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  • How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

Published on October 12, 2022 by Shona McCombes and Tegan George. Revised on November 21, 2023.

Structure of a research proposal

A research proposal describes what you will investigate, why it’s important, and how you will conduct your research.

The format of a research proposal varies between fields, but most proposals will contain at least these elements:

Introduction

Literature review.

  • Research design

Reference list

While the sections may vary, the overall objective is always the same. A research proposal serves as a blueprint and guide for your research plan, helping you get organized and feel confident in the path forward you choose to take.

Table of contents

Research proposal purpose, research proposal examples, research design and methods, contribution to knowledge, research schedule, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about research proposals.

Academics often have to write research proposals to get funding for their projects. As a student, you might have to write a research proposal as part of a grad school application , or prior to starting your thesis or dissertation .

In addition to helping you figure out what your research can look like, a proposal can also serve to demonstrate why your project is worth pursuing to a funder, educational institution, or supervisor.

Research proposal length

The length of a research proposal can vary quite a bit. A bachelor’s or master’s thesis proposal can be just a few pages, while proposals for PhD dissertations or research funding are usually much longer and more detailed. Your supervisor can help you determine the best length for your work.

One trick to get started is to think of your proposal’s structure as a shorter version of your thesis or dissertation , only without the results , conclusion and discussion sections.

Download our research proposal template

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Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We’ve included a few for you below.

  • Example research proposal #1: “A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management”
  • Example research proposal #2: “Medical Students as Mediators of Change in Tobacco Use”

Like your dissertation or thesis, the proposal will usually have a title page that includes:

  • The proposed title of your project
  • Your supervisor’s name
  • Your institution and department

The first part of your proposal is the initial pitch for your project. Make sure it succinctly explains what you want to do and why.

Your introduction should:

  • Introduce your topic
  • Give necessary background and context
  • Outline your  problem statement  and research questions

To guide your introduction , include information about:

  • Who could have an interest in the topic (e.g., scientists, policymakers)
  • How much is already known about the topic
  • What is missing from this current knowledge
  • What new insights your research will contribute
  • Why you believe this research is worth doing

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As you get started, it’s important to demonstrate that you’re familiar with the most important research on your topic. A strong literature review  shows your reader that your project has a solid foundation in existing knowledge or theory. It also shows that you’re not simply repeating what other people have already done or said, but rather using existing research as a jumping-off point for your own.

In this section, share exactly how your project will contribute to ongoing conversations in the field by:

  • Comparing and contrasting the main theories, methods, and debates
  • Examining the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches
  • Explaining how will you build on, challenge, or synthesize prior scholarship

Following the literature review, restate your main  objectives . This brings the focus back to your own project. Next, your research design or methodology section will describe your overall approach, and the practical steps you will take to answer your research questions.

To finish your proposal on a strong note, explore the potential implications of your research for your field. Emphasize again what you aim to contribute and why it matters.

For example, your results might have implications for:

  • Improving best practices
  • Informing policymaking decisions
  • Strengthening a theory or model
  • Challenging popular or scientific beliefs
  • Creating a basis for future research

Last but not least, your research proposal must include correct citations for every source you have used, compiled in a reference list . To create citations quickly and easily, you can use our free APA citation generator .

Some institutions or funders require a detailed timeline of the project, asking you to forecast what you will do at each stage and how long it may take. While not always required, be sure to check the requirements of your project.

Here’s an example schedule to help you get started. You can also download a template at the button below.

Download our research schedule template

If you are applying for research funding, chances are you will have to include a detailed budget. This shows your estimates of how much each part of your project will cost.

Make sure to check what type of costs the funding body will agree to cover. For each item, include:

  • Cost : exactly how much money do you need?
  • Justification : why is this cost necessary to complete the research?
  • Source : how did you calculate the amount?

To determine your budget, think about:

  • Travel costs : do you need to go somewhere to collect your data? How will you get there, and how much time will you need? What will you do there (e.g., interviews, archival research)?
  • Materials : do you need access to any tools or technologies?
  • Help : do you need to hire any research assistants for the project? What will they do, and how much will you pay them?

If you want to know more about the research process , methodology , research bias , or statistics , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Methodology

  • Sampling methods
  • Simple random sampling
  • Stratified sampling
  • Cluster sampling
  • Likert scales
  • Reproducibility

 Statistics

  • Null hypothesis
  • Statistical power
  • Probability distribution
  • Effect size
  • Poisson distribution

Research bias

  • Optimism bias
  • Cognitive bias
  • Implicit bias
  • Hawthorne effect
  • Anchoring bias
  • Explicit bias

Once you’ve decided on your research objectives , you need to explain them in your paper, at the end of your problem statement .

Keep your research objectives clear and concise, and use appropriate verbs to accurately convey the work that you will carry out for each one.

I will compare …

A research aim is a broad statement indicating the general purpose of your research project. It should appear in your introduction at the end of your problem statement , before your research objectives.

Research objectives are more specific than your research aim. They indicate the specific ways you’ll address the overarching aim.

A PhD, which is short for philosophiae doctor (doctor of philosophy in Latin), is the highest university degree that can be obtained. In a PhD, students spend 3–5 years writing a dissertation , which aims to make a significant, original contribution to current knowledge.

A PhD is intended to prepare students for a career as a researcher, whether that be in academia, the public sector, or the private sector.

A master’s is a 1- or 2-year graduate degree that can prepare you for a variety of careers.

All master’s involve graduate-level coursework. Some are research-intensive and intend to prepare students for further study in a PhD; these usually require their students to write a master’s thesis . Others focus on professional training for a specific career.

Critical thinking refers to the ability to evaluate information and to be aware of biases or assumptions, including your own.

Like information literacy , it involves evaluating arguments, identifying and solving problems in an objective and systematic way, and clearly communicating your ideas.

The best way to remember the difference between a research plan and a research proposal is that they have fundamentally different audiences. A research plan helps you, the researcher, organize your thoughts. On the other hand, a dissertation proposal or research proposal aims to convince others (e.g., a supervisor, a funding body, or a dissertation committee) that your research topic is relevant and worthy of being conducted.

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Develop a Research Proposal

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The sections below provide guidance on developing a research proposal as part of postgraduate / doctoral studies or when applying for a research grant. 

Please note that the guidance below is generic and you should follow any additional specific guidance given by your department or funding body.

What is a research proposal? A research proposal provides a detailed plan of a research project before you undertake the research. A proposal is usually submitted before you undertake research for a final dissertation during postgraduate study, and before or during doctoral studies. A proposal may also be submitted as part of an application for a funding grant.  

What to include in a research proposal

A research proposal will usually (but not always) include the following key elements:

  • An outline of the background and context of the research topic / issue
  • Reasons why the specific topic / issue is important (rationale)
  • A review of key literature related to the topic / issue
  • An outline of the intended research methodology (including consideration of ethical issues)
  • A discussion of ethical issues 
  • How the findings will be disseminated
  • A timescale for the research

Getting started 

Start by choosing a topic or issue related to your course. A broader topic / issue will need to be narrowed down to a more specific focus that can be explored or investigated. Recommendations for further research at the end of published papers can be a useful source of ideas.

