AP English Language and Composition

Learn all about the course and exam. Already enrolled? Join your class in My AP.

Not a Student?

Go to AP Central for resources for teachers, administrators, and coordinators.

About the Course

Learn about the elements of argument and composition as you develop your critical-reading and writing skills. You’ll read and analyze nonfiction works from various periods and write essays with different aims: for example, to explain an idea, argue a point, or persuade your reader of something.

New for 2024-25: MCQs Will Have Four Answer Choices

Starting with the 2025 exam, AP English Language and Composition multiple-choice questions (MCQs) will have four answer choices instead of five. Most AP courses have already implemented this change, which research indicates could improve your exam-day experience. This summer we’ll release updated resources reflecting the change. 

Skills You'll Learn

Reading closely, analyzing, and interpreting a piece of writing

Evaluating a source of information

Gathering and consolidating information from different sources

Writing an evidence-based argument

Drafting and revising a piece of writing

Equivalency and Prerequisites

College course equivalent.

An introductory college-level literary analysis course

Recommended Prerequisites

Tue, May 14, 2024

AP English Language and Composition Exam

This is the regularly scheduled date for the AP English Language and Composition Exam.

About the Units

The course content outlined below is organized into commonly taught units of study that provide one possible sequence for the course. Your teacher may choose to organize the course content differently based on local priorities and preferences.

Course Content

You’ll learn to identify and analyze the claims in a text and determine whether the writer backs up their assertions with reasoning and evidence.

Skills you will practice may include:

  • Identifying the purpose and intended audience of a text
  • Examining how evidence supports a claim
  • Developing paragraphs as part of an effective argument

You’ll learn about how writers organize information and evidence to support a specific argument and appeal to a particular audience.

  • Analyzing audience and its relationship to the purpose of an argument
  • Building an argument with relevant and strategic evidence
  • Developing thesis statements
  • Developing structure and integrating evidence to reflect a line of reasoning

You’ll explore the range of perspectives around a topic and how various arguments can relate and respond to one another.

  • Identifying and describing different claims or lines of reasoning
  • Identifying and avoiding flawed lines of reasoning
  • Introducing and integrating sources and evidence
  • Using sufficient evidence for an argument
  • Attributing and citing references
  • Developing parts of a text with cause-effect and narrative methods

You’ll examine how a writer makes choices about methods of developing arguments, introductions, and conclusions.

  • Developing and connecting thesis statements and lines of reasoning
  • Developing introductions and conclusions
  • Developing parts of a text with comparison–contrast and definition–description methods

You’ll focus on the very specific and minute choices a writer makes to bring all the parts of an argument together.

  • Developing commentary throughout paragraphs
  • Maintaining ideas throughout an argument
  • Using modifiers to qualify an argument and convey perspective
  • Using transitions

You’ll work to understand the difference between position and perspective, how to consider bias, and how to integrate and address multiple perspectives in an argument.

  • Incorporating multiple perspectives strategically into an argument
  • Recognizing and accounting for bias
  • Adjusting an argument to address new evidence
  • Analyzing tone and shifts in tone

You’ll consider the breadth and complexity of arguments around a topic and what makes each successful or unsuccessful.

  • Examining complexities in issues
  • Considering how words, phrases, and clauses can modify and limit an argument
  • Examining how counterargument or alternative perspectives affect an argument
  • Exploring how sentence development affects an argument

You’ll explore the stylistic choices a writer can make and how those choices affect an argument.

  • Choosing comparisons based on an audience
  • Considering how sentence development and word choice affect how the writer is perceived by an audience
  • Considering how all choices made in an argument affect the audience
  • Considering how style affects an argument

You’ll consider a wide range of perspectives as you develop a complex argument.

  • Strategically conceding, rebutting, or refuting information
  • Crafting an argument through stylistic choices like word choice and description

Credit and Placement

Search AP Credit Policies

Find colleges that grant credit and/or placement for AP Exam scores in this and other AP courses.

Course Resources

Ap classroom resources.

Once you join your AP class section online, you’ll be able to access AP Daily videos, any assignments from your teacher, and your assignment results in AP Classroom. Sign in to access them.

  • Go to AP Classroom

AP English Language and Composition Reading Study Skills

Advice to keep up with the reading workload in your AP class.

AP English Language and Composition Writing Study Skills

Learn to craft your writing process.

AP English Language and Composition Course and Exam Description

This is the core document for the course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general.

The Difference Between AP English Language and Composition and AP English Literature and Composition

Learn the similarities and differences between these two courses and exams.

  • Go to College Board Blog

See Where AP Can Take You

AP English Language and Composition can lead to a wide range of careers and college majors

Additional Information

Monomoy Regional School District Home of the Sharks

In This Section

Ap english literature and composition summer reading 2024.

Welcome to AP English Literature and Composition. The information below describes your summer reading and essay assignments. Summer reading is an important part of the Advanced Placement course and serves multiple purposes. This is a literature course so of course, reading literature and then writing about that literature is the main focus. Summer reading and the essay assignment will work to prepare you for next year and practice these skills. 

Everyone must read two books, one is listed below and the other is selected from the list of titles. 

Required: The Bonesetter’s Daughter by Amy Tan

Choose one from this list of suggested titles from the AP English Literature and Composition Exam:

An American Marriage       The Sun Also Rises Great Expectations               One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Brave New World                  The Awakening All the Pretty Horses            East of Eden Jane Eyre                                    Sula Little Fires Everywhere       The Color Purple The Kite Runner                     Catch-22 Slaughterhouse-Five            The Invisible Man The Handmaid’s Tale            There There    

The Assignments      For The Bonesetter’s Daughter , you will write an essay in the first week of school. It will be a response to an AP Literature and Composition Free Response Prompt and will help me understand what you can do as writers and what we should work on in preparation for the AP test. 

For the second book, choose 3 prompts from the list below and write a literary argument that responds to the prompt. In addition to the thesis statements, include specific scenes and/or details from the text that would support the argument. Include the number of the prompt and submit it to Google Classroom on the first day of school.

