Six project-management tips for your PhD

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Six simple tips to help ensure progress during your Ph.D. studies.

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Six project-management tips for your PhD

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Submitted by Angel J Santiago-Lopez on 28 January 2019 - 2:36pm

Angel J Santiago-Lopez's picture

This article was originally published in  Nature . You can read the full lenght English version there. You can read the full lenght Spanish version by clicking on ESPAÑOL at the top right of your screen.

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How to Manage a Research Project in Graduate School

Entering graduate school is more than getting a degree after completing your undergraduate and learning a sophisticated technical skill in the lab.

How a research project fails

When you start as a graduate student, there is a high-level skill to master immediately. This skill is managing and completing a research project with several tasks: planning research experiments, performing experiments, collecting data, analyzing data, and writing a thesis. Unfortunately, you only have a limited time to complete all of the tasks on this list.

Managing multiple tasks in a research project can be similar to juggling—if you drop one ball, it will be chaotic. Likewise, when you fail to manage your research project, you’ll also get undesired outcomes.

Let's say you come across one failed experiment. Performing this experiment repeatedly or tweaking it to make it work can occupy most of your time in the lab. Therefore, you get further from completing subsequent experiments. When your mentor finds out about this situation, she will certainly be concern.

So how do you find the balance? How do you manage it all while accounting for all of the obstacles thrown your way? In this article, we explore a few techniques to help you manage your upcoming research project.

In This Article

Why is managing a research project an important skill for a graduate student?

Why is the project management skill valuable for future careers, factors to consider when managing a research project, helpful tips to manage your research project, what are some helpful tools to manage a research project.

Managing a research project is an important skill for a graduate student due to the following reasons:

1.To complete your project

To graduate, you have to complete your research project and thesis before approaching the end date of your funding. The last thing you want is to find out you are unable to finish your final experiments because the funding has expired.

2.To ensure good quality

The quality of your research can also suffer when you are in a rush to complete multiple experiments.

3.To plan ahead

Planning your research project step-by-step allows you to find the right strategy to tackle each project and anticipate incoming challenges for each experiment.

4. To manage changes

When performing a research project, it’s possible that your research plan has to change. For example, due to the availability of your research materials and equipment, you may have to alter your experiment. Having a clear plan will allow you to make some changes to the original plan, achieve your research objective and still meet your deadline.

Project management will become one of most valuable skills you develop—no matter what your future career may be. After graduating and starting a new path, you will still need this skill to plan, organize and complete projects.

As a graduate student, you build the project management skill by managing your research project from beginning to end.

When managing a research project, there are three important constraints to consider ( Williams, 2013 ):

  • Cost : The amount of money needed to support your research.
  • Time : the end date of your funding or years needed to obtain a degree.
  • Scope : this includes your experiments, thesis, required classes, etc.

Triple Constraints of Project Management

A change in one constraint generally affects the other constraints. For example, you decide to increase the scope of your project by adding in more research experiments. In this case, your costs will increase and you will have less available time for the rest of your project. As a result, you will also have less time to write your thesis. In this case, the quality of your thesis may suffer.

Eventually, the interactions among the triple constraints affect quality .

Set your goals early

From early on, plan your research project based on your goals. In graduate school, your main goal is to complete these important tasks: required classes, your research project, and your thesis.

For each of these tasks, identify smaller, reasonable tasks. As an example, for the research project, completing each research objective in the project can be your smaller goal. Then, add a link between tasks, for example, a particular task that you can only start after finishing other tasks ( project contingencies ). Afterwards, estimate the time you need to complete each task and map out the start date and the end date.

Some of the advantages of setting small, reasonable goals are: it allows you to plan a specific strategy to finish each goal and it helps keep you motivated after finishing each goal.

To learn more about setting goals, find our article below:

Building a Clear Path and Finishing Graduate School Even When You’re Ready to Give Up

Learn more about the funding

When the university admits a graduate student, it may offer the student a funding package covering tuition and fees, such as a research assistantship or a teaching assistantship. In addition to this package, another source of funding usually supports the graduate student’s research during her or his time as a graduate student.

