by spraying vinegar on plant leaves will show its harmful effects.

94. The Growing Gummy Bears Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Gummy bears placed in water will absorb it, growing in size.

95. The Weather Forecast Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Creating a homemade weather station will allow you to predict the weather based on observations.

96. The Colorful Ice Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Adding food coloring to water before freezing it will result in colorful ice cubes.

97. The Crystal Garden Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Growing crystals in a container filled with a super-saturated solution will create a crystal garden.

98. The Colorful Eggshells Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Coloring eggshells with different substances will create vibrant, colorful shells.

99. The Balancing Act Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Creating a balance scale with household items will help understand the concept of weight and balance.

100. The Invisible Force Hypothesis:

Hypothesis: Demonstrating the force of magnetism by testing objects for their magnetic properties.

Final Words

These are just a few of the exciting 5th grade science project ideas with hypothesis. Remember that the key to a successful science project is to start with a clear hypothesis, conduct experiments carefully, and document your findings. Whether you’re exploring the mysteries of chemistry, physics, biology, or environmental science, these projects are a fantastic way to learn and have fun at the same time.

So, gather your materials, make your hypotheses, and get ready to dive into the fascinating world of science. Who knows, you might even discover something new and groundbreaking along the way! 

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The Scientific Method by Science Made Simple

Understanding and using the scientific method.

The Scientific Method is a process used to design and perform experiments. It's important to minimize experimental errors and bias, and increase confidence in the accuracy of your results.

science experiment

In the previous sections, we talked about how to pick a good topic and specific question to investigate. Now we will discuss how to carry out your investigation.

Steps of the Scientific Method

  • Observation/Research
  • Experimentation

Now that you have settled on the question you want to ask, it's time to use the Scientific Method to design an experiment to answer that question.

If your experiment isn't designed well, you may not get the correct answer. You may not even get any definitive answer at all!

The Scientific Method is a logical and rational order of steps by which scientists come to conclusions about the world around them. The Scientific Method helps to organize thoughts and procedures so that scientists can be confident in the answers they find.

OBSERVATION is first step, so that you know how you want to go about your research.

HYPOTHESIS is the answer you think you'll find.

PREDICTION is your specific belief about the scientific idea: If my hypothesis is true, then I predict we will discover this.

EXPERIMENT is the tool that you invent to answer the question, and

CONCLUSION is the answer that the experiment gives.

Don't worry, it isn't that complicated. Let's take a closer look at each one of these steps. Then you can understand the tools scientists use for their science experiments, and use them for your own.

OBSERVATION

observation  magnifying glass

This step could also be called "research." It is the first stage in understanding the problem.

After you decide on topic, and narrow it down to a specific question, you will need to research everything that you can find about it. You can collect information from your own experiences, books, the internet, or even smaller "unofficial" experiments.

Let's continue the example of a science fair idea about tomatoes in the garden. You like to garden, and notice that some tomatoes are bigger than others and wonder why.

Because of this personal experience and an interest in the problem, you decide to learn more about what makes plants grow.

For this stage of the Scientific Method, it's important to use as many sources as you can find. The more information you have on your science fair topic, the better the design of your experiment is going to be, and the better your science fair project is going to be overall.

Also try to get information from your teachers or librarians, or professionals who know something about your science fair project. They can help to guide you to a solid experimental setup.

research science fair topic

The next stage of the Scientific Method is known as the "hypothesis." This word basically means "a possible solution to a problem, based on knowledge and research."

The hypothesis is a simple statement that defines what you think the outcome of your experiment will be.

All of the first stage of the Scientific Method -- the observation, or research stage -- is designed to help you express a problem in a single question ("Does the amount of sunlight in a garden affect tomato size?") and propose an answer to the question based on what you know. The experiment that you will design is done to test the hypothesis.

Using the example of the tomato experiment, here is an example of a hypothesis:

TOPIC: "Does the amount of sunlight a tomato plant receives affect the size of the tomatoes?"

HYPOTHESIS: "I believe that the more sunlight a tomato plant receives, the larger the tomatoes will grow.

This hypothesis is based on:

(1) Tomato plants need sunshine to make food through photosynthesis, and logically, more sun means more food, and;

(2) Through informal, exploratory observations of plants in a garden, those with more sunlight appear to grow bigger.

science fair project ideas

The hypothesis is your general statement of how you think the scientific phenomenon in question works.

Your prediction lets you get specific -- how will you demonstrate that your hypothesis is true? The experiment that you will design is done to test the prediction.

An important thing to remember during this stage of the scientific method is that once you develop a hypothesis and a prediction, you shouldn't change it, even if the results of your experiment show that you were wrong.

An incorrect prediction does NOT mean that you "failed." It just means that the experiment brought some new facts to light that maybe you hadn't thought about before.

Continuing our tomato plant example, a good prediction would be: Increasing the amount of sunlight tomato plants in my experiment receive will cause an increase in their size compared to identical plants that received the same care but less light.

This is the part of the scientific method that tests your hypothesis. An experiment is a tool that you design to find out if your ideas about your topic are right or wrong.

It is absolutely necessary to design a science fair experiment that will accurately test your hypothesis. The experiment is the most important part of the scientific method. It's the logical process that lets scientists learn about the world.

On the next page, we'll discuss the ways that you can go about designing a science fair experiment idea.

The final step in the scientific method is the conclusion. This is a summary of the experiment's results, and how those results match up to your hypothesis.

You have two options for your conclusions: based on your results, either:

(1) YOU CAN REJECT the hypothesis, or

(2) YOU CAN NOT REJECT the hypothesis.

This is an important point!

You can not PROVE the hypothesis with a single experiment, because there is a chance that you made an error somewhere along the way.

What you can say is that your results SUPPORT the original hypothesis.

If your original hypothesis didn't match up with the final results of your experiment, don't change the hypothesis.

Instead, try to explain what might have been wrong with your original hypothesis. What information were you missing when you made your prediction? What are the possible reasons the hypothesis and experimental results didn't match up?

Remember, a science fair experiment isn't a failure simply because does not agree with your hypothesis. No one will take points off if your prediction wasn't accurate. Many important scientific discoveries were made as a result of experiments gone wrong!

A science fair experiment is only a failure if its design is flawed. A flawed experiment is one that (1) doesn't keep its variables under control, and (2) doesn't sufficiently answer the question that you asked of it.

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120+ Exciting 5th Grade Science Project Ideas With Hypothesis In 2023

5th Grade Science Project Ideas With Hypothesis

Are you ready to embark on an exciting journey into the world of 5th-grade science projects with hypotheses? Science projects are not just about fun experiments; they also involve forming hypotheses to make educated guesses about outcomes. But what makes a good hypothesis for a science project? In this blog, we’ll explore the key components of a successful hypothesis.

Selecting the right 5th-grade science project can be a challenge, and we’ll share some valuable tips to help you choose the perfect one. We’ll dive into the importance of combining hypothesis with your science project and why it’s a vital aspect of learning and discovery.

But that’s not all! We’ve also compiled an extensive list of 120+ exciting 5th-grade science project ideas with hypothesis, providing you with a wealth of inspiration for your next scientific adventure. Stay tuned with us to unleash the world of  5th-grade science project ideas with hypothesis  and nurture your curiosity in the process.

What Is A Good Hypothesis For A Science Project?

Table of Contents

A good hypothesis for a science project is like a smart guess. It helps scientists figure out what they think will happen in their experiment. To make a good hypothesis, you need to use words like  if  and  then.  For example,  If I water the plant every day, then it will grow taller.  This shows what you’re going to do and what you expect to see.