The AP Prompts

  • Choose a novel or play that depicts a conflict between a parent (or parental figure) and a son or daughter.  Write an essay in which you analyze the sources of the conflict and explain how the conflict contributes to the meaning of the work.
  • Many plays and novels use contrasting places (for example, two counties, two cities or towns, two houses, or the land and sea) to represent opposing forces or ideas that are central to the meaning of the work.  Choose a novel or a play that contrasts two such places. Write an essay explaining how the places differ, what each place represents, and how their contrast contributes to the meaning of the work.
  • Writers often highlight the values of a culture or a society by using characters who are alienated from that culture or society because of gender, race, class, or creed.  Choose a play or novel in which such a character plays a significant role and how that character’s alienation reveals the surrounding society’s assumptions and moral values.  
  • The British novelist Fay Weldon offers this observation about happy endings: “The writers, I do believe, who get the best and most lasting response from readers are the writers who offer a happy ending through moral development.  By a happy ending, I do not mean mere fortunate events* a marriage or a last-minute rescue from death* but some kind of spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation, even with the self, even at death.”  Choose a novel or play that has the kind of ending Weldon describes.  In a well-written essay, identify the “spiritual reassessment or moral reconciliation” evident in the ending and explain its significance in the work as a whole. 
  • Novels and plays often include scenes of weddings, funerals, parties, and other social occasions.  Such scenes may reveal the values of the characters and the society in which they live.  Select a novel or play that includes such a scene and, in a focused essay, discuss the contribution the scene makes to the meaning of the work as a whole. 
  • In a novel by William Styron, a father tells his son that life “is a search for justice.” Choose a character from a novel or play who responds in some way to justice or injustice. Then write a well-developed essay in which you analyze that character’s understanding of justice, the degree to which the character’s search for justice is successful, and the significance to the work as a whole.

AP English Summer Reading List Ideas

  • catherineahern
  • Categories : Summer reading lists for grades k 12
  • Tags : Summer learning

AP English Summer Reading List Ideas

Where to Start

Unlike most other AP courses, which are guided by chronology or a textbook, AP English Literature has so many options for where to start and which way to go, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. After all, there are hundreds of great books out there that you could assign your students for summer reading and throughout the year.

I’m going to suggest a failsafe strategy for coming up with an effective AP English summer reading list. It will require you to assign one piece of literary criticism and one or two texts with literary merit, whether they’re canonical or contemporary. Lastly, I’ll give you suggestions for how to bridge the criticism and literature successfully. If you follow this guide, you’ll be starting off on the right foot, and your students will be on their way to earning 4’s and 5’s on their AP exams next May.

Introduction to Literary Criticism

Many of your students will have limited to no background in literary criticism, but it would behoove them to start thinking like a literary critic as soon as possible. For this reason, I strongly suggest assigning either of Thomas C. Foster’s accessible introductions to the topic: How to Read Literature Like a Professor or How to Read Novels Like a Professor . Both texts provide approachable advice for reading and understanding great literature, so you can’t go wrong with either. If, of course, you plan on assigning a piece of literature that isn’t a novel (say, Shakespeare’s King Lear , for example), you should obviously pick the former, but otherwise it’s just up to your personal preference.

Both How to Read books are broken into thematic chapters, in which Foster applies an idea to a plethora of texts as examples. In How to Read Literature , Foster starts out analyzing “quests.” He makes the claim that just about every trip in literature is really a quest through which the character (the knight, if you will) discovers self-knowledge. In the equally interesting opening chapter of How to Read Novels , Foster shows the reader just how important opening lines, pages, and chapters are to a novel, by identifying the eighteen literary elements they reveal about the book. This is exactly the kind of thinking you want to expose your AP students to, so that–eventually–it will become second nature for them.

Having students read these books in tagent with a classic or contemporary text may also be a strategy you can use. They can then use the How to Read skills they’ve learned on the text. This can be turned into a written summer assignment.

Delving into the Canon

AP Literature is primarily concerned with the classics, so it would be a good idea to expose your students to this caliber of text before they even enter your classroom. That way they’ll know what to expect in regard to your course’s difficulty and they’ll already have one piece of great literature to discuss on day one.

My classics recommendations for AP summer reading, on the other hand, are more accessible and still bursting with literary merit. Consider one or two of these to be read in conjunction with one of Foster’s criticism books:

  • Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  • Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  • 1984 by George Orwell
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  • Anything by Dickens

There are plenty of other excellent choices; these are just a starting-off point. When evaluating your choice, though, consider the book’s accessibility in addition to its literary merit. If you fully expect the majority of your students to hate it, it’s probably not the best choice.

Embracing Contemporary Literature

While it’s true that AP Literature is primarily concerned with the classics, they aren’t its only concern. In fact, they’ve referenced plenty of pieces of contemporary fiction on their exams, including The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, American Pastoral by Philip Roth, All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy, and The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri, among others.

There are many benefits to including a piece of quality contemporary literature on your AP English summer reading list. Firstly, your students might really appreciate it. The decline of reading is well documented, and even your brightest students probably aren’t doing it enough for pleasure. Their course loads and extra curricular activities take up a huge amount of their time. I hope you’ll agree that we don’t want them to leave high school thinking that their only choices in literature are dense classics (however impressive they might be) and frivolous pop fiction, like Twilight . You have the opportunity to expose them to another category of great books: the contemporaries. There are certainly plenty of excellent novels written every year; introduce your students to one of them.

Another benefit of including a contemporary piece on your summer reading list is that it will force your students to do their own analysis. Unfortunately, due the abundance of study aids available online and in print, some students don’t even read the books assigned to them. Instead they read summaries and analysis on sites like SparkNotes. If you pick a newer novel, you may be able to take away their crutch, and they’ll have to do their own thinking. Keep in mind, though, that if this is a big concern of yours, you should check to see if SparkNotes already covers the work you’re considering assigning. Also, if SparkNotes does cover the book, read the SparkNotes version before you grade the assignment (or create an assignment) and bring your classes discussion and focus to the aspects of the text that were not covered. This will teach your students that they cannot just read SparkNotes early on. The Handmaid’s Tale and All the Pretty Horses fall into this category.

Here are a few other AP-worthy contemporary texts that you might consider:

  • The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery
  • The Known World by Edward P. Jones
  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

Making Connections

Once you’ve selected your titles, you want to build a bridge from the literary criticism to the literature itself. You can make this part of the summer project or give out the assignment when students enter your class in the fall, but it’s important that you require them to apply their new understanding of criticism to the text(s) that they read.