Before starting your first semester in graduate school, investigate the details about your funding, particularly the budget, the end date and the requirements. That way you have a clear idea about when you must finish your research project.

Consider your time

As a graduate student, you have other important tasks you must complete. For example, to get your degree, you must complete all required classes. Therefore, you need to juggle time between performing research experiments and taking classes. If you are under a teaching assistantship, divide your time evenly for conducting your research, taking your required classes, and teaching your class.

Weighing the risk

The nature of conducting research experiments is that they occasionally fail. Therefore, to prevent losing time, allocate a longer timeline for the experiments with a higher risk. If possible, add this type of experiment to your timeline as early as possible. In addition, create a plan to overcome each possible failure. Finally, add experiments with a lower risk closer to the end of your timeline.

Consider the value

When adding some experiments into your research project, consider their value. Sometimes adding more experiments will strengthen your findings. Unfortunately, too many experiments also means it will take more time and effort to finish them. Therefore, only choose necessary experiments that add more value to your research and bring you closer to your main goal.

One way to manage your research project effectively is by using a tool to create clear and visual timeline of your research project.

1.Gantt Chart

A Gantt chart is a chart using a horizontal bar to visualize the timeline of a project and its tasks, with start and end dates within the timeline. A timeline in the Gantt Chart shows the chronological order of your experiments.

Ideally, your timeline starts from the first semester to several months before you plan to graduate. After deciding a timeline, assign each smaller task with each milestone. A milestone is a specific time point in the timeline, which contains a start date and an end date of each task.

Each horizontal bar represents a task in the research project, whereas the length of the bar shows the length of time to finish the step.

This chart provides an effective way to track progress, plan multiple steps in the project, and map out workloads.

Gantt Chart example for research projects in life science and biology - Illustration of a Gantt Chart for biotech research projects - project management tool

How to create a Gantt Chart:

a. Identify tasks:

  • Identify all major tasks; all the research objectives in your research project.
  • Identify all subtasks; your research experiments in each research objective.

b. Draw a horizontal bar for the length of time:

  • Identify a timeline; start from the first semester and end closer to the semester you plan to graduate.
  • Plug in each horizontal bar for each subtask. This bar should represent how long each experiment may take. It is represented along the overall timeline of the project.
  • Map out each subtask with its milestone. Each milestone should contain the start date and the end date.
  • Pay attention to the experiments that can only start after the completion of another experiment. The starting date for these subtasks should be after the end date of the proceeding experiment.

c. Edit the chart if necessary, for example when adding more subtasks or experiments.

You can create a Gantt Chart is by using Lucidchart , monday.com , PowerPoint, Word , or Excel .

2.High-Level Process Map

A high-level process map is a map containing several key steps for each task in a research project. This map is a relatively simple flowchart, but it helps visualize all processes in a research project.

High-Level Process Map example for managing biotechnology research projects - project management tool

How to create the map:

  • Identify all processes in the research project.
  • Identify the start and the end of each process.
  • Use symbols to represent each unique step, and write the detail in the symbol. The common symbols used in this map are boxes to represent different steps, diamonds to represent important decisions as go or no-go, and flow arrows to connect boxes and diamonds.

A quick way to create this map is by using Lucidchart . You can also use Power Point or Word, although it takes a much longer time. Otherwise, there is always a simple way by creating it with a pen and paper.

3.Work Breakdown Structure Example

A work breakdown structure is a chart containing a list of tasks and subtasks in a research project. This chart has a tree-like structure with the main branches containing the tasks and smaller branches containing smaller tasks. This structure helps to divide a big research project into smaller and achievable tasks you can manage.

Work Breakdown Structure example illustration for managing biotechnology research projects - project management tool

How to create the work breakdown structure:

  • Identify all tasks in the research project.
  • Divide each task into three levels: big, medium, and small tasks.
  • Outline and arrange the tree-like structure into three sections based on the three levels of tasks.