In addition, a strong hypothesis also needs to be testable. That means you can experiment to see if it’s true or not. It’s like a detective’s clue that leads you to find the answer. Scientists use good hypotheses to guide their experiments and learn new things about the world. So, making a good hypothesis is an important part of any science project.

Things To Remember While Selecting A 5th Grade Science Project Ideas With Hypothesis

Here are some things to remember while selecting a 5th grade science project ideas with hypothesis:

1. Personal Interest

Choose a 5th-grade science project that interests you. Picking a topic you’re curious about makes the project more enjoyable. Whether it’s plants, animals, or space, your passion can make learning fun.

2. Age-Appropriate

Make sure the project is right for your grade level. A 5th-grade project shouldn’t be too simple or too complex. It should match your skills and what you’ve learned in school.

3. Available Resources

Check if you have access to the materials you need. Some projects might need special tools or expensive stuff. It’s essential to choose something you can do with the materials you have.

4. Safety First

Keep safety in mind. Select a project that’s safe to do at home or in school. Make sure you won’t be using anything harmful or dangerous.

5. Clear Instructions

Look for a project with clear instructions. It’s easier when you know what to do step by step. Projects with easy-to-follow directions help you succeed and learn better.

Developing A Hypothesis For Your Science Project

Developing a hypothesis for your science project is a crucial step. It’s like making an educated guess about what you think will happen during your experiment. Here are seven key points to consider while creating a hypothesis:

  • Identify the Variables: Determine the two things you’re testing in your experiment, the  if  and  then  parts. For example, if you’re testing plant growth, the variables could be  amount of sunlight  and  plant height. 
  • Be Specific: Make sure your hypothesis is clear and precise. Avoid vague or broad statements. The more specific, the better.
  • Predict the Outcome: Your hypothesis should state what you expect to happen. Will one variable cause a change in the other? State your prediction clearly.
  • Use  If-Then  Statements : Craft your hypothesis using  if-then  statements to show the relationship between the variables. For instance,  If the amount of sunlight increases, then the plant height will also increase. 
  • Keep It Testable: Ensure that your hypothesis is something you can test through an experiment. It should lead to concrete results that you can measure.
  • Avoid Bias: Make sure your hypothesis doesn’t show your personal beliefs. It should be based on research and evidence, not what you want to happen.
  • Revisit and Revise : As you conduct your experiment, be ready to adjust your hypothesis if the results don’t match your initial prediction. Science is all about learning and adapting.

Here we have a list of 120+ exciting 5th grade science project ideas with hypothesis in 2023: 

  • Balloon Rocket

Hypothesis –   If I inflate a balloon and release it, then it will move forward because of the escaping air. 

  • Moldy Bread

Hypothesis –  I think bread left in different conditions will develop mold at varying rates. 

  • Growing Plants 

Hypothesis –   If I give plants different amounts of water, then they will grow differently. 

  • Magnet Magic

Hypothesis –  I predict that magnets will attract some objects but not others. 

  • Lemon Battery

Hypothesis –  I believe I can create a battery using a lemon because it is acidic. 

  • Volcano Eruption

Hypothesis –   I expect that a mixture of vinegar and baking soda will create a volcanic eruption. 

  • Density of Liquids

Hypothesis –   I think different liquids have different densities, and some will float on top of others. 

  • Solar Still

Hypothesis –   I predict that a solar still can collect clean water from dirty water through evaporation. 

  • Bouncing Balls

Hypothesis –   I believe that balls made from different materials will bounce to different heights. 

  • Static Electricity

Hypothesis –   I think rubbing a balloon on my hair will create static electricity that attracts objects. 

  • Fruit Battery

Hypothesis –  I expect that fruits like oranges and lemons can power a small light bulb. 

  • Color-Changing Milk

Hypothesis –  I predict that adding soap to milk with food coloring will make colorful patterns. 

  • Tornado in a Bottle

 Hypothesis –   I think that by swirling water and dish soap in a bottle, I can create a tornado-like vortex. 

  • Water Filtration

Hypothesis –   I believe that by using sand and gravel, I can filter impurities from water. 

  • Rust Formation

Hypothesis –  I predict that metal objects left in water will rust over time. 

  • Candy Dissolving

Hypothesis –  I think that different candies will dissolve at different rates in water. 

  • Seed Germination

Hypothesis –  If I plant seeds in various conditions, then they will sprout at different rates. 

Hypothesis –  I expect that by using a simple rain gauge, I can measure rainfall accurately. 

  • Sound Vibrations

Hypothesis –   I believe that different objects will produce different sounds when struck. 

  • Egg Drop Challenge

Hypothesis –   I predict that if I design a protective container, the egg will survive a fall. 

  • Paper Airplanes

Hypothesis –   I think that altering the shape of paper airplanes will affect their flight distance. 

  • Food Preservation

 Hypothesis –   I expect that different methods of food preservation will keep food fresh longer. 

  • Homemade Slime

Hypothesis –  I believe that mixing glue and borax will create a slimy substance. 

Hypothesis –   I predict that combining oil and water with Alka-Seltzer will create a mesmerizing lava lamp effect. 

  • Air Pressure

Hypothesis –   I think air pressure can be measured with a simple barometer. 

  • Crystal Growth

Hypothesis –  I expect that I can grow crystals by dissolving substances in water. 

  • Ocean Currents

Hypothesis –   I predict that hot water and cold water will create ocean currents in a container. 

  • Rainbow in a Jar

Hypothesis –   I believe I can create a rainbow by layering different liquids with different densities. 

  • Static Electricity Levitation

Hypothesis –  I think that static electricity can make a small object levitate. 

  • Melting Ice

Hypothesis –   I predict that adding salt to ice will cause it to melt faster. 

  • Potato Battery

Hypothesis –   I expect that a potato can conduct electricity and power a small device. 

  • Pendulum Swing

Hypothesis –   I believe that the length of a pendulum will affect its swing time. 

  • Soda Geyser

Hypothesis –   I predict that dropping Mentos candies into soda will create a geyser. 

  • Chromatography

Hypothesis –  I think I can separate the colors in markers using chromatography. 

  • Heat Transfer

Hypothesis –  I expect that different materials will transfer heat at varying rates. 

  • Rainfall and Runoff

Hypothesis –   I predict that if I simulate rainfall on different surfaces, some will produce more runoff. 

  • Fizzy Lemonade

Hypothesis –   I believe that combining lemon juice and baking soda will make lemonade fizzier. 

  • Rock Identification

Hypothesis –  I think I can identify different rocks by their characteristics. 

Hypothesis –  I predict that by cutting a straw, I can make it produce musical sounds like an oboe. 

  • Taste Perception

Hypothesis –   I expect that people’s taste perception may change when their sense of smell is altered. 

  • Color-Changing Flowers

Hypothesis –   I believe that adding food coloring to water will change the color of white flowers. 

  • Solar Cooker

Hypothesis –   I predict that a solar cooker can cook food using only the sun’s energy. 

  • Tornado Formation

Hypothesis –  I think that rotating two bottles will create a tornado effect. 

  • Vinegar and Baking Soda Rocket

Hypothesis –  I expect that mixing vinegar and baking soda in a bottle will launch it into the air. 

  • Popsicle Stick Bridge

Hypothesis –  I predict that I can build a strong bridge using only popsicle sticks and glue. 

  • Rainfall Patterns

Hypothesis –  I believe that rainfall patterns can be different in various parts of the world. 