I suggest that the writing assignment be pretty short–let’s say one to two pages–for your sanity and your students’. In their essay(s)–one if you only assigned one book in addition to Foster’s, two if you assigned another–they should apply one of Foster’s ideas to their reading. If you assigned a classic and a contemporary piece (or two classics), I suggest requiring that they have to use a different chapter from How to Read for each essay. For example, they might choose to use the chapter “Nice to Eat With You: Acts of Communion” to help dissect a scene in Jane Eyre and “…More Than It’s Gonna Hurt You: Concerning Violence” to analyze a scene in The Known World (both chapters from How to Read Literature ). Or maybe they’ll use “Pickup Lines and Open(ing) Seductions or Why Novels Have First Pages” to discuss Dickens’s famous opening to A Tale of Two Cities and “Never Trust a Narrator with a Speaking Part” to evaluate the reliability of the narrators in The Elegance of the Hedgehog (both chapters in How to Read Novels ). Doing this exercise early on will give you invaluable insight into your students’ strengths and weaknesses in both analysis and writing, and give them a bit of practice with the kind of thinking and writing they’ll be doing for the rest of the year.

Now that you’ve got the ball rolling with an effective summer reading assignment, you’re off to a successful year. Best of luck!

 alt=

Much Ado About Teaching

Summer reading in ap lit..

ap english summer homework

A few years ago I revamped my summer reading assignment.

It marked an important departure for me. It was a significant step in my growth as a teacher. I’ll explain why, but first I want to share what I have done in years past.

THE OLD SUMMER READING ASSIGNMENT

My summer assignment has gone through different iterations over the years, but the gist of it has always been that the students had to read two books — How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines and 1984 — and develop an outline for each. There are many versions of this assignment online. Its probably where I first developed the idea. I must have Googled “ How to Read Literature Like a Professor summer assignment.” A bunch of results came up, and seeing that a lot of other teachers paired Thomas C. Foster’s work with another novel probably validated its worth in my mind.

I liked that both books were accessible and my students could find help online if they needed it.

I liked that I was introducing my students to good literature without ruining their summer with dense texts and mountains of work.

I liked that when students returned from school I could assess them by asking them to apply a chapter from How to Read Literature Like a Professor to 1984 .

I liked that I was doing something to prevent the summer slide.

THE PROBLEM WITH THE OLD ASSIGNMENT

There was nothing pedagogically wrong with my old summer reading assignment. But there were certain things about it that had bothered me over the years:

  • Students can easily find summaries of How to Read Literature Like a Professor online ( like this link) .
  • Many of my students are not readers of classic literature on their own. In spite of its cheeky humor and tone, they did not have the awareness of texts mentioned in How to Read Literature to fully appreciate the references.
  • Students felt that How to Read Literature Like a Professor simplified the process of reading, reducing everything to either a symbol or an allusion.
  • The assignment was not thoroughly thought through. It was too simplistic. Basically I was asking students to read and outline. I felt like I was simply following what others were doing without making this assignment a true reflection of my teaching and my goals.
  • There wasn’t much feedback I could provide on an outline and consequently little room for growth.

THE GOALS OF SUMMER ASSIGNMENTS

I believe that when students are faced with low-rigor tasks, they create low achievement even when students do well on these tasks. In addition, such tasks contribute to the boredom students so often complain about when they spend too many hours on work that is routine and bland, often centered on discrete skills.

Outlining a text is a low-rigor task. It requires little skill beside extrapolation and summarization.

I want my summer assignments to have what I believe are the three principles of an effective assignment:

1. Effective assignments provide clear expectations about what should be completed, how it should be completed, and why the assignment is important.

I needed to rethink the final part of that criteria. While the original assignment provided clear expectations and walked students through the steps to be completed, it never explained why the assignment was important. When there is no value attached to an assignment, the work can feel like busy work.

Assignment-making requires teachers to clarify what learning is demonstrated and how it can be demonstrated. I needed to answer questions about purpose and relevance: “Why are my students doing this? What greater good will result from this work? As well as, are there significant concepts connected to the curriculum?”

2. Effective assignments are formative, providing feedback that allows teachers to adjust their instruction and scaffold learning.

I also needed to understand how my teaching can be informed by what the students completed. This is where the outlines of the prior assignment failed to be valuable. I was learning nothing about my students nor anything about their thinking.

With the new summer assignment adjustments would I make based on the work that students produced? What was I learning about their reading skills or their writing skills?

Good assignments, whether in the summer or during the school year, should inform instruction, giving teachers a chance to assess skills and modify instruction accordingly.

3. Effective assignments set high expectations and provide pathways to achieve those expectations.

I want the new assignment to communicate high expectations for critical thinking and levels of analysis. I want my students to be challenged no matter what skill sets or content background they bring into the course.

WHAT MY STUDENTS ARE DOING INSTEAD

  • I want my students to have a summer experience that is not punitive but is preparatory. I don’t want to punish them with mountains of work or use a summer assignment as a gatekeeper for the class. I want to set a foundation for the enjoyment that comes from reading, thinking, and writing creatively and analytically.
  • I want my students to see that great ideas can be expressed in a variety of formats. Therefore, they will read blog articles, watch YouTube videos, and read poems as well as a novel.
  • I want them to learn from readers, writers, and thinkers that I admire. I’m not just handing them books and asking them to read them, I want them to observe how others analyze and how others approach the act of writing.  These pieces have the levels of analysis that will promote high expectations for my students.
  • I want them to choose the novel they read, not have one assigned to them.
  • I want them to have a space of their own creation (their StudyTee Notes) where they will respond to each text that they encounter in thoughtful and diverse ways.

THE SUMMER READING TEXTS

  • StudyTee’s Note-Taking Method
  • The NerdWriter Analyzes Edward Hopper’s “Nighthawks”
  • Leo Babauta’s Why I Read (+ a Dozen Book Recommendations)
  • Any novel on this list or this one
  • Poetry Foundation’s Poem of the Day

Download the Summer Reading Assignments for Susan Barber and Brian Sztabnik

Concluding thoughts.

I know that I am asking my students to complete somewhat unorthodox summer assignments. They are not being handed a textbook or a stack of novels and asked to complete a series of study guide questions or outlines. There comes a point in a teacher’s career when he or she stops doing things just because everyone else is doing them and strikes out on his or her own path.

And this has been that moment for me.

Instead, I am giving them models of critical thinkers. I am exposing them to a variety of texts across a span of genres. I am giving them the power to choose the novel and poems that they want to read. And it will have clear expectations, an understanding of why each component of the assignment is important, a chance for me to gain formative feedback, and high expectations for success.

