Royal Society of Chemistry

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Research Fund

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Apply for up to £5000.

research grants 2024 round 1

Our Research Fund supports members with limited access to research funds to start new projects, particularly those working in less well-funded institutes, those in developing countries and early career researchers.

Please note that from this application round, we are introducing new processes for successful applicants to accept and receive grant funding. Please read the Guidance for Applicants document carefully to ensure you are prepared for the changes.

Who can apply?

In order to be eligible, you must meet all of the following criteria:

  • You are an RSC member (AMRSC or above).
  • You hold an independent research post (please see the Guidance for Applicants  document for full details).
  • You must not be currently holding another active Research Fund grant.
  • Current Research Enablement Grant holders may not apply for a Research Fund to support the same project. If, as a Research Enablement Grant holder, you apply to the Research Fund for a different project, reviewers will consider the application in the context of your current Research Enablement Grant.
  • Applications are limited to one per department and require support from your Head of Department.

Please ensure you read our Guidance for Applicants fully before you begin your application. Our Frequently Asked Questions document also provides further details about eligibility and the application process.

You can download an example application form here for your information. Please note that this is provided for information only and the real application form is subject to differ.

Institutions are encouraged to allow the maximum number of applicants they can over a 12 month period. If an unsuccessful applicant from the previous round wishes to apply again, their new application should be substantially different than the previous.

What can I request funding for?

The scheme provides up to £5000 of funding for 12 months, covering:

  • Chemicals and/or equipment
  • Consumables
  • Licences for specialist software required for the project
  • Equipment repairs not covered by University funds
  • Equipment access, for example at a synchrotron facility
  • Travel costs
  • Salary contributions
  • Departmental overheads (including office equipment)
  • Costs for the dissemination of the work (including conference attendance and publication costs)
  • Funding also should not replace or reduce institutional or funding agency support.

Application timelines

Please note for fairness and transparency to all applicants, we must apply our rules consistently. This means that we do not allow late applications. You are welcome to apply in the next application round providing you meet all eligibility criteria of that round.

Round 1 2024

3 June 2024
8 July 2024 1400 UK time (BST)
Week commencing 22 July 2024
 Late September 2024

Round 2 2024

28 October 2024
2 December 2024 1400 UK time (GMT)
Week commencing 16 December 2024
Early March 2025

Assessment criteria

All applications will be checked by RSC staff. Your application will not proceed to peer review if:

  • You do not meet our eligibility criteria (see above).
  • Your application is incomplete.
  • Your application does not adhere to length limits instructed in the application system.
  • Your funding request exceeds the £5000 limit.

All remaining applications will undergo peer review by members of our Researcher Grants Peer Review Group and final funding decisions will then be overseen by:

  • Professor Andy Cammidge, University of East Anglia
  • Dr Haresh Manyar, Queen’s University Belfast
  • Professor Gavin Miller, Keele University

Our reviewers will assess applications on:

Reviewers will assess novelty and scientific impact of the proposed project.
Your proposal must be clearly written and costed, and must be feasible to complete in a 12 month timeframe.
We will prioritise those with limited access to research funding or a short-term gap in funding which is impacting a specific project.
Reviewers will assess how completion of your project will benefit your career. Examples include promotion/new position prospects or chances for further funding.

For full details, please see our Guidance for Applicants or contact us using the form below.

Downloadable document

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Submit your application

Log in or register to create an application.

Prizes & funding

Research grants

Apply for research grants in open competition.

research grants 2024 round 1

About the grant

Our Research Grants are open competition grants given to support the best dermatology research projects worldwide. 

We welcome applications for research projects that improve the understanding of the underlying medicinal, biological, chemical, or pharmacological mechanisms of dermatological diseases and their symptoms.

We also welcome applications for projects that address clinical issues among people who are at risk of developing, or have developed, a skin disease, including how it impacts their quality of life and the societal costs involved.

Application deadlines

Calls are announced on an ongoing basis. Submission period will open four weeks prior to each deadline.

Please find the application deadlines for the research grants in the list below.

Grant Opens Deadline
14 May 2024 25 Jun 2024

For novel and unexpected, also known as serendipitous, discoveries made by current LEO Foundation
grantees.

Grants of up to DKK 4 million are awarded for a two-year period.

DEADLINE: 25 June 2024 (16:00 CEST)

01 Feb 2024 17 Apr 2024

For talented, emerging research leaders with ambitions to establish or expand an independent research group at a Danish institution, and to pursue novel and important research questions within skin and skin diseases.

Grants of DKK 12 million are awarded for a five-year period.

DEADLINE: 17 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

27 Feb 2024 10 Apr 2024

To stimulate a cohesive and agile skin research ecosystem by supporting temporary embedment of skin researchers in a foreign research environment with the aim of fostering genuine international collaborations and strengthening the exchange of knowledge, ideas, methodology, and technology between Danish and international skin research communities.

DEADLINE: 10 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

15 Aug 2024 02 Oct 2024

To stimulate a cohesive and agile skin research ecosystem by supporting temporary embedment of skin researchers in a foreign research environment with the aim of fostering genuine international collaborations and strengthening the exchange of knowledge, ideas, methodology, and technology between Danish and international skin research communities.

DEADLINE: 2 October 2024 (16:00 CEST)

27 Feb 2024 10 Apr 2024

Through our Research Networking Grants, we seek to enable knowledge-sharing and facilitate networking and collaborations within the skin research community by providing researchers and students with opportunities to present and discuss the newest research within their field. 

DEADLINE: 10 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

15 Aug 2024 02 Oct 2024

Through our Research Networking Grants, we seek to enable knowledge-sharing and facilitate networking and collaborations within the skin research community by providing researchers and students with opportunities to present and discuss the newest research within their field. 

DEADLINE: 2 October 2024 (16:00 CEST)

20 Nov 2023 08 Jan 2024

To support the best dermatology research projects worldwide.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 8 January 2024 (16:00 CET)

19 Feb 2024 02 Apr 2024

To support the best dermatology research projects worldwide.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 2 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

01 Aug 2024 12 Sep 2024

To support the best dermatology research projects worldwide.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 12 September 2024 (16:00 CEST)

27 Nov 2023 15 Jan 2024

To strengthen the pipeline of future researchers within the fields of medicine, chemistry, and pharmacy, and to raise awareness about science, including skin and skin diseases.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 15 January 2024 (16:00 CET)

27 Feb 2024 09 Apr 2024

To strengthen the pipeline of future researchers within the fields of medicine, chemistry, and pharmacy, and to raise awareness about science, including skin and skin diseases.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 9 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

20 Aug 2024 01 Oct 2024

To strengthen the pipeline of future researchers within the fields of medicine, chemistry, and pharmacy, and to raise awareness about science, including skin and skin diseases.

It is important that the applicant carefully reads the application guide before initiating the application process, as this document contains the complete call as well as detailed instructions for the application process.

DEADLINE: 1 October 2024 (16:00 CEST)

21 Nov 2023 09 Jan 2024

The LEO Foundation Award was born out of the aim of advancing the understanding and treatment of skin diseases and strengthening the pipeline of excellent dermatology researchers. It recognizes promising young talents and hopefully provides a boost to their future careers.

Three awards are made each year, one in each of the regions: Americas, EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) and Asia-Pacific. Each award is worth USD 100,000.

DEADLINE for self-nomination: 9 January 2024 (16:00 CET)

20 Feb 2024 02 Apr 2024

The LEO Foundation Award was born out of the aim of advancing the understanding and treatment of skin diseases and strengthening the pipeline of excellent dermatology researchers. It recognizes promising young talents and hopefully provides a boost to their future careers.

Three awards are made each year, one in each of the regions: Americas, EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) and Asia-Pacific. Each award is worth USD 100,000.

DEADLINE for self-nomination: 2 April 2024 (16:00 CEST)

16 May 2024 27 Jun 2024

The LEO Foundation Award was born out of the aim of advancing the understanding and treatment of skin diseases and strengthening the pipeline of excellent dermatology researchers. It recognizes promising young talents and hopefully provides a boost to their future careers.

Three awards are made each year, one in each of the regions: Americas, EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) and Asia-Pacific. Each award is worth USD 100,000.

DEADLINE for self-nomination: 27 June 2024 (16:00 CEST)

Application process and guidance

The LEO Foundation’s Board of Trustees has established a formal evaluation process with a panel of national and international external experts to assist the Board in ensuring that our grants are given to the best projects and the most qualified applicants.

When the application deadline is reached, your application will be screened for mandatory requirements and if accepted, assigned for review by the LEO Foundation Scientific Evaluation Committee using the criteria and scoring guide shown in the application guide.

Based on the evaluations by the Scientific Evaluation Committee the Board approves all grants.

It will normally take approx. three months from application deadline to grant decision.

If and when your application is approved, you will be notified and assigned a dedicated contact person who will contact you for next steps.

All applicants receive an answer to their application by e-mail. The Foundation does not provide arguments as to why an application has been rejected but provides a few statistics about the application review and the round in general.

The typical grant amount applied for is DKK 2–4 million for a period of 1–3 years.

Recipients of a LEO Foundation standalone grant can apply for the open competition research grants.

Application guide

Grant terms and conditions

Evaluation process

Once the call deadline has expired, the Foundation’s secretariat screens your application for formal requirements and if approved, sends it to an independent expert committee for evaluation. The evaluation process follows the path illustrated below.

The Foundation generally uses committees consisting of internationally recognized, independent experts to evaluate the applications for grants and awards that are submitted in open competition.

research grants 2024 round 1

Scientific Evaluation Committee (SEC)

The LEO Foundation has appointed an independent Scientific Evaluation Committee (SEC) for evaluation of applications received in open competition.

Learn more about our committees:

Committee member Titles
Professor, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin (Ireland)
Professor, MD, DMSc, PhD, Department of Clinical Allergology, Odense University Hospital Svendborg (Denmark)
Professor, King's College London, St John's Institute of Dermatology (United Kingdom)
Associate Professor, M.D. PhD, University of Lausanne (Switzerland)
Professor, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine (USA)
MD, PhD, Arthur C. Curtis Professor of Skin Molecular Immunology Professor, Dermatology Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Emerging Scholar, University of Michigan, Department of Dermatology (USA)
Director, MD, Centro Studi GISED (Italy)
Associate Professor, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)
Associate Professor, PhD. M.D., Weill Cornell Medicine (USA)
Lecturer, King's College London (United Kingdom)
Professor, Queen's University Belfast, School of Pharmacy (United Kingdom)

We do not support

Applications that are not submitted online, or applications that are not in compliance with our application requirements and guidance are not eligible for support.

Moreover, we do not support:

  • Graduate students below PhD students and/or academic fees except PhD-tuition fees
  • Administration or overhead costs exceeding 5%
  • Participation in domestic meetings or courses
  • Passive attendance at conferences
  • Expenses incurred prior to making an application or obtaining a grant
  • Research projects about skin cancer
  • Research projects involving commercial companies
  • Research projects involving drug testing for commercial purposes
  • Applications from other foundations or associations, including patient organisations

Please contact the grant team for further information

Anne-marie engel.

Anne-Marie is Chief Scientific Officer at the LEO Foundation and responsible for the Foundation’s grant activities.

Anne-Marie’s background includes:

  • Novo Nordisk Foundation, Director of Strategic Partnerships
  • Lundbeck Foundation, various positions including Director of Grants
  • Statens Serum Institut, Senior Researcher
  • The Bartholin Institute, Copenhagen University Hospital, Postdoc

Anne-Marie holds a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree as well as a PhD in tumour immunology – both from the University of Copenhagen.

Other positions

  • Museum of Natural History, Oslo, Chair of the Board, 2022-
  • Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, Member of the praesidium
  • Dagmar Marshall’s Foundation, Board member
  • University of Oslo, Board member (2013-2021)

Joined the LEO Foundation in 2022.

+45 27 38 60 59

[email protected]

Lars is responsible for coordinating the Foundation’s grants and handles scientific and administrative matters relating to the Foundation’s donations. He also works on further developing the philanthropic area.

Lars has a scientific background having worked in academic research for 16 years on projects ranging from molecular mechanisms in migraine over COPD to sleep disorders and osteoporosis.

Lars holds an MSc in human biology and a PhD in neuroscience, both from University of Copenhagen.

Joined the Foundation in 2017.

+45 30 46 42 91 [email protected] LinkedIn

Signe Rømer Holm

Signe is responsible for various areas related to the Foundation’s grants, both in terms of guidelines for applications, review processes and measuring impact. She is also involved in further developing the philanthropic area with new grant making instruments.

Signe has extensive experience in administration and grants. She has previously worked as Senior Grant Manager at the Novo Nordisk Foundation, as Administrative Coordinator at DTU Health Technology and as Project Manager at Innovation Fund Denmark.

Signe holds a Master of Arts (MA) in Danish Language and Literature from University of Copenhagen.

Joined the Foundation in 2022

+45 53 70 66 18 [email protected] LinkedIn

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National Institute for Health and Care Research logo | Homepage

NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships - Round 1

research grants 2024 round 1

16 April 2024

11 July 2024

  • For more information about the funding Programme, visit the Global Health Page

Supporting Information

Guidance Notes: NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships - Round 1 - 2024

Application Form Guidance: NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship - Round 1 - 2024

Funding Committee 

Webinar recording

The Global Advanced Fellowship is a mid-career postdoctoral award. The scheme will create a career pathway for Global Health researchers from the UK and low and middle income countries to become research leaders.

The Global Advanced Fellowship is for postdoctoral researchers at all levels. The NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship is aimed at individuals at various points of their career

This £750,000 award will fund research projects, training and development, and institutional capacity strengthening. The programme funds researchers undertaking research that aims to specifically and primarily benefit people in LMICs eligible for Official Development Assistance (ODA) .

We welcome applications from different professional backgrounds, clinical and non-clinical.

Eligibility

To be eligible for an NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship you must:

  • Hold a relevant PhD or postgraduate medical research degree, or have submitted your thesis for examination at the time of application. You must have been awarded your PhD or postgraduate medical research degree by the time you attend interview.
  • Not already hold a Professorship/Chair at the point of application.
  • For clinical applications: have completed relevant pre-registration training.
  • Be employed by a Higher Education Institution (HEI) or Research Institute in a LMIC or a HEI the UK
  • Be conducting research that directly and primarily benefit patients and the public in countries on the OECD DAC list .

Institutional eligibility

Lmic-based researchers.

If you are employed by a Higher Education Institution (HEI) or research institute in a LMIC:

  • The institution must be able to provide appropriate academic support throughout the length of your Fellowship
  • The institution should have examples of recent research awards and a track record of research funding.
  • You may wish to include other LMIC partner organisation/s
  • The research outputs must be of direct and primary relevance to the health and care challenges of LMICs.

UK-based researchers

  • If you are hosted by a HEI in the UK (England and the Devolved Administrations):
  • You must have at least one partner organisation in LMIC(s).

Apply for 2024 Climate Research Innovation Grants

Deadline: february 26, 2024.

The Nicholas Institute for Energy, Environment & Sustainability invites all Duke faculty and research staff to submit proposals for the 2024 round of Climate Research Innovation Seed Program (CRISP) grants . CRISP, which advances research aligned with the Duke Climate Commitment , is funded by the Office of Climate and Sustainability.  

During the 2024 funding round, Research Awards (up to $100,000) will support projects addressing Climate and Community Resilience , one of the four Duke Climate Commitment areas of focus. Ideation Awards (up to $20,000) will support projects addressing any of the four areas of focus: Energy Transformation , Climate and Community Resilience , Environmental and Climate Justice , and Data-Driven Climate Solutions . The anticipated total of awards during the 2024 funding round is $600,000.