  • Chemical Reactions

Hypothesis –  I think mixing certain chemicals will result in a visible reaction. 

  • Fruit Decomposition

Hypothesis –   I predict that different fruits will decompose at different rates. 

  • Balancing Act

Hypothesis –  I expect that I can balance various objects on a pivot point. 

  • Photosynthesis Simulation

Hypothesis –   I believe that using a simple setup, I can show how plants perform photosynthesis. 

  • Sinking and Floating

Hypothesis –  I think that objects with different densities will either sink or float in water. 

  • Tooth Decay

Hypothesis –  I predict that different liquids will affect teeth differently, simulating tooth decay. 

  • Rainwater Collection

Hypothesis –   I expect that by using a funnel, I can collect rainwater efficiently. 

  • Soundproofing

Hypothesis –  I think that different materials will block sound to varying degrees. 

  • Egg in a Bottle

Hypothesis –   I predict that I can place a peeled hard-boiled egg into a bottle without breaking it.  

  • Water Wheel

Hypothesis –   I believe that the flow of water can make a small wheel turn.  

  • Invisible Ink

Hypothesis –   I expect that I can create invisible ink that reveals messages under certain conditions.  

  •  Heat from the Sun

Hypothesis –   I predict that a dark-colored object will get hotter in the sun than a light-colored one.  

  • Layered Liquids

Hypothesis –   I think that liquids of different densities will form layers when mixed.  

  • Candle Burning

Hypothesis –   I predict that different types of candles will burn at different rates.  

  • Buoyancy with Clay Boats

Hypothesis –   I believe I can make clay boats that float and carry small loads.  

Hypothesis –   I expect that a mixture of cornstarch and water will behave strangely, like a liquid and a solid.  

  • Magnetic Slime

Hypothesis –   I predict that adding iron filings to slime will make it magnetic.  

  • Stalactites and Stalagmites

Hypothesis –   I think I can grow stalactites and stalagmites using a simple solution.  

Hypothesis –   I expect that different substances will have varying pH levels, which can be tested with indicator paper.  

  • Solar Still for Drinking Water

Hypothesis –   I believe that a solar still can produce clean drinking water from saltwater.  

Hypothesis –   I predict that I can create a sundial that tells time using the sun’s shadow.  

  • Dissolving Sugar

Hypothesis –   I expect that sugar will dissolve faster in hot water than in cold water.  

  • Balloon Inflator

Hypothesis –   I think that a chemical reaction in a bottle can inflate a balloon.  

  • Baking Soda and Vinegar Boat

Hypothesis –   I predict that a boat made from materials like baking soda and vinegar will move.  

  • Oil Spill Cleanup

Hypothesis –   I believe that using different materials can help clean up an oil spill in water.  

  • Seed Dispersal

Hypothesis –   I predict that seeds can be dispersed in various ways, such as by wind or animals.  

  • Lemonade Sweetness

Hypothesis –   I expect that lemonade sweetness can be adjusted by adding sugar in different amounts.  

  • Density of Solids

Hypothesis –   I think different solid objects will have different densities, which can be measured.  

  • Making Ice Cream

Hypothesis –   I predict that I can make ice cream by mxing ingredients and using ice and salt.  

  • Conduction and Insulation

Hypothesis –   I believe that different materials will either conduct or insulate heat.  

  • Centrifugal Force

Hypothesis –   I predict that spinning an object will create a centrifugal force that affects its path.  

  • Balloon-Powered Car

Hypothesis –   I expect that a car powered by a balloon will move because of the escaping air.  

  • Candle Extinguisher

Hypothesis –   I think that covering a candle with a glass will extinguish it by using up the oxygen inside.  

  • Water Filter Comparison

Hypothesis –   I predict that different water filters will remove impurities to varying degrees.  

  • Capillary Action

Hypothesis –   I expect that water will rise differently in materials with varying capillary action.  

  • Static Electricity and Salt

Hypothesis –   I believe that salt can be moved with static electricity.  

  • Food Coloring in Flowers

Hypothesis –   I predict that adding food coloring to water will change the color of flowers.  

  • Bottle Trombone

Hypothesis –   I think I can make a simple trombone-like instrument using a plastic bottle.  

  • Windmill Power

Hypothesis –   I expect that a windmill can generate power when exposed to wind.  

  • Chewing Gum Flavor

Hypothesis –   I predict that the flavor of chewing gum changes over time as it’s chewed.  

  • Yeast Balloons

Hypothesis –   I believe that yeast will produce gas that can inflate a balloon.  

  • Water Wheel Efficiency

Hypothesis –   I think that the design of a water wheel affects its efficiency in generating power.  

  • Simple Electric Circuit

Hypothesis –   I expect that I can make a light bulb glow by completing an electric circuit.  

  • Sugar Crystal Lollipop

Hypothesis –   I predict that sugar crystals will grow on a string dipped in a sugary solution.  

  • Temperature and Magnetism

Hypothesis –   I believe that magnets will behave differently at various temperatures.  

  • Styrofoam and Acetone

Hypothesis –   I expect that acetone will dissolve styrofoam.  

  • Starch in Foods

Hypothesis –   I think I can test for the presence of starch in different foods using iodine.  

  • Balloon-Powered Boat

Hypothesis –   I predict that a boat powered by a balloon will move on water.  

  • Melting Chocolate

Hypothesis –   I expect that chocolate will melt at different rates when heated.  

  • Air Pollution and Plant Growth

Hypothesis –   I believe that exposing plants to air pollution will affect their growth.  

  • Simple Motor

Hypothesis –   I predict that I can build a simple motor that turns when an electric current flows through it.  

  • Lemon Battery Voltage

Hypothesis –   I expect that different fruits will produce varying amounts of electricity when used as batteries.  

  • Fireworks in a Jar

Hypothesis –   I think that mixing oil and colored water will create a fireworks-like display in a jar.  

  • Bending Water with Static Electricity

Hypothesis –   I predict that static electricity can bend a stream of water from a faucet.  

  • Soda Can Fizz

Hypothesis –   I expect that dropping a mentos candy into a soda can will cause fizzing.  

  • Tornado Tube

Hypothesis –   I believe that connecting two plastic bottles with a tornado tube will create a vortex.  

  • Magnetic Attraction and Distance

Hypothesis –   I predict that magnets will attract objects from varying distances.  

  • Heat Absorption by Colors

Hypothesis –   I think that objects of different colors will absorb heat differently under sunlight.  

  • Lemon Battery Power

Hypothesis –   I expect that a lemon battery can power a small LED light.  

  • Strawberry DNA Extraction

Hypothesis –   I believe I can extract DNA from strawberries using common household items.  

  • Marshmallow Density

Hypothesis –   I predict that marshmallows of different shapes and sizes have different densities.  

  • Balloon-Powered Windmill

Hypothesis –   I think a windmill with balloons will turn when exposed to air.  

  • Spinning Colors

Hypothesis –   I expect that spinning a color wheel will create the illusion of blending colors.  

  • Sound and Vibration

Hypothesis –   I predict that different objects will create different sounds when struck and vibrate differently.  

  • Rock Erosion

Hypothesis –   I believe that different rocks will erode at varying rates when exposed to water.  

  • Air Pressure and Crushed Can

Hypothesis –   I expect that changing air pressure will crush an empty can.  

  • Straw Flute

Hypothesis –   I think that cutting and blowing through a straw can produce musical notes.  

  • Bottle Rocket

Hypothesis –   I predict that a bottle rocket filled with water and pressurized air will launch into the air.  