' src=

Brian Sztabnik is just a man trying to do good in and out of the classroom. He was a 2018 finalist for NY Teacher of the Year, a former College Board advisor for AP Lit, and an award-winning basketball coach.

ap english summer homework

End of Year Activities

ap english summer homework

It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times

You may also like.

ap english summer homework

Poetry Blog Exchange

ap english summer homework

The Secret to Close-Reading Success

ap english summer homework

THE BIGGEST COLLEGE ESSAY MISTAKES

Please go to the Instagram Feed settings page to create a feed.

Much Ado About Teaching

Copyright © 2024 DAHZ All Rights Reserved. Much Ado About Teaching.

Precollege Programming

Ap english summer homework, students must read all four selections before class convenes in the fall and meet the turn-in deadlines below..

Please read your books and email your responses in the prescribed order. These required readings will provide the basis for discussion, group work, and presentations. They will also serve as essential material for your first major essays in ATYP AP English, so please read carefully and be sure to refresh and reacquaint yourself with the texts before we meet in September, should you finish your reading early in the summer.

THE READINGS:

  • First reading  ( Annotation and Written Reflection) , due June 30th : Joy Harjo's "Crazy Brave" (memoir) ISBN: 9780393345438 
  • Second reading  ( Annotation and Written Reflection) , due by July 30th : Quian Julie Wong’s "Beautiful Country" (memoir) ISBN: 9780593313008 
  • Third reading  (Annotation and Written Reflection) , due by August 30th : Hedy Habra's "The Taste of the Earth" ISBN: 9781950413096
  • Fourth and final reading  ( Annotation and Written Reflection) ,   due by 8 p.m. (get some sleep) the day before our first class meets: 
  • James Baldwin's "Sonny's Blues" available online . If you want to purchase the entire short story collection "Going to Meet the Man," it is available, ISBN 9780679761792.

It’s fine to purchase used copies,  but see if you can find copies that don’t have other people’s annotations in them.  Also,  Zhang Scholarship recipients can have summer reading novels purchased for them. The ATYP office will send an email regarding obtaining your books. If you are not a scholarship recipient but purchasing the texts is a hardship, please contact the ATYP office. We will help!

In the spirit of supporting local business …please consider purchasing your texts from a local store! This is also a great time to buy your summer beach reads! We have given our titles to this is a bookstore/Bookbug and Kazoo Books so they can help you. In addition, there will be a special book purchasing day on Saturday, June 1, at this is a bookstore, 3019 Oakland Drive, Kalamazoo. The store will donate a percentage of the purchase amount for that day back to the program if you tell them that you’re purchasing for ATYP. 

WRITING DIRECTIONS:  Two Steps (annotations and writing reflections)

Step 1: Annotation , aka: Write in your book! 

  • Page synopsis:   Write minimally at the top of nearly ever page (or every third page, or so) summarizing the events of the page. Ex: write what’s happening, the characters present, or any other brief detail that will help you quickly orient yourself within the novel when you flip through and reference later. This will come in extraordinarily handy for our discussions and the critical work you will perform on these novels.
  • Underline key passages/lines. How will you decide what to underline? Consider passages that seem to sum up or epitomize core themes, central conflicts or tensions, or are particularly indicative of certain characters. Put your brain in critical mode: what might you want to easily find and quote later?
  • Write down questions in the margins -  as well as any connections to other texts/current events/etc. that you notice.
  • On the first day of class, I will flip through each of your novels and check your annotations and sticky notes. Put ink on those pages!  It should go without saying that you will do this FIRST, before tackling the written reflection below.
  • If you have an eBook or some other form of the book that you are unable to annotate physically (library book, etc.), you will still need to complete the above work to the best of your ability , which may involve a separate and detailed notes page or digital annotations that you will show me in class.

Step 2. Writing Reflection

For Harjo, Wang, and Baldwin: Locate TWO compelling moments in each of these readings and craft TWO paragraphs about each moment. Format all your documents in 12pt Times New Roman font, 1.5 spacing, 1-inch margins, with your name, my name, and the assignment title in your header: 

  • First paragraph: Copy the passage and discuss why this passage proves significant to the story as a whole ; does it play a key role in the events of the story, representing some kind of turning point or dramatic action? Or is it a small moment that simply compels closer reflection from the reader? Or perhaps it provides a good example of the work’s voice, structure, themes, etc.? (Hint: simple plot points won't show me what you can do - use your discerning eye) And… I want to see the rhetorical or literary devices that you can identify in the passage, as well. Your first and second year instructors would like you to show off your chops! Resist copy/pasting from a Google search…I need to see what you can do. ATYP English uses MLA style . Each book quote should be followed by the author’s last name and a page number in parentheses. Try to narrow your selections to one or two paragraphs so you can really focus your analysis.
  • Second paragraph , address how/why the passage affects you on a personal level. For this second paragraph, it might help to simply think about the ways in which this passage mirrors your own experiences or observations of the world around you. You can even talk about how the passage broadens your horizons and makes you reconsider previous assumptions - or confirms them. This exploration will provide a helpful reference when you write your first essays in the fall. Some students in the past gave me vague or hasty writing - please avoid. Show me your thoughtfulness and candor. 
  • To avoid confusion : This means FOUR paragraphs per reading -  so you will have 12 paragraphs between the three readings, altogether. You have a different set of directions for the poetry book.
  • With this written reflection, make sure to vary your responses! No boilerplate, copy & paste answers here -  give each of the works special care and attention. Find the piece's unique voice and architecture.

For Habra's poetry book: While you will be annotating all of the poems, select four poems that speak to you the most from this collection to write about. Write about each of the four poems individually.  

  • First paragraph: First, discuss what the poem is exploring/what appears to be at the heart of this piece? And then write about what draws in the reader: this is where you list several beautifully crafted lines, imagery, and various devices employed by Habra so you may show an appreciation for how this poet’s craft compels us to interact with this particular poem.  Resist copy/pasting from a Google search…I need to see what you can do. 
  • Second paragraph:  Address how/why the poem speaks to you or affects  you on a personal level.  For this second paragraph, it might help to simply think about the ways in which this poem mirrors your own experiences or observations of the world around you. How does it touch you or reach you? You can even talk about how the poem broadens your horizons and makes you reconsider previous assumptions - or confirms them. This exploration will provide a helpful reference when you write your first essays in the fall. As noted above, some students in the past gave me vague or hasty writing - please avoid. Show me your thoughtfulness and candor. 
  • To avoid confusion :  This means TWO paragraphs per reading -  so you will have 8 paragraphs between the four poems you choose to write about, altogether. I can't wait to see what you say!
  • With this written reflection, make sure to vary your responses! No boilerplate, copy & paste answers here - give each of the poems special care and attention. Find the piece's unique voice and architecture.