The easy way to create a work breakdown structure is by using Lucidchart , Excel, PowerPoint, or Word.

Employers Want Project Managers Skills! (2017, April 12). Northeastern University Toronto. https://www.northeastern.edu/toronto/employers-wan...

Creating High-level Process Maps. (1442). Center for Professional & Executive Development. https://blog.uwcped.org/creating-high-level-proces...

Funding Factors to Consider. (n.d.). Rackham Graduate School: University of Michigan. Retrieved February 15, 2021, from https://rackham.umich.edu/funding/factors-to-consi...

How to Create a Work Breakdown Structure | Lucidchart Blog. (2000). Lucidchart.com. https://www.lucidchart.com/blog/how-to-create-a-work-breakdown-structure-and-why-you-should.

How to Make a Gantt Chart in Word + Free Template. (n.d.). Office Timeline. https://www.officetimeline.com/make-gantt-chart/microsoft-word.

Online Diagram Software & Visual Solution | Lucidchart. (2017). Lucidchart. https://www.lucidchart.com/pages

PhD transferable skills | University Career Center. (n.d.). Careercenter.umich.edu. Retrieved February 16, 2021, from https://careercenter.umich.edu/article/phd-transferable-skills.

Project Management for Graduate Students. (2018). https://grad.wisc.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/329/2018/02/2018-Project-Management-for-Graduate-Students-Course-Workbook.pdf.

Project Management for Research | CCTS. (n.d.). Ccts.osu.edu. Retrieved February 15, 2021, from https://ccts.osu.edu/content/project-management-research.

Santiago-Lopez, A. (2019). Six project-management tips for your PhD. Nature, 573(7772), 153–153. https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6.

Seven Essential Tips for Managing a Large Research Project. (n.d.). Www.wiley.com. https://www.wiley.com/network/researchers/writing-and-conducting-research/seven-essential-tips-for-managing-a-large-research-project.

Simple Gantt Chart. (2019, August 4). Office.com. https://templates.office.com/en-us/simple-gantt-chart-tm16400962.

The structure of a research project. (2014). https://www.kent.ac.uk/learning/resources/studyguides/managingaresearchproject.pdf.

This simple tool can help you manage multiple research projects. (n.d.). Www.natureindex.com. Retrieved February 15, 2021, from https://www.natureindex.com/news-blog/simple-tool-can-help-manage-multiple-research-science-projects.

Williams, R. A. (2013). Spinning plates and juggling balls. Project managing your PhD. EMBO Reports, 14(4), 305–309. https://doi.org/10.1038/embor.2013.17.

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Six project-management tips for your PhD.

Nature , 01 Sep 2019 , 573(7772): 153 https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6   PMID: 31481765 

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Project management is a vastly transferrable and highly sought-after skillset that can open doors to careers in almost any field. The ability to effectively manage projects is a huge asset in today’s competitive job market, which graduate researchers are in a prime position to practice and refine during their candidature. The movement into and out of academia as a career path is also a lot more fluid these days, with industry, government or project management experience informing research, policy and practice and vice versa.

This session will encourage participants to think more broadly about the sorts of career paths they might seek, and also to view the skills they learn in doing a PhD in a different light. In this seminar you will hear from four speakers with PhDs who have extensive experience working both within and outside of academia. They will share their experiences of managing projects in professional contexts ranging from small NGOs to international consultancies.

Panellists will discuss what ‘projects’ are, what skills and tools may be used in managing projects, and how to learn, apply and communicate this experience to potential employers. This seminar is relevant to graduate researchers at all stages of candidature.

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4 Essential Project Management Skills for PhD Students

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Earning a Ph.D. requires you to complete years of coursework, perform laboratory studies, publish your work , and attend conferences . Time management, therefore, is a difficult but necessary aspect of this undertaking. In this article, we want to share important project management tips that can help you as you complete your Ph.D.

The Need for Project Management Skills

Dr. Fiona Saunders, Head of Education at Manchester Metropolitan University’s School of Engineering, says Ph.D. students can sometimes find themselves “lost in a fog.” This means that they have difficulty setting a plan and staying organized while taking on big projects.