  • Fruit Electricity

Hypothesis –   I believe that different fruits can produce electricity using simple circuits.  

  • Melting Snow and Ice

Hypothesis –   I expect that different substances can help melt snow and ice at varying rates.  

  • Plant Growth in Different Soils

Hypothesis –   I think that different soils will affect the growth of plants differently.  

  • Static Electricity and Salt and Pepper

Hypothesis –   I predict that salt and pepper can be moved with static electricity.  

  • Floating Paperclip

Hypothesis –   I expect that surface tension can make a paperclip float on water.  

  • Crayon Melt Art

Hypothesis –   I believe that crayons will melt and create art when heated.  

  • Balloon-Powered Hovercraft

Hypothesis –   I predict that a hovercraft powered by balloons will glide over a smooth surface.  

  • Research Topics For Commerce Students
  • Maths Project Ideas For College Students

Importance Of 5th Grade Science Project Ideas With Hypothesis For Students 

In this section, we will discuss the importance of 5th grade science project ideas with hypothesis for students: 

1. Hands-On Learning

5th-grade science projects with hypotheses offer students a chance to learn through doing. They get to experiment, make predictions, and see the real-world results. This hands-on approach helps students grasp scientific concepts better.

2. Critical Thinking

These projects encourage critical thinking. Students have to come up with educated guesses (hypotheses) and then analyze their experiments’ outcomes. It teaches them to think logically and solve problems.

3. Curiosity and Exploration

Science projects fuel curiosity. They allow students to explore topics they find interesting, making learning more engaging. This curiosity can spark a lifelong interest in science.

4. Application of Knowledge

The things that students have learned in school can be used in real life. It helps them understand that science is not just in books, but all around them. This makes their education more useful.

5. Confidence Building

Successfully completing a science project with a hypothesis can boost a student’s confidence. They see that they can tackle challenging tasks and find solutions. This confidence can extend to other areas of their education and life.

Understanding what makes a good hypothesis is the first step in any 5th-grade science project with a hypothesis. It’s all about making educated guesses and having clear  if-then  statements. Remember to choose a project that matches your interest, is safe, and fits your grade level. With over 120 exciting 5th-grade science project ideas with hypothesis, you have a world of possibilities to explore. 

Moreover, these projects offer hands-on learning, boost critical thinking, and ignite curiosity. They let you apply what you’ve learned in school to real life. Completing these projects can build your confidence, showing that you can tackle challenges and make discoveries. So, dive into the world of 5th-grade science project ideas with hypothesis and start your exciting scientific journey!

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23 Ideas for Science Experiments Using Plants

ThoughtCo / Hilary Allison

  • Cell Biology
  • Weather & Climate
  • B.A., Biology, Emory University
  • A.S., Nursing, Chattahoochee Technical College

Plants are tremendously crucial to life on earth. They are the foundation of food chains in almost every ecosystem. Plants also play a significant role in the environment by influencing climate and producing life-giving oxygen. Plant project studies allow us to learn about plant biology and potential usage for plants in other fields such as medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. The following plant project ideas provide suggestions for topics that can be explored through experimentation.

Plant Project Ideas

  • Do magnetic fields affect plant growth?
  • Do different colors of light affect the direction of plant growth?
  • Do sounds (music, noise, etc.) affect plant growth?
  • Do different colors of light affect the rate of photosynthesis ?
  • What are the effects of acid rain on plant growth?
  • Do household detergents affect plant growth?
  • Can plants conduct electricity?
  • Does cigarette smoke affect plant growth?
  • Does soil temperature affect root growth?
  • Does caffeine affect plant growth?
  • Does water salinity affect plant growth?
  • Does artificial gravity affect seed germination?
  • Does freezing affect seed germination?
  • Does burned soil affect seed germination?
  • Does seed size affect plant height?
  • Does fruit size affect the number of seeds in the fruit?
  • Do vitamins or fertilizers promote plant growth?
  • Do fertilizers extend plant life during a drought?
  • Does leaf size affect plant transpiration rates?
  • Can plant spices inhibit bacterial growth ?
  • Do different types of artificial light affect plant growth?
  • Does soil pH affect plant growth?
  • Do carnivorous plants prefer certain insects?
  • 8th Grade Science Fair Project Ideas
  • Plant and Soil Chemistry Science Projects
  • High School Science Fair Projects
  • Middle School Science Fair Project Ideas
  • Animal Studies and School Project Ideas
  • Elementary School Science Fair Projects
  • Chemistry Science Fair Project Ideas
  • Magnetism Science Fair Projects
  • Science Fair Project Ideas
  • 4th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Environmental Science Fair Projects
  • Plant Stresses: Abiotic and Biotic Stresses
  • 6th Grade Science Fair Projects
  • Household Product Testing Science Fair Projects
  • College Science Fair Projects
  • Understanding Simple vs Controlled Experiments

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  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

What is snow and how does it form? ❄️

70 Easy Science Experiments Using Materials You Already Have On Hand

Because science doesn’t have to be complicated.

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

If there is one thing that is guaranteed to get your students excited, it’s a good science experiment! While some experiments require expensive lab equipment or dangerous chemicals, there are plenty of cool projects you can do with regular household items. Regardless of how empty your cabinets may be, we think you are likely to have at least some of these things lying around at home. Watch as your students engineer a bridge, solve environmental issues, explore polymers, or work with static electricity. We’ve rounded up a big collection of easy science experiments that anybody can try, and kids are going to love them!

1. Amplify a smartphone

DIY smartphone amplifier made from paper cups

No Bluetooth speaker? No problem! Put together your own from paper cups and toilet paper tubes.

Learn more: Mum in the Madhouse

2. Send a teabag flying

Empty tea bags burning into ashes

Hot air rises, and this experiment can prove it! You’ll want to supervise kids with fire, of course. For more safety, try this one outside!

Learn more: Coffee Cups and Crayons

3. Taste the rainbow

Skittles form a circle around a plate. The colors are bleeding toward the center of the plate. (easy science experiments)

Teach your students about diffusion while creating a beautiful and tasty rainbow! You’ll definitely want to have extra Skittles on hand so your class can enjoy a few as well!

Learn more: ToucanBox

4. Watch the water rise

Two side-by-side shots of an upside-down glass over a candle in a bowl of water, with water pulled up into the glass in the second picture

Learn about Charles’s Law with this simple experiment. As the candle burns, using up oxygen and heating the air in the glass, the water rises as if by magic.

Learn more: Team Cartwright

5. Set raisins dancing

Raisins floating in a glass of fizzy water

This is a fun version of the classic baking soda and vinegar experiment, perfect for the younger crowd. The bubbly mixture causes raisins to dance around in the water.

Learn more: 123 Homeschool 4 Me/Dancing Raisins

6. Race a balloon-powered car

Car made from cardboard with bottlecap wheels and powered by a blue balloon

Kids will be amazed when they learn they can put together this awesome racer using cardboard and bottle-cap wheels. The balloon-powered “engine” is so much fun too.

Learn more: ProLab

7. Crystallize your own rock candy

Colorful rock candy on wood sticks

Crystal science experiments teach kids about supersaturated solutions. This one is easy to do at home, and the results are absolutely delicious!