 Due Dates:  email each portion to me ( becky.cooper@wmich.edu ) by the following dates:

  • Selection one, Crazy Brave, by 10 p.m. June 30th
  • Selection two, Beautiful Country, by 10 p.m. July 30th
  • Selection three, The Taste of the Earth, by 10 p.m. August 30th
  • Please save “Sonny’s Blues” for last, as it will be the quickest read (but notice that a quick read does not mean without depth). Email this selection to me by 8 p.m. the day before our first class meets (get some sleep)

FINAL NOTES:

  • I staggered the turn-in dates to help you stay on track in order to avoid a last-minute rush before school starts.  You have four turn-in dates. Notice the key word is "by," so you can technically send the responses earlier. The dates represent when I will consider them late.
  • Please save "Sonny's Blues" for last as it will be the quickest read (but notice that a quick read does not mean without depth). Email this selection to me by 8 p.m. (get some sleep) the day before our first class meets.
  • Parents should be aware that the texts may contain mature content. ATYP faculty agree that our students entering the third year of ATYP in a college-readiness course are ready for this content. ATYP faculty are trained in facilitating productive conversations on potentially difficult topics. We also encourage students to discuss what they’re reading with their parents. To review the books, we suggest looking for the titles on goodreads.com or commonsensemedia.org .

Advice from previous students:  “The reading was fun - hardly like work at all, but do not wait too long before getting started!” 

Have a fantastic summer! I’m looking forward to seeing you in September!

Brooklyn Technical High School

×

Summer Reading 2023

High five! You made it to summer! Tech's English Department hopes that July and August offer you some rest and relaxation, some time to invest in the people and activities you love. We also hope you find a book to enjoy. For this summer assignment, choose any work of fiction or non-fiction that interests and challenges you. You can see our suggestions on the next page, but the choice is up to you.

What do I do over the summer?

  • Select a book that you haven't read before from our suggested list or find one on your own. You can check many of these books out digitally from our school library using the Sora app or from a public library. Be thoughtful about your selection. Choose something of personal interest and something that will push you as a reader and thinker. You are free to read from any grade level or even something that isn't on our list.
  • Choose one of the options below:
  • Option 1: Write a personal response to your chosen book. What did you find relatable / compelling / infuriating / thought-provoking / problematic and why? How do the issues and themes this book raises relate to your life? Dig into some specific ideas and moments that got you thinking. (350-500 words)
  • Option 2: Create a piece of visual art that explores an important idea from the book you read. The piece should delve into your response to the book, not just provide an illustration. It may be any size or medium, but it must be your original artwork. Include a caption that explains your intentions and choices. (~150 words)
  • Option 3: Compose a letter to the author of your chosen book OR a letter to a character in it. In your letter, bring up the ideas and questions that the book raised for you. Consider offering your personal reactions to specific moments in the book. Write like it's a conversation, not an essay. (350-500 words)
  • Two additional guidelines to consider:
  • The spirit of this assignment is to encourage curiosity and thoughtfulness about books and the world. Be original, be creative, have fun! Please, please, please don't be boring. We are interested in your opinions, reactions, and responses to the book. No summaries please; we can read those online too.
  • Save your work digitally so that you can easily upload your writing/artwork to Google Classroom in the fall by Friday, September 15th .

Come to class in the fall ready to talk to your new classmates and teacher about your book and share your writing/artwork. Your English teacher will provide more details in the first week of school, but plan to submit your work on Google Classroom by Friday, September 15th . EVERY SINGLE TECH STUDENT IS EXPECTED TO COMPLETE A SUMMER READING ASSIGNMENT!

For Rising Seniors, Class of 2024:   In addition to the summer reading, all seniors are expected to have a complete draft of an essay that responds to one of the Common Application essay prompts . You may revisit the work you did with your 11th grade English teacher this past spring or start over with a new idea based on what you learned. This essay is also due Friday, September 15th . You will spend some time in the early fall revising this piece.

Alternate Assignments:   Please note that students who are taking the following classes next year have a different summer assignment that they should complete in lieu of this one: AP Capstone Seminar, AP Capstone Research, and AP English Literature . Those assignments are posted below. Also note that juniors taking AP English Language must choose from the list of 11th grade non-fiction options.

What's that you say? You want to read MORE!?

Please join us for the BTHS Summer Reading Challenge Bingo ! Read three books in different categories and win Tech merch! Students, staff, parents and alumni are all invited to participate.

  •       10th Grade AP Capstone Seminar - Complete the alternate assignment below called "Summer Reading 2023 AP Capstone Seminar."
  •       11th Grade AP English Language & Composition - You MUST choose from the list of suggested 11th grade NON-FICTION works in the general assignment.
  •       12th Grade AP English Literature - Complete the alternate assignment below called "Summer Reading 2023 AP English Literature." 
  •       12th Grade AP Capstone Research - Complete the alternate assignment below called "Summer Log 2023 AP Capstone Research."

AP Central for Educators

Supporting Students from Day One to Exam Day

Access free AP resources from anywhere.

Deadline: Free Score-Send Selections

Have students follow these steps to choose a free score-send recipient before the June 20 deadline.

AP Annual Conference 2024

Join us in Las Vegas on July 24–26 for the AP Annual Conference.

AP Annual Conference

The Latest in AP

 alt=

AP Summer Institutes

Explore upcoming summer workshops to expand your teaching skills.

 alt=

AP Alumni Network

Encourage seniors to join this network to advocate for future AP students. 

AP Courses and Exams

Find course and exam information, classroom resources, and instructions for completing the Course Audit.

Explore teaching resources and useful information for every AP subject.

AP Course Audit

Learn how to complete the Course Audit and get your course authorized.

Important Dates

POSTMARK JUNE 15

Deadline: Return AP Exam Invoices and Payments

Deadline: students use free score sends.

This is the deadline for students to access My AP and indicate or change the recipient of their free score report.

AP Scores Released

AP score reports are available to designated colleges, students, high schools, and districts.

Start and Expand Your AP Program

Bring ap to your school.

Learn how to get approved to administer AP Exams and offer AP courses at your school.