To help narrow down a topic / issue and plan your research project:

  • Start by re-reading some of the research papers which you read as part of your course. Conduct a preliminary review of the literature related to the topic / issue. This can include literature related to theoretical concepts as well as practical research.  
  • Aim to identify what is currently known and whether there are any 'gaps' in existing knowledge. This will enable you to determine how your own research will contribute to and build on what is already known.    
  • Identify how research on the topic / issue has previously been conducted in terms of, for example: approach, methods, analysis of data.  
  • It will also be useful to refer to literature on research methods - check the recommended reading list for your dissertation module / Centre for Doctoral Education guidance.  
  • For Masters level research, the contribution to existing knowledge does not necessarily need to be something completely new that has never been explored before. Your research could make a contribution to existing knowledge by, for example: Adopting a less commonly used research approach / research method or focusing on a particular context (such as a school or country) where  a limited amount of research has been conducted  
  • For doctoral level research, there will usually be a need to demonstrate more originality.  

Below is an outline of the sections typically included in a research proposal. Specific guidance on how to structure the research proposal for a dissertation or doctoral research will usually be given by individual departments. If you are applying for doctoral research funding, specific guidelines will be stipulated by the funding body. It is important to follow specific guidance given by your department or funding body when writing your own research proposal for a dissertation or PhD application, but the following can be used as general guidance .

Title / working title of the research

An initial idea of the title should be given - this is likely to be revised as the research progresses and can therefore be a tentative suggestion at the proposal stage.

Introduction

The context and background of the research topic / issue, as well as the rationale for undertaking the research, should be outlined in the introduction section. Reference to key literature should be included to strengthen the rationale for conducting the research. This will enable the reader to understand what the research will be about and why it is important. At the end of the introduction, include an outline (or synopsis) of how the proposal is organised.

Literature review

This should expand on the key literature referred to in the introduction. The review of the literature will need to go further than listing individual studies or theories. You will need to demonstrate an awareness of the current state of knowledge and an understanding of key lines of argument and debates on the topic / issue. The literature will need to be critically analysed and evaluated rather than just described. This means demonstrating how studies, arguments and debates are linked and how the existing body of research links to your own research area / issue.

Research aims and questions

The research aims and research questions should be used to guide your research. The aims of the research relate to the purpose of conducting the research and what you specifically want to achieve. The research questions should be formulated to show how you will achieve the aims of the research and what you want to find out. The research aims and questions can either be stated at the end of the introduction (before the outline of the proposal) or after the literature review - guidance from your department / funding body may specify this.

Methodology

The methodology section of the proposal should outline how the research will be conducted. This should generally include a description and justification of: sample / participants, methods, data collection and analysis, and ethical considerations. To justify the chosen methodology, you can refer to recommended reading for research methods as well as previous studies conducted on your chosen topic.

Including a detailed discussion of the ethics of your research project can really strengthen the proposal. It forces you to think in very practical and detailed terms about what you are planning to do.  

You may be required to include a schedule or plan of how you intend to conduct the research within a specified timeframe. This can be presented in a variety of ways but should generally include specific milestones (e.g. collection of data, analysis of findings) and intended completion dates.

Reference list

The reference list should include all sources cited in the research proposal. Departmental guidelines for referencing should be followed for in-text citations and the reference list.  

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How to Develop a Research Paper Timeline

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Research papers come in many sizes and levels of complexity. There is no single set of rules that fits every project, but there are guidelines you should follow to keep yourself on track throughout the weeks as you prepare, research, and write. You will complete your project in stages, so you must plan ahead and give yourself enough time to complete every stage of your work.

Your first step is to write down the due date for your paper on a big wall calendar , in your planner , and in an electronic calendar.

Plan backward from that due date to determine when you should have your library work completed. A good rule of thumb is to spend:

  • Fifty percent of your time researching and reading
  • Ten percent of your time sorting and marking your research
  • Forty percent of your time writing and formatting

Timeline for Researching and Reading Stage

  • 1 week for short papers with one or two sources
  • 2-3 weeks for papers up to ten pages
  • 2-3 months for a thesis

It’s important to get started right away on the first stage. In a perfect world, we would find all of the sources we need to write our paper in our nearby library. In the real world, however, we conduct internet queries and discover a few perfect books and articles that are absolutely essential to our topic—only to find that they are not available at the local library.

The good news is that you can still get the resources through an interlibrary loan. But that will take time. This is one good reason to do a thorough search early on with the help of a reference librarian .

Give yourself time to collect many possible resources for your project. You will soon find that some of the books and articles you choose don’t actually offer any useful information for your particular topic. You’ll need to make a few trips to the library. You won’t finish in one trip.

You’ll also discover that you will find additional potential sources in the bibliographies of your first selections. Sometimes the most time-consuming task is eliminating potential sources.

Timeline for Sorting and Marking Your Research

  • 1 day for a short paper
  • 3-5 days for papers up to ten pages
  • 2-3 weeks for a thesis

You should read each of your sources at least twice. Read your sources the first time to soak in some information and to make notes on research cards.

Read your sources a second time more quickly, skimming through the chapters and putting sticky note flags on pages that contain important points or pages that contain passages that you want to cite. Write keywords on the sticky note flags.

Timeline for Writing and Formatting

  • Four days for a short paper with one or two sources
  • 1-2 weeks for papers up to ten pages
  • 1-3 months for a thesis

You don’t really expect to write a good paper on your first attempt, do you?

You can expect to pre-write, write, and rewrite several drafts of your paper. You’ll also have to rewrite your thesis statement a few times, as your paper takes shape.

Don’t get held up writing any section of your paper—especially the introductory paragraph. It is perfectly normal for writers to go back and complete the introduction once the rest of the paper is completed.

The first few drafts don’t have to have perfect citations. Once you begin to sharpen your work and you’re heading toward a final draft, you should tighten your citations. Use a sample essay if you need to, just to get the formatting down.

Make sure your bibliography contains every source you’ve used in your research.

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Writing a research proposal

The research proposal is an essential part of a PhD application for many of our academic departments.

Before making an application, you should ensure that the specialist area you wish to study is covered by a member(s) of staff at Lancaster University. You can do this by exploring our academic profiles – search for a theme, subject or name to see profiles, research activities, details of current PhD supervision and relation graphs for all Lancaster academics.

Some of our courses have specific requirements for the research proposal. You can find information about the entry requirements on the course information page.

Unless stated in the entry requirements, a proposal should be between 1500 and 2000 words and will include the following:

A working title of the topic area

Your title should be concise and descriptive and do more than convey the keywords associated with the proposed research.

If possible, think of an informative but catchy title; a compelling title not only helps to get the reader’s interest but may also predispose them favourably towards the proposal.

Often titles are stated in terms of a functional relationship because such titles indicate the independent and dependent variables.