Learn more: Growing a Jeweled Rose

8. Make elephant-sized toothpaste

children are seen from the shoulders down standing behind three bottles that are overflowing with red, yellow, and green fluid. (easy science experiments)

This fun project uses yeast and a hydrogen peroxide solution to create overflowing “elephant toothpaste.” You can also add an extra fun layer by having the kids create toothpaste wrappers for their plastic bottles.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

9. Repel glitter with dish soap

Square dish filled with water and glitter, showing how a drop of dish soap repels the glitter

Everyone knows that glitter is just like germs—it gets everywhere and is so hard to get rid of! Use that to your advantage and show kids how soap fights glitter and germs.

Learn more: Living Life & Learning

10. Blow the biggest bubbles you can

Girl making an enormous bubble with string and wire (Easy Science Experiments)

Add a few simple ingredients to dish soap solution to create the largest bubbles you’ve ever seen! Kids learn about surface tension as they engineer these bubble-blowing wands.

Learn more: Scholastic/Dish Soap Bubbles

11. Make neon flowers

Eight daisies are shown in different neon colors. The water in the vases they are in are the same color as the daisies. (easy science experiments)

We love how simple this project is to re-create since all you’ll need are some gerbera daisies, food coloring, glasses, and water. The end result is just so beautiful!

Learn more: My Child Care Academy/Neon Flower

12. Build a Ferris wheel

Miniature Ferris Wheel built out of colorful wood craft sticks

You’ve probably ridden on a Ferris wheel, but can you build one? Stock up on wood craft sticks and find out! Play around with different designs to see which one works best.

Learn more: Teachers Are Terrific and eHow

13. Learn about capillary action

Glasses of colored water with paper towel strips leading from one to the next

Kids will be amazed as they watch the colored water move from glass to glass, and you’ll love the easy and inexpensive setup. Gather some water, paper towels, and food coloring to teach the scientific magic of capillary action.

Learn More: 123 Homeschool 4 Me/Capillary Action

14. Demonstrate the “magic” leakproof bag

Plastic bag full of water with pencils stuck through it (Easy Science Experiments)

So simple and so amazing! All you need is a zip-top plastic bag, sharp pencils, and some water to blow your kids’ minds. Once they’re suitably impressed, teach them how the “trick” works by explaining the chemistry of polymers.

Learn more: Paging Fun Mums

15. Design a cell phone stand

Basic cell phone stand made from wood craft sticks, paper clips, and rubber bands (Sixth Grade Science)

Use your engineering skills and items from around the house to design and build a cell phone stand.

Learn more: Science Buddies/Cell Phone Stand

16. Give a balloon face a beard

A pink balloon has a face drawn on it. It is hovering over a plate with salt and pepper on it (easy science experiments)

Equally educational and fun, this experiment will teach kids about static electricity using everyday materials. Kids will undoubtedly get a kick out of creating beards on their balloon person!

Learn more: Go Science Girls/Static Electricity

17. Re-create the water cycle in a bag

Plastic bag of blue water with a sun and clouds drawn on it (Easy Science Experiments)

You can do so many easy science experiments with a simple zip-top bag! Fill one partway with water and set it on a sunny windowsill to see how the water evaporates up and eventually “rains” down.

Learn more: Grade School Giggles

18. Conduct an egg drop

Egg surrounded by paper straws taped into place

Put all their engineering skills to the test with an egg drop! Challenge kids to build a container from stuff they find around the house that will protect an egg from a long fall (this is especially fun to do from upper-story windows).

Learn more: Buggy and Buddy/Egg Drop

19. Engineer a drinking straw roller coaster

Student building a roller coaster of drinking straws for a ping pong ball (Fourth Grade Science)

STEM challenges are always a hit with kids. We love this one, which only requires basic supplies like drinking straws.

Learn more: Frugal Fun for Boys and Girls/Straw Roller Coaster

20. Use apple slices to learn about oxidation

Several apple slices are shown on a clear plate. There are cards that label what they have been immersed in (including salt water, sugar water, etc.) (easy science experiments)

Have students make predictions about what will happen to apple slices when immersed in different liquids, then put those predictions to the test! Finally, have them record their observations.

Learn more: Jennifer Findley/Apple Oxidation

21. Build a solar oven

Solar oven built from a pizza box with s'mores inside

Explore the power of the sun when you build your own solar ovens and use them to cook some yummy treats. This experiment takes a little more time and effort, but the results are always impressive. The link below has complete instructions.

Learn more: Desert Chica

22. Float a marker man

Float a Marker Man on water with sharpie

Their eyes will pop out of their heads when you “levitate” a stick figure right off the table! This experiment works due to the insolubility of dry-erase marker ink in water, combined with the lighter density of the ink.

Learn more: Gizmodo

23. Discover density with hot and cold water

Mason jars connected at the mouths, with layers of colored water

There are a lot of easy science experiments you can do with density. This one is extremely simple, involving only hot and cold water and food coloring, but the visuals make it appealing and fun.

Learn more: STEAMsational

24. Find your way with a DIY compass

DIY compass made from a needle floating in water

Here’s an old classic that never fails to impress. Magnetize a needle, float it on the water’s surface, and it will always point north.

Learn more: STEAM Powered Family

25. Learn to layer liquids

Clear cylinder layered with various liquids in different colors

This density demo is a little more complicated, but the effects are spectacular. Slowly layer liquids like honey, dish soap, water, and rubbing alcohol in a glass. Kids will be amazed when the liquids float one on top of the other like magic (except it is really science).

Learn more: Wonder How To

26. Crush a can using air pressure

Student's gloved hand holding tongs over a crushed soda can sitting in a bowl of water (Seventh Grade Science)

Sure, it’s easy to crush a soda can with your bare hands, but what if you could do it without touching it at all? That’s the power of air pressure!

Learn more: Frugal Fun for Boys and Girls/Can Crush

27. Make homemade bouncy balls

Two children are shown (without faces) bouncing balls on a white table (easy science experiments)

These homemade bouncy balls are easy to make since all you will need is glue, food coloring, borax powder, cornstarch, and warm water. You will want to store them inside a container like a plastic egg because they will flatten out over time.

Learn more: Come Together Kids/Make Your Own Bouncy Balls

28. Build a Da Vinci bridge

Mini Da Vinci bridge made of pencils and rubber bands (Easy Science Experiments)

There are plenty of bridge-building experiments out there, but this one is unique. It’s inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s 500-year-old self-supporting wooden bridge. Learn how to build it at the link, and expand your learning by exploring more about Da Vinci himself.

Learn more: iGame Mom

29. Grow a carbon sugar snake

Giant carbon snake growing out of a tin pan full of sand

Easy science experiments can still have impressive results! This eye-popping chemical reaction demonstration only requires simple supplies like sugar, baking soda, and sand.

Learn more: KiwiCo/Carbon Sugar Snake

30. Create eggshell chalk

Chunk of pink chalk lying on paper towels (Easy Science Experiments)

Eggshells contain calcium, the same material that makes chalk. Grind them up and mix them with flour, water, and food coloring to make your very own sidewalk chalk.

Learn more: Kidspot

31. Make a basic sundial

a large piece of cardboard has a white circle in the center with a pencil standing upright in the middle of the circle. Rocks are on all four corners holding it down.

While people use clocks or even phones to tell time today, there was a time when a sundial was the best means to do that. Kids will certainly get a kick out of creating their own sundials using everyday materials like cardboard and pencils.

Learn more: PBS Kids/Sundial

32. Learn about plant transpiration

Plastic zipper bag tied around leaves on a tree (Easy Science Experiments)

Your backyard is a terrific place for easy science experiments! Grab a plastic bag and rubber band to learn how plants get rid of excess water they don’t need, a process known as transpiration.