Build Your AP Program

Learn how to expand your AP program to offer more subjects and reach more students.

ap english summer homework

Professional Learning for Teachers

Deepen your instruction and elevate your students’ learning potential by participating in professional learning programs, both in person and online. Benefit from the experience of your colleagues through AP Mentoring and the AP Community.

ap english summer homework

Find Resources for Your Role

Find resources to enhance your instruction and support your students.

AP Coordinators

Find key dates, resources, and everything you need to administer exams.

Find key dates, teacher resources, and professional learning opportunities.

District Leaders

Find user guides, key dates, and resources to support teachers, parents, and students.

More to Explore

Ap community.

Connect online with colleagues, participate in discussions with experts, and share classroom-ready materials.

AP Coordinator Resources

Download the AP Coordinator’s Manual, guides for creating sections in AP Classroom, and additional resources.  

Have Questions?

Ap faq center.

Find answers to frequently asked questions about the AP Program.

AP Contacts

Contact the AP Program with questions.

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Our 13th Annual Summer Reading Contest

Middle and high school students are invited to tell us what they’re reading in The Times and why. The contest runs from June 10 to Aug. 19.

By The Learning Network

Update, April 27, 2023: Here are the guidelines for our 2023 Summer Reading Contest .

Update, Aug. 30, 2022: You can read about this summer’s winners here.

Every year since 2010, The Learning Network has invited teenagers around the world to add The New York Times to their summer reading lists. So far, more than 80,000 have done so.

If you are looking for ways to offer students more “voice and choice,” we hope our open-ended contest can help. Every week, we ask participants to choose something in The Times that has piqued their interest, and then tell us why. At the end of the week, judges from the Times newsroom and The Learning Network pick their favorite responses, and we publish them. It’s that simple.

Though our goals include some that appear on many educators’ lists — helping students become more aware of the world and their place in it; learning how to navigate sophisticated nonfiction; and practicing writing for an audience — we also hope that students will realize that reading the newspaper can be fun. As you’ll see in the guidelines below, students can choose anything that was published on NYTimes.com in 2022. We don’t care if they choose a piece about Ukraine or U.S. politics ; breakups or boa constrictors ; superheroes or surfing ; music , movies or mental health . We just care about why they chose it.

Here’s what you need to know:

  • How to Submit
  • Contest Guidelines
  • Resources for Teachers, Students and Parents
  • Frequently Asked Questions

We are having trouble retrieving the article content.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and  log into  your Times account, or  subscribe  for all of The Times.

Thank you for your patience while we verify access.

Already a subscriber?  Log in .

Want all of The Times?  Subscribe .

SAT Registration

Show colleges you're ready: register for the SAT from your College Board account.

Dates and Deadlines

FRI, JUN 14, 2024

June SAT Score Release

FRI, AUG 9, 2024

Registration Deadline for August SAT

TUE, AUG 13, 2024

Late Registration Deadline for August SAT

SAT, AUG 24, 2024

7:45 AM Local

August 24 SAT

Success Starts with the SAT

Find a Test Center

Test center search.

Search for places that offer the SAT. You'll choose a specific location when you register.

Test Center Closings

Get the latest information about test center closings.

SAT Dates and Deadlines

Use these dates to plan to take the SAT.

Fee Waivers

If you're eligible for a fee waiver, you can take the SAT for free and get other benefits.

SAT fee waivers are available to low-income 11th- and 12th-grade students in the U.S. or U.S. territories.

If you qualify, benefits include two free sat tests, unlimited score reports to send to colleges, and waived application fees at participating colleges..

A smiling young girl wearing a helmet and holding onto bicycle handles while standing next to young boy smiling toward the camera, holding a basketball

For K–12 Educators

Accommodations.

Students who have a documented disability may be eligible for testing accommodations when they take the SAT.

SAT fee waivers are sent directly to schools and community-based organizations (CBOs).

School Code Search

Search for K–12 school codes, also known as College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) codes. These codes identify your institution to College Board.

  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Newsletters
  • Photography
  • Personal Finance
  • AP Investigations
  • AP Buyline Personal Finance
  • AP Buyline Shopping
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Global elections
  • Asia Pacific
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Election Results
  • Delegate Tracker
  • AP & Elections
  • Auto Racing
  • 2024 Paris Olympic Games
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Personal finance
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

Vermont becomes 1st state to enact law requiring oil companies pay for damage from climate change

FILE - A small tractor clears water from a business as flood waters block a street, July 12, 2023, in Barre, Vt. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024, after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, file)

FILE - A small tractor clears water from a business as flood waters block a street, July 12, 2023, in Barre, Vt. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024, after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, file)

FILE - This image made from drone footage provided by the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets shows flooding in Montpelier, Vt., Tuesday, July 11, 2023. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024 after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets via AP)

FILE - A man views flood damage in Bridgewater, Vt., that submerged vehicles and threatened homes Monday, July 10, 2023. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024 after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali, File)

FILE - Jodi Kelly, seated center, practice manager at Stonecliff Veterinary Surgical Center, behind, and her husband Veterinarian Dan Kelly, right, use a canoe to remove surgical supplies from the flood damaged center, Tuesday, July 11, 2023, in Montpelier, Vt. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024 after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

FILE = Jodi Kelly, left, practice manager at Stonecliff Veterinary Surgical Center, behind, and her husband, veterinarian Dan Kelly, use a canoe to remove surgical supplies from the flood-damaged center, Tuesday, July 11, 2023, in Montpelier, Vt. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024, after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

  • Copy Link copied

Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather.

Republican Gov. Phil Scott allowed the bill to become law without his signature late Thursday, saying he is very concerned about the costs and outcome of the small state taking on “Big Oil” alone in what will likely be a grueling legal fight. But he acknowledged that he understands something has to be done to address the toll of climate change.

“I understand the desire to seek funding to mitigate the effects of climate change that has hurt our state in so many ways,” Scott, a moderate Republican in the largely blue state of Vermont, wrote in a letter to lawmakers.

The popular governor who recently announced that he’s running for reelection to a fifth two-year term, has been at odds with the Democrat-controlled Legislature, which he has called out of balance. He was expected by environmental advocates to veto the bill but then allowed it to be enacted. Scott wrote to lawmakers that he was comforted that the Agency of Natural Resources is required to report back to the Legislature on the feasibility of the effort.

Last July’s flooding from torrential rains inundated Vermont’s capital city of Montpelier, the nearby city Barre, some southern Vermont communities and ripped through homes and washed away roads around the rural state. Some saw it as the state’s worst natural disaster since a 1927 flood that killed dozens of people and caused widespread destruction. It took months for businesses — from restaurants to shops — to rebuild, losing out on their summer and even fall seasons. Several have just recently reopened while scores of homeowners were left with flood-ravaged homes heading into the cold season.