A general overview of the area

The overview should take the form of a brief abstract of your proposed general area of study and identify the discipline(s) within which it falls.

You might also refer to how your background and experience give you competencies in your chosen area.

It should include the research question, the rationale for the study, the hypothesis (if any) and the proposed method. Descriptions of the method may include the design, procedures, the sample and any instruments you will use, where applicable.

Identification of the relevant literature

In this section, you should develop your proposal to demonstrate that you are aware of existing debates and issues raised in relevant bodies of literature.

You should reference key articles and texts to show that you appreciate their relevance to your research area.

A PhD is an original piece of research, and so you should demonstrate that your proposed topic has yet to be studied. So you need to identify your niche, which will lead to the thesis preparation.

The literature review can often suffer the following problems, so it is essential to consider these when drafting it:

  • Lack of organisation and structure
  • Lack of focus, unity and coherence
  • Repetition of information
  • Failure to cite influential papers
  • Failure to keep up with recent developments
  • Failure to critically evaluate cited papers
  • Citing irrelevant or trivial references
  • Dependent too much on secondary sources

Key research questions

Since you need to demonstrate that you can complete the topic within the usual period allowed, you need to show that it is manageable and so focus on key questions within your niche area.

Methodology

You need to demonstrate an awareness of the methodological tools available and show some understanding of which would suit your research.

It may be that qualitative methods, including the analysis of interviews, are appropriate. Alternatively, your approach may involve forecasting or statistical modelling. In other cases, you may be combining methodologies.

You need to specify the method you feel will be most appropriate.

Timescale and research planning

You need to demonstrate an awareness of the need for planning and the timescale of the research.

Bibliography

You should include a shortlist of references to key articles and texts in the application.

And finally

  • We recommend that you contact your department for guidance on whether we need a research proposal for your application
  • Make your topic as specific as possible - please avoid broad topic areas which would be unmanageable as PhD topics
  • Describe your research areas in detail - do not use vague descriptions of research areas
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Home » How To Write A Research Proposal – Step-by-Step [Template]

How To Write A Research Proposal – Step-by-Step [Template]

Table of Contents

How To Write a Research Proposal

How To Write a Research Proposal

Writing a Research proposal involves several steps to ensure a well-structured and comprehensive document. Here is an explanation of each step:

1. Title and Abstract

  • Choose a concise and descriptive title that reflects the essence of your research.
  • Write an abstract summarizing your research question, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes. It should provide a brief overview of your proposal.

2. Introduction:

  • Provide an introduction to your research topic, highlighting its significance and relevance.
  • Clearly state the research problem or question you aim to address.
  • Discuss the background and context of the study, including previous research in the field.

3. Research Objectives

  • Outline the specific objectives or aims of your research. These objectives should be clear, achievable, and aligned with the research problem.

4. Literature Review:

  • Conduct a comprehensive review of relevant literature and studies related to your research topic.
  • Summarize key findings, identify gaps, and highlight how your research will contribute to the existing knowledge.

5. Methodology:

  • Describe the research design and methodology you plan to employ to address your research objectives.
  • Explain the data collection methods, instruments, and analysis techniques you will use.
  • Justify why the chosen methods are appropriate and suitable for your research.

6. Timeline:

  • Create a timeline or schedule that outlines the major milestones and activities of your research project.
  • Break down the research process into smaller tasks and estimate the time required for each task.

7. Resources:

  • Identify the resources needed for your research, such as access to specific databases, equipment, or funding.
  • Explain how you will acquire or utilize these resources to carry out your research effectively.

8. Ethical Considerations:

  • Discuss any ethical issues that may arise during your research and explain how you plan to address them.
  • If your research involves human subjects, explain how you will ensure their informed consent and privacy.

9. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

  • Clearly state the expected outcomes or results of your research.
  • Highlight the potential impact and significance of your research in advancing knowledge or addressing practical issues.

10. References:

  • Provide a list of all the references cited in your proposal, following a consistent citation style (e.g., APA, MLA).

11. Appendices:

  • Include any additional supporting materials, such as survey questionnaires, interview guides, or data analysis plans.

Research Proposal Format

The format of a research proposal may vary depending on the specific requirements of the institution or funding agency. However, the following is a commonly used format for a research proposal:

1. Title Page:

  • Include the title of your research proposal, your name, your affiliation or institution, and the date.

2. Abstract:

  • Provide a brief summary of your research proposal, highlighting the research problem, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes.

3. Introduction:

  • Introduce the research topic and provide background information.
  • State the research problem or question you aim to address.
  • Explain the significance and relevance of the research.
  • Review relevant literature and studies related to your research topic.
  • Summarize key findings and identify gaps in the existing knowledge.
  • Explain how your research will contribute to filling those gaps.

5. Research Objectives:

  • Clearly state the specific objectives or aims of your research.
  • Ensure that the objectives are clear, focused, and aligned with the research problem.

6. Methodology:

  • Describe the research design and methodology you plan to use.
  • Explain the data collection methods, instruments, and analysis techniques.
  • Justify why the chosen methods are appropriate for your research.

7. Timeline:

8. Resources:

  • Explain how you will acquire or utilize these resources effectively.

9. Ethical Considerations:

  • If applicable, explain how you will ensure informed consent and protect the privacy of research participants.

10. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

11. References:

12. Appendices:

Research Proposal Template

Here’s a template for a research proposal:

1. Introduction:

2. Literature Review:

3. Research Objectives:

4. Methodology:

5. Timeline:

6. Resources:

7. Ethical Considerations:

8. Expected Outcomes and Significance:

9. References:

10. Appendices:

Research Proposal Sample

Title: The Impact of Online Education on Student Learning Outcomes: A Comparative Study

1. Introduction

Online education has gained significant prominence in recent years, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This research proposal aims to investigate the impact of online education on student learning outcomes by comparing them with traditional face-to-face instruction. The study will explore various aspects of online education, such as instructional methods, student engagement, and academic performance, to provide insights into the effectiveness of online learning.

2. Objectives

The main objectives of this research are as follows:

  • To compare student learning outcomes between online and traditional face-to-face education.
  • To examine the factors influencing student engagement in online learning environments.
  • To assess the effectiveness of different instructional methods employed in online education.
  • To identify challenges and opportunities associated with online education and suggest recommendations for improvement.

3. Methodology

3.1 Study Design

This research will utilize a mixed-methods approach to gather both quantitative and qualitative data. The study will include the following components:

3.2 Participants

The research will involve undergraduate students from two universities, one offering online education and the other providing face-to-face instruction. A total of 500 students (250 from each university) will be selected randomly to participate in the study.

3.3 Data Collection

The research will employ the following data collection methods:

  • Quantitative: Pre- and post-assessments will be conducted to measure students’ learning outcomes. Data on student demographics and academic performance will also be collected from university records.
  • Qualitative: Focus group discussions and individual interviews will be conducted with students to gather their perceptions and experiences regarding online education.

3.4 Data Analysis

Quantitative data will be analyzed using statistical software, employing descriptive statistics, t-tests, and regression analysis. Qualitative data will be transcribed, coded, and analyzed thematically to identify recurring patterns and themes.