But how does a student learn these skills? Angel Santiago-Lopez, a Ph.D. candidate in bioengineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta), feels that a Ph.D. program should include some aspect of project management instruction . This instruction would teach students how to develop project topics, organize project goals, and build schedules.

Important Project Management Skills

Define your project.

It is very important that you clearly define the project and its different parts. Do not simply say that you want to do a study of bioethics in the 21 st century. Instead, define your project as something new that will contribute to important work being done in the field.

Time Management

Time management is vital. Deadlines are an important structuring tool for any project. There are many ways that you can structure your timeline.

  • First, have an end goal. This is the final deadline for your project. You can look at this as the day when you want to turn in a completed, revised project to your professor.
  • Second, you can make deadlines for individual parts of the project. For example, if it is an article that you hope to publish, you can set deadlines for each section of the article.
  • Lastly, make study goals. Set a daily or weekly schedule for doing research and completing parts of your study.

Fortunately, there are many tools that you can use. For example, flow charts and Gantt graphs are a good visual representation of a project management plan. Also, there is an abundance of project management software that can help you set up and execute a project management plan.

Use Checkpoints

Checkpoints are an important way to see if you are making progress and keeping to your schedule. Also, these checkpoints will keep you motivated to continue working towards your goals.

A few examples of checkpoints are:

  • Meetings with professors
  • Meetings with fellow students
  • Completing individual sections of the project
  • Personal deadlines for completing research

Checkpoints can also help you prepare for the unexpected. A checkpoint gives you time to reassess your progress and fix any errors that might have been made.

Define Success

Everyone wants to do “good work.” But, what does that mean? You need to set a clear definition of success in order to monitor the quality of your project. For example, your project should introduce a new idea. Or, it should solve a longstanding problem in your field. Regardless of the end goal, the project should be new and interesting while introducing new ideas on a topic.

Using Project Management Skills in Any Career

Project management is a vital tool for many career paths. At its core, project management involves an aptitude in creativity and problem-solving. Project management in the sciences is extremely important. From grants to personal projects, these skills will help you manage projects of any scale and scope . This is even more important as many Ph.D. graduates are pursuing careers beyond academia.

What are your experiences with project management? How have you used these skills in your academic work? Please share with us in the comments.

' src=

I’m agree with authors,because time management is one of the most difficult things that you face in work study. Samely, using schedules does easier and efficient your research works. Lastly, if you have your goals clearly, you¨ll get success in appropieted time.

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Project Management resource for PhD students and supervisors

2018 Nov 27 | Resource , Soft Skills | 0

This article is not only a blog post but also a resource linking to other good blog posts and to free downloadable templates of project management tools for PhD students and supervisors .

To create this resource I asked around me and on Twitter if people had good references. I got a few nice ones, but actually I got many suggestions about self-organization and time management. It then appears to me that we tend to mix up what project management is versus time management, and even for me today it’s still not 100% clear.

In this research and student-supervisor relationship context, I would like to suggest the following:

  • time management is a personal skills : you manage your own time, you decide what to do Tuesday at 10 AM, maybe you agree to meet with someone at this time, but ultimately you’re the one who decides when for example you want to have lunch or coffee (at least I hope you can). This also means that, to some extent, it doesn’t matter if your time management style does not align perfectly with your colleagues. Again, I wrote to some extent .
  • on the other hand, for project management and in this context, there are at least two persons involved: the student and the supervisor. In my views, project management is as much about planning and conducting a project as about finding a compatible way for two persons to work together . Project management is a team skill.

Therefore, what I’ve been looking for are references to help both PhD students and supervisors to first understand what the underlying principles of project management are, and secondly to get an overview of different tools available to help them work together.

Below you will find interesting blog posts, whenever possible I selected those giving concrete advice on how to implement project management in research, and I also looked for free ready-to-use templates .

Click on each drop-down item below to see the content.