Projects may approach their topics from any disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspective and should aim for tangible, measurable, and durable results.

Learn More About CRISP

Download the RFP to get the full details on the 2024 round of CRISP grants, including eligibility and review criteria. Submit proposals by Monday, February 26, 2024 at 5:30 p.m. ET.

Register for an informational webinar on December 12, 2023, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Email questions to: [email protected]

Previously Funded Projects

The initial round of CRISP grants in 2023 funded 12 teams of scholars from across 8 Duke schools to investigate wide-ranging topics such as lower-cost, higher-efficiency solar cells; subsidies for energy-saving home renovations; the environmental, health and justice impacts of mining critical raw materials; and pastoral care for climate change. Awards totaling $643,000 included Research Awards (up to $100,000) focused on Energy Transformation and Ideation Awards (up to $20,000) spanning all four Duke Climate Commitment areas of focus.

Contact Tom Cinq-Mars at the Nicholas Institute. 

Related News

research grants 2024 round 1

Brian Murray Named Director of Nicholas Institute for Energy, Environment & Sustainability

Growing Number of “Plus” Programs Adding Up to Powerful Research Experiences

Apply Now for Summer 2024 Climate+ Research Projects

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research grants 2024 round 1

Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG)

Proposal & award policies & procedures guide (pappg) (nsf 24-1), pappg (nsf 24-1) dated january 22, 2024 (pdf, 3 mb), summary of changes to the pappg, table of contents, introduction, a. about the national science foundation.

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent Federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to “promote the progress of science; [and] to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare” by supporting research and education in all fields of science and engineering.

From those first days, NSF has had a unique place in the Federal Government: it is responsible for the overall health of science and engineering across all disciplines. In contrast, other Federal agencies support research focused on specific missions such as health or defense. The Foundation also is committed to ensuring the nation’s supply of scientists, engineers, and science and engineering educators.

NSF recognizes the unique lived experiences of individuals from communities that are underrepresented and/or underserved in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and the barriers to inclusion and access to STEM education and careers. NSF highly encourages the leadership, partnership, and contributions in all NSF opportunities of individuals who are members of such communities supported by NSF. This includes leading and designing STEM research and education proposals for funding; serving as peer reviewers, advisory committee members, and/or committee of visitor members; and serving as NSF leadership, program, and/or administrative staff. NSF also highly encourages demographically diverse institutions of higher education (IHEs) to lead, partner, and contribute to NSF opportunities on behalf of their research and education communities. NSF expects that all individuals, including those who are members of groups that are underrepresented and/or underserved in STEM, are treated equitably and inclusively in the Foundation’s proposal and award process.

NSF encourages IHEs that enroll, educate, graduate, and employ individuals who are members of groups underrepresented and/or underserved in STEM education programs and careers to lead, partner, and contribute to NSF opportunities, including leading and designing STEM research and education proposals for funding. Such IHEs include, but may not be limited to, community colleges and two-year institutions, mission-based institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), women’s colleges, and institutions that primarily serve persons with disabilities, as well as institutions defined by enrollment such as Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs), Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs), and Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs).

“Broadening participation in STEM” is the comprehensive phrase used by NSF to refer to the Foundation’s goal of increasing the representation and diversity of individuals, organizations, and geographic regions that contribute to STEM teaching, research, and innovation. To broaden participation in STEM, it is necessary to address issues of equity, inclusion, and access in STEM education, training, and careers. Whereas all NSF programs might support broadening participation components, some programs primarily focus on supporting broadening participation research and projects. Examples can be found on the NSF Broadening Participation in STEM website.

NSF funds research and education in most fields of science and engineering. It does this through grants and cooperative agreements to approximately 3,000 institutions of higher education, K-12 school systems, for-profit organizations, informal science organizations and other research organizations throughout the U.S. The Foundation accounts for about one-fourth of Federal support to IHEs for basic research.

The Foundation considers proposals [1] submitted by organizations on behalf of individuals or groups for support in most single, multi-, cross-, trans- and inter- disciplinary fields of STEM research and education convergence research.

NSF does not normally support technical assistance, pilot plant efforts, research requiring security classification, the development of products for commercial marketing, or market research for a particular project or invention. Biological research on mechanisms of disease in humans, including on the etiology, diagnosis, or treatment of disease or disorder, is normally not supported. Biological research to develop animal models of such conditions, or the development or testing of procedures for their treatment, also are not normally eligible for support. However, research with etiology, diagnosis- or treatment-related goals that advances knowledge in engineering, mathematical, physical, computer, or information sciences is eligible for support. Bioengineering and assistive information technology research to aid persons with disabilities also is eligible. The Foundation operates no laboratories itself but does support National Research Centers, user facilities, certain oceanographic vessels, and Antarctic research stations. See “ Funding ” and “ Awards ” on the NSF website to search using keywords for projects that have been funded and which NSF programs provided the support.

In fiscal year 2024, NSF expects to evaluate over 46,500 proposals through a competitive merit review process and make over 12,900 awards of which about 10,800 are expected to be new research grants and the remainder cooperative agreements. One of NSF’s flagship programs, the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) helps ensure the vitality and diversity of the scientific and engineering workforce; the program awards about 2,500 fellowships each year. Guidance regarding the GRFP program may be found in the program solicitation, as well as in the GRFP Administrative Guide .

The Foundation also supports cooperative research between IHEs and industry, technical research and development on innovations from the small business community, U.S. participation in international scientific and engineering efforts, and educational activities at every academic level. For example, the Directorate for Technology, Innovation, and Partnerships (TIP) collaborates with all the other NSF directorates to advance critical and emerging technologies addressing societal and economic challenges and opportunities; accelerate the translation of research results from the lab to market and society; and cultivate new education pathways leading to a demographically and experientially diverse skilled technical workforce comprising of researchers, practitioners, technicians, and entrepreneurs from all backgrounds. TIP accomplishes these objectives by catalyzing strategic partnerships that link IHEs, for-profit organizations, nonprofit organizations, governmental, civil society, and communities of practice to cultivate innovation ecosystems throughout the U.S., growing regional economies, creating the jobs of the future, and enhancing the Nation’s long-term competitiveness.

NSF is structured much like an IHE with divisions/offices for the various disciplines and fields of science and engineering and for STEM education. NSF also uses a variety of management mechanisms to coordinate research in areas that cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. The Foundation is assisted by advisors from the scientific and engineering communities who serve on formal committees or as ad hoc reviewers of proposals. This advisory system, which focuses on both program directions and specific proposals, involves approximately 50,000 scientists and engineers each year. NSF staff members who are experts in a certain field or area make award recommendations; Principal Investigators (PIs) receive unattributed verbatim copies of peer reviews.

Recipients are wholly responsible for conducting their project activities and preparing the results for publication and/or other forms of dissemination. Thus, the Foundation does not assume responsibility for such findings or their interpretation.

NSF has Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD) and Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) capabilities that enable individuals with hearing or speech impairments to communicate with the Foundation about NSF programs, employment, or general information. TDD may be accessed at (703) 292-5090 and (800) 281-8749, FIRS at (800) 877-8339.

The NSF Information Center may be reached at (703) 292-5111.

B. Foreword

The Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) is comprised of documents relating to the Foundation's proposal and award process for the assistance programs of NSF. The PAPPG, in conjunction with the applicable standard award conditions incorporated by reference in the award [2] , serve as the Foundation’s implementation of 2 CFR §200, Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards. If the PAPPG and the award conditions are silent on a specific area covered by 2 CFR §200, the requirements specified in 2 CFR §200 must be followed.

The PAPPG has been designed for use by both our proposer and recipient community and NSF staff and consists of two parts:

  • Part I sets forth NSF’s proposal preparation and submission guidelines. The coverage provides guidancefor the preparation and submission of proposals to NSF. Some NSF programs have program solicitations that modify the general provisions of the PAPPG, and, in such cases, the guidelines provided in the solicitation must be followed. The policy and procedural guidance contained in the NSF Grants.gov Application Guide should be followed when preparing and submitting proposals to NSF via Grants.gov.
  • Part II of the NSF PAPPG sets forth NSF policies and procedures regarding the award, administration, and monitoring of the Foundation’s awards. Coverage includes the NSF award process, from issuance and administration of an NSF award through closeout. Guidance is provided regarding other award requirements or considerations that either are not universally applicable or do not follow the award cycle. Part II also implements other Public Laws, Executive Orders (E.O.) and other directives insofar as they apply to awards and is issued pursuant to the authority of Section 11(a) of the NSF Act (42 U.S.C. § 1870). When NSF award general terms and conditions or an award notice reference a particular section of the PAPPG, then that section becomes part of the award requirements through incorporation by reference.

The PAPPG does not apply to NSF procurement contracts, other arrangements, or other transactions. For information relating to NSF contracts or other arrangements, consult the guidance maintained by the Division of Acquisition and Cooperative Support (DACs).

General information about NSF programs may be found on the NSF website. Additional information about special requirements of individual NSF programs may be obtained from the appropriate Foundation program office. Information about most program deadlines and target dates for proposals are available on the NSF website. Program deadline and target date information also appears in individual funding opportunities and on relevant NSF Divisional/Office websites.

Assistance Listings

The System for Award Management (SAM) provides detailed, public descriptions of all Federal assistance listings . SAM replaces the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA), and all CFDA.gov functionality and data can now be found on SAM.gov . Each assistance listing, however, continues to be associated with a unique five-digit CFDA number.

NSF programs fall under the following listings on the SAM.gov site:

47.041 -- Engineering  47.049 -- Mathematical and Physical Sciences  47.050 -- Geosciences  47.070 -- Computer and Information Science and Engineering  47.074 -- Biological Sciences  47.075 -- Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences  47.076 -- Education and Human Resources  47.078 -- Polar Programs  47.079 -- Office of International Science & Engineering  47.083 -- Office of Integrative Activities  47.084 – Technology, Innovation & Partnerships

C. Acronym List

A — B — C — D — E — F — G — I — L — M — N — O — P — R — S — T — U — V

A ABR – Accomplishment-Based Renewal ACH – Automated Clearing House (U.S. Treasury) ACM$ – Award Cash Management Service AD – Assistant Director ADPE – Automatic Data Processing Equipment APHIS – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service AOR – Authorized Organizational Representative

B BFA – Budget, Finance & Award Management

C CA – Cooperative Agreement CAFATC – Cooperative Agreement Financial/Administrative Terms and Conditions CAP – Cost Analysis and Pre-award Branch CAPTC – Cooperative Agreement Programmatic Terms and Conditions CEQ – Council on Environmental Quality CFR – Code of Federal Regulations CGI – Continuing Grant Increment CLB – Career-Life Balance CMIA – Cash Management Improvement Act COA – Collaborators and Other Affiliations COI – Conflict of Interest Co-PI – co-Principal Investigator CSA – Cooperative Support Agreement CSB – Cooperative Support Branch

D DACS – Division of Acquisition and Cooperative Support DAS – Division of Administrative Services DCL – Dear Colleague Letter DD – Division Director DFM – Division of Financial Management DGA – Division of Grants and Agreements DHHS – Department of Health and Human Services DIAS – Division of Institution and Award Support DOC – Department of Commerce DoED – Department of Education DUNS – Data Universal Numbering System DURC – Dual Use Research of Concern

E EAGER – EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research EFT – Electronic Funds Transfer EEO – Equal Employment Opportunity E.O. – Executive Order

F F&A – Facilities & Administrative Costs FAPIIS – Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System FAQs – Frequently Asked Questions FAR – Federal Acquisition Regulation FASED – Facilitation Awards for Scientists and Engineers with Disabilities FDP – Federal Demonstration Partnership FEMA – Federal Emergency Management Agency FFRDC – Federally Funded Research and Development Centers FIRS – Federal Information Relay Service FOIA – Freedom of Information Act FOP – Federally-owned Property FWA – Federal-Wide Assurance

G GC-1 – Grant General Conditions GOALI – Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry GPO – Government Publishing Office GPO – Government Publishing Office GSA – General Services Administration

I IACUC – Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IBC – Institutional Biosafety Committee IHE – Institution of Higher Education IPA – Intergovernmental Personnel Act IRB – Institutional Review Board IRS – Internal Revenue Service ISE – International Science & Engineering

L LEP – Limited English Proficiency LFO – Large Facilities Office LOI – Letters of Intent

M MREFC – Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction Account

N NASEM – National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine NDAA – National Defense Authorization Act NEPA – National Environmental Policy Act NIH – National Institutes of Health NSB – National Science Board NSF – National Science Foundation

O OECR – Office of Equity and Civil Rights OGC – Office of the General Counsel OHRP – Office for Human Research Protections OIA – Office of Integrative Activities OIG – Office of Inspector General OLAW – Office for Laboratory Animal Welfare OMB – Office of Management and Budget ONR – Office of Naval Research

P PAPPG – Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide PAR - Public Access Repository PHS – Public Health Service PI – Principal Investigator PNAG – Prospective New Awardee Guide PO – Program Officer POR – Project Outcomes Report for the General Public PPOP - Primary Place of Performance ProSPCT – Program Suitability and Proposal Concept Tool

R R&D Research & Development RAISE – Research Advanced by Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering RAM – Resolution and Advanced Monitoring Branch RAPID – Rapid Response Research RECR – Responsible and Ethical Conduct of Research REU – Research Experiences for Undergraduates RIG – Research Infrastructure Guide ROA – Research Opportunity Awards RTC – Research Terms and Conditions RUI – Research in Undergraduate Institutions

S SAM – System for Award Management SBA – Small Business Administration SBIR – Small Business Innovation Research SF – Standard Form SPO – Sponsored Projects Office SSN – Social Security Number STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics STTR – Small Business Technology Transfer

T TDD – Telephonic Device for the Deaf TIP – Directorate for Technology, Innovation and Partnerships TTY – Text Telephone

U UEI – Unique Entity Identifier URL – Uniform Resource Locator USC – United States Code USDA – U.S. Department of Agriculture

V VSEE – Visiting Scientist, Engineer, or Educator

D. Definitions & NSF-Recipient Relationships

1. definitions.

  • An award means an NSF grant or cooperative agreement.
  • An Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR)/Authorized Representative means the administrative official who, on behalf of the proposing organization is empowered to make certifications and representations and can commit the organization to the conduct of a project that NSF is being asked to support as well as adhere to various NSF policies and award requirements.

A Grant Agreement means a legal instrument of financial assistance between NSF and a recipient that, consistent with 31 USC §§ 6302, 6304:

(1) Is used to enter into a relationship the principal purpose of which is to transfer anything of value from NSF to the recipient to carry out a public purpose authorized by a law of the United States (see 31 USC § 6101(3)); and not to acquire property or services for NSF’s direct benefit or use;

(2) Is distinguished from a cooperative agreement in that it does not provide for substantial involvement between NSF and the recipient in carrying out the activity contemplated by the NSF award.

NSF makes the following two types of grants:

(a) A Standard Grant means a type of grant in which NSF agrees to provide a specific level of support for a specified period of time with no statement of NSF intent to provide additional future support without submission of another proposal.

(b) A Continuing Grant means a type of grant in which NSF agrees to provide a specific level of support for an initial specified period of time, usually a year, with a statement of intent to provide additional support for the project for additional periods, provided funds are available and the results achieved warrant further support.

A Cooperative Agreement means a legal instrument of financial assistance between NSF and a recipient that, consistent with 31 U.S.C. §§ 6302–6305:

(1) Is used to enter into a relationship the principal purpose of which is to transfer anything of value from NSF to the recipient to carry out a public purpose authorized by a law of the United States (see 31 U.S.C. § 6101(3)); and not to acquire property or services for NSF’s direct benefit or use;

(2) Is distinguished from a grant in that it provides for substantial involvement between NSF and the recipient in carrying out the activity contemplated by the NSF award.

In the case of NSF, grants and cooperative agreements involve the support or stimulation of scientific and engineering research, science and engineering education or other related activities. NSF is authorized to use grants and cooperative agreements for this purpose. Grants, however, are the primary mechanism of NSF support.

  • A Cost Reimbursement Award means a type of award under which NSF agrees to reimburse the recipient for work performed and/or costs incurred by the recipient up to the total amount specified in the award. Such costs must be allowable in accordance with the applicable cost principles. Accountability is based primarily on technical progress, financial accounting, and fiscal reporting. Except under certain programs and under special circumstances, NSF awards are normally cost reimbursement type awards.
  • A Fixed Amount Award means a type of award in which NSF provides a specific level of support without regard to actual costs incurred under the award. This type of NSF award reduces some of the administrative burden and recordkeeping requirements for both the recipient and NSF. Accountability is based primarily on performance and results. See 2 CFR §§ 200.102(c), 200.201(b), and 200.333 for additional information.
  • A Foreign Country of Concern means the People's Republic of China, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, the Islamic Republic of Iran, or any other country deemed to be a country of concern as determined by the Secretary of State.

An Institution of Higher Education means an educational institution in any State that:

(1) admits as regular students only persons having a certificate of graduation from a school providing secondary education, or the recognized equivalent of such a certificate, or persons who meet the requirements of 20 U.S.C. § 1091(d);

(2) is legally authorized within such State to provide a program of education beyond secondary education;

(3) provides an educational program for which the institution awards a bachelor's degree or provides not less than a 2-year program that is acceptable for full credit toward such a degree, or awards a degree that is acceptable for admission to a graduate or professional degree program, subject to review and approval by the Secretary of Education;

(4) is a public or other nonprofit institution; and

(5) is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association, or if not so accredited, is an institution that has been granted preaccreditation status by such an agency or association that has been recognized by the Secretary for the granting of preaccreditation status, and the Secretary has determined that there is satisfactory assurance that the institution will meet the accreditation standards of such an agency or association within a reasonable time (20 U.S.C. § 1001(a), via 42 U.S.C. § 18901(13)).

A Malign Foreign Talent Recruitment Program means -

A. Any program, position, or activity that includes compensation in the form of cash, in-kind compensation, including research funding, promised future compensation, complimentary foreign travel, things of non de minimis value, honorific titles, career advancement opportunities, or other types of remuneration or consideration directly provided by a foreign country at any level (national, provincial, or local) or their designee, or an entity based in, funded by, or affiliated with a foreign country, whether or not directly sponsored by the foreign country, to the targeted individual, whether directly or indirectly stated in the arrangement, contract, or other documentation at issue, in exchange for the individual—

(i) engaging in the unauthorized transfer of intellectual property, materials, data products, or other nonpublic information owned by a United States entity or developed with a Federal research and development award to the government of a foreign country or an entity based in, funded by, or affiliated with a foreign country regardless of whether that government or entity provided support for the development of the intellectual property, materials, or data products;

(ii) being required to recruit trainees or researchers to enroll in such program, position, or activity;

(iii) establishing a laboratory or company, accepting a faculty position, or undertaking any other employment or appointment in a foreign country or with an entity based in, funded by, or affiliated with a foreign country if such activities are in violation of the standard terms and conditions of a Federal research and development award;

(iv) being unable to terminate the foreign talent recruitment program contract or agreement except in extraordinary circumstances;

(v) through funding or effort related to the foreign talent recruitment program, being limited in the capacity to carry out a research and development award, or required to engage in work that would result in substantial overlap or duplication with a Federal research and development award;

(vi) being required to apply for and successfully receive funding from the sponsoring foreign government’s funding agencies with the sponsoring foreign organization as the recipient;

(vii) being required to omit acknowledgment of the recipient organization with which the individual is affiliated, or the Federal research agency sponsoring the research and development award, contrary to the institutional policies or standard terms and conditions of the Federal research and development award;

(viii) being required to not disclose to the Federal research agency or employing organization, the participation of such individual in such program, position, or activity; or

(ix) having a conflict of interest or conflict of commitment contrary to the standard terms and conditions of the Federal research and development award. And

(B) A program that is sponsored by—

(i) a foreign country of concern or an entity based in a foreign country of concern, whether or not directly sponsored by the foreign country of concern;

(ii) an academic institution on the list developed under § 1286(c)(8) of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (10 U.S.C. § 2358 note; Public Law 115–232); or

(iii) a foreign talent recruitment program on the list developed under § 1286(c)(9) of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (10 U.S.C. § 2358 note; Public Law 115–232 ).

The following are not considered malign foreign talent recruitment programs unless such activities are funded, organized, or managed by an academic institution or a foreign talent recruitment program on the lists developed under paragraphs (8) and (9) of section 1286(c) of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (10 U.S.C. 4001 note; Public Law 115–232):

(i) making scholarly presentations and publishing written materials regarding scientific information not otherwise controlled under current law;

(ii) participation in international conferences or other inter- national exchanges, research projects or programs that involve open and reciprocal exchange of scientific information, and which are aimed at advancing international scientific understanding and not otherwise controlled under current law; and

(iii) advising a foreign student enrolled at an institution of higher education or writing a recommendation for such a student, at such student’s request.

  • Principal Investigator (PI) – see PAPPG Exhibit II-3, Definitions of Categories of Personnel. For purposes of this document, when used throughout, the term Principal Investigator also includes Project Director and the term co-Principal Investigator also include co-Project Director. A proposal submitted to NSF must include a PI and a maximum of four co-PIs.
  • Recipient - means an entity that receives an award directly from NSF. The term recipient does not include subrecipients or individuals that are beneficiaries of the award. NSF awards are normally made to organizations rather than to the PI and any co-PIs identified on a proposal. Categories of eligible proposers may be found in Chapter I.E.

2. NSF-Recipient Relationships

a. Grants will be used by NSF when the accomplishment of the project objectives requires minimal NSF involvement during performance of the activities. Grants establish a relationship between NSF and the recipient in which:

(1) NSF agrees to provide up to a specified amount of financial support for the project to be performed under the conditions and requirements of the award. NSF will monitor progress and assure compliance with applicable standards.

(2) The recipient agrees to:

  • perform the project as proposed;
  • the prudent management of the funds provided; and
  • carry out the supported activities in accordance with the provisions of the award. (See Chapter VI.B for the documents that comprise an NSF award.)

b. Cooperative agreements will be used by NSF when the accomplishment of the project objectives requires substantial ongoing Foundation involvement during the project performance period. Substantial agency involvement may be necessary when an activity is technically and/or managerially complex and would require extensive or close coordination between NSF and the recipient. This, however, does not affect NSF’s right to unilaterally suspend or terminate support for cause or consider termination in accordance with Chapter XII, if it is in the best interest of NSF or the Government. The doctrine of substantial involvement is set forth in the Federal Grant and Cooperative Agreement Act of 1977 (31 USC §§ 6301-6308).

NSF utilizes two types of cooperative agreements:

  • Standalone Cooperative Agreement (CA) , which consists of a cooperative agreement for a single, unified award where there is no need to provide separate, discrete funding and oversight for the projects or programs under that award.
  • Master Cooperative Agreement/Cooperative Support Agreement (CA/CSA), which consists of a master or overall agreement having separate and specific awards (CSAs) that are funded individually under the umbrella of the master agreement. CSAs have their own terms and conditions in addition to those of the master agreement. The scope of CSAs falls within the scope of the master agreement, but each CSA has its own distinct award number and funding based on its approved budget; no funding is attached to the master CA.

Examples of projects suitable for cooperative agreements include: management of research centers, large curriculum projects, multi-user facilities, projects which involve complex subcontracting, construction or operations of major in-house university facilities and major instrumentation development, and projects in which NSF participates with other stakeholder agencies or organizations that have influence over project direction and/or development.

Under a cooperative agreement, the recipient has primary responsibility for the conduct of the project. To the extent that NSF does not reserve responsibility for coordinating or integrating the project activities with other related activities or does not assume a degree of shared responsibility for certain aspects of the project, all such responsibilities remain with the recipient. While NSF will monitor the cooperative agreement in accordance with the terms and conditions of the award, the Foundation will not assume overall control of a project or unilaterally change or direct the project activities.

The cooperative agreement will specify the extent to which NSF will advise, review, approve or otherwise be involved with project activities, as well as NSF’s right to require more clearly defined deliverables. NSF may provide advice, guidance, or assistance of a technical, management, or coordinating nature and may require that the recipient obtain NSF prior approval of specific decisions, milestones, or project activities. Substantial involvement is incorporated in key areas of accountability in both financial and programmatic award terms; examples include prior agency approval requirements, type and frequency of project plans, special reporting requirements, and project and recipient reviews that NSF will conduct during the term of the award.

Cooperative agreements for construction are generally funded through a separate appropriation from Congress for Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC). NSF maintains the MREFC appropriations in a separate budget account, for major construction projects that successfully undergo a rigorous selection process. MREFC funds cannot be co-mingled with funds for activities other than construction; therefore, NSF issues a separate award for operations and other activities related to commissioning and management of the facility or major instrument. The recipient is required to maintain an accounting system capable of segregating MREFC and operating costs, and to ensure that such costs are applied accordingly.

Many major facility awards, including those for NSF-supported Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs), consist of a cooperative agreement as an umbrella award, establishing the overall basic provisions of the award, and separate cooperative support agreements.The cooperative support agreements contain specific terms and conditions for construction activities, management and operations, research activities that are co-sponsored by other agencies, and any other focused activities that NSF needs to monitor separately from the overall objectives of the cooperative agreement.

E. NSF Organizations

The NSF organizations/offices described below are normally of most direct interest to the NSF proposer and recipient community. Consult the NSF website at: https://new.nsf.gov/about/directorates-offices for the most current listing of NSF offices/directorates and an organizational chart.

1. National Science Board (NSB)

The NSB was established by Congress in 1950, and along with the Director, constitutes the National Science Foundation. The Board provides oversight for, and establishes the policies of, the agency within the framework of applicable national policies set forth by the President and Congress. In this capacity, the Board identifies issues that are critical to NSF's future, approves NSF's strategic budget directions, approves annual budget submissions to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), approves major awards and consults on certain programs, analyzes NSF's budget to ensure progress and consistency along the strategic direction set for NSF, and ensures balance between initiatives and core programs. In addition, the Board serves as an independent body of advisors to both the President and Congress on broad national policy issues and, together with the Director, recommends and encourages the pursuit of national policies related to science and engineering research and education. The Board is comprised of 24 members appointed by the President. The NSF Director also serves as an ex officio voting member of the Board. Members are selected on the basis of their distinguished service in science and engineering research and education, and are representative of scientific, engineering, and educational leadership throughout the Nation.

2. Program Divisions/Offices

Program Divisions/Offices are responsible for the scientific, technical, and programmatic review and evaluation of proposals and for recommending that proposals be declined or awarded. The scientific, engineering and/or educational aspects of an award will be monitored by the NSF Program Officer identified in the award notice. (See Chapter III for a detailed description of the NSF Merit Review Process.) Integral staff in the program division/office relative to the NSF proposal and award process are:

a. NSF Program Officers. Program Officers are considered subject matter experts in both technical and programmatic areas. They oversee the merit review of proposals and recommend which projects should be funded by the Foundation.

b. NSF Division Directors. Division Directors are NSF executives whose responsibilities include long-range planning, contributing to the achievement of the Foundation's strategic goals and objectives, and providing stewardship for budgetary and other resources. They are responsible for ensuring the integrity of the merit review and award process.

3. Division of Grants & Agreements (DGA)

DGA is responsible for the award and administration of the majority of NSF's assistance awards - i.e., grants, cooperative agreements, and fellowship awards, recommended for support by NSF program offices. From pre-award through closeout, DGA conducts a variety of business, financial, and administrative reviews to ensure compliance with award terms and conditions and consistency with applicable NSF policies and Federal rules and regulations. DGA provides stewardship and support to a diverse set of stakeholders including award recipients, NSF Directorates/Offices, and others within the scientific research and education communities. DGA also maintains a leadership role in the Federal award arena.

Grants and Agreements Officers have delegated warrant authority to issue awards on behalf of the Foundation and their approval constitutes a legal obligation of Federal funds for recipients to expend to fulfill the scope of the award. In addition, Grants and Agreement Officers are responsible for issuing all award amendments and certain post-award prior approvals, for monitoring recipient compliance with award terms and conditions, and for the administration and closeout of these awards.

4. Division of Institution & Award Support (DIAS)

DIAS is responsible for the development and implementation of proposal and award policies and procedures, clearance of NSF funding opportunities, advanced monitoring activities, cost analysis and award support, audit resolution, electronic award systems administration, and outreach to the external community. DIAS also advocates for the needs of the research community. DIAS organizational units are as follows:

a. The Policy Office is responsible for the development, coordination, and issuance of NSF pre- and post-award policies and award terms and conditions for the assistance programs of NSF. The Policy Office provides guidance on the interpretation of NSF policies and procedures, including NSF's electronic proposal and award systems, as well as official clearance for NSF funding opportunities. The Policy Office also advocates for the needs of the research community.

The Policy Office coordinates outreach programs for external stakeholders across the broad research community and NSF staff. Through a variety of mechanisms, it releases timely information regarding NSF policies and procedures, proposal preparation, and award management. In addition to working closely with professional research administration societies, the Policy Office coordinates two major grants conferences held at various locations throughout the U.S., typically in the spring and fall of each year.

b. The Cost Analysis and Pre-award (CAP) Branch specializes in determinations with regard to the allowability, allocability and reasonableness of costs either budgeted or claimed under NSF awards. CAP evaluates accounting systems, internal controls, and policies and procedures of prospective and current NSF recipients. Its major functions include: pre-award reviews of new recipients, Phase II research projects involving small businesses; budgets of large-scale awards; and indirect cost rate negotiation. CAP provides guidance to recipients for questions related to its areas of responsibility.

c. The Resolution and Advanced Monitoring (RAM) Branch specializes in determining the allowability, allocability and reasonableness of costs claimed under NSF awards. RAM also evaluates the accounting systems, internal controls and policies and procedures of current NSF recipients. RAM's primary responsibilities include: audit resolution, advanced monitoring to assess recipients' administrative capability, performance, and compliance with award terms and conditions; and review of certain post-award adjustments to expenditures. RAM provides guidance to recipients for questions related to its areas of responsibility.

d. The Systems Office plays a major role in the design, implementation, administration, and oversight of business rules for assistance awards across NSF electronic corporate systems. It is also responsible for systems analysis and requirements development necessary for the implementation of award business rules.

5. Division of Acquisition and Cooperative Support (DACS)

DACS provides tailored acquisition, contracts, other arrangements and transactions, and cooperative agreement award solutions and support for the Foundation. The Contracts Branch is responsible for planning, solicitation, negotiation, award, and administration of professional, research and development, and support contracts for NSF. The Infrastructure Support Branch (ISB) is responsible for planning, solicitation, negotiation, award, and administration of cooperative agreements primarily focused on major facilities, including FFRDCs and multi-organizational and international programs, in all lifecycle stages and certain Mid-Scale Research Infrastructure Projects. ISB participates in NSF's Integrated Project Teams, business process reviews, risk assessments, advanced cost analysis, oversight, and administrative assistance. The ISB Grants and Agreements Officers have delegated warrant authority to issue awards on behalf of the Foundation and their approval constitutes a legal obligation of Federal funds for recipients to expend to fulfill the scope of the award. In addition, Grants and Agreements Officers are responsible for issuing all award amendments and certain post-award prior approvals, for monitoring recipient compliance with award terms and conditions, and for the administration and closeout of these awards. The DACS Policy Branch provides comprehensive compliance oversight and operational policies to support the DACS mission.

6. Division of Financial Management (DFM)

DFM is responsible for the financial policy and financial management of NSF. The Division is responsible for recipient business office relationships and the payment of vendors. The Payments and Analytics Branch of DFM is available to assist recipient financial and business officials in matters of payment and financial reporting discussed in Chapter VIII of the PAPPG.

7. Research Infrastructure Office (RIO)

RIO is the Foundation’s primary resource for all oversight practices related to mid-scale and major facility projects and is the NSF-wide resource on project management best practices. RIO has the institutional authority and resources to effectively develop policies, practices and procedures, for all stages of the facility life-cycle. The Office provides: (1) expert assistance on non-scientific and non-technical aspects of project planning, budgeting, and implementation for mid-scale and major facilities; (2) assurance that all applicable requirements are followed in order to give credence to NSF’s oversight capabilities; and (3) facilitates the use of best practices by fostering coordination and collaboration throughout NSF to share application of lessons learned from prior major facility projects.

8. Office of the General Counsel (OGC)

OGC is the legal advisor and advocate for the Foundation, providing legal advice and counsel on all aspects of the Foundation's programs, policies, and operations, as well as areas affecting science and technology more broadly. Advice is provided in a wide variety of areas, such as: assistance awards; ethics and conflicts of interest; Freedom of Information Act; Privacy Act; labor and personnel law; environmental law; Federal fiscal and administrative law and procedure; and international law and agreements.

9. Office of Equity and Civil Rights (OECR)

OECR is responsible for administering the Foundation's policies, practices and procedures related to external equal opportunity and civil rights. Its mission is to ensure the agency is in compliance with the laws and regulations that govern Federal-sector Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and civil rights; as well as, to foster a diverse and inclusive work environment that ensures equal opportunity through policy development, workforce analyses, outreach and education to best serve the Foundation's employees and its stakeholders. OECR also is responsible for responding to all civil rights matters pertaining to NSF programs or activities receiving Federal financial assistance, including Title IX Compliance activities. In addition, OECR serves as the Foundation's authority for receiving, processing, and coordinating the NSF response to all notifications required by the Foundation's Term and Condition entitled, "Notification Requirements Regarding Sexual Harassment, Other Forms of Harassment, or Sexual Assault". (See Chapter XI.A for additional information.)

10. Office of Inspector General (OIG)

OIG is an independent oversight office that reports directly to the NSB and Congress. It is responsible for conducting audits, reviews, and investigations of NSF programs, and of organizations and individuals that apply for or receive NSF funding. OIG also investigates allegations of research misconduct, such as plagiarism, falsification, or fabrication, involving researchers who request or receive NSF funding (see Chapter XII.C.1). The OIG staff includes scientists, attorneys, auditors, law enforcement personnel, evaluators, and information technology specialists. OIG audits focus on the assistance awards funded by NSF. Their purpose is to ensure that the financial, administrative, and program activities of NSF are conducted efficiently and effectively, and that the NSF recipient organization’s claimed costs are allowable, reasonable, and properly allocated.

OIG investigations focus on program integrity and financial or nonfinancial wrongdoing by organizations and individuals who submit proposals to, receive awards from, conduct business with, or work for NSF, and can result in criminal, civil, or administrative sanctions. Statutory law enforcement authority was granted to OIG by the U.S. Attorney General.

Anyone, including recipients, administrators, and NSF personnel, should contact the OIG, as specified at: https://oig.nsf.gov/contact/hotline to report instances of possible misconduct, fraud, waste, or abuse.

Footnotes for Introduction

[1] - For purposes of this Guide, the term “proposal” is interchangeable with the term “application.”

[2] - See Chapter VI.C. for additional information on NSF award terms and conditions.

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Linkage Projects 2020 Round 3 Announcement Banner

Now Open: Applications for Linkage Projects 2024 Round 1

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Applications for Linkage Projects for funding applied for in 2024 Round 1 are now open in the Research Management System  (RMS) and will close at 5:00pm (AEST) on Wednesday, 8 May 2024.

There will be two assessment rounds for applications for Linkage Projects for funding applied for in 2024. Key dates, including Important Dates, for this scheme are on the  Grants Calendar  available on the ARC website.

Draft LP24 applications will carry over in RMS between rounds (a draft application started during Round 1 can be submitted in Round 2).

Documentation for the grant opportunity can be found on GrantConnect :

  • Grant Opportunity View—GO6639

While the Grant Guidelines are available to view, you will need to register with GrantConnect to access all documentation. Please refer to the GrantConnect website.

If you have any questions, please email  [email protected] .

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NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships 2024 – Round 1 (up to £750,000)

research grants 2024 round 1

Deadline: July 11, 2024

Applications for the first round of the National Institute for Health and Care research (NIHR) Global Advanced Fellowships 2024 are now open. The Global Advanced Fellowship is a mid-career postdoctoral award. The scheme will create a career pathway for Global Health researchers from the UK and low- and middle-income countries to become research leaders.

The Global Advanced Fellowship is for postdoctoral researchers at all levels. The NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship is aimed at individuals at various points of their career. This award will fund research projects, training and development, and institutional capacity strengthening. The programme funds researchers undertaking research that aims to specifically and primarily benefit people in LMICs eligible for Official Development Assistance (ODA).

research grants 2024 round 1

  • Funding up to £750,000 is available.

Eligibility

To be eligible for an NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship you must:

  • Hold a relevant PhD or postgraduate medical research degree, or have submitted your thesis for examination at the time of application. You must have been awarded your PhD or postgraduate medical research degree by the time you attend interview.
  • Not already hold a Professorship/Chair at the point of application.
  • For clinical applications: have completed relevant pre-registration training.
  • Be employed by a Higher Education Institution (HEI) or Research Institute in a LMIC or a HEI the UK.
  • Be conducting research that directly and primarily benefit patients and the public in countries on the OECD DAC list.

Institutional Eligibility

LMIC-based researchers

If you are employed by a Higher Education Institution (HEI) or research institute in a LMIC:

  • The institution must be able to provide appropriate academic support throughout the length of your Fellowship
  • The institution should have examples of recent research awards and a track record of research funding.
  • You may wish to include other LMIC partner organisation/s
  • The research outputs must be of direct and primary relevance to the health and care challenges of LMICs.

UK-based researchers

  • If you are hosted by a HEI in the UK (England and the Devolved Administrations):
  • You must have at least one partner organisation in LMIC(s).

Application

Click here to apply

For more information, visit Global Advanced Fellowship .

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  • British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants

BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants 2024 guidance notes

Guidance notes for the BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants 2024 competition. Please read these scheme notes carefully. Any incorrectly submitted application will be ineligible for award.

Scheme guidance

In January 2018 the British Academy (BA) announced the continuation of the partnership with the Leverhulme Trust to support the funding of the Small Research Grants scheme. The awards are co-sponsored by the Leverhulme Trust with funding for five years adding to the public funding deriving from the grant made to the Academy via the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology. In addition, the Academy continues to be able to offer some awards derived from funds generously donated by other funders including the Society for the Advancement of Management Studies, the Sino-British Fellowship Trust, British Accounting and Finance Association, Journal of Moral Education Trust, Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain, the Honor Frost Foundation, EY, and the Wellcome Trust.

Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS)

The British Academy has partnered with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) who will co-fund two Small Research Grants for this round.

  • UK applicants should submit an application for a British Academy Small Grant and ensure that their Chinese co-applicant submits an application to CASS in English and Chinese (on its prescribed application form) at the same time.
  • China-based applicants must be of postdoctoral (or above) status and have a permanent position (spanning the duration of the project) at a CASS institute.
  • China-based applicants must first submit an expression of interest, together with a written recommendation letter issued by their CASS institute to the Bureau of International Cooperation of CASS (http://www.bic.cas.cn/) before submitting a proposal to the British Academy in the same year.
  • Applications will be considered by each side, who will jointly agree the final list of successful applicants to receive co-funded awards.
  • The application to the British Academy must indicate the total cost requested (up to £10,000) and if the award is recommended for co-funding, the British Academy will cover costs of the participants from the UK side (up to £5,000) and CASS will cover costs of the participants from the Chinese side (up to RMB 50,000).

Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS)

The British Academy has partnered with the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS) who will co-fund two Small Research Grants for this round.

  • UK applicants should submit an application for a British Academy Small Grant and ensure that their Chinese co-applicant submits an application to SASS in English and Chinese (on its prescribed application form) at the same time.
  • China-based applicants must be of postdoctoral (or above) status and have a permanent position (spanning the duration of the project) at a SASS institute.
  • China-based applicants must first submit an expression of interest, together with a written recommendation letter issued by their SASS institute to the Bureau of International Cooperation of SASS before submitting a proposal to the British Academy in the same year.
  • The application to the British Academy must indicate the total cost requested (up to £10,000) and if the award is recommended for co-funding, the British Academy will cover costs of the participants from the UK side (up to £5,000) and SASS will cover costs of the participants from the Chinese side (up to RMB 50,000).

Purpose of Grant

Grants are available to support primary research in the humanities and social sciences. The first recourse for funding should be to your own institution (where applicable).

The maximum grant is £10,000 over two years – applications will not be considered for less than £500.

Applications for collaborative or individual research projects are equally welcome under this scheme. Applications from international groups of scholars are welcome, provided there is a UK-based scholar as lead applicant for the duration of the award period.

Funds are available to facilitate initial project planning and development; to support the direct costs of research; and to enable the advancement of research through workshops or visits by or to partner scholars. Applicants may seek support for any combination of eligible activity and cost up to the overall limit of £10,000. The Academy will assess applications equally on their merits, with no preference as to mode of enquiry.

Grants are not intended to support interchange between UK and overseas scholars where there is no planned programme of activity to meet a clearly specified research objective (dissemination of results of research conducted under the aegis of the project for which funding is sought is a permitted purpose, but applications purely to organise an international conference, whether held in the UK or overseas will not be considered); nor are grants intended solely to support attendance at open conferences organised by a third party or international organisation.

All applications should demonstrate that funds are sought for a clearly defined, discrete piece of research, which will have an identifiable outcome on completion of the Academy-funded component of the project.

NB - The British Academy welcomes proposals for high-quality research in all its subject areas. While all proposals should be situated in an appropriate field of study, they may vary considerably in their approach to conceptualisation, methodology and/or outputs, depending on the discipline. In some cases, creative and professional practice may play a significant role in shaping the methods and/or outcomes of research. In all proposals, whether practice-led or not, a clear scholarly rationale is required for the choice of research methods, processes and outputs.

Eligibility

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • Grants are available for research, at postdoctoral or equivalent level, in the fields of the humanities and the social sciences. Equivalent experience may include holding, or having held, an established post, having a record of publications in the field and/or having teaching experience.
  • Postgraduate students are not eligible to apply .
  • Applicants must be ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands (that is, classed as ‘ordinarily resident’ for tax purposes) or currently employed overseas by a recognised UK overseas research organisation.
  • UK research organisations based overseas may apply to be recognised by demonstrating that they satisfy both the following conditions:
  • Organisations which are, or which are constituent parts of, charities registered with the Charity Commission; and
  • Which must be able to demonstrate an independent capability to undertake research in the field or discipline in which they wish to be funded, and to lead the research for which funding is received.
  • Awards will not be made retrospectively: this means that the work for which support is requested must not have commenced before the award is announced.

The Academy offers awards in this scheme in two rounds of competition each year.

Please note the earliest point at which research can commence, and to help regulate the flow of applications, the latest starting date also. The Academy is inviting proposals in this round with the closing date noted below .

Opening date

10th April 2024

Closing date

5th June 2024 (5pm UK time)

Research to commence

No earlier than 1st September 2024

No later than 31st March 2025

Results notified by

By 30th August 2024

Eligible Costs

Funds may be sought to cover the direct expenses incurred in planning, conducting, and developing the research, including: • project planning and development costs (cost of travel for discussion in the UK and overseas; initial workshops with potential partners)

  • travel and maintenance for UK scholars; including travel to disseminate results of the research at conferences held either in the UK or abroad
  • travel and maintenance for overseas scholars engaged in collaborative research activity with UK partner(s)
  • research assistance (based in UK or abroad)
  • workshops to advance the programme of research (principally the costs of travel and maintenance for key participants, though organisational costs may be considered)
  • consumables
  • specialist software
  • costs of interpreters in the field

Bids for the cost of child or parent care may be considered if the carer is conducting research away from home and it is not possible to make alternative arrangements. The costs of normal regular childcare whilst at home are not eligible for support. Consumables include the purchase of datasets, photocopies, microfilms, etc, and any other minor items that will be used up during the course of the project. Applicants may apply for short-term consultancy or salary costs for expert staff, or short periods of research assistance. Provided they are central to the research process and an adequate case is made, the costs of preparing illustrations (including photography, acquisition of images, draughtsmanship and cartography or other bespoke illustrative material) may be considered. The cost of reproduction rights for text or images may be considered provided there is a contract for publication in place. Costs associated with deposit of digital material in an appropriately accessible repository may be considered. Costs related to conservation may be considered provided there is a clear research context to the work that falls within the remit of the Academy; if an application is purely for technical or practical work with no research objective, it is not eligible for funding. Incidental translation expenses may be considered.

The following items are not currently eligible for funding (applicants registered with special needs may consult the Academy about possible exceptions):

  • Institutional overheads, or any element that should properly be ascribed to institutional overheads
  • Computer hardware including laptops, electronic notebooks, digital cameras, etc
  • Books and other permanent resources
  • Preparation of camera-ready copy, copy-editing, proof-reading, indexing, nor any other editorial task
  • Subventions for direct production costs (printing, binding, distribution, marketing etc)
  • Costs of publication in electronic media Payment to the principal researcher(s) in lieu of salary, or for personal maintenance at home Replacement teaching costs Travel and maintenance expenses for purposes such as lecture tours or to write up the results of research

Please note, the British Academy has set aside specific funding to support any additional needs that applicants and award holders may require. Each request will be considered on a case by case basis. Please find further details, and how to apply, here .

Level and Duration of Award

Applicants should not apply for expenditure that will take place over more than 24 months. (Note that if application includes an element for dissemination of results of research at conferences, the timing of such a conference must be within the 24-month limit and the end date of the award calculated accordingly to include this element).

There is no bar to reapplying for further funding, providing the conditions of award relating to the preceding grant have been satisfactorily fulfilled. Please note, however, that once a pilot project has been successfully completed further applications relating to the main project may be more appropriately directed elsewhere for funding (ESRC/AHRC). There is no guarantee that a re-application will be successful, so applicants with longer-term projects in mind should ensure that their research is so designed that a single phase will have an appropriate and worthwhile outcome, even if further phases are not funded.

Applications to multiple British Academy Schemes

Please note that only one British Academy Small Research Grant or another similar Academy grant may be held, or applied for, at any one time.

An application cannot be accepted if there is a report outstanding on any previous research grant awarded by the Academy to the principal investigator or co-applicant(s) named in the current proposal. Failure to follow this guidance will result in your application being withdrawn from this round of competition.

Duplicate applications for the same purpose to more than one Academy scheme will not be accepted.

Please note the following:

• An International Fellowship co-applicant can apply to this scheme providing there is no duplication of costs.

• You can apply to both this scheme and the Mid-Career Fellowship Scheme but cannot be successful in both as the Mid-Career Fellowship Scheme includes some research expenses and buys 100% of your time.

• You can apply to both this scheme and the Postdoctoral Fellowship Scheme providing there is no duplication of costs.

• Providing it is for the same project, it is acceptable to apply for a BA\Leverhulme Senior Research Fellowship at the same time, and to hold both awards if successful in both schemes, provided there is no duplication of costs.

Resubmissions

The Academy will accept one resubmission of an application previously unsuccessful in passing the quality threshold. A fresh proposal must be prepared, and a new statement of support supplied by a referee (who may be either the same or different from that named on the first application). Applicants should clearly demonstrate if and how the proposal has been modified.

Proposals which have previously passed the quality threshold assessment, but were not selected in the randomisation process, can be resubmitted without modification, however this does not carry a guarantee that they will pass the threshold upon resubmission, and this will still be considered as their second and final submission

Nominated Referee

Applicants are required to nominate one referee and ensure that the supporting statement from their chosen referee is submitted on the British Academy Flexi-Grant® Grant Management System (GMS) by the application submission deadline. Please note this deadline is final.

The reference must be submitted before the application can be approved. Any application without a supporting reference will not be able to be submitted. Please also note that the reference must be submitted in time to allow you to submit the application for approval by your employing organisation for the same deadline.

Your referee has to be drawn from outside your own employing institution and from outside the employing institution of your co-applicant(s), if any.

Before listing your referee on your application form you should seek permission from them that they are happy to provide this by the deadline. It is essential that you enter the correct email address for your referee, otherwise your referee will not receive the automated messages delivered from the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS

Your referee must register on Flexigrant first, before you can send them this invitation.

We strongly advise that you complete your application as early as possible to allow your referee enough time to provide their reference in the system. An application cannot be considered for an award unless the proposal and reference have been submitted on time.

Please note that references must be provided through the GMS, they cannot be provided as an email attachment nor sent by post in hard copy. Any references received after the deadline, or outside of the system, or by another academic at the same institution as you or a co-applicant(s) will not be accepted, and your application will be withdrawn from this competition.

The British Academy has decided to trial a new approach to the peer review and assessment of British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants. Applications will be assessed in the normal way by assessors at the initial stage to determine whether an application is fundable or not.

Assessors will be asked to confirm that applications are good enough to be considered for funding against specific criteria – the quality and interest of the research proposal; the ability of the applicant (and any co-applicants) to make a success of it based on their past track record; the feasibility of the methodology; the feasibility of the timescale; and the appropriateness of costs requested.

The primary assessment of quality will be based on the specific research objective of the proposal, and whether the methodology and research programme outlined are likely to lead to successful achievement of the objective. The details of how the objective will be achieved - whether through research visits, use of research assistance, workshops, or any combination of eligible activities/costs - will be assessed only in relation to each individual application. No preference will be shown between individual or collaborative modes of research. There are no quotas for different types of application, and no comparisons will be made across applications on the grounds of their operational and financial specifications. For projects involving partners from other countries, assessors may take into account the availability of partner funding: in cases where partner funding is likely to be scarce, assessors may give priority to those projects which are likely to contribute to capacity building and lead to benefits for the wider scholarly community. In addition, Assessors may consider evidence of language competence where the understanding of material in a foreign language is crucial to the achievement of the research objective.

All applications that are deemed fundable at this stage - i.e. meeting the quality threshold - will then be entered into a random allocation process.

As a result of this revised process, the Academy will be able to give all unsuccessful applicants feedback on their applications. Applicants whose applications are judged not to meet the quality threshold on one or more of the criteria will be informed of this when given the result at the end of the assessment process. Applicants who are entered into the random allocation process but not selected for award will be informed that their applications were fundable and the only reason for being unsuccessful was that there were not enough funds to support everyone entered into the random allocation.

We believe that this approach will have wide benefits. We hope that the transparency and simplicity of the system will improve research culture more generally

• Between the very best applications, we will be removing human bias and partiality, which may be fairer to traditionally overlooked groups.

• Allow us to give applicants feedback on which elements of the proposal did not pass the quality threshold. Please note that we will not be able to enter into correspondence about feedback or provide further detail.

• Overall, we believe that partial randomisation will ease the burden on applicants and research officers without impacting the quality of applications and assessment. An application needs to pass our rigorous quality threshold, but it does not need to be checked and edited time and time again, so more time will be freed up for both applicants and research officers.

The British Academy is working with researchers at the University of Oxford to evaluate the Partial Randomised Allocation Trial. These researchers are requesting your consent for the British Academy to share some details of your SRG application to enable you to be involved as a study participant. The researchers will use this information to gather data on your past and future research outputs. We will be in touch after you have submitted your application with further details. Your decision to participate or not is entirely independent from the allocation of funding for the Small Research Grants scheme.

Code of Practice

The Academy has a Code of Practice for assessing research applications, setting out the principles of equity, integrity and confidentiality governing the treatment of all applications for research support. The Code of Practice also covers Data Protection, the Academy’s ethics policy and the appeals procedure. The Code of Practice may be viewed on the Academy’s website at https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/funding/code-practice .

Application guidance

Completing the application form.

Any application which is incorrectly submitted will not be eligible

The application can be completed by using the navigation tabs on the application summary page, with each page categorised as follows:

Page 1: Eligibility Declaration Page

Page 2: research proposal, page 3: proposal focus, page 4: contact details, page 5: lead applicant career summary.

Page 6: Co-Applicant Career Summary

Page 7: Second Co-Applicant Career Summary

Page 8: Financial Details

Page 9: equal opportunities.

Page 10: Lead Applicant Referee Statement

A full list of question fields to be completed as part of the application can be found in the following table. Each box in the table represents a page of the application form: the left-hand column contains the questions within each of these pages as set out in the form; the righthand column contains useful guidance on its completion. A red asterisk (*) indicates which questions are mandatory and therefore must be complete before the application can be submitted.

Please read the guidance notes carefully before completing the form.

Summary table

When your application form is complete, all sections on this summary table will be marked as ‘Complete’. The ‘Complete’ status will only appear when all the mandatory fields in that section have been completed. All mandatory fields are marked with an asterisk ‘*’. Only then will a ‘Submit’ button appear for you to be able to submit your application.

UK Residency

Please note, you must be ordinarily resident in the UK - have a registered UK address - to be eligible for this scheme. If you answer No to this question, unfortunately your application is not eligible

Experience, PhD or Equivalent

Please note, PhD or equivalent experience is required in order for your application to be considered. Please select the relevant options in the dropdown menu.

Multiple Applications

Please note, only ONE application can be submitted (whether as Primary or Co-Applicant) per round of applications.

Outstanding Reports

Please note, any outstanding reports must be submitted by the earliest start date of your proposal, otherwise your application will be withdrawn. Please select Not Applicable if you have not previously been granted an Award and therefore do not have any reports to submit.

Project Dates

Please note, your project timeline must be within 24 months. Your start date must be within the allotted timeframe (no earlier than 1st September 2024 and no later than 31st March 2025).

Lead Applicant Referee

Please note, if your referee is based at the same institution as any applicant on your proposal, your application will not be accepted. Please find an alternative referee if this is the case.

Project Costs

Please ensure your proposed costs are within budget, and please also refer to our eligible costs table (found as an appendix on this document page 16)

Subject Area

Please select the Subject Area from the drop-down menu that is most relevant to this proposal. Please ensure you have carefully considered the overall subject focus of your research.

Please select a Subject from the drop-down menu. This can only be done once the ‘Subject Group’ has been selected

Title of Research Proposal

In this field, please avoid using any unnecessary quotation or other punctuation marks (e.g. do not use quotation marks round the full title simply to indicate it is a title). Consider the presentation by checking the ‘print application’ option to ensure that the title appears as you wish it to.

Please provide a short abstract summarising your proposed research in terms suitable for an informed general audience, not one specialised in your field. This is a mandatory field and the limit is 150 words

Start date/ end date

To select a date in the future using the calendar feature, click on the month and year in between the two arrows at the top of the box. To change the year keep clicking on the box – a second click will produce a decade. Use the arrows to move back or forward in time. To change the month, a second box will appear where you can select the month you wish and then you can type the year you require in the box provided. Click on the date and the calendar will take you to the month and year you have selected where you can select the relevant date for display.

Please note that awards may be held over a period of up to 24 months from a starting date not earlier than 1st September 2024 and no later than 31st March 2025.

Proposed programme/plan of action

The proposal must;

  • clearly specify the context, and research objectives of the proposed study,
  • describe the methodology to be used, and
  • set out a realistic research programme, describing the activities that will take place, and explaining how they will contribute to the achievement of the research objectives

Applicants should give an account of their research which is complete of itself and should not depend on material facts being provided by their referees, nor rely on special prior knowledge on the part of assessors.

Where the bulk of funding sought is to finance a workshop(s) or conference(s), applicants should give a clear account of the overall research programme, provide a justification of the contribution of the event(s) to the achievement of the research objective, and give an account of the onward research planned.

It is essential that applicants clearly state the reasons why funds are needed. For example, it is not sufficient to state that the applicant will visit a particular archive: adequate details must be provided of sources to be consulted, and the length of visit must be clearly justified. The applicant should briefly explain why alternative access to material, such as microfilm or internet access, is not appropriate.

Grants are intended only for the planning and conduct of primary research. They are not available to cover the costs of spending time at another institution for purposes such as the writing up of primary research. All applications must clearly itemise the research programme to be undertaken at any location. Convenience is not a justification.

If support is sought for visits between UK and overseas scholars, applicants should clearly explain the purpose of the meeting(s).

If a research assistant is to be employed, applicants should provide a brief job description, clearly stating the nature of the work to be undertaken by the research assistant, and the arrangements for ensuring adequate supervision. If the research assistant has already been identified, details should be given under ‘other participants’, otherwise, applicants should state the skills and qualifications sought.

Applicants should justify the period of employment (or number of hours) for which funding is sought (e.g., has a pilot study or sample been conducted to show how long it will take the assistant to achieve the task in question?). Please note that PhD candidates employed as research assistants on projects funded by the Academy should work for no more than 10 hours per week on projects outside their own PhD research. British Academy research grants may not be used to fund work by PhD candidates that is directly related to their PhD thesis.

If the study will involve the use of a questionnaire as a research tool, a sample of the questionnaire (in English) should be submitted, if available at the time of application. Please note no other attachments can be uploaded. The PDF cannot exceed 3 Mb in size.

Independent researchers, not affiliated to an institution, should provide evidence of access to relevant facilities and resources.

If applicants wish to include a reference list/ bibliography then this should be included as part of the main text – you cannot upload this as an additional document . Please note it is not a mandatory requirement that you include a list of references.

Planned research outputs/plans for publication/ dissemination

Under ‘planned research outputs’, please only state the type of output expected. Please give more detail about potential publishers etc. under plans for publication. In assessing value for money, the assessors may consider the intended outcome as compared with the amount of money sought, although it is fully appreciated that some modes of research are more expensive than others and proposals will not be discriminated against on grounds of cost alone.

Digital Resource/Deposit of Datasets

Digital resources created as a result of research funded by the Academy should be deposited in an appropriately accessible repository. Of course, we do not expect confidential data to be readily available. If applicable to your project, you will need to provide details of how and where any electronic or digital data (including datasets) developed during the project will be stored, along with details on the appropriate methods of access. Applicants should ensure that any necessary technical advice is obtained before commencing work that involves the creation of digital resources. Please confirm whether the primary product of the research will be a digital resource, and if so how and where it will be deposited.

Overseas Travel: Country/ Institution

Where overseas travel is to be undertaken, please list the most significant country (up to three can be chosen) to be visited under “Overseas travel – country”; and if your research involves working in a particular overseas institution, and/or working in other countries to which you will travel in connection with this application, please give details under ‘Overseas travel – institution’. This information is used for monitoring purposes and may be provided to sister Academies or other organisations which have agreements or links with the British Academy, or the British International Research Institutes. Relevant information about the proposal, including, with the consent of the applicant, contact details, may be shared with the sister Academies or Institutes where this is part of the assessment process, or where joint funding is available (see https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/international/research-institutes for list of organisations with which the Academy has links).

Research Leave Granted/ Permission Obtained

If it is necessary for you to obtain research leave in order to undertake this research project, has this already been granted?

Support of BA School or Institute Required/Granted

Please note that scholars may not apply for cash support from both the British Academy and the British International Research Institutes. There is no bar to applicants seeking cash support under the Small Research Grants scheme, and logistical, permit-related, or other non-cash assistance from an Institute or Society. If the project is funded by an Institute or Society, an application may not be submitted under the Small Research Grants scheme. If your research will take you to a country or region in which one of the British International Research Institutes operates, you are strongly encouraged to make contact with them before completing this form so that you can take account of any relevant expertise, facilities and logistical advice: details can be found on the Academy’s website at https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/international/research-institutes.

Language Competence

The Academy expects that applicants will have any language skills necessary to conduct the research. If relevant, please state the level of language competence of the applicant and other participants, or otherwise explain how the objectives of the research will be met.

Other participants/ Role of other participants/ Added value of collaboration

Under ‘Other participants’ please give the names, appointments and institutional affiliation of any other participants in the proposed research. If detail is not known yet, please indicate numbers and status of people who might be involved. Please describe the contribution to the project to be made by other participants, citing any particular specialisms and expertise, under ‘role of other participants’; and under ‘Added value of collaboration’, please provide any comments you wish to make on the particular relevance, timeliness or other aspects of the collaboration, and the benefits envisaged.

Endangered or Emerging Subject Areas

Applicants for the Small Research Grants should be intending to pursue original, independent research in any field of study within the humanities or social sciences. There are no quotas for individual subject areas and no thematic priorities. The primary factor in assessing applications will remain the excellence of the proposal. The Academy will however, where appropriate, take into account the aim of providing particular support for certain important fields, either emerging areas of scholarship or areas of research that are endangered or under threat.

Ethical Issues

This field is mandatory and must be addressed by all applicants.

Are there any special ethical issues arising from your proposal that are not covered by the relevant professional Code of Practice? Have you obtained, or will you obtain, ethical approval from your employing institution or other relevant authority?

It is not expected that any special ethical issues will arise that are not already covered by relevant professional Codes of Practice. The normal expectation, therefore, will be that applicants should answer the pair of questions with the answers no and no.

If there are any special issues arising, but they have already been cleared by approval from a relevant authority, please answer yes and yes.

If any special issues arise and approval has not yet been obtained, please answer yes and no, and provide more explanation.

Source of Funding

Please provide details of other support given or applied for in connection with the current proposal. Please indicate whether any other grant applications relating to this project have been submitted, either to the British Academy or to any other funder.

Applications submitted to the Academy by separate applicants will not be accepted if it is considered that both (or all, if more than two) applications relate to the same project, whose components would not be viable as independent pieces of research.

The Academy has no objection to its grants being held in conjunction with awards from other bodies, if there is no duplication of expenditure. Applicants are requested to keep the Academy informed of the outcomes of any other applications by email to [email protected] . Failure to do so may jeopardise the application’s prospects of success. In cases where simultaneous applications to the Academy and to another funding agency covering the same elements of a project are both successful, the applicant will be asked to choose which award to accept.

Only if there is no duplication and no unnecessary inflation of a project will an applicant be permitted to retain both awards (subsequent requests to alter the plan of research simply to allow the applicant to retain both awards are unlikely to be considered favourably).

Primary and Secondary Subjects

Your application must be relevant to the Humanities and/or Social Sciences and you will need to select the relevant subject areas and fields from the drop-down list

Time Period, Audiences, Regional Interests

These fields provide the opportunity to give further indications of the relevance of your subject area. They are optional fields.

Lead Applicant Contact Details

Please take care to review and complete your personal details accurately. Errors in this section can cause difficulties in the processing of your application.

You can update your personal details by checking ‘my account’ and selecting the link to ‘my contact details’ and ‘my organisation’ and ensuring the relevant details are up to date.

Employing Organisation

Please be aware that it is your responsibility to ensure that you complete your application in time for your employing institution to process it and provide their approval by the closing date.

Please select your current employing organisation (or independent scholar if appropriate). The majority of appropriate establishments are registered in the system. If your employing organisation is not there, however, please contact the institution’s research support services, or equivalent, and ask them to provide the Research Awards Department with contact details of an appropriate person in the organisation to act as an approver on its behalf.

All applications must be approved by the employing organisation authorities e.g. research grants office, finance department, etc. The approving department will receive email notification once you have completed your application and submitted it. They will be asked to provide approval and then submit the application to the British Academy. The deadline for this round is the deadline by which approval must be given. Remember that the application cannot be submitted for approval before the referee has submitted their reference, so it is essential to obtain the reference well before the deadline.

It is strongly recommended that the applicant maintains an open dialogue with the approving department at your employing institution as the British Academy cannot be held responsible for emails being caught in spam filters or not being received.

It is recommended that you allow at least five working days for this process. Once they have checked your application, they will contact you if any changes are required, please note if changes need to be made these will have to be done before the deadline as they cannot be done afterwards.

Co-Applicants

Please note that all applications must have one lead applicant, although applications on behalf of more than one person are welcome. Please note that all correspondence is sent via the system only to the individual in whose name the application is submitted on the British Academy FlexiGrant® GMS.

The applicant is responsible for notifying any other parties. If there is more than one applicant, or the research involves other partners, please complete this section, and the relevant sections of the co-applicant personal details and co-applicant career summary. A ‘co-applicant’ is a joint director of the project with equal responsibility for the academic management of the project.

For the Small Grants Research grants scheme up to a maximum of two co-applicants can be named.

Postgraduate students are not eligible to apply for grant support from the Academy, and applicants (and co-applicants) are asked to confirm in the personal details section(s) that they are not currently working towards a PhD, nor awaiting the outcome of a viva voce examination, nor awaiting the acceptance of any corrections required by the examiners.

Other participants in a project, whose involvement does not equate to being a ‘co-applicant’ should be named in the relevant section (other participants) in the Research Proposal section.

Statement of qualifications and career

Please give details of up to 4 qualifications in reverse chronological order .

Present Appointment, Employing Institution and Department

Please give details of your current appointment. Applications are welcomed from independent or retired scholars, and such applicants should indicate ‘independent scholar’ here and select this as their ‘organisation’ in the eligibility section. ‘Approval’ of their application will be given by the BA as appropriate.

PhD confirmation

Applicants working towards a PhD or awaiting the outcome of their viva/submission of corrections are not eligible to apply. Please therefore confirm that you have a PhD by answering yes. If you are an established scholar with relevant equivalent experience, but no doctorate, please select 'no' and indicate in the 'personal statement' field why you should be eligible for consideration

Personal statement

This field is optional, but may be used, for example, in providing information regarding interruptions to an academic career. The limit on this field is 150 words

Publications, Unpublished Research

Please list up to 6 relevant publications to date in reverse chronological order under publications; and any unpublished studies previously funded by any agency, including but not restricted to the British Academy. Please give details of planned publication dates or explain why the research has not yet been published. Assessors may take backlogs of publication into account.

Previous support Dates

An application will not be eligible for consideration if there is a report outstanding on any previous research grant awarded by the Academy to the applicant or any co-applicant. Failure to follow this guidance will result in your application being withdrawn from this round of competition.

Please give details of any research applications submitted to the British Academy within the last five years. In the case of a further application for continuing research which has received previous Academy support, please note that a full report and statement of expenditure for the previous grant must be submitted before further funding can be considered.

Where did you hear of this scheme?

This field is optional. It helps the British Academy to target appropriate resources towards the promotion of the scheme to know where an applicant hears about it. As appropriate please state BA website; BA literature; PhD supervisor; University Research Office; Twitter, other colleague etc.

Pages 6 & 7: Co-Applicant(s) Career Summary

Specify Co-Applicant

In this scheme up to a maximum of two co-applicants can be named.

Your co-applicant(s) will need to register themselves on the British Academy GMS before they are able to complete this section.

If applicable, please enter all the details of your co-applicant(s) by clicking ‘Contributors’ tab on the Application’s ‘Summary’ page. Please click on the ‘Invite’ button, enter the co-applicant’s email address and then click ‘Send Invitation’. If necessary, it is possible to enter additional co-applicants by repeating the instructions above.

Once you have clicked on the ‘Send Invitation’ button, your co-applicant will be able to view your application amend the relevant co-applicant career summary page.

Financial Details/ Justification

If you include ineligible costs your application will be withdrawn from this competition. Please see the Eligible Costs Table for a list of eligible costs.

Please provide details of funding in the relevant fields.

Applicants should prepare accurate costings for the proposed research expenses and should be particularly careful not to overestimate the resources required. Applicants are advised that competition for funds can be fierce, and proposals on the margin for award may have a greater chance of success if they are modestly costed.

Costs should be clearly itemised and justified in terms of the research programme. If the Academy is being asked to support only a proportion of the total costs, please explain this clearly under proposed programme on the proposal tab.

It is advised that travel costs should be clearly justified; that the length of time for which subsistence is sought should be justified in the application; that per diem rates should be explained; that hourly or monthly rates of research assistants should be specified; and that the period of employment needed for a research assistant should be fully justified. If a claim for child or parental care is included, please supply sufficient justification for the case to be assessed.

In terms of subsistence (food, accommodation and travel) away from home, applicants are asked to quote realistic daily rates, bearing in mind that the Academy reserves the right to reduce the amount requested if it is thought excessive. In all cases the Academy is looking to ensure value for money.

In cases where funds are sought for the costs of illustrative material, please note that if there is an agreement for commercial publication, further information may be sought about the general finances for the volume(s). Requests for reproduction fees (for text or image) will only be considered if a publishing contract is in place.

Please note that no payments can be made to the principal investigator or co-applicant(s) either for their own salary costs or for replacement teaching.

Please note that grants are cash-limited, and there is no scope for supplementation of an award. Projects should be fully costed from the outset.

Please do not use ‘£’ signs in the amount boxes.

Special Funds

The British Academy has established partnerships with a number of other funders (both government and other organisations) to provide support for specific areas of research. This support is delivered through the Small Grants programme. If your research is relevant to one of these areas, you can indicate the relevance of your proposal to the appropriate fund by entering the name in this field.

Please note that all applications are considered on their merits equally, and it is not guaranteed that awards will be made simply because of the suitability of the subject area.

In this round of competition for BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants, all applicants will automatically be considered for funding either from the public funding or the Leverhulme Trust funding, and no preference need be expressed by the applicant. The funding is expected to be equally available from both sources and no advantage may be obtained by indicating any preference.

The other funds available to be distributed in addition to these main sources of funding include the following special funds:

  • Chinese Academy of the Social Sciences (CASS) - UK applicants should submit an application for a British Academy Small Grant and ensure that their Chinese co-applicant submits an application to CASS in English and Chinese (on its prescribed application form) at the same time. China-based applicants must be of postdoctoral (or above) status and have a permanent position (spanning the duration of the project) at a CASS institute. Chinabased applicants must first submit an expression of interest, together with a written recommendation letter issued by their CASS institute to the Bureau of International Cooperation of CASS ( http://www.bic.cas.cn/ ) before submitting a proposal to the British Academy in the same year
  • Shanghai Academy of the Social Sciences (SASS) - UK applicants should submit an application for a British Academy Small Grant and ensure that their Chinese co-applicant submits an application to SASS in English and Chinese (on its prescribed application form) at the same time. China-based applicants must be of postdoctoral (or above) status and have a permanent position (spanning the duration of the project) at a SASS institute. Chinabased applicants must first submit an expression of interest, together with a written recommendation letter issued by their SASS institute to the Bureau of International Cooperation of SASS before submitting a proposal to the British Academy in the same year.
  • EY – research in the fields of artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies and their potential disruptive impact on trust, sustainability, future talent needs and broader issues relating to organisational or societal transformation.
  • Wellcome Trust – research in the fields of health and wellbeing.
  • British Accounting and Finance Association – research in the fields of accounting finance, broadly interpreted to cover all aspects of historical and contemporary research in relevant subjects.
  • Honor Frost Foundation – research in the fields of maritime archaeology and cultural heritage.
  • Journal of Moral Education Trust – research in the fields of moral education, moral psychology, moral philosophy and ethics, civics and citizenship education and subjects bearing on how human beings engage or disengage with moral life.
  • Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain – research in the fields of philosophy that bears on educational questions and issues.
  • Sino-British Fellowship Trust – funds individual or collaborative projects in Britain or China with preference to applications that will help to achieve sustainable development regarding environmental issues and pollution.
  • Society for the Advancement of Management Studies – research in the fields of management and business studies.

Please also continue to refer to https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/funding/british-academy-specialfunds as it is possible that further private funding may become available in future.

Equal opportunities

This section is optional; however, the Academy would greatly appreciate it if you can complete the details to assist us in our diversity monitoring.

The British Academy is committed to its policy of Equal Opportunity in the provision of its grants and awards. Please help us to monitor the effectiveness of this policy by providing information concerning your age, gender, ethnic origin and disabilities (if any).

This information will be kept separately from the rest of your application and will not be seen by those involved in making decisions in the selection process, including referees etc.

Page 10: Nominated Referee

Applicants are required to nominate one referee and ensure that the supporting statement from their chosen referee is submitted on the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS well in advance of the deadline for the submission of your application.

Please enter all the details of your referee by clicking ‘Contributors’ tab on the Application’s ‘Summary’ page. After your referee has registered on Flexigrant, please click on the ‘Invite’ button, enter the referee’s email address and then click ‘Send Invitation’.

Please note that the reference must be submitted into the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS BEFORE you can formally submit the application for approval, and you are strongly advised to ensure that your referee submits the reference well in advance of the formal deadline for the submission of your application.

Please be aware that the deadline as it appears to the referee is the same deadline as the submission of your application, and you also need to allow time for approval to be given by your employing organisation. Please note this deadline is final.

Your referee should be familiar with your project and able to comment on its significance and feasibility, and on your abilities. The reference may be supplied by a scholar based outside the UK if you wish. Your referee must be drawn from outside your own employing institution and from outside the employing institution of your co-applicant(s), if any.

Before listing your referee on your application form, you should seek permission from them that they are happy to provide this by the deadline. It is essential that you enter the correct email address for your referee otherwise your referee will not receive the automated messages delivered from the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS.

We strongly advise that you alert your referee as early as possible to allow them enough time to provide their reference in the system. Note that the deadline shown to the referee is the deadline for the whole application to be submitted. The application needs to be approved before the same deadline, and it cannot be submitted for approval before the reference is submitted.

An application cannot be considered for an award unless the proposal and reference have been submitted on time.

Please note that references must be provided through the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS, they cannot be provided as an email attachment nor sent by post in hard copy. Any references received after the deadline, or outside of the system, or by another academic at the same institution as you or a coapplicant(s) will not be accepted, and your application will be withdrawn from this competition.

THE ACADEMY WILL ONLY PROCESS COMPLETE, SUBMITTED APPLICATIONS

Submission of Application

Once you have submitted your application for approval by your host organisation, automatic emails will be sent to your host organisation approver asking them to log on to the system. You will not be able to edit your application after it has been submitted to your host organisation for approval. The host organisation approver will either: approve and submit your application, ‘send back’ your application and contact you to request modifications or decline your application and contact you.

Please be aware that it is your responsibility to ensure that you complete your application in time for your host organisation to process it (including requesting changes) and provide their approval by the closing date. It is recommended that you allow at least five working days for this process, but please check with your proposed host institution as their internal timetables may require earlier submission.

If your host organisation approver requests modifications through the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS email facility, they can unlock your application, allowing you to edit it. They can do this by selecting ‘Return to Applicant’. An automatic e-mail will be sent to you alerting you of this fact. Once you have completed and saved the requested changes, please re-submit your application for approval by your host organisation.

Once your host organisation has approved your application and submitted it to the British Academy it will not be possible to make any changes.

Please note that once the closing date has passed, host organisation approvers cannot approve applications and submit them to the British Academy; unapproved applications are removed from consideration. No late applications will be accepted.

It is recommended that you check that your application is submitted in time. To see the details of the host organisation approver and to check the status of your application, you should log into the British Academy Flexi-Grant® GMS and click on the link to the Application Portal where a summary of your application will be displayed.

NB. The administration of the scheme is undertaken solely by the British Academy and all aspects of the application process, assessment process and award management is undertaken by the Academy.

Please see the flowchart below for an overview of the application to award process.

Application to award process flowchart

All applicants will be informed of the decisions, only once the random allocation has taken place. We will not be informing applicants during the process.

Outcome of Application

Once your application has been submitted, complete with the reference, and it has been approved, you will not be contacted again by the British Academy until the decisions have been made. You can track the progress of your application by logging in again to the Flexi-Grant system at any time. Results are issued by email.

Applicants in any doubt about their eligibility or any other aspect of their application are advised to contact the Research Funding Office at the Academy, where staff will be pleased to assist.

The British Academy

Research Funding Office

10-11 Carlton House Terrace

London SW1Y 5AH

Due to remote working we recommend contacting us by email only.

Email: [email protected]

Important Dates

Deadline for application submission and organisation approval: 5pm (UK time) 5th June 2024

Results announced by email to address on application: 30th August 2024

PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR ELIGIBILE COSTS TABLE:

Eligible Costs Table

Table1: Items eligible for funding from Small Research Grants

Travel and maintenance away from home

Research assistance, consumables.

(i.e. purchase of datasets, photocopies, microfilms, etc., and any other minor items that will be used up during the course of the project)

Specialist software

( excluding commonly available office packages) and web development costs (for the duration of the award period)

Costs of interpreters in the field

Organisation of workshops to advance the research.

(if part of the approved programme of work)

Short-term consultancy or salary costs of expert staff

The costs of:.

preparing illustrations, including photography, acquisition of images, draughtsmanship and cartography or other bespoke illustrative material; and the costs of reproduction rights for text or images

YES (see note 1)

Incidental translation expenses

Attendance at conferences either in the uk or abroad to disseminate results of research, small scale participant incentives e.g. vouchers, care for children or other relatives where this is unavoidable, computer hardware, including laptops, electronic notebooks, digital cameras etc., books and publications, permanent resources and equipment or any elements that should properly be ascribed to departmental or university overheads.

(hiring this equipment instead would be eligible)

The preparation of camera-ready copy, copy-editing, proof-reading, indexing, or any other editorial task

Subventions for direct production costs (printing, binding, distribution, marketing etc.), costs of publication in electronic media, payment to the principal/ co-researcher(s) in lieu of salary, or for personal maintenance at home, replacement teaching costs, travel /maintenance expenses for purposes such as lecture tours, or writing up results of research, apprenticeship levy, institutional overheads.

Note 1: The case made must be explicitly approved by the Academy.

Flexi-Grant® guidance

Flexi-grant® user guide.

Please refer to the British Academy Flexi-Grant® Guidance Notes

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OREF

Research Grant and Award Programs

Requests for Applications (RFAs) for OREF grant opportunities will be released following the schedule(s) below. Please note that dates are subject to change due to availability of funds. Changes and exceptions to the schedule(s) below will be noted on this page, so please check back often. To be notified of all grant opportunities as their application period opens, sign up for email and follow us on social media.

Additional grants will be listed as RFA dates are confirmed. Bookmark this page or sign up for email updates to be notified as grants become available and deadlines approach. Please note: any changes to RFA release dates will be reflected on this webpage.

research grants 2024 round 1

2024 Awards - Programs Opening 4/8/2024
AmountRFA Release DateLOI DeadlineApplication Deadline
$20,0004/8/2024N/A7/1/2024
2024 Round 3 - Programs Opening 3/7/2024
AmountRFA Release DateLOI DeadlineApplication Deadline
$50,0004/8/20246/20/2024
$25,0003/7/2024N/A6/20/2024
$20,0003/7/2024N/A6/20/2024
$20,0003/7/20244/8/20246/20/2024
$5,0003/7/20244/8/20246/20/2024
2024 Awards - Programs Opening 2/28/2024
AmountRFA Release DateLOI DeadlineApplication Deadline
$1,5002/28/2024N/A7/15/2024
N/A
2024 Round 3 - Programs Opening 1/11/2024
AmountRFA Release DateLOI DeadlineApplication Deadline
$50,0001/11/2024N/A4/11/2024
4/11/2024
1/11/20242/8/2024
4/11/2024
2024 Round 2 - Programs Opening 11/9/2023
AmountRFA Release DateLOI DeadlineApplication Deadline
$100,000N/A2/8/2024
$50,00011/9/2023N/A2/8/2024
$25,00011/9/2023N/A2/8/2024
$5,00011/9/202312/7/20232/8/2024
$20,00011/9/2023N/A2/8/2024

Grant Forms

Looking for forms related to your OREF grant? Click here to access all forms .

OREF Grant and Award Portfolio

OREF supports new and experienced investigators with a broad range of grant and award programs that recognize the unique needs of both the investigator and the field. The programs below are expected to be offered in the future, pending funding availability. For currently available opportunities, click the Open Grants and Awards tab. For questions, please contact the OREF Grants team at [email protected] .

Career Development Grant

Provides $300,000 in funding over three years to encourage investigators to commit to scientific research. Research may be basic, translational, clinical and/or health services.

New Investigator Grant

Provides $50,000 to advance the scientific training of the next generation of orthopaedic physician-scientists with seed and start-up funding for promising research projects. Residents fellows, and orthopaedic surgeons having completed formal training within the last four years may apply.

OREF Resident Clinician Scientist Training Grant

Provides $20,000 to prepare residents for a career with research as a major component.

OREF Resident Research Project Grant

Provides $5,000 in funding to residents who are interested in research. Please note that these grants now require a Letter of Intent. They are offered twice each year, but you may submit only one application per grant year. Please apply during the time frame that most closely aligns with your research rotation in the labs.

OREF Mentored Clinician Scientist Grant

Provides $20,000 to promote the development of new clinician scientists who have demonstrated success as both a clinician and a researcher. This grant allows investigators to spend dedicated time in research for a period of up to five years to develop a long and productive career in academic surgery.

OREF Clinical Research Award

Awards $20,000 in recognition of outstanding body of clinical research related to musculoskeletal disease or injury.

OREF/AAOS Injectable Orthobiologics Knee Osteoarthritis Research Grant

Provides $50,000 in funding for proposals focused on the broad area of injectable orthobiologics for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

OREF/Goldberg Arthritis Research Grant

Provides $50,000 in seed and start-up funding for promising research projects that address issues related to the treatment of arthritis with an emphasis on arthroplasty.

OREF/ASES/Rockwood Clinical Shoulder Research Grant

Provides $50,000 in funding and encourages new investigators to conduct research in the area of shoulder care.

OREF/MTEC Solutions to Accelerate Return-to-Readiness following Musculoskeletal Injuries Grant

Provides funding for investigator-initiated research proposals focused on a broad area of musculoskeletal research focused on faster recovery through the regeneration and repair of soft tissue, nerves and muscle following acute injury.

OREF Musculoskeletal Research Grant/Acute Injury in Collaboration with the Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium (MTEC)

Provides funding for a broad area of musculoskeletal research focused on faster recovery through the regeneration and repair of soft tissue, nerves and muscle following acute injury.

OREF Prevention of Musculoskeletal Youth Sports Injuries Research Grant in Honor of James R. Andrews, MD

Provides funding for new investigators conducting clinical and/or social research on the prevention of musculoskeletal youth sports injuries.

OREF/AANA Foundation Multimodal Musculoskeletal Perioperative Pain Management Research Grant

Provides $50,000 in funding for research focused on the broad area of perioperative musculoskeletal pain management.

OREF Osteoarthritis Research Grant

Provides $50,000 in funding for research that aims to help us better understand how to prevent and treat osteoarthritis, one of the most common causes of disability in adults.

OREF/MTF Biologics Research Grant

Provides $100,000 ($50,000 per year for two years) for research focusing on the science of biologic—reconstruction, bone regeneration, transplantation—allografts, including stem cells for graft transplantation.

Sports Medicine Multicenter Research Grant with funding support from The Aircast Foundation

This collaboration with AOSSM and AAOS provides funding for research focused on the broad area of sports medicine multicenter research trials.

OREF Etiology of Hip Osteoarthritis Grant in Honor of William H. Harris, MD

Provides $250,000 over two years for investigator-initiated research proposals focused on the etiology of hip osteoarthritis.

The OREF Impact of Regulatory Policies on the Patient-Physician Relationship Research Grant in Honor of Sigvard Hansen, MD

Provides $75,000 in funding for proposals that explore the impact of regulatory practices on the patient-physician relationship. The proposal should examine how and to what extent the burden of additional required documentation impacts the amount and quality of time a physician has available to focus on direct patient care.

OREF/OTA Trauma Research Grant with funding support from Arthrex

Provides $150,000 for investigator-initiated research proposals focusing on Orthopaedic Trauma that investigates innovative strategies for operatively managing ankle fractures in the setting of compromised bone or soft tissue or metabolic challenges likely to increase risk of complications.

OREF/JRGOS Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Disparities in Orthopaedic Health Care Research Grant with funding support from the Zimmer Biomet Foundation

Provides $150,000 in funding over two years to stimulate clinical research and provide funding for promising studies to find solutions to problems of diversity, equity, inclusion, and disparities in orthopaedics.

ORS/OREF Travel Grants in Orthopaedic Research Translation

Provide a $500 honorarium to be used toward travel to the ORS Annual Meeting. These grants recognize clinician scientists and clinical investigators in the early stages of their careers who have played a key or leading role in an original research project in clinical or translational medicine, and who have demonstrated excellence in training and a commitment to orthopaedic research.

Shimomura/OREF/International Society of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology (SICOT) Travel Awards

Provides $1,500 for a SICOT member with a specific travel objective and a global objective for future research who has completed studies focusing on health care policy, clinical outcomes or translational research having immediate impact.

OREF Michael P. Kelly Sr. Leadership Fellowship Program

The one-year program is designed to aid and develop leadership skills in the orthopaedic resident's research career path. The curriculum focuses on leadership development, including cultivating the attributes of integrity, selflessness, decisiveness, organization, benevolence, vision, communication, and innovation. The participant selection process will prioritize women and underrepresented minorities.

Have Questions?

OREF invites applications for funding for qualified, clinically relevant orthopaedic research projects. Specific eligibility requirements for each grant are listed in the grant descriptions.

OREF strongly encourages the submission of well-crafted basic, translational and clinical studies. Clinical relevance must be clearly noted in the abstract and specific aims and be obvious from the title and the study design. All proposed projects should generate results that have a practical application.

Ask the Grants Team

research grants 2024 round 1

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GRANTS FOR ARTS PROJECTS

: Login.gov will be down for maintenance on February 15th from 1 am - 4 am Eastern Time. This may affect your ability to access Login.gov, SAM, and Grants.gov during this time period. We recommend you submit Part 1 of your application early in order to avoid any issues.

Grants for Arts Projects (GAP) provides expansive funding opportunities to strengthen the nation’s arts and cultural ecosystem. Grants are available for arts projects in a wide variety of artistic disciplines. Each discipline has identified the types of projects that are of greatest interest within this program as well as the characteristics of competitive applications.

Applicants may request cost share/matching grants ranging from $10,000 to $100,000.

Designated local arts agencies eligible to subgrant may request from $30,000 to $150,000 for subgranting programs in the Local Arts Agencies discipline .

A minimum cost share/match equal to the grant amount is required for all grant recipients.

Read the “Program Description” located in the left sidebar to get started .

Stay Connected to the National Endowment for the Arts

University of Virginia, School of Architecture

Announcing the 2024 A-School Research Grant Recipients

UVA School of Architecture is pleased to announce this year's research grant recipients, including eight projects led by faculty members across our four departments. Administered through the Office of the Dean and totaling approximately $37K, the program provides seed or top-off funds in support of research activities that substantively contribute to the development of faculty members’ research agendas. The program is established to provide financial support for immediate research expenses, often for current established projects, and support one calendar year of activities.

This cycle's projects represent research ranging from urban informality and restorative spaces to the green energy transition and low-carbon structures.

Favela_da_Maré_WikiCommons_Junius

From Crisis to Agential Possibility: The Role of Solutions Journalism in the Maré Favela Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Vanessa Guerra Assistant Professor, Urban and Environmental Planning

This project will analyze stories covering COVID-19 in Maré Online, a Rio de Janeiro favela newspaper, during the early stages of the pandemic, using qualitative content analysis and McIntyre & Lough's (2021) solutions journalism framework. Assistant Professor Vanessa Guerra and her co-PIs will explore the role of this community newspaper in promoting social resilience and supporting a marginalized population in asserting its right to the city. Brazil's favelas, informal communities, the result of rapid urbanization and rural-to-urban migration, predominantly house densely settled populations of socio-economic and racial minorities. The COVID-19 pandemic heightened the existing vulnerabilities of these citizens, including insufficient healthcare access and inadequate sanitation. This project will assess the journalistic approach of Maré Online , not only in providing accurate information during a time when the national regime was actively engaged in disinformation, but also in offering opportunities for citizens to organize mutual aid and secure representation.

Fragile Beauty Photo Dan Addison

The Art of Collaboration

Sanda Iliescu Professor, Architecture (courtesy appointment in Art)

The Art of Collaboration  is a series of large-scale paintings of abstract compositions in vivid colors based on forms inspired by nature. Drawing from the theme of the natural environment’s fragile beauty, the project enlists the entire A-School community (staff, faculty, and student volunteers) to create together under the guidance of Professor Sanda Iliescu and two lead student assistants. An exercise in the process of creating collaboratively, Iliescu will also develop an essay that unpacks the challenges and rewards of co-created work at this scale, and in a higher ed institutional context. The Art of Collaboration  also aims to lay the foundation for a potential future symposium titled “Creativity and Collaboration” chaired by Iliescu.

Fire clay parts_Ismail, Halle, Sefah, Wang and Mueller

Digital Forms: Accessible fabrication methods for low-carbon concrete structures

Mohamed Ismail Assistant Professor, Architecture

The Open Structures Group, led by Assistant Professor Mohamed Ismail , will explore the many ways that increasingly available fabrication methods like CNC routing, plasma cutting, and robotic assembly might allow designers and builders to design and build materially efficient concrete structures. This research explores the acuity and performance of different formwork materials to advance a thorough understanding of their environmental, economic, and human costs. Using local industry insight and inter-disciplinary structural design research, Digital Forms would inform digital fabrication workflows that generate high-performance structural systems, making them increasingly accessible to building designers. 

View of Iran and Iraq and Karun River_NASA Johnson Space Center

Across the Altitudes of Zagros: A Flora Map of Matriarchal Ecologies

Ghazal Jafari Assistant Professor, Urban and Environmental Planning

Assistant Professor Ghazal Jafari builds upon her ongoing research investigating the histories and spaces of water conflict across the Iran-Iraq borderlands, one of the most conflict-riddled regions today. This research, culminating in a forthcoming book, demystifies the complex entanglement of historical events and interventions between the orientalist representations of the ‘Middle East’ as a ‘desert’ and spatial manufacturing of the region as a ‘wasteland’ across 200 years. It uncovers the complexities of overlapping environmental practices, ethnocultural exchanges, seasonal migratory flows and fluxes, intertribal relationships, and treaties, as they increasingly clash with political boundaries, extractive state policies, international sanctions, infrastructural cleavages, environmental violence and crimes compounded by climate-induced pressures, gendered violence, and material scarcities. The project reveals and renews a contemporary understanding of rivers and water bodies at the center (rather than the periphery) of political uncertainty, geographical inequality, cultural genocide, and ecological injustice.

Works by Giancarlo De Carlo_composite

Giancarlo De Carlo, Built Heritage, and Participatory Design

Andrew Johnston Associate Professor, Architectural History

Associate Professor Andrew Johnston ’s research project is focused on the life and work of Italian architect Giancarlo De Carlo (1919 – 2005), to culminate in a book. In addition to being an architect, De Carlo was a planner, writer, and educator, as well as a founding member of Team X. His 1969 lecture and consequent article, Architecture's Public , remains a seminal text on the need for the inclusion of users in the design process and the inherently political role of the architect. Much of his built work is located in Urbino, a small Italian hill town for which he proposed a master plan between 1958-1964, which has slowly been implemented over the past forty years. Johnston’s research on De Carlo also aims to have student voices contribute to the contemporary analysis and interpretation of his life and work. 

Before Building Laboratory Compiled photos

PST ART: Art & Science Collide

Katie MacDonald and Kyle Schumann Assistant Professors, Architecture

Assistant Professor’s Katie MacDonald and Kyle Schumann ’s Before Building Laboratory are invited to participate in the third cycle of the exhibition series PST ART , an initiative of the Getty Museum. This cycle, to launch in September 2024, and featuring work of 818 international artists shown in 50 exhibitions, brings leading voices from across the world into dialogue with Los Angeles, under the theme Art & Science Collide . They will present their work as part of the exhibition titled Material Acts: Material Experimentation in Architecture and Design  at the Craft Contemporary in LA, which “explores the most promising and pragmatic building materials and technologies at the intersection of nature, science, and craft.” MacDonald and Schumann’s installation will be comprised of building material assemblies using a robotic sawmill they developed, supported in part by a UVA White Ruffin Byron Center for Real Estate Faculty Research Seed Grant

Washing the copper ore_Fairphone_CC-BY-NC-SA

Atlas of Energy Transitions (working title)

Matthew Seibert Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture

This research project is an edited collection of scholars, artists, and activists that employs immersive first-person narrative descriptions and projective world-building imagery to call into question conventional readings of time and land relations through stories of contestation, exploitation, and complication lying within the landscapes that support the world’s green energy transition. Edited by Assistant Professor Matthew Seibert , Atlas of Energy Transitions: Mapping Costs and Cautions of the Dark Side of Green  (working title), this book project continues his ongoing research around material agency, climate change, and unconventional narrative design. The title aims to reveal the risks of green energy, while propagating new, more desirable, futures through generative imaging. 

Stella Photo by Tom Daly

Representing Restorative Spaces in Architecture

Katie Stranix Assistant Professor, Architecture

This project involves experimenting with the graphic representation of restorative spaces in architecture from around the world, exploring orthographic and perspectival drawing methods to analyze and describe the formal, spatial, and material strategies of each project. It will involve determining graphic approaches for Assistant Professor Katie Stranix ’s forthcoming book, Designing Restorative Space , examining small-scale restorative spaces at three different scales – architectural elements, enclosures, and environments. The development and realization of drawings are critical to documenting the design and implementation of these spaces to not only understand what makes them restorative, but also to highlight why they are a critical component of our shared built environment, particularly given our current mental health crisis.

The UVA School of Architecture Research Grants are open to applications on an ongoing basis. For more information please contact [email protected] .

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The School of Architecture’s Melissa Goldman Advocates for Peer Mentorship Initiative for UVA Staff

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MacDonald and Schumann's After Architecture wins national AIA Excellence Award

Mason Creek, Norfolk, Virginia

PhD Student Luka Hamel-Serenity is a 2024 Environmental Futures Fellow

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The mission of the Historic Resources Committee (HRC) is to identify, understand, and preserve architectural heritage, both nationally and internationally. HRC is engaged in promoting the role of the historic architect within the profession through the development of information and knowledge among members, allied professional organizations, and the public.

2024 Upjohn research grants - call for submissions is open

1.  2024 upjohn research grants - call for submissions is open.

research grants 2024 round 1

AIA Upjohn Research Initiative Grants

The AIA Upjohn Research Initiative supports applied research projects that enhance the value of design

and professional practice knowledge.

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Submission deadline: August 28, 2024

Academic institutions, firms, practice, and other research  and non-profit organizations are all eligible for grants.

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research grants 2024 round 1

  • NIH Grants & Funding
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NIH Extramural Nexus

research grants 2024 round 1

FY 2022 By the Numbers: Extramural Grant Investments in Research

Today we present our annual snapshot of NIH grant funding and success rate data for fiscal year (FY) 2022 enacted appropriations. These data are available in the NIH Data Book , which is also being regularly updated with other FY 2022 grants information. Similar to our FY 2021 and FY 2020 posts, spending related to special appropriations for coronavirus are excluded here, but may be found using RePORTER’s advanced search capabilities .

In FY2022, NIH spent $33.3 billion of its total $45.2 billion appropriation for competing and noncompeting grant awards. This is a 3.1% increase (or $1.02 billion) in spending over the previous year. Monies for grants and Other Transaction awards are included while research and development contracts are excluded.

NIH supported 1,576 additional new and renewed extramural grants in FY 2022, for a total of 58,368 competing and non-competing awards (2.8% more than FY 2021). NIH issued grants to 2,707 academic universities, hospitals, small businesses, and other organizations throughout the U.S. and internationally.

Table 1 – All Extramural Research (competing and non-competing, excluding contracts)

56,792 58,368 2.8%
$32.32 $33.34 3.1%

The success rate for new research project grants (RPGs) increased 1.6 percentage points from 19.1% in FY 2021 to 20.7% in FY 2022. This is because we received 4,301 fewer RPG competing applications in FY 2022 compared to the previous year (54,571 compared to 58,872), while making 82 more awards (11,311 compared to 11,229). The average nominal cost per RPG rose by 1.9% in 2022 to $592,617 from $581,293 in FY 2021.

Table 2 – Research Project Grants (RPG)

58,872 54,571 -7.3%
11,229 11,311 0.7%
19.1% 20.7% 8.7%
$581,293 $592,617 1.9%
$23.280 $24.400 4.8%

* Success rates are calculated by dividing the number of awards made in a FY by the number of applications received. Applications having one or more amendments in the same fiscal year are only counted once.

Most RPGs are R01-equivalent grants , and they showed similar trends. We spent $19.1 billion on average on R01-equivalent grants in FY 2022 compared to $18.1 billion spent in FY 2021, a 5.4% increase. Like RPGs, the R01-equivalent grant success rate also increased (1.5 percentage points), going from 20.1% in FY 2021 to 21.6% in FY 2022. We spent 2.4% more in average nominal costs on R01-equivalents in FY 2022 ($585,307) compared to $571,561 spent in FY 2021.

Table 3 – R01-equivalent Grants**

37,987 36,198 -4.7%
7,627 7,816 2.5%
20.1% 21.6% 7.5%
$571,561 $585,307 2.4%
$18.134 $19.108 5.4%

**R01-equivalent grants are defined as activity codes DP1, DP2, DP5, R01, R37, R56, RF1, RL1, U01 and R35 from select National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Human Genome Research Institute program announcements. Not all these activities may be in use by NIH every year.

Please note that NIH does not report the number of applications received in specific research areas, and thus does not report success rates for those areas either.

I would like to thank my colleagues within the NIH Office of Extramural Research’s Division of Statistical Analysis and Reporting for their work on this analysis.

Correction: Previously, we accidently misreported the FY 2021 success rate for R01-equivalent grants. We have corrected the data table to reflect this change, which now makes the percent change calculation correct.

RELATED NEWS

Please check “2022 % Change from 2021” for “Success rates for R01-equivalent applications:”. How did you calculate a 7.5% increase?

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. We accidently misreported the FY 2021 success rate for R01-equivalent grants. We have corrected the data table to reflect this change, which now makes the percent change calculation correct.

Thank you so much for this reporting. I would be interested to learn about data on 1) the average cut in budget made by the NIH before award is made (% of budget) and 2) the incidence in which the duration of the project has been reduced. This latter issue occurs both to align the year-end reporting with NIH workload (resulting in a short first year), but also occurs with an entire year is taken off the project to save money (e.g., a five-year grant is cut to 4 years).

Thank you so much. Could you also report on the numbers and percentages for women and underrepresented researchers?

These success rates seem higher than posted paylines for many institutes and how many colleagues are getting funded. Is this success % of all grants submitted, or those discussed?

You show that there are 7,816 new or renewal R01-equivalent grants. What is the total number of active R01-equivalent grants?

What are the non-R01-equivalent research project grants?

Before submitting your comment, please review our blog comment policies.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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fresh funding

Texas organization grants over $40m to chemistry research in houston and beyond.

Two local professors are among the newly announced recipients of funding from the Houston-based Welch Foundation, which finances chemical research projects.

The two professors are:

  • Jacinta Conrad, the Frank M. Tiller Professor in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at the University of Houston. Conrad will use her grant to investigate glass transition, a temperature change that affects polymers. She describes glass transition as one of the “most intriguing open problems in physical chemistry.”
  • James Shee, assistant professor in the Chemistry Department at Rice University. Shee will put his grant toward advancing theoretical chemistry.

Every year, the foundation provides annual grants totaling at least $100,000 to support chemistry research being carried out by full-time faculty members at colleges, universities, and other educational institutions in Texas.

In all, the Welch Foundation on June 4 announced more than $40.5 million in academic research grants, equipment grants, and fellowships.

Part of the announced funding will go toward the foundation’s new Postdoctoral Fellows Grant Program. The program provides three-year fellowships to recent PhD graduates to support clinical research careers in Texas. A total of $900,000 in postdoctoral fellowships were funded at Rice University, Texas A&M University, and the University of Texas at Austin.

Since 1954, the Welch Foundation has contributed over $1.1 billion for Texas-nurtured advancements in chemistry through research grants, endowed chairs, and other chemistry-related ventures.

“Ongoing basic chemical research is critically important for helping to solve current and future problems,” said Adam Kuspa, President of the Welch Foundation. “We strongly believe the foundation’s continued support of the research grant program, combined with … new programs, will yield even more exciting developments as we work to advance chemistry and improve our lives.”

  • Rice University announces leader of new materials and nanotechnology institute ›
  • Baylor scientist wins award for young chemists, scores $3M for groundbreaking cancer tech ›
  • Houston organization announces nearly $28M in Texas research grant funding ›

Trending News

By the numbers, houston suburb clocks in among best job markets in america, ready to grow, rice accelerator names innovative second summer cohort, houston voices, rice expert: why tech companies should sponsor hackathons, cutting costs, how adding isolcork to your building could save you thousands — or even millions, going my way, explore the eco-friendly commuting app that's driving change at houston area employers, ready year 2, applications are open for accel, an accelerator for bipoc-led startups.

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Funding Opportunities

Securing funding is critical to the success of efforts to deploy a network of electric vehicle chargers, zero-emission fueling infrastructure, and zero-emission transit and school buses.

Future funding opportunities for Joint Office of Energy and Transportation (Joint Office) projects may become available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

The Joint Office provides information and resources about current funding opportunity announcements (FOAs), requests for information, and links to related opportunities from other DOE offices and federal organizations.

Funded Projects

The Joint Office made available $46.5 million from President Biden's Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for projects that bolster America's electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure. The 30 projects across 16 states and Washington, D.C., will ensure convenient and efficient EV infrastructure for drivers.

Learn about key considerations from past DOE-funded projects on curbside EV charging, EV car share, EV charging for multifamily housing, and EV mobility hubs.

Become a Joint Office Reviewer

The Joint Office is seeking subject matter experts to review applications for federal funding opportunities, including the Communities Taking Charge Accelerator (DE-FOA-0003214). Desired reviewer expertise and application instructions are listed on the Reviewers Needed for Joint Office Federal Funding Applications page.

Open Funding Opportunities

Current funding opportunities that may be of interest are listed below. To suggest adding a funding opportunity to this list, contact us .

Charging and Fueling Infrastructure Discretionary Grant Program Round 2

The purpose of this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) is to solicit applications for the Charging and Fueling Infrastructure Discretionary Grant Program (CFI Program) established under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (“Bipartisan Infrastructure Law” or “BIL”). In addition, funds under the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program 10 percent set-aside, also established by BIL, will also be awarded under this NOFO. The CFI Program provides two funding categories of grants: (1) Community Charging and Alternative Fueling Grants (Community Program); and (2) Charging and Alternative Fuel Corridor Grants (Corridor Program). CFI Program investments will make modern and sustainable infrastructure accessible to all drivers of electric, hydrogen, propane, and natural gas vehicles. The CFI Program offers up to $1.3 billion under this NOFO.

Number: 693JJ324NF00017 Type: Grant Program: FHWA Application Deadline: Aug. 28, 2024

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) – Joint Office of Energy and Transportation: Communities Taking Charge Accelerator, Fiscal Year 2024 Funding Opportunity Announcement

The purpose of Communities Taking Charge is to expand community e-mobility access and provide clean reliable energy. The funding will drive innovation in equitable clean transportation and is aligned with strategies detailed in the U.S. National Blueprint for Transportation Decarbonization. Topic areas include expanding charging access for privately owned E-mobility, expanding electrified micro, light, and medium-duty fleets, and managed charging.

Number: DE-FOA-0003214 Type: FOA Program: Joint Office of Energy and Transportation Concept Deadline: May 20, 2024 Application Deadline: July 16, 2024

Clean Heavy-Duty Vehicles Grant Program

This funding will replace existing non-zero-emission heavy-duty vehicles with zero-emission vehicles, support zero-emission vehicle infrastructure, and train and develop workers.

Type: Grant Program: EPA Application Deadline: July 25, 2024

Notice of Intent: R&D Funding for Charging Solutions for Heavy-Duty Electric Vehicles

The U.S. Department of Energy issued a notice of intent to fund projects that would provide innovative research, development, and demonstration of concepts for delivering charging solutions for trucks. The opportunity also supports approaches for load management and delivery of grid services that alleviate grid capacity challenges at charging installations for medium- and heavy-duty electric vehicles.

Number: DE-FOA-0003352 Type: NOI Program: VTO

Vehicle Technologies Office Fiscal Year 2024 Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement

This funding seeks research projects to address priorities in the following areas: the increase in energy density of battery cells containing phosphate-based cathodes; the development of innovative technologies capable of significantly decreasing greenhouse gases; the production and manufacturing of new high-performance E–steels using domestic resources; the advancement of state of the art Na-ion batteries; the improvement of efficiency and convenience of the mobility-system using V2X; the development of planning tools and/or models to identify, quantify, and assess the impact of convenience strategies on regions and/or communities; addressing vulnerabilities and potential cybersecurity threats posed by the nature of EVs and charging infrastructure integrated with the grid, to improve fuel economy and reduce GHG emissions with the goals of carbon pollution free electricity by 2035 and net-zero of GHG emissions by 2050.

Number: DE-FOA-0003248 Type: FOA Program: Vehicle Technologies Office Concept Deadline: May 2, 2024 Application Deadline: June 24, 2024

Active Transportation Infrastructure Investment Program

The Active Transportation Infrastructure Investment Program (ATIIP) is a new competitive grant program created by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to construct projects to provide safe and connected active transportation facilities in active transportation networks or active transportation spines. ATIIP will award two types of grants: Planning and Design grants and Construction grants.

Type: Grant Program: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Application Deadline: June 17, 2024

Low or No Emission Grant Program - 5339(c)

This funding supports state and local efforts to buy or modernize buses, improve bus facilities, and support workforce development.

Type: Grant Program: U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration (FTA)

More Funding Opportunity Resources

FOAs are also listed on Grants.gov , the portal for numerous grant programs administered by federal government agencies, and the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) eXCHANGE for all EERE FOAs.

Other federal agency funding opportunities can be found on these pages:

  • Urban Electric Mobility Infrastructure Funding Table
  • Rural EV Infrastructure Funding Table
  • Tribal Nations Funding Opportunities

Subscribe to receive news and funding opportunity updates from the Joint Office by email.

New EERE eXCHANGE Log-In Process: To make the sign-in process more secure, the EERE Funding Opportunity Exchange (eXCHANGE) has been updated to integrate with Login.gov —a secure service used by the public to sign into participating government agencies. All potential applicants and reviewers must have a Login.gov account to apply to open opportunities. Please read the MFA Quick Guide for more information

research grants 2024 round 1

Funding opportunity: BBSRC follow-on fund: 2024 round 1

Last updated: 23 February 2024 - see all updates

Apply for follow on funding (FoF) to bridge the gap between bioscience research and achieving economic and societal benefit.

FoF applications must draw substantially on current or prior BBSRC funding. You must be based at a UK research organisation eligible for BBSRC funding.

FoF awards aim to take ideas through to a stage where the route to practical application is clear.

The full economic cost (FEC) of your project can be up to £800,000. BBSRC will fund 80% of the FEC. FoF awards support defined programmes of work for up to two years.

The funding opportunity will open on 24 January 2024.

Who can apply

Before applying for funding, check the Eligibility of your organisation .

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) has introduced new role types for funding opportunities being run on the new UKRI Funding Service.

For full details, visit Eligibility as an individual .

Who is eligible to apply

In order to be eligible for FoF funding:

  • applications must have a direct link to current or previous Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-supported funding
  • based at a UK research organisation eligible for BBSRC funding, which will be responsible for submitting the grant application to UKRI
  • resident in the UK for at least 183 days in a tax year
  • hold a lecturer or lecturer-equivalent position at a UK higher education institution, research council institute or a UKRI-approved independent research organisation
  • employed at the submitting research organisation at lecturer level, or equivalent, or due to move to the organisation before the start date of the grant
  • employed or if not, have an agreement that the research will be conducted at the submitting research organisation, as if you were an employee at lecturer level or equivalent
  • co-applicants must be employed at an eligible organisation and meet the same employment criteria

Equality, diversity and inclusion

We are committed to achieving equality of opportunity for all funding applicants. We encourage applications from a diverse range of researchers.

We support people to work in a way that suits their personal circumstances. This includes:

  • career breaks
  • support for people with caring responsibilities
  • flexible working
  • alternative working patterns

Find out more about equality, diversity and inclusion at UKRI .

What we're looking for

The aim of our follow-on fund (FoF) is to help researchers maximise the commercial, economic, and societal benefits of their research.

The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) FoF is designed to enable researchers, with a sound understanding of the market opportunity of their intellectual assets, to execute a defined programme of work that has clear objectives.

Projects considered through this programme must:

  • draw upon current or previous BBSRC supported research, or other type of BBSRC research investment, or both
  • enable research outputs to be further developed into practical application to deliver benefit and impact

We support both early-stage projects aimed at de-risking innovative ideas and later-stage projects that encompass significant technical milestones.

It is recognised that smaller scale, in particular early-stage, projects may not require the full word count allowance for each application section.

FoF projects must seek to deliver demonstrable benefit to the UK. However, it is recognised that the outcomes of some projects may also provide benefits to, or operate within, international markets.

Projects previously funded through the Global Challenges Research Fund and Newton Fund funding opportunities are considered to be eligible for FoF. However, they must ensure they clearly articulate how they will deliver social and economic impact within the UK.

We conduct reviews of applications to ensure their alignment with the designated scope and retain the authority to reject applications that are considered to be out of scope before assessment by the FoF committee.

Applications to the FoF must be within the remit of BBSRC. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the remit of your proposed project, please see the ‘Contact details’