Learn more: Teach Beside Me

33. Make naked eggs

Child holding a raw egg without its shell

This is so cool! Use vinegar to dissolve the calcium carbonate in an eggshell to discover the membrane underneath that holds the egg together. Then, use the “naked” egg for another easy science experiment that demonstrates osmosis .

Learn more: Making Memories With Your Kids

34. Make sparks with steel wool

Steel wool on fire in a tin pan (Easy Science Experiments)

All you need is steel wool and a 9-volt battery to perform this science demo that’s bound to make their eyes light up! Kids learn about chain reactions, chemical changes, and more.

Learn more: The Homeschool Scientist

35. Practice stop-motion animation

An image is divided into four separate images. There are small action figures in front of a tablet.

This is the perfect experiment for the budding filmmaker since they can decide on a backdrop, characters (toys), and story. Use a good stop-motion animation app to bring the film to life!

Learn more: Tinker Lab/Stop-Motion Animation

36. Turn milk into plastic

Student scooping plastic fragments out of a mug next to bottle of vinegar and measuring glass of milk (Easy Science Experiments)

This sounds a lot more complicated than it is, but don’t be afraid to give it a try. Use simple kitchen supplies to create plastic polymers from plain old milk. Sculpt them into cool shapes when you’re done!

Learn more: Science Buddies/Milk Into Plastic

37. Levitate a Ping-Pong ball

Student holding the cut off top of a bottle with a straw attached through the lid, with a ping pong ball floating over top

Kids will get a kick out of this experiment, which is really all about Bernoulli’s principle. You only need plastic bottles, bendy straws, and Ping-Pong balls to make the science magic happen.

Learn more: Buggy and Buddy/Floating Ping-Pong Ball

38. Launch a two-stage rocket

Two long balloons turned into a rocket with straws, rubber bands, and binder clips (Easy Science Experiments)

The rockets used for space flight generally have more than one stage to give them the extra boost they need. This easy science experiment uses balloons to model a two-stage rocket launch, teaching kids about the laws of motion.

Learn more: Science Buddies/Two-Stage Rocket

39. Pull an egg into a bottle

Empty bottle next to a bowl of eggs and a cup of matches with a plastic straw (Easy Science Experiments)

This classic easy science experiment never fails to delight. Use the power of air pressure to suck a hard-boiled egg into a jar, no hands required.

Learn more: Left Brain Craft Brain

40. Test pH using cabbage

Test tubes filled with purple liquid (Easy Science Experiments)

Teach kids about acids and bases without needing pH test strips! Simply boil some red cabbage and use the resulting water to test various substances—acids turn red and bases turn green.

Learn more: Education Possible

41. Clean some old coins

Pennies in containers of cola, vinegar and salt, apple juice, water, catsup, and vinegar (Easy Science Experiments)

Use common household items to make old oxidized coins clean and shiny again in this simple chemistry experiment. Ask kids to predict (hypothesize) which will work best, then expand the learning by doing some research to explain the results.

Learn more: Gallykids

42. Clean up an oil spill

Students sit around a table that has a tin pan filled with blue liquid wiht a feather floating in it (easy science experiments)

Before conducting this experiment, teach your students about engineers who solve environmental problems like oil spills. Then, have your students use provided materials to clean the oil spill from their oceans.

Learn more: Science After School Blogspot/Oil Spill

43. Blow up a balloon—without blowing

Two plastic water bottles with inflated balloons attached to the tops (Easy Science Experiments)

Chances are good you probably did easy science experiments like this when you were in school yourself. This well-known activity demonstrates the reactions between acids and bases. Fill a bottle with vinegar and a balloon with baking soda. Fit the balloon over the top, shake the baking soda down into the vinegar, and watch the balloon inflate.

Learn more: All for the Boys

44. Construct a homemade lava lamp

Plastic bottle with blobs of blue oil floating in water

This 1970s trend is back—as an easy science experiment! This activity combines acid/base reactions with density for a totally groovy result.

Learn more: Education.com

45. Whip up a tornado in a bottle

Upside-down glass bottle with a water tornado inside (Easy Science Experiments)

There are plenty of versions of this classic experiment out there, but we love this one because it sparkles! Kids learn about a vortex and what it takes to create one.

Learn more: Cool Science Experiments HQ

46. Explore how sugary drinks affect teeth

Four cups of different liquids with eggs floating in them (Easy Science Experiments)

The calcium content of eggshells makes them a great stand-in for teeth. Use eggs to explore how soda and juice can stain teeth and wear down the enamel. Expand your learning by trying different toothpaste and toothbrush combinations to see how effective they are.

Learn more: Feels Like Home

47. Monitor air pressure with a DIY barometer

Homemade barometer using a tin can, rubber band, and ruler

This simple but effective DIY science project teaches kids about air pressure and meteorology. They’ll have fun tracking and predicting the weather with their very own barometer.

Learn more: Edventures With Kids

48. Mummify a hot dog

Two hotdogs, one smaller and darker than the other, on a paper towel (Easy Science Experiments)

If your kids are fascinated by the Egyptians, they’ll love learning to mummify a hot dog! No need for canopic jars ; just grab some baking soda and get started.

Learn more: Science Buddies/Science of Mummification

49. Extinguish flames with carbon dioxide

Series of lit tea lights with a glass pitcher

This is a fiery twist on acid-base experiments. Light a candle and talk about what fire needs in order to survive. Then, create an acid-base reaction and “pour” the carbon dioxide to extinguish the flame. The CO2 gas acts like a liquid, suffocating the fire.

Learn more: Sick Science!/YouTube

50. Make a magnifying glass from ice

A child holds up a pice of ice to their eye as if it is a magnifying glass. (easy science experiments)

Students will certainly get a thrill out of seeing how an everyday object like a piece of ice can be used as a magnifying glass. Be sure to use purified or distilled water since tap water will have impurities in it that will cause distortion.

Learn more: STEAMsational/Ice Magnifying Glass

51. Do the Archimedes squeeze

Child dropping a ball of aluminum foil into a container of water (Easy Science Experiments)

It sounds like a wild dance move, but this easy science experiment demonstrates Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy. All you need is aluminum foil and a container of water.

Learn more: Science Buddies/Archimedes Squeeze

52. Step through an index card

Student stretching out an index card cut into a large rectangle (Easy Science Experiments)

This is one easy science experiment that never fails to astonish. With carefully placed scissor cuts on an index card, you can make a loop large enough to fit a (small) human body through! Kids will be wowed as they learn about surface area.

Learn more: Mess for Less

53. Stand on a pile of paper cups

Child standing on a stack of paper cups and cardboard squares

Combine physics and engineering and challenge kids to create a paper cup structure that can support their weight. This is a cool project for aspiring architects.

Learn more: Science Sparks

54. Mix up saltwater solutions

Glasses of basking soda water, sugar water, plain water, and salt water with red stones in them (Easy Science Experiments)

This simple experiment covers a lot of concepts. Learn about solutions, density, and even ocean science as you compare and contrast how objects float in different water mixtures.

Learn more: Science Kiddo

55. Construct a pair of model lungs

Plastic bottle with pink and black balloons inside, with student pulling a red balloon diaphragm (Easy Science Experiments)

Kids get a better understanding of the respiratory system when they build model lungs using a plastic water bottle and some balloons. You can modify the experiment to demonstrate the effects of smoking too.

Learn more: Surviving a Teacher’s Salary

56. Test out parachutes

Child standing on a stepladder dropping a toy attached to a paper parachute

Gather a variety of materials (try tissues, handkerchiefs, plastic bags, etc.) and see which ones make the best parachutes. You can also find out how they’re affected by windy days or find out which ones work in the rain.