FILE - A woman is silhouetted against the setting sun as triple-digit heat indexes continue in the Midwest, Aug. 20, 2023, in Kansas City, Mo. The rate Earth is warming hit an all-time high in 2023 with 92% of last year’s surprising record-shattering heat caused by humans, top scientists calculated. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Under the legislation, the Vermont state treasurer, in consultation with the Agency of Natural Resources, would provide a report by Jan. 15, 2026, on the total cost to Vermonters and the state from the emission of greenhouse gases from Jan. 1, 1995, to Dec. 31, 2024. The assessment would look at the effects on public health, natural resources, agriculture, economic development, housing and other areas. The state would use federal data to determine the amount of covered greenhouse gas emissions attributed to a fossil fuel company.

It’s a polluter-pays model affecting companies engaged in the trade or business of extracting fossil fuel or refining crude oil attributable to more than 1 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions during the time period. The funds could be used by the state for such things as upgrading stormwater drainage systems; upgrading roads, bridges and railroads; relocating, elevating or retrofitting sewage treatment plants; and making energy efficient weatherization upgrades to public and private buildings. It’s modeled after the federal Superfund pollution cleanup program.

“For too long, giant fossil fuel companies have knowingly lit the match of climate disruption without being required to do a thing to put out the fire,” Paul Burns, executive director of the Vermont Public Interest Research Group, said in a statement. “Finally, maybe for the first time anywhere, Vermont is going to hold the companies most responsible for climate-driven floods, fires and heat waves financially accountable for a fair share of the damages they’ve caused.”

Maryland, Massachusetts and New York are considering similar measures.

The American Petroleum Institute, the top lobbying group for the oil and gas industry, has said it’s extremely concerned the legislation “retroactively imposes costs and liability on prior activities that were legal, violates equal protection and due process rights by holding companies responsible for the actions of society at large; and is preempted by federal law.”

“This punitive new fee represents yet another step in a coordinated campaign to undermine America’s energy advantage and the economic and national security benefits it provides,” spokesman Scott Lauermann said in a statement Friday.

Vermont lawmakers know the state will face legal challenges, but the governor worries about the costs and what it means for other states if Vermont fails.

State Rep. Martin LaLonde, a Democrat and an attorney, believes Vermont has a solid legal case. Legislators worked closely with many legal scholars in crafting the bill, he said in statement.

“Most importantly, the stakes are too high – and the costs too steep for Vermonters – to release corporations that caused the mess from their obligation to help clean it up,” he said.

ap english summer homework

IMAGES

  1. AP Lang Summer Homework 2015 APLangSummerHW2015

    ap english summer homework

  2. AP English Language Summer Packet by The Angry Teacher Store

    ap english summer homework

  3. English Homework SummerTerm

    ap english summer homework

  4. AP Language and Composition 2015 Summer Assignment

    ap english summer homework

  5. AP English Language Summer Assignment

    ap english summer homework

  6. AP English Summer Assignment

    ap english summer homework

VIDEO

  1. Summer Homework

  2. SUMMER HOMEWORK 3 আসছে😍😍 Free Fire Summer event 2024

  3. Class 5 English summer pack (activity 8 to activity 11)#english ##alliedschool

  4. My summer vacation holiday homework of English grammar and English reader 😊💗🥰#ytshorts #youtube

  5. ENGLISH SUMMER HOLIDAY HOMEWORK 🏖️

  6. HOW TO COMPLETE IN EVENT SUMMER HOMEWORK #1 FULL DETAILS 💯 ✅

COMMENTS

  1. PDF AP English Language & Composition

    AP English Lang. & Comp. AP English Language & Composition - 2023 Summer Assignments Congratulations! You have chosen to embark on a journey that will challenge, inspire, and enlighten you as to the ways language and rhetoric impacts our lives as individuals and as members of society. I commend you

  2. AP English Language and Composition

    AP English Language and Composition Course and Exam Description. This is the core document for this course. Unit guides clearly lay out the course content and skills and recommend sequencing and pacing for them throughout the year. The CED was updated in the summer of 2020 to include scoring guidelines for the example questions.

  3. PDF AP English Language & Composition Summer Reading Assignments for the

    Summer Reading Assignments for the 2021-22 School Year Welcome to AP English Language & Composition! ... Step 1: Write an email to Mr. Bui ([email protected]) with the email title "AP Lang Summer Work 21-22 - Full Name" Step 2: Attach the MS Word file (do not SHARE via OneDrive, we need it attached as a copy) and hit send. ...

  4. PDF AP English Language & Composition (Grade 11) Summer Reading 2021

    during summer vacation. This work is particularly intense to ensure students' commitment to the challenge and rigor of the course. It is also designed to demonstrate that students possess the prerequisite reading and writing skills for success in the course. Remember: AP English Language and Composition is a college-level writing course.

  5. PDF AP Language Summer Reading List

    Summer Reading List Reading List: AP Language & Composition Summer 2021 The AP reading list was developed using recommendations from College Board, AP English Language curriculum, and award winning non-fiction with a Lexile score of 1100 or above. The content of these books can be sensitive in nature. Parents are advised to review the list, read

  6. PDF 2020 Summer Reading: A.P. Language and Composition

    2020 Summer Reading: A.P. Language and Composition_____ ... If we ignore reading literature from the past because we judge it from our present perspective, then we are cheating ourselves out of a valuable understanding of ... relates well to other passages that you will see on your multiple-choice section of the AP® English Language exam.

  7. PDF AP English Literature Summer Reading and Assignments

    ©AP Lit & More: Literature & Writing Resources, 2018 Assignment #3: Additional Reading Finally, select one more title to read over the summer from the list provided. The titles on the list are considered novels of "literary merit" by those who write the AP Lit exam, but they never define what "literary merit" means.

  8. PDF AP Language and Composition Summer Reading List

    Welcome to AP English Language and Composition. The following lists offer students high interest readings, contemporary texts, non-fiction readings, as well as literary classics. Hopefully, you will find the summer readings enjoyable as well as thought provoking. Many of these texts are not found on the pre-approved list for Knox County.

  9. AP English Language and Composition

    New for 2024-25: MCQs Will Have Four Answer Choices. Starting with the 2025 exam, AP English Language and Composition multiple-choice questions (MCQs) will have four answer choices instead of five. Most AP courses have already implemented this change, which research indicates could improve your exam-day experience.