4. Ethical Considerations

The study will adhere to ethical guidelines, ensuring the privacy and confidentiality of participants. Informed consent will be obtained, and participants will have the right to withdraw from the study at any time.

5. Significance and Expected Outcomes

This research will contribute to the existing literature by providing empirical evidence on the impact of online education on student learning outcomes. The findings will help educational institutions and policymakers make informed decisions about incorporating online learning methods and improving the quality of online education. Moreover, the study will identify potential challenges and opportunities related to online education and offer recommendations for enhancing student engagement and overall learning outcomes.

6. Timeline

The proposed research will be conducted over a period of 12 months, including data collection, analysis, and report writing.

The estimated budget for this research includes expenses related to data collection, software licenses, participant compensation, and research assistance. A detailed budget breakdown will be provided in the final research plan.

8. Conclusion

This research proposal aims to investigate the impact of online education on student learning outcomes through a comparative study with traditional face-to-face instruction. By exploring various dimensions of online education, this research will provide valuable insights into the effectiveness and challenges associated with online learning. The findings will contribute to the ongoing discourse on educational practices and help shape future strategies for maximizing student learning outcomes in online education settings.

About the author

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Researcher, Academic Writer, Web developer

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How to Create a Research Timeline for Your Thesis

How to Create a Research Timeline for Your Thesis

5-minute read

  • 21st May 2023

Beginning a dissertation can feel both thrilling and overwhelming. One of the best things you can do to prepare for the exciting journey of doing a dissertation is to design a comprehensive timeline as your guide. Here we will take you step by step through creating your thesis timeline and provide some example templates, so you’ll be well-prepared to begin your dissertation work.

Reasons for Creating a Timeline

There are many benefits to crafting a detailed dissertation timeline. In addition to helping with time management and meeting crucial deadlines, your timeline will also help you stay motivated by reviewing the tasks you have completed as you progress. A thorough timeline will be valuable during your dissertation proposal and useful if you are applying for grants or other additional funding.

Ste0ps for Creating a Timeline for Your Thesis:

  • Research and record all requirements and deadlines.

Before you write out your timeline, ensure you know all of your program’s requirements and deadlines. Academic institutions often require you to complete your dissertation within a specified timeframe.

There are likely several recommended or mandatory deadlines for approval of certain items by your adviser (and possibly the rest of your committee members). Gather all these dates beforehand so you can allot an appropriate amount of time to meet your deadlines.

It will be beneficial to meet with your adviser to understand when you are expected to complete the major phases of your dissertation work and to confirm that there aren’t any other requirements or deadlines that you may not be aware of.

  • List all of your tasks and bundle them into phases.

Now that you’ve assembled your dates, working backward from your deadlines is a good rule of thumb. List all of the required tasks that must be completed to meet each milestone, from coming up with your research questions to writing each chapter of your dissertation .

Even though your list will be unique to your research project, it can help to refer to a thesis checklist . It’s also helpful to assemble tasks into different phases (e.g., dissertation proposal, research recruitment). Grouping tasks into phases gives anyone looking at your timeline a quick overview of your research plan.

  • Organize your tasks into a schedule and assign task deadlines.

Now it’s time to build your timeline. There are many different free templates available online, from straightforward lists of deliverables to colorful options with room for notes and customization.

Find this useful?

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A popular organizational approach for thesis timelines is a Gantt chart , which is a type of bar chart often used in project management in which the length of the bar corresponds to the time the task will take. The best choice for you will depend on the specifics of your research study and personal preferences. Whichever option you select, make sure you can easily edit and revise it as need be.

Sanity-Saving Tips:

●  Pay attention to your work style. Some people are more productive when writing in short bursts, while others write better after taking time to get into the zone. Some people choose to start writing parts of their thesis while still conducting research, while others prefer to focus on one phase at a time. Set yourself up for success by reflecting on what type of schedule will help you create the best quality work.

●  Schedule breaks. Almost everyone will work better after a well-deserved break. Make sure to schedule regular breaks into your timeline, as well as provide enough time to sleep, eat well, and do anything else you need to do to safeguard your well-being. 

●  Always have a plan B. Your dissertation is an extensive endeavor with many moving parts. It’s impossible to anticipate and plan for every conceivable event, but it’s helpful to expect something may occur that will cause a deviation from your original timeline. Perhaps study recruitment takes longer than you expected, or one of your committee members gets sick and you have to postpone your dissertation proposal. After you draft your timeline, check that it is not so strict that any disruption will cause a total derailment of your plan. Aim to strike a balance between goals that will inspire you to progress steadfastly and have some leeway in your timeline for the inevitable curveball that life will throw at you somewhere along the way.

Following these three steps will help you draft a timeline to steer the course of your dissertation work: research and record all requirements and deadlines; work backward from your dissertation deadline and assemble your task lists; and organize your tasks into a timeline.

Don’t forget to include ample time for editing and proofreading your dissertation . And if you are interested in any help from us, you can try a sample of our services for free . Best of luck in writing your dissertation!

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How to Write a Timeline for a Research Proposal

Harrison pennybaker.

Developing a timeline for your research proposal is a fairly easy, but very useful step in your project.

Developing a proper timeline for your research proposal is essential for the process. Writing a research proposal might seem like a daunting and, at times, unending process. However, like any large project, breaking the task down into smaller, more manageable tasks makes the job easier and far less stressful. A timeline can help you plan these tasks. Once you have made basic preparations for your proposal, write your timeline.

Familiarize yourself with the requirements, rules, and procedures of the body or individual for whom you are writing the timeline. If you are writing the plan for yourself, then you set your own parameters; however, if you are writing your research proposal for a granting agency, professor, superior, or institution, then you'll need to be familiar with their requirements, including any relevant deadlines. Take these into account before preparing your timeline. Check if deadlines, requirements, and other formalities are negotiable or flexible.

Determine the total amount of time that you will be carrying out and writing up your research, as well as any specific deadlines that you'll need to meet. This is important for determining the start point and end point of your timeline. Make realistic estimates, and, when in doubt, opt for a longer timeline rather than a shorter one if possible. It's usually better to propose a longer timeline and then come in early than it is to propose a shorter one and come in late.

Determine how many phases, steps, or tasks your project will require, name them, and break them into sub-components, if applicable. Depending on your project, you may have several distinct sections, and these sections may include their own sub-sections. Determining the sections and breaking them into smaller components will allow you to develop a more precise and detailed idea of how much time you will require. It will also help you develop a better working plan, because time management is easier when you know exactly what you are required to do.

Break your phases, steps, or tasks down into time increments appropriate for the length of the project. For instance, if your project involves only four phases and will take two years, break down the steps for your project into monthly increments; for instance, allow six months for research, six months for processing and sorting data, six months for writing the piece, and six months for edits and printing.