Learn more: Inspiration Laboratories

57. String up some sticky ice

Piece of twine stuck to an ice cube (Easy Science Experiments)

Can you lift an ice cube using just a piece of string? This quick experiment teaches you how. Use a little salt to melt the ice and then refreeze the ice with the string attached.

Learn more: Playdough to Plato

58. Experiment with limestone rocks

Child pouring vinegar over a rock in a bowl

Kids  love to collect rocks, and there are plenty of easy science experiments you can do with them. In this one, pour vinegar over a rock to see if it bubbles. If it does, you’ve found limestone!

59. Recycle newspaper into an engineering challenge

Kids stacking a textbook into a cone of newspaper tubes (Easy Science Experiments)

It’s amazing how a stack of newspapers can spark such creative engineering. Challenge kids to build a tower, support a book, or even build a chair using only newspaper and tape!

Learn more: STEM Activities for Kids

60. Turn a bottle into a rain gauge

Plastic bottle converted to a homemade rain gauge (Easy Science Experiments)

All you need is a plastic bottle, a ruler, and a permanent marker to make your own rain gauge. Monitor your measurements and see how they stack up against meteorology reports in your area.

Learn More: NurtureStore

61. Use rubber bands to sound out acoustics

White plastic cup with rubber bands stretched across the opening (Easy Science Experiments)

Explore the ways that sound waves are affected by what’s around them using a simple rubber band “guitar.” (Kids absolutely love playing with these!)

62. Send secret messages with invisible ink

I Love You written in lemon juice on a piece of white paper, with lemon half and cotton swabs

Turn your kids into secret agents! Write messages with a paintbrush dipped in lemon juice, then hold the paper over a heat source and watch the invisible become visible as oxidation goes to work.

Learn more: KiwiCo/Invisible Ink

63. Build a folded mountain

Pile of layered towels being pushed together between two plastic tubs

This clever demonstration helps kids understand how some landforms are created. Use layers of towels to represent rock layers and boxes for continents. Then pu-u-u-sh and see what happens!

Learn more: The Chaos and the Clutter

64. Play catch with a catapult

Catapult and catcher made from plastic cups, pencils, and wood craft sticks (Easy Science Experiments)

Catapults make fun and easy science experiments, but we like the twist on this one that challenges kids to create a “receiver” to catch the soaring object on the other end.

Learn more: Science Buddies/Ball Launcher Challenge

65. Take a Play-Doh core sample

Layers of Play Doh with holes poked into it

Learn about the layers of the Earth by building them out of Play-Doh, then take a core sample with a straw. ( Love Play-Doh? Get more learning ideas here. )

Learn more: Line Upon Line Learning

66. Project the stars on your ceiling

Student poking holes in the shape of a constellation on the bottom of a paper cup (Easy Science Experiments)

Use the video lesson in the link below to learn why stars are only visible at night. Then create a DIY star projector to explore the concept hands-on.

Learn more: Mystery Science

67. Build a better umbrella

Cupcake liner turned upside-down over wood craft sticks with water being poured over top

Challenge students to engineer the best possible umbrella from various household supplies. Encourage them to plan, draw blueprints, and test their creations using the scientific method.

Learn more: Raising Lifelong Learners

68. Make it rain

Glass jar of water with shaving cream floating on top, with blue food coloring dripping through, next to a can of shaving cream

Use shaving cream and food coloring to simulate clouds and rain. This is an easy science experiment little ones will beg to do over and over.

Learn more: Mrs. Jones’ Creation Station

69. Use water to “flip” a drawing

Drawing of a hand with the thumb up and a glass of water

Light refraction causes some really cool effects, and there are multiple easy science experiments you can do with it. This one uses refraction to “flip” a drawing; you can also try the famous “disappearing penny” trick .

Learn more: Go Science Kids

70. Send a soda geyser sky-high

Students looking surprised as foamy liquid shoots up out of diet soda bottles

You’ve always wondered if this really works, so it’s time to find out for yourself! Kids will marvel at the chemical reaction that sends diet soda shooting high in the air when Mentos are added.

Learn more: Scholastic/Soda Explosion

Looking for even more science fun? Get the best science experiments for grades K-8 here.

Plus, sign up for our newsletters to get all the latest learning ideas, straight to your inbox..

Science doesn't have to be complicated! Try these easy science experiments using items you already have around the house or classroom.

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Science Fun

Science Fun

Science Experiments for Kids:

Science experiments you can do at home!  Explore an ever growing list of hundreds of fun and easy science experiments. Have fun trying these experiments at home or use them for science fair project ideas. Explore experiments by category, newest experiments, most popular experiments, easy at home experiments, or simply scroll down this page for tons of awesome experiment ideas!

Lava Lamp - April 2018

Making A Volcano:

Acids and Bases Can Erupt in Your Faces

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Orange Fizz:

Dry Erase - March 2018

Awesome Experiments:

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

New Experiments:

Check Out Our Newest Experiments

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Top Experiments:

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Easy Experiments:

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Storm In A Glass:

Home Made Play Dough - July 2014

Home Made Play Dough:

Snow Fluff - December 2017

Snow Fluff:

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Snow Globe:

Squishy Turkeys - November 2017

Squishy Turkeys:

Rainbow in a Glass! - May 2017

Rainbow in a Glass:

Sizzlin' Snowballs - December 2016

Sizzlin’ Snowballs:

Jello Lenses - August 2018

Jello Lenses:

Ice Fishing - July 2018

Ice Fishing:

Super Cool Soda - Sept. 2017

Super Cool Soda:

Jack-O-Cano - October 2016

Jack-O-Cano:

Dancing Hearts - February 2015

Dancing Hearts:

Marbled Gift Wrap - December 2018

Marbled Gift Wrap:

Massive Expanding Soap - July 2017

Massive Expanding Soap:

Surface Tension Art - February 2017

Surface Tension Art:

Fizzy Fruit

Fizzy Fruit:

Rotting Pumpkin

Rotting Pumpkin:

Explode A Bag

Explode A Bag:

Rotting Pumpkin

Invisible Extinguisher:

Paper Hovercrafts

Paper Hovercrafts:

Fun Fossil Stamps - April 2017

Fun Fossil Stamps:

Ping Pong - October 2018

Cool Crystals:

Balloon Pop! Not! - January 2017

Balloon Pop! Not!

Solar Eclipse Kit - Aug. 2017

Solar Eclipse Kit:

Moldy Apples - September 2016

Moldy Apples:

Cool Off Volcanoes

Cool Off Volcanoes:

Vinegar Pops - June 2016

Vinegar Pops:

science experiment ideas with hypothesis

Make It Rain:

Black Light Blue Beverage - October 2015

Black Light Blue Beverage:

Changing of the Leaves - September 2015

Changing of the Leaves:

Snowflakes - December 2015

Snowflakes:

Egg Drop - November 2015

Water Fireworks:

The Mind of a Student - August 2015

Mind of a Student:

Balloon Speakers - May 2016

Balloon Speakers:

Polar Bear Blubber - January 2016

Polar Bear Blubber:

Gorgeous Gooey Gobstoppers - February 2016

Gorgeous Gooey Gobstoppers:

Olympic Medals - August 2016

Olympic Medals:

Dyed Flowers - May 2015

Dyed Flowers:

Rain, Rain, Don't Go Away Gauge - April 2015

Rain, Rain, Don’t Go Away Gauge:

Blossoming Beans - March 2015

Blossoming Beans:

Sun Dial - January 2015

Butter Fingers:

Polishing Pennies - September 2014

Polishing Pennies:

Dancing Liquid - October 2014

Dancing Liquid:

Floating Egg - April 2014

Floating Egg:

Bendy Bones

Bendy Bones:

Pot of Gold - March 2016

Pot Of Gold:

Layers of Liquids - May 2014

Layers of Liquids:

Crystal Candy - March 2014

Crystal Candy:

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COMMENTS

  1. List of Science Fair Ideas and Experiments You Can Do

    List of Science Fair Ideas and Experiments You Can Do. Science Fair Ideas Okay, this is the hardest part of the whole project…picking your topic. But here are some ideas to get you started. Even if you don't like any, they may inspire you to come up with one of your own.