1. Understand the underlying principles of project management for researchers

Project management for scientists - blog post.

by Stanley E. Portny and Jim Austin in 2002 on the Sciencemag website

meant toward supervisors

This article tries to define what project management is, argues that it can be applied to research and introduce the principles for how to do so:

“Projects can be large or small, planned and tracked formally or informally, and defined by a legal contract or an informal agreement.”

“Project management allows–indeed, insists–that the components of a project be constantly revised as new information arises.”

How Project Management Techniques Can Improve Research - blog post

by Donna Kridelbaugh in 2017 on the website labmanager.com

“research project management as a subdiscipline that can provide the tools and resources for researchers to better organize projects, but with flexibility in the planning process to evolve with the project as needed”

“Creating a road map to guide successful project implementation create a culture of shared ownership toward research goals and open communication throughout the project life cycle.”

A PhD as a project - blog posts

from Fiona Saunders on her website and on the Thesis Whisperer website in 2013

meant toward PhD students

Introduction from the Thesis Whisperer : “Fiona Saunders is a Senior Lecturer in the Management of Engineering Projects at The University of Manchester and a part-time PhD student. Her research interests are in the management of projects in safety-critical industries. Prior to academia, Fiona enjoyed a successful 15 year industry career in project management.”

In the article first part :

“It strikes me that, at least in the early days, most PhDs are akin to “Lost in the Fog” projects .”

She recommends to “Have a plan – even it only stretches out over the next six months and changes frequently”

In the second part:

“Having a documented PhD scope can help guard against a loss of focus, or drift in what the aims and objectives of the PhD are.”

“The third and final lesson from project management that is highly relevant to a PhD is the importance of communication .”

“One of the hardest lessons for new PhD students to learn is that the PhD is your project as such you are the project manager and you must take responsibility for managing the various communication channels on the project.”

The Smart Way to Manage a Large Research Project - blog post

by Eva Lantsoght in 2013 on the nextscientist website

Tips on project management and also to manage data and files. Plus the article acts as a resource with an extensive list of tools to help you get organized.

“Planning consists of the following subtasks:

  • Identifying the tasks that need to be carried out.
  • Splitting the main tasks into their respective subtasks.
  • Considering how much time each task takes.
  • Determining which tasks run simultaneously.
  • Assess the consequences if a task takes more time.
  • Allow some air to breathe

Making the Right Moves - book - PDF

the book subtitle is: A Practical Guide to Scientific Management for Postdocs and New Faculty

meant toward postdocs and new faculty as the subtitle says

“Based on workshops co-sponsored by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and HHMI, this book is a collection of practical advice and experiences from seasoned biomedical investigators and includes chapters on laboratory leadership, getting funded, project management, and teaching and course design.”

2. Get to know different project management techniques and tools

  • Gantt chart

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Kanban board.

Each tool has its pros and cons. Therefore, one could combine them on different levels. For example, to visualize a complete PhD timeline I would recommend Gantt charts . To make this timeline, using WBS and SMART goals will help break down the project into smaller achievable tasks . Then to implement work and to track the progress throughout the project, one could use the Agile principles and use a shared Kanban board .

I don’t pretend that this resource is complete, there is surely much more which I don’t know about. Nevertheless, this was done to the best of my knowledge and it includes the project management tools which I’ve seen the most often in academia.

Gantt charts:

Academiac - blog posts and template.

With my complete unbiased objectivity, I think that my 2 articles about Gantt charts with a free downloadable template are the best ones to explain how to use these charts for a PhD project =)

In the first article,  Are Gantt charts useful for PhD students? , I introduce what Gantt charts are and what are the drawbacks to keep in mind (i.e. lack of flexibility).

Templates by the I think well coaching team

on the website ithinkwell.com.au by Maria Gardiner and Hugh Kearns

Different templates and ready-to-use tools both for PhD students and for supervisors . For PhD students they have thesis planners and forms for different time scales, from a 3-year PhD to 6 months to a week to a one day plan .