  10. PDF AP English Language & Composition (Grade 11) Summer Reading 2023

    the power of language. Students in AP English Language and Composition must complete the major reading and writing assignments, as well as supplemental readings and writings during summer vacation. This work is particularly intense to ensure students' commitment to the challenge and rigor of the course. It is also designed to

  11. AP English Literature and Composition Summer Reading 2024

    Welcome to AP English Literature and Composition. The information below describes your summer reading and essay assignments. Summer reading is an important part of the Advanced Placement course and serves multiple purposes. This is a literature course so of course, reading literature and then writing about that literature is the main focus.

  12. PDF Ap English Language and Composition Summer Homework

    This assignment should be fun! AP English Language and Composition is a time to put the boring 5-paragraph FSA essay behind you, and to branch out and explore other styles of writing. This assignment is an opportunity to play games with language. You should, of course, take the assignment seriously and tailor your writing to

  13. PDF Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Summer Assignment

    to prepare for our odyssey together, you will need to complete the following summer reading and writing assignments. The summer assignment is an important component of the AP English Literature program, serving to keep you active as readers, to expand your horizons, and to stimulate your own thinking through writing about what you have read.

  14. AP English Summer Reading List Ideas

    My classics recommendations for AP summer reading, on the other hand, are more accessible and still bursting with literary merit. Consider one or two of these to be read in conjunction with one of Foster's criticism books: Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte.

  15. PDF Summer Reading/Activity List for AP Literature and Composition*

    How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster (ISBN: 978--0623-0167-3) Assignment for Book #1: Create a digital notebook in a Google doc. (If you do not have access to a computer this summer, you can create a handwritten notebook.) At the very beginning, type out a schedule with your own deadlines to complete the reading of all ...

  16. Summer Reading in AP Lit.

    Outlining a text is a low-rigor task. It requires little skill beside extrapolation and summarization. I want my summer assignments to have what I believe are the three principles of an effective assignment: 1. Effective assignments provide clear expectations about what should be completed, how it should be completed, and why the assignment is ...

  17. AP English Summer Homework

    Akhil Sharma's "Family Life" (semi-autobiographical novel) ISBN: 9780393350609 (about $15) Fourth and final reading (Annotation and Written Reflection), due by 8 p.m. (get some sleep) the day before our first class meets: John Lewis' March, Book One, co-written by Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell (autobiographical graphic novel ...

  18. PDF AP English Language and Composition Summer Reading Assignment for the

    summer reading for the 2024-2025 school year: 1. Mr. Cionfolo (That's me. Yes, I am writing in the 3rd person.) is an avid reader. For the two months of school-free summer (June & July) he will read between 10-15 books. He challenges you to out read him. Part 1 of the summer reading is to read at least one

  19. PDF AP English Literature and Composition Summer Assignment, 2023-2024

    2023-2024 Mrs. A. Dales, M.Ed. - Combs High School AP Literature and Composition Overview/Rationale Part One of the summer assignment is designed to help you prepare for college and the AP Literature Exam, where skills developed by avid reading are essential. Only the well-read student can respond intelligently to

  20. Summer Reading Assignments

    Please join us for the BTHS Summer Reading Challenge Bingo! Read three books in different categories and win Tech merch! Students, staff, parents and alumni are all invited to participate. Classes with Special Assignments or Instructions. 10th Grade AP Capstone Seminar - Complete the alternate assignment below called "Summer Reading 2023 AP ...

  21. AP English Literature and Composition Summer Assignment, 2022-2023

    The summer assignment for AP Literature and Composition is designed to prepare you for the college-level reading demands of this course. The purpose of the AP English Literature Summer Assignment is to keep reading and writing skills sharp and help students prepare for the class in the fall and the AP English Literature Exam in the spring.

  22. AP Summer Homework

    AP Summer Homework Assignments & Welcome Letters. If you need to check out materials from the Gregori Bookroom to complete your assignment (s), we will check out materials during finals week or during Summer. You must turn in all current materials before checking out new books for next year. SUMMER BOOKROOM HOURS: 8am - 2:30pm; Closed May 30 ...

  23. AP English Literature Summer Reading Assignment

    English II DPAC Summer Reading; AP English Literature Summer Reading Assignment; AP Language and Composition; 2800 Texas Avenue, Deer Park, TX 77536 Phone: (832) 668-7000. Compliance Statement; Website Disclaimer; Facebook; Twitter; YouTube; Instagram; Vimeo; Edlio Login Powered by Edlio.

  24. AP Summer Assignments

    AP US History / Honors English 11 - Summer 2024; AP World Summer 2023; AP Art Summer 2023. ... 2024 Summer AP Calculus Packet. ... Honors Humanities 10 Summer Homework; AMSCO text prologue . Eastlake High School. Driving 400 228th Ave N.E., Sammamish, WA 98074 ;

  25. Course & Exam Pages

    A comprehensive list of all current AP courses and exams categorized by subject areas on AP Central College Board.

  26. AP Central

    Course materials, exam information, and professional learning opportunities for AP teachers and coordinators. AP Central. Home; About AP. AP at a Glance; Start and Expand Your AP Program; Explore AP by Role; 2023-24 AP School Year Timeline ... AP Summer Institutes Explore upcoming summer workshops to expand your teaching skills. Learn More and ...

  27. Our 13th Annual Summer Reading Contest

    Every year since 2010, The Learning Network has invited teenagers around the world to add The New York Times to their summer reading lists. So far, more than 80,000 have done so.

  28. AP analysis finds 2023 set record for US heat deaths, killing in areas

    An Associated Press analysis of federal data shows that about 2,300 people in the United States died in the summer of 2023 with their death certificates mentioning the effects of excessive heat. ... Founded in 1846, AP today remains the most trusted source of fast, accurate, unbiased news in all formats and the essential provider of the ...

  29. SAT Registration

    Help Center: Students; Help Center: Professionals and Educators; Help Center: K-12 Reporting Portal; Help Center: SAT Suite Ordering and Registration (Schools)

  30. Vermont becomes 1st state to enact law requiring oil companies pay for

    3 of 5 | . FILE - A man views flood damage in Bridgewater, Vt., that submerged vehicles and threatened homes Monday, July 10, 2023. Vermont has become the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by climate change, Thursday, May 30, 2024 after the state suffered catastrophic summer flooding and damage from other extreme weather.