Review your timeline as your project unfolds, and, if possible, amend it as required. A timeline is an estimate and plan for the unfolding of a project, but it's useful to keep an eye on it as you progress. Individual deadlines will vary in terms of flexibility, so your timeline management will also vary. Try not to rush just to meet your pre-set timeline if that will sacrifice the quality of your work. Adjust the timeline if necessary.

  • 1 Northwest Arkansas Community College: Proposal Development Timeline

About the Author

Harrison Pennybaker began writing in 2004. He has written as a student and a journalist, specializing in politics, travel, arts and culture and current affairs. He holds a Master of Arts in political science and is currently pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy in political science.

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Surf awards: sample timelines.

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  • Sample Timelines

Your SURF proposal timeline should:

  • clearly indicate start and end dates,
  • include an anticipated number of project work hours each week (maximum: 40),
  • include a total number of project work hours,
  • provide a week-by-week listing of planned project milestones, and
  • include your full name.

This level of detail will show the reviewers you have carefully structured your project. Account for your planned enrollment in summer coursework, participation in study abroad programs, and/or any other substantial commitments in your timeline. All weeks of summer research must be completed between May 6 and August 23, 2024 .

The standard SURF timeline involves working on your project 40 hours/week for 9 weeks (or 35 hours/week for 10 weeks). However, the weeks need not be continuous, and you might elect to work fewer hours per week if that would be more appropriate to your particular situation. If you commit to fewer than 350 total project hours, your stipend amount will be prorated.

There are many different ways to present a timeline; three good examples follow below. Remember that your proposal, timeline, and budget should work in concert to demonstrate the feasibility of your project.

Timeline – Jane Husky Total project hours – 350. Work week: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm (35 hrs/week for 10 weeks). I will have weekly lab meetings with my advisor to track progress and troubleshoot any major issues. I will also be consulting regularly with graduate students in the lab working on related projects.

Timeline – Jonathan Husky Work weeks will be 5 days per week (Mon. – Fri.) at an average of 25 hours per week, totaling approximately 400 hours. In accordance with the policies of the Institute of Materials Science, I will not be working in the lab in the absence of supervision from either a graduate student or instructor.

Timeline – June Husky

I will remain in regular touch with my advisor, Professor Cross, throughout the summer. We have scheduled weekly Skype calls for the time I will be in Brazil and biweekly meetings on campus upon my return. Project hours: 350 hours total.

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Guidelines to draw a timeline of your PhD

2018 Nov 20 | Resource , Soft Skills | 0

In a previous article I talked about how project management can help reduce PhD students’ anxieties . Most of my PhD I felt very much confused. Sometimes I could not even say whether I was still in the beginning, somewhere in the middle or close to the end of it. Therefore, I suggested that supervisors and students should try to define a tangible objective early on in the doctoral process, and that they should have regular check-point meetings to adjusts plans in order to keep the student’s project on track. I also mentioned that it is highly important to clarify what the supervisors and students long-term expectations are .

In another article I talked about Gantt charts , a great project management tool to draw and visualize a project outline.

Do you see where we’re going here? Let’s draw a timeline of your PhD in the shape of a Gantt chart! I know, it’s in the title ;)

In this other article about Gantt charts, I explained that there are some drawbacks to keep in mind. Indeed, upfront planning techniques like Gantt charts tend to lack flexibility and when things don’t work as planned it can actually increase the feeling of failure, which is exactly what we want to avoid here.

So, does it even make sense to draw a timeline early on in the doctoral process? I believe it does! We can keep the drawbacks of Gantt charts in mind and draw such a timeline if we define guidelines of how to use it .

  • Example & download
  • Why draw a timeline?
  • Guidelines for how to make & use the timeline throughout your PhD

1. Example & download:

I draw below an example for the institute where I did my PhD: the Institute of Biology at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Therefore, it is designed for a 4-year PhD program with annual committee meetings and for students who spend a lot of time performing lab experiments . However, it can be easily adapted to any field or any doctoral program.

You can download for free the Excel file I used to make this timeline by clicking here .

timescale in research proposal

Because I want this to be a general example but also because it is such a long time scale, I kept the level of detail to the minimum to make it flexible and to avoid over-planning . The time for each task here is a very rough estimate, it is meant to be adapted to what you think is best for you or to what is expected in your doctoral program. Importantly, the uncertainty level is increasing with time . You don’t have to start writing a paper on the 11th month of your third year, maybe you’ll start much earlier or much later and it will be perfectly fine. This is just a broad overview to help visualize what the main steps are, but their exact length or when they should start will get clarified once you are closer to it.

2. Why draw a timeline?

To draw such a timeline and for it to be realistic and useful, you are going to ask very concrete questions, to yourself and to your supervisor , like what are the important steps, what are the milestones (technical milestones for developing a protocol, committee meetings, exams…), what are the risks, do you have only one project or do you have more, maybe one large risky project and one smaller safer project, and all other questions which are relevant to you.

Project management is effective if concrete questions are openly discussed. If your supervisor doesn’t bring up these questions with you, it might feel quite scary for you to ask for it. To help you find the courage to so, I believe that having such a timeline will provide you a highly visual and attractive medium to foster these discussions.

When I learned about Gantt charts at the beginning of my second year of PhD studies, I draw myself such a timeline, but I didn’t dare to discuss it with my supervisor. With no surprise things really didn’t work out the way I planned it. Supervisors by default have more experience than a junior PhD student so they should know better what is realistic, what is expected and how much upfront planning can be done depending on the project.

3. Guidelines for how to make & use the timeline throughout your PhD:

  • I suggest that you draw a first version within the first two months of your PhD . But it’s never too late to start =)
  • Take my example and adjust it , maybe you already have a clearly defined project, maybe not, maybe you don’t need to design a new method, maybe you’ve been included in someone else project with a clear short-term objective, maybe you think you should start drafting a paper earlier, go and adjust it to what feels right to you.
  • Make sure to keep in mind that this chart is going to change many times until you graduate, stay flexible. This first timeline should only be an overview of the main steps which you expect in your PhD. It is here to give a direction, and if used regularly it can give a feeling of moving forward.
  • Schedule a meeting with your supervisor to discuss this initial timeline ( still within the first two months ), ask the maximum of questions, clarify the maximum of points and make sure you both agree.
  • Then whenever needed, go back to it and adjust it, maybe there is a great collaboration opportunity and for a few months you’ll be asked to put your main project aside and work fully on this collaboration, maybe your new protocol is working great and you’re already getting publishable data, maybe the protocol is not working well and you need to change strategy, how does it affect your timeline?
  • Whenever a big change happens or whenever you feel too lost, schedule an extra meeting with your supervisor to specifically discuss the timeline and the long-term objectives. Hopefully it should give you a feeling of being on a track, even if it’s not the first one you pictured.
  • I would suggest having such a discussion at least every 6 months .

This timeline is now a tool which is going to grow with you throughout your PhD. At first it is a rough overview of the main steps, if you keep it update with what you really do, at the end it will be a true overview of everything you’ve accomplished. Therefore, on top of guiding you through it, it will become a great tool to look back at your PhD experience once you’re finished.