I highly recommend supervisors and students to look at other materials which are available on their website like:

  • YourSupervisoryPracticeSelfAssessment.pdf
  • CareerPlanningDiscussion.pdf
  • ExpectationsOfResearchSupervision.pdf

Online planner to create a PhD road map

By Jeanine de Bruin and Brigitte Hertz

This is a tool where you can drag and drop pictograms onto a 4-year calendar to create a road map for your PhD. They have signs for things like writing, conferences, meeting, holidays, risk analysis, etc.

Templates for different PhD length by the University of Adelaide

This university seems to require doctoral students to draw a thesis road map as a Gantt chart. Nicely they provide templates for different PhD length, from 3-year up to 6-year-long program :

PERT charts

It happens that I don’t know much about PERT charts but I’ve seen it mentioned in many references (often together with Gantt charts) so I thought it would be good to put it here.

PERT charts - articles and templates

PERT means Program Evaluation Review Technique.

Like a Gantt chart there is the idea to draw a diagram for a project but instead of horizontal bars here it uses boxes and arrows. Again each technique has its pros and cons, have a look at these two articles to try to understand the differences between Gantt charts and PERT charts:

  • difference-gantt-chart-pert-chart
  • advantages-of-pert-charts-vs-gantt-charts

Here a template to see how to use PERT charts for a PhD thesis .

In this extensive article , they suggest a formula to calculate an estimate of how long a task might take:

  • “For each task, give three time estimates in days: the most optimistic completion time (O), the normal/most likely time (M), and the pessimistic time (P).
  • Calculate expected time (TE) using the formula (O + 4*M + P) ÷ 6 = TE.”

Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) - articles and templates

It is often recommended to first break a PhD project into small tasks and make a Work Breakdown Structure before making a Gantt chart or PERT chart.

An introduction and templates for WBS from the University of Washington

“The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) organizes and defines the scope of the project, breaking it into manageable tasks.”

Definition, templates and examples on the website workbreakdownstructure.com .

SMART goals

Smart goals - blog posts.

A 1 page document subtitled For use with the Doctoral Student Yearly Reviews from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute:

“SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Time-bounded objectives.”

It provides a quick introduction and some examples.

An article entitled ‘Understanding SMART Objectives’ – for Your Project Proposals

“SMART objectives are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-related.”

Briefly the Agile method is to define a concrete goal (like SMART goals) to reach in a short period (typically <1 month), to work hard and focus toward this goal (as a sprint), then to analyze results and define a new goal for the next short period. In particular, it promotes communication and forces to regularly get feedback from stakeholders.

Be an Agile Academic - blog post

by coach Katy Peplin on her website katypeplin.com in 2017

An introduction to Agile and how she implemented the methodology in her PhD studies.

“I’ve isolated a few key concepts that really challenged how I thought about my work and helped me build systems to move quickly and efficiently through the dissertation process .”

“In Agile systems, being adaptive is a core value that underpins so many of the actual day to day practices.”

A drawback of Agile

One potential drawback is that it doesn’t force people to look at longer time goals and that consequently one might lose sense of the bigger picture . From a video by Fiona Saunders

In my PhD studies, setting up short time goals like performing experiments x, y and z for the coming month was not the difficult part. What I missed was a sense of longer time goals and the big picture. This is why for me using Gantt charts to create a PhD timeline and promote communication between students and supervisors seems like the most important project management tool to implement.

However, we do need to consider the two scales: the project long-term goals/big picture, and the short-term goals which make the project move forward step by step. Therefore, using Agile and SMART goals in combination with a PhD Gantt chart does sound like a great way to grasp hold on both scale .

The Agile Approach with Doctoral Dissertation Supervision - Publication & model

Tengberg L.G.W., 2015

I haven’t read it whole but this paper seems interesting . In figure 1, the author suggests a model for the doctoral dissertation:

six project management tips for your phd

In a Kanban board one creates different columns where tasks are placed depending on their status. The simplest way is with 3 columns To Do , Doing , Done but, of course, you can adapt this to your needs and I will even recommend having columns like Waiting For , or Someday/Maybe Ideas .