  2. Writing a Hypothesis for Your Science Fair Project

    In a science fair setting, judges can be just as impressed by projects that start out with a faulty hypothesis; what matters more is whether you understood your science fair project, had a well-controlled experiment, and have ideas about what you would do next to improve your project if you had more time.

  3. Writing a Hypothesis for Your Science Fair Project

    Don't worry! The goal of a science project is not to prove your hypothesis right or wrong. The goal is to learn more about how the natural world works. Even in a science fair, judges can be impressed by a project that started with a bad hypothesis.

  4. Science Projects (Search: hypothesis)

    Showing results for "hypothesis" Browse Science Projects Over 1,200 free science projects for K-12. Browse by subject, grade level, or try our Topic Selection Wizard to find your winning science project. With science projects in 32 different areas of science from astronomy to zoology, we've got something for everyone!

  5. 50 of the Best Science Fair Project Ideas for Kids

    1. With this science fair experiment, you can learn what factors affect melting ice. 2. Try this magic milk experiment for an easy science fair project that younger students can accomplish. STEM Activity for Kids: Magic Milk Experiment by Waterford UPSTART Watch on 3. How much sun does a seed need to sprout?

  6. Hypothesis Examples

    Here are some research hypothesis examples: If you leave the lights on, then it takes longer for people to fall asleep. If you refrigerate apples, they last longer before going bad. If you keep the curtains closed, then you need less electricity to heat or cool the house (the electric bill is lower).

  7. List of Science Fair Project Ideas

    Below is a list of the 1130 science fair project ideas on our site. To help you find a topic that can hold your interest, Science Buddies has also developed the Topic Selection Wizard.It will help you focus on an area of science that's best for you without having to read through every project one by one!

  8. Sample Variables & Hypothesis

    There are two parts of this hypothesis, and thus two experiments: Experiment #1: Measure the voltage of fresh AA batteries as they are used in different current drain devices. Experiment #2: Compare the rate of voltage change between devices with low, medium, and high current drain. The second experiment does not require any more data ...

  9. Best Science Fair Ideas and Projects by Grade Level

    Grade School Science Project Ideas . Students are introduced to the scientific method in grade school and learn how to propose a hypothesis. Grade school science projects tend to be quick to complete and should be fun for the student and the teacher or parent. Examples of suitable project ideas include: . Determine whether insects are attracted to lights at night because of their heat or their ...

  10. A Strong Hypothesis

    Keep in mind that writing the hypothesis is an early step in the process of doing a science project. The steps below form the basic outline of the Scientific Method: Ask a Question. Do Background Research. Construct a Hypothesis. Test Your Hypothesis by Doing an Experiment. Analyze Your Data and Draw a Conclusion.

  11. High School Science Experiment Ideas

    By Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D. Updated on July 08, 2019 Try these ideas for science experiments targeted at the high school educational level. Perform a science experiment and explore different hypotheses to test. Caffeine Experiments JGI / Jamie Grill / Getty Images

  12. Science Projects

    Browse Science Projects. Over 1,200 free science projects for K-12. Browse by subject, grade level, or try our Topic Selection Wizard to find your winning science project. With science projects in 32 different areas of science from astronomy to zoology, we've got something for everyone! Let us help you find a science project that fits your ...

  13. 50 Fantastic 4th Grade Science Projects and Experiments

    Dec 27, 2023 Nothing gets kids more excited for science than hands-on experiments! Watch your 4th grade science students' eyes light up when they try some of these activities. You'll find physics, biology, engineering, chemistry, and more. These projects are easy to set up and really help drive the learning home. Get ready for some science fun!

  14. 35 Easy Science Experiments You Can Do Today!

    Will it sink or will it float? This fun experiment challenges what students think they know about household items! Students record their hypothesis for each item then test it to compare what they think will happen against their observations. Detailed Instructions & Video Tutorial -> Float or Sink Science Experiment

  15. 100+ Easy & FUN Science Fair Project Ideas

    Rainbow Absorption. Film Canister Rockets. Blooming Paper Flowers. Dancing Acorns ~ Hands-on Teaching Ideas. States of Matter Experiments - solids, liquids and gases. Rubber Bouncing Egg Experiment. Color Changing Flowers Experiment ~ Messy Little Monster. Paper Burning Experiment ~ Preschool Powol Packets.

  16. PDF 200 Science Fair Project Ideas

    Read this list of 200 science-fair project ideas. Circle all of the ones that sound interesting to you. 1. How does the temperature of a tennis ball affect the height of its bounce? 2. How does the air pressure of a soccer ball affect how far it travels when kicked? 3. Does a metal baseball bat vibrate more than a wooden one? 4.

  17. Top 100 5th Grade Science Project Ideas with Hypothesis

    1. The Color-Changing Milk Hypothesis: Hypothesis: Mixing milk, dish soap, and food coloring will create a mesmerizing display of color. 2. The Vinegar and Baking Soda Volcano Hypothesis: Hypothesis: When vinegar reacts with baking soda, it will create a volcanic eruption. 3. The Seed Germination Hypothesis:

  18. The Scientific Method

    This is the part of the scientific method that tests your hypothesis. An experiment is a tool that you design to find out if your ideas about your topic are right or wrong. It is absolutely necessary to design a science fair experiment that will accurately test your hypothesis. The experiment is the most important part of the scientific method.

  19. 150+ Exciting 5th Grade Science Project Ideas With Hypothesis

    1. Personal Interest Choose a 5th-grade science project that interests you. Picking a topic you're curious about makes the project more enjoyable. Whether it's plants, animals, or space, your passion can make learning fun. 2. Age-Appropriate Make sure the project is right for your grade level.

  20. 70 Best High School Science Fair Projects in Every Subject

    Some science experiments for high school are just advanced versions of simpler projects they did when they were younger, with detailed calculations or fewer instructions. Other projects involve fire, chemicals, or other materials they couldn't use before.

  21. 23 Ideas for Science Experiments Using Plants

    Plant project studies allow us to learn about plant biology and potential usage for plants in other fields such as medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. The following plant project ideas provide suggestions for topics that can be explored through experimentation. Bailey, Regina. "23 Ideas for Science Experiments Using Plants."

  22. 70 Easy Science Experiments Using Materials You Already Have

    1. Amplify a smartphone No Bluetooth speaker? No problem! Put together your own from paper cups and toilet paper tubes. Learn more: Mum in the Madhouse 2. Send a teabag flying Hot air rises, and this experiment can prove it! You'll want to supervise kids with fire, of course. For more safety, try this one outside!

  23. Science Experiments for Kids:

    Science Experiments for Kids: Science experiments you can do at home! Explore an ever growing list of hundreds of fun and easy science experiments. Have fun trying these experiments at home or use them for science fair project ideas.