Thanks for reading and I hope these ideas can help you :)

Make sure to read my previous article about Gantt charts where I explained that it can be used both for long-time scale like here, or on shorter time scale (like 2 months) with a higher level of detail.

Looking for more reading about project management for research? Have a look at the resource I made Project Management resource for PhD students and supervisors !

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Top 5 Research Timeline Samples with Templates and Examples

Top 5 Research Timeline Samples with Templates and Examples

Ashima Monga

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When it comes to doing a thesis, project report, or dissertation, you spend lots of time doing research through case studies. It, however, always works best if you planned everything in a given timeline. Thus, a research timeline template is beneficial for writing a research report or project presentation for sponsors or investors.

To address this pain point of business, SlideTech offers you invaluable help in building innovative research timeline templates that give you the outline to create perfect project reports, add or remove new tasks and milestones, and change the deliverable dates of your project with a few clicks. Our templates provide an overview of the project plan’s events, highlight important points in time, break down the project’s agenda and distill important information about your products or services, etc.

In this blog, we are introducing our top-notch research timeline templates that are perfect for telling stories and visualizing the processes of your project. 

Template 1: Projected Research Timeline Milestone PPT PowerPoint Presentation Ideas Backgrounds

If you need to learn how to make a research document and set schedule activities for each step, then use this fantastic research template that encompasses the content of a well-maintained research paper. Organize your activities and map meetings according to project milestones with this expert-curated template. For instance, use this template to mark out when your ‘reading and research starts and mark it as task 1, with the color-coded legend. Then task 2 could be topic presenting that starts, as soon as task 1 ends. Then, topic interpreting can be task 3 with the same start as the work on the topic started. This editable template lets you change font styles and color themes with a few clicks.

Projected Research Timeline

Download Now!

Template 2: Projected Research Timeline Elements PPT Presentation Infographic Template Skills

When you introduce your new products and services to the customers, get this template where steps are needed to analyze, plan, design, implement, and evaluate a specific product. Adapt this PPT Template to give a comprehensive overview of your products to target audience that you value. This handy template design guides your project from inception to completion dividing your project research tasks into Elements, Tasks and Actions. 

Projected Research Timeline

Template 3: Projected Research Timeline Planning PowerPoint Presentation Icon Backgrounds

Manage your planning with this PPT Template design to complete your project research, enlist tasks or activities with its deadline. You can measure the activities you planned through it by going to the timetable you set and evaluating the work progress. Business owners can easily visualize data with customizable maps, widgets, graphs, and charts. The phases are also listed out in detail in this template.

Projected Research Timeline

Template 4: Dissertation Projected Research Timeline Analysis PPT PowerPoint Presentation Professional

Fashionably present your research project through this ready-made Presentation Template and keep track of project deadlines. This goal- oriented template breaks down your project’s events or tasks in chronological order, giving a high-level view of the project's planning and reflecting your business plan. Use color hues for each task that differentiate each task from others on the timeline, schedule prioritize tasks, and make information more visual.

Dissertation Projected Research Timeline

Template 5: Dissertation Projected Research Timeline Research PPT PowerPoint Presentation Topics

Grab this research timeline to illustrate and represent roadmaps for your project and highlight the planning process’s goals and tasks over a specific period. Color-coding of this template makes your design more readable, differentiating tasks, defining specific daily, weekly, or monthly activities, etc. The project manager can visualize processes and their status quo and also create natural flow of information among team members. 

Dissertation Projected Research Timeline

The Final Word

Running a business smoothly is a very tricky job and sometimes may be hard to manage. Our beautifully crafted research timeline templates provide the most solid foundation that builds something genuinely remarkable for your business that will captivate your audience, stakeholders, investors, etc. Our research timeline templates communicate the business’s core message clearly and emphasizes timely project delivery to your potential customers. You can always modify our templates to fit your business’s needs. 

FAQs on Research Timeline

What is a research timeline.

A research timeline is an essential part of any project proposal. It defines the chronological order of events of your project plan that includes aspects such as reading & research, analysis results, milestones, preliminary data results, literature review results, etc. It gives a broad overview of your project’s planned activities at a glance.

How do you write a research timeline?

Writing a research document for any project comes with levels of complexity. You must follow some guidelines while writing a research timeline to keep yourself on track. Write the research timeline of the project in stages and give enough time to complete every step of your work.

  • Define research ideas, objectives, and resources and then prepare the research proposal.
  • Develop a research design for it
  • Capture relevant information to create a sampling plan
  • Carry out data collection to write it up 
  • Prepare data for analysis and draw conclusions or recommendations
  • Write the final draft of the application.
  • Again, review it and edit it if required and submit the final research proposal.

How long should a research timeline be?

A research timeline project can be eight weeks, six months, one year, two years, three years, or more, depending on the requirement of the project proposal. But it would help if you remembered to complete it timely while planning these periods.

How do you write a  PhD research timeline?

A PhD Research Timeline is a challenging process that spans across years. Sometimes, researchers can feel quite overwhelmed. Some tips for writing a perfect PhD research timeline are:

  • Decide what elements like data collection, fieldwork, experiments, data analysis, writing plan, conferences, publications, coursework, etc., you must include in your PhD research timeline.
  • Share or discuss your ideas and thoughts with your guide or PhD supervisor and get their views. Note the discussion points during the meeting and edit your provisional PhD research timeline, accordingly. 
  • Think about the design of your PhD research timeline and prepare it across tasks and milestones.
  • Track your tasks and update your PhD research timeline to prioritize tasks and set achievable and concrete goals when needed.

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Planning your PhD research: A 3-year PhD timeline example

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Planning out a PhD trajectory can be overwhelming. Example PhD timelines can make the task easier and inspire. The following PhD timeline example describes the process and milestones of completing a PhD within 3 years.

Elements to include in a 3-year PhD timeline

The example scenario: completing a phd in 3 years, example: planning year 1 of a 3-year phd, example: planning year 2 of a 3-year phd, example: planning year 3 of a 3-year phd, example of a 3 year phd gantt chart timeline, final reflection.

Every successful PhD project begins with a proper plan. Even if there is a high chance that not everything will work out as planned. Having a well-established timeline will keep your work on track.

What to include in a 3-year PhD timeline depends on the unique characteristics of a PhD project, specific university requirements, agreements with the supervisor/s and the PhD student’s career ambitions.

For instance, some PhD students write a monograph while others complete a PhD based on several journal publications. Both monographs and cumulative dissertations have advantages and disadvantages , and not all universities allow both formats. The thesis type influences the PhD timeline.

Furthermore, PhD students ideally engage in several different activities throughout a PhD trajectory, which link to their career objectives. Regardless of whether they want to pursue a career within or outside of academia. PhD students should create an all-round profile to increase their future chances in the labour market. Think, for example, of activities such as organising a seminar, engaging in public outreach or showcasing leadership in a small grant application.