When you search for tips on how to create Kanban boards, it’s likely that you’ll be suggested the online tool Trello. I also use Trello a lot and love it, but there are other software available, also paper and pen is always a good way to start!

Live a PhD life less disorganised with Trello - blog post

by a PhD student in 2015

“I’m an academic always looking for ways to manage my work and writing more effectively. I’m also in the thick of my PhD . For both of these I can recommend a very intuitive (and free!) web-based project management tool called Trello.”

“I then invited my supervisors (one of whom insists she is a technophobe) to access the Trello board, and waited to see what would happen next.

Using Trello in academia - blog post

by Christian Bettstetter in 2016

“I lead a team of 10–15 scientists and a nonprofit company. Over the past 15 years, I used various methods and tools to manage projects, keep track of the scientific work of doctoral students and postdocs, recruit dozens of people, and organize my own tasks in research, teaching, and administration.”

“I use group boards for all research projects and for some other processes with at least two persons involved, such as managing job applications.”

Progress tracking tool for managing PhD students - StackExchange

In 2016 a supervisor asked on StackExchange for “ Progress tracking tool for managing PhD students ”

“I am looking for good options for tools to manage my PhD students, in terms of seeing that they are on track in working out their PhD theses (…) So some basic features would be:

  • Collaborative software (preference of hosted on a server)
  • Task lists with deadlines
  • Timeline progression”

More ideas on StackExchange

More ideas of software and project management tools for researchers on StackExchange discussions:

  • What are some of the task planning tools people use in academia
  • What are some good project management tools for academics
  • Project management techniques applied to research
  • Project management and research

Take-home message:

There is not 1 and unique way to manage a project, everyone finds its own way, adapts it to the persons involved in the project and even makes its practice evolve with time. So the take-home message would be like Katy Peplin wrote in her article about Agile : “Google a lot of things and borrow what works for you!”.

I hope you find in this resource a list of relevant materials for you to figure out your own project management way :) I also highly recommend you to attend a project management or leadership workshop. If you’re in Switzerland 🇨🇭, make sure to check out the CUSO transversal program with whom I first learned about project management .

And if you’re looking for more solutions to help you communicate with your student or with your supervisor, have a look at my checklist to clarify students and supervisors long term expectations .

Do you like resources? I do! Have a look at the Resource menu up the page, I have been writing about social media for PhD students, YouTube , Instagram and Twitter , and also some specific resources for Switzerland ! From my experience, social media is one of the best ways to learn about subjects like project management and time management in academia!

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  • CAREER COLUMN
  • 30 March 2020

How to defend a PhD remotely

  • Alyssa Frederick 0

Alyssa Frederick is a postdoctoral scholar at the Bodega Marine Laboratory in Bodega Bay, California, part of the University of California, Davis.

You can also search for this author in PubMed   Google Scholar

In November 2019, I conducted my PhD defence using the videoconferencing software Zoom.

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COMMENTS

  1. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Six project-management tips for your PhD Use strategies from the private sector to better manage your graduate project. By Angel Santiago-Lopez One way to help manage your PhD is to...

  2. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    PMID: 31481765 DOI: 10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6 No abstract available Keywords: Careers; Lab life. MeSH terms Academic Success* Education, Graduate / organization & administration* Efficiency* Humans

  3. Meyer Lab · Six project-management tips for your PhD

    /Team Research Publications Protocols/Links 04 January 2019 Six project-management tips for your PhD - Six simple tips to help ensure progress during your Ph.D. studies.

  4. How agile project management can work for your research

    1. Splitting the work. Slice a big chunk of work into several layers of activities, in which each layer is characterized by a tangible result to be obtained. In this case: I. Planning and execution...

  5. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Six project-management tips for your PhD Santiago-Lopez, Angel Abstract Use strategies from the private sector to better manage your graduate project. Publication: Nature Pub Date: January 2019 DOI: 10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6

  6. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Mentoring, professional development, and outreach to succeed in grad school and beyond

  7. Don't miss your PhD deadline

    Project-management skills are therefore key, says Sara Shinton, head of researcher development at the University of Edinburgh, UK. ... Six project-management tips for your PhD Twenty things I wish ...

  8. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Six project-management tips for your PhD. Angel Santiago-Lopez () . Nature, 2019, vol. 573, issue 7772, 153-153 . Abstract: Use strategies from the private sector to better manage your graduate project. Keywords: Careers; Lab life (search for similar items in EconPapers) Date: 2019 References: Add references at CitEc Citations: Track citations by RSS feed ...

  9. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Six project-management tips for your PhD. Author(s): Angel Santiago-Lopez. Publication date (Electronic): January 4 2019 . Journal: Nature. Publisher: Springer Nature. Read this article at. ScienceOpen Publisher Further versions . open (via free pdf) Powered by .

  10. How to Manage a Research Project in Graduate School

    To manage changes When performing a research project, it's possible that your research plan has to change. For example, due to the availability of your research materials and equipment, you may have to alter your experiment.

  11. Six project-management tips for your PhD.

    Europe PMC is an archive of life sciences journal literature. Six project-management tips for your PhD.

  12. Project Management for PhD's

    Project Management for PhD's. Tuesday 17 Sep 2019 2pm - 3:30pm. Harold White Theatre 757 Swanston Street (Stop 1) Map. Project management is a vastly transferrable and highly sought-after skillset that can open doors to careers in almost any field. The ability to effectively manage projects is a huge asset in today's competitive job market ...

  13. Six project-management tips for your PhD. Nature

    Santiago-Lopez, A. (2019). Six project-management tips for your PhD. Nature. doi:10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6

  14. Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Corrections. All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nat:nature:v:573:y:2019:i:7772:d:10.1038_d41586-018-07860-6.See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.. For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct ...

  15. 4 Essential Project Management Skills for PhD Students

    First, have an end goal. This is the final deadline for your project. You can look at this as the day when you want to turn in a completed, revised project to your professor. Second, you can make deadlines for individual parts of the project.

  16. Career resources for PhD students

    Graduate student survey 2022 Stress and uncertainty drag down graduate students' satisfaction Scholars in PhD and master's programmes struggle with securing work-life balance and support around...

  17. Project Management resource for PhD students and supervisors

    1. Understand the underlying principles of project management for researchers Project Management for Scientists - blog post How Project Management Techniques Can Improve Research - blog post A PhD as a project - blog posts The Smart Way to Manage a Large Research Project - blog post Making the Right Moves - book - PDF 2.

  18. Ankita Burke, PhD on LinkedIn: Six project-management tips for your PhD

    Six project-management tips for your PhD nature.com 19 5 Comments Like ...

  19. Altmetric

    Six project-management tips for your PhD Published by: Nature, January 2019 DOI: 10.1038/d41586-018-07860-6: Pubmed ID: 31481765. Authors: Angel Santiago-Lopez View on publisher site Alert me about new mentions. Twitter Demographics. The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,418 tweeters who shared this research output.

  20. Through the Blood, Sweat and Years

    Six project-management tips for your PhD. Use strategies from the private sector to better manage your graduate project. Angel Santiago-Lopez; Career Column 4 Jan 2019 Nature

  21. Six project-management tips for your PhD : r/GradSchool

    Six project-management tips for your PhD nature.com Open 150 Sort by: Open comment sort options bvdzag • 4 yr. ago This is great advice. Project management is sooooo much more structured in the private sector. I think science teams could be so much more successful if they would employ more dedicated resources towards management.

  22. Three tips to achieve academic success

    Six project-management tips for your PhD Being a PhD student shouldn't be bad for your health Work-life balance: Break or burn out How agile project management can work for your research ...

  23. How to defend a PhD remotely

    Six project-management tips for your PhD Make science PhDs more than just a training path for academia What not to do in graduate school Subjects. Careers; Peer review; Conferences and meetings ...