The most common elements included in a 3-year PhD timeline are the following:

  • Data collection (fieldwork, experiments, etc.)
  • Data analysis
  • Writing of different chapters, or a plan for journal publication
  • Conferences
  • Additional activities

The whole process is described in more detail in my post on how to develop an awesome PhD timeline step-by-step .

Many (starting) PhD students look for examples of how to plan a PhD in 3 years. Therefore, let’s look at an example scenario of a fictional PhD student. Let’s call her Maria.

Maria is doing a PhD in Social Sciences at a university where it is customary to write a cumulative dissertation, meaning a PhD thesis based on journal publications. Maria’s university regulations require her to write four articles as part of her PhD. In order to graduate, one article has to be published in an international peer-reviewed journal. The other three have to be submitted.

Furthermore, Maria’s cumulative dissertation needs an introduction and conclusion chapter which frame the four individual journal articles, which form the thesis chapters.

In order to complete her PhD programme, Maria also needs to complete coursework and earn 15 credits, or ECTS in her case.

Maria likes the idea of doing a postdoc after her graduation. However, she is aware that the academic job market is tough and therefore wants to keep her options open. She could, for instance, imagine to work for a community or non-profit organisation. Therefore, she wants to place emphasis on collaborating with a community organisation during her PhD.

You may also like: Creating awesome Gantt charts for your PhD timeline

Most PhD students start their first year with a rough idea, but not a well-worked out plan and timeline. Therefore, they usually begin with working on a more elaborate research proposal in the first months of their PhD. This is also the case for our example PhD student Maria.

  • Months 1-4: Maria works on a detailed research proposal, defines her research methodology and breaks down her thesis into concrete tasks.
  • Month 5 : Maria follows a short intensive course in academic writing to improve her writing skills.
  • Months 5-10: Maria works on her first journal paper, which is based on an extensive literature review of her research topic. At the end of Month 10, she submits the manuscript. At the same time, she follows a course connected to her research topic.
  • Months 11-12: Maria does her data collection.

timescale in research proposal

Maria completed her first round of data collection according to plan, and starts the second year of her PhD with a lot of material. In her second year, she will focus on turning this data into two journal articles.

  • Months 1-2: Maria works on her data analysis.
  • Months 3-7: Maria works on her second journal paper.
  • Month 7: Maria attends her first conference, and presents the results of her literature-review paper.
  • Month 8: Maria received ‘major revisions’ on her first manuscript submission, and implements the changes in Month 8 before resubmitting her first journal paper for publication.
  • Month 9: Maria follows a course on research valorisation to learn strategies to increase the societal impact of her thesis.
  • Months 9-12: Maria works on her third journal paper. She uses the same data that she collected for the previous paper, which is why she is able to complete the third manuscript a bit faster than the previous one.

timescale in research proposal

Time flies, and Maria finds herself in the last year of her PhD. There is still a lot of work to be done, but she sticks to the plan and does her best to complete her PhD.

  • Month 1: Maria starts a second round of data collection, this time in collaboration with a community organisation. Together, they develop and host several focus groups with Maria’s target audience.
  • Month 2: Maria starts to analyse the material of the focus group and develops the argumentation for her fourth journal paper.
  • Month 3: Maria presents the results of her second journal paper at an international conference. Furthermore, she helps out her supervisor with a grant application. They apply for funding to run a small project that is thematically connected to her PhD.
  • Months 4-9: Maria writes her fourth and final journal article that is required for her PhD.
  • Month 10: Maria writes her thesis introduction .
  • Month 11: Maria works on her thesis conclusion.
  • Month 12 : Maria works on the final edits and proof-reading of her thesis before submitting it.

timescale in research proposal

Combining the 3-year planning for our example PhD student Maria, it results in the following PhD timeline:

timescale in research proposal

Creating these PhD timelines, also called Gantt charts, is easy. You can find instructions and templates here.

Completing a PhD in 3 years is not an easy task. The example of our fictional PhD student Maria shows how packed her timeline is, and how little time there is for things to go wrong.

In fact, in real life, many PhD students spend four years full-time to complete a PhD based on four papers, instead of three. Some extend their studies even longer.

Furthermore, plan in some time for thesis editing, which is a legitimate practice and can bring your writing to the next level. Finding a reputable thesis editor can be challenging, so make sure you make an informed choice.

Finishing a PhD in 3 years is not impossible, but it surely is not easy. So be kind to yourself if things don’t work out entirely as planned, and make use of all the help you can get.

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Timeline Templates

11+ research timeline templates.

When it comes to making a dissertation, or a thesis, it means spending lots of time doing research, looking through case study after case study, and going to school. With all these tasks, you need to plan them all out in a timeline. A research timeline template is a reliable source for any professionals and students who are at the task of writing a research. As years go by, making research becomes easy with the help of the newest innovation under Plan Project Timeline Templates that is accessible online. Here, setting your sample plans for the research paper is well outlined and a manageable way to accomplish where users can have an idea on how to create a perfect research template equipped with useful tools. With our templates, you will be able to make a timeline for your research. We have a variety of samples whether it’s for 3-year research or one for a master’s degree, all of which can help you get the job done!

timescale in research proposal

Simple Research Timeline Template

research timeline

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Sample Research Timeline Template

free research timeline template

Research Proposal Timeline Gantt Chart Template

research proposal timeline gantt chart templates

Free Research School Thesis Study Timeline Template

research study timeline template

Free Research Paper Dissertation Timeline Template

research paper timeline template

Free Research Project Schedule Timeline Template

research project timeline template

Free Research Proposal 3 Year Case Study Timeline Template

research proposal timeline template

Free Market Research Business Timeline Template

market research timeline template

Free Qualitative Research Timeline Visualizing Template

qualitative research timeline visualizing template

Free Research Master Plan Timeline Template

research plan timeline template

Free Action Research Timetable Timeline Template

action research timeline template

How to Make Research Timeline Plan

What are involved in research timeline plan.

  • Setting up the main objectives and the research basic template questions is the primary thing to start so you will know what you must do and how you can do it for the research paper you have.
  • The timeline layout you will have can confirm whether the research topic and method you will use are correct. There is always a factual basis for each research question and the means to solve must be viable too.
  • The professional schedule that will be used, must be following the methodology that will be applied in the research paper.

Tips for Using Research Timeline Template

  • The printable template must be following the overview of the scope and duration of the research process.
  • Have the sample template that is suitable for the research paper you are working on, as every research has its timetable to follow
  • Make sure that all that is written in the timeline in PDF can be worked on based on the time given and can be completed by the researchers to meet their deadline.

Here’s How We Can Help

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Related articles

16+ research timeline templates.

A researcher sees what everybody else has seen and yet thinks what nobody else has ever thought. And thus a researcher spends months and years in strenuous efforts to bring give his findings the shape of a discovery. However, not all researches are successful. The basic elements that make research stand apart from others are- it’s organized planning, its patient finding, and its wholesome approach. Research planning is one of the most important parts of research and needs to be done extremely cautiously for it to be successful. You may also see some of our chart timeline templates.

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IMAGES

  1. Top 5 Research Timeline Samples with Templates and Examples

    timescale in research proposal

  2. How to Make an Animated Timeline for Research Proposal in PowerPoint

    timescale in research proposal

  3. Gantt Chart

    timescale in research proposal

  4. 10 Step Timeline For Research Project

    timescale in research proposal

  5. Research Proposal Sample

    timescale in research proposal

  6. Neat Research Proposal Timeline Example Monthly Template How To Make A

    timescale in research proposal

VIDEO

  1. Video Research Progress Report

  2. December 20, 2023 geological timescale #geology #history

  3. 🙄0.000000000000000001 seconds⚡, shortest timescale in the universe 2023 Nobel Prize

  4. Research Proposal, Research Review 0% Plagiarism Paid services available @S.Rohail

  5. How timescale in closing big deals can be shortened and sometimes help add 10x to the top line

  6. Inauguration for State level Orientation Programme on Research Proposal

COMMENTS

  1. Research Sample Timeline

    Research Sample Timeline Conduct continuous, thorough literature review to identify gaps in knowledge and experts in the field Identify specific aims of project based on your research vision, plan, preliminary data results and literature review results Target agencies based on their objectives and how they relate to your specific project

  2. PDF Guidance on Writing a Research Proposal What is a PhD Proposal?

    How long does it need to be? Most research proposals are between 1500 and 2000 words long. What's a research proposal for? Your proposal gives a relatively brief overview of what you would like to study.

  3. PDF Research Project Timeline Example 1

    Research Project Timeline Example 1 Stage Activity Estimated duration Start date End date Deliverable Comments Research design and planning Develop research design Finalise research problem/questions Confirmed research problem/questions Draft research design section for final report Prepare research proposal Research proposal/ethical approval

  4. PDF PLANNN A RSAR PRO T

    There are 2 types of timelines: Timeline 1 - This is for your research proposal and your supervisor so they can track what stage you are at. It is simpler with clearer big goals. You may update this every 6 months or as requested by your supervisor. Timeline 2 - This is for YOU!

  5. PDF Writing A Research Proposa l

    to justify a proposed research project to a particular audience, eg. supervisor, departmental or faculty committee, external funding body etc. Some strategies before you start Search through literature for topic related articles and books, ie. search through databases/catalogues/journals etc.

  6. PDF Timeline

    Timeline Writing an effective and persuasive proposal is a time consuming task. Although the groundwork for your research must start when you begin graduate school, here are the final stages in preparing to submit a grant proposal.

  7. How to Write a Research Proposal

    Research proposal examples. Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We've included a few for you below. Example research proposal #1: "A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management".

  8. Develop a Research Proposal

    The sections below provide guidance on developing a research proposal as part of postgraduate / doctoral studies or when applying for a research grant. ... Timescale. You may be required to include a schedule or plan of how you intend to conduct the research within a specified timeframe. This can be presented in a variety of ways but should ...

  9. How to Develop a Research Paper Timeline

    1 day for a short paper 3-5 days for papers up to ten pages 2-3 weeks for a thesis You should read each of your sources at least twice. Read your sources the first time to soak in some information and to make notes on research cards.

  10. Writing a research proposal

    The research proposal is an essential part of a PhD application for many of our academic departments. Before making an application, you should ensure that the specialist area you wish to study is covered by a member (s) of staff at Lancaster University. You can do this by exploring our academic profiles - search for a theme, subject or name ...

  11. How To Write A Research Proposal

    Timeline: Create a timeline or schedule that outlines the major milestones and activities of your research project. Break down the research process into smaller tasks and estimate the time required for each task. 7. Resources: Identify the resources needed for your research, such as access to specific databases, equipment, or funding.

  12. How to Create a Research Timeline for Your Thesis

    A thorough timeline will be valuable during your dissertation proposal and useful if you are applying for grants or other additional funding. Ste0ps for Creating a Timeline for Your Thesis: Research and record all requirements and deadlines. Before you write out your timeline, ensure you know all of your program's requirements and deadlines.

  13. How to Write a Timeline for a Research Proposal

    How to Write a Timeline for a Research Proposal HARRISON PENNYBAKER CLASS ... Developing a proper timeline for your research proposal is essential for the process. Writing a research proposal might seem like a daunting and, at times, unending process.

  14. SURF Awards: Sample Timelines

    Sample Timelines Your SURF proposal timeline should: clearly indicate start and end dates, include an anticipated number of project work hours each week (maximum: 40), include a total number of project work hours, provide a week-by-week listing of planned project milestones, and include your full name.

  15. How to Write a Research Proposal

    In a research proposal, the goal is to present the author's plan for the research they intend to conduct. In some cases, part of this goal is to secure funding for said research. In others, it's to have the research approved by the author's supervisor or department so they can move forward with it.

  16. Research Methodology, Timeline, and Tools

    Th at meant providing detailed, oft en confi dential, fi nancial and membership information; submitting reams of paper, including publications, annual reports, and meeting minutes; hosting site visits; and answering numerous questions about its policies, procedures, and internal operations.

  17. Writing a Research Proposal: Structure and Time Schedule

    How Long Should My Research Proposal Be? The length of your paper should depend on your research problem and the type of proposal writing. While Ph.D. dissertations and proposals should be comprehensive and detailed, Master's and bachelor's thesis proposal can have just a few pages to meet the requirements.

  18. Guidelines to draw a timeline of your PhD

    Guidelines for how to make & use the timeline throughout your PhD. 1. Example & download: I draw below an example for the institute where I did my PhD: the Institute of Biology at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. Therefore, it is designed for a 4-year PhD program with annual committee meetings and for students who spend a lot of time ...

  19. Top 5 Research Timeline Samples with Templates and Examples

    Template 1: Projected Research Timeline Milestone PPT PowerPoint Presentation Ideas Backgrounds. If you need to learn how to make a research document and set schedule activities for each step, then use this fantastic research template that encompasses the content of a well-maintained research paper. Organize your activities and map meetings ...

  20. Planning your PhD research: A 3-year PhD timeline example

    Think, for example, of activities such as organising a seminar, engaging in public outreach or showcasing leadership in a small grant application. The most common elements included in a 3-year PhD timeline are the following: Data collection (fieldwork, experiments, etc.) Data analysis. Writing of different chapters, or a plan for journal ...

  21. Research Proposal Template (Free Template for Academics)

    Depending on the length of your research proposal, you may wish to include a contents page for the proposal itself (not for your main research project: suggested contents for this are included in your Proposed Chapter Outline, section 9), as follows (add page numbers/subsections when you know them, depending on your research).As you introduce sub-sections into your different sections, number ...

  22. Research Timeline Template

    11+ Research Timeline Templates When it comes to making a dissertation, or a thesis, it means spending lots of time doing research, looking through case study after case study, and going to school. With all these tasks, you need to plan them all out in a timeline.

  23. PDF Don't choose something too broad

    A research proposal will include the following (note that this is a general guide and that you may have been given more specific instructions by your ... Timescale: include a timescale, showing that you understand the need to plan your research carefully and have thought about how long the different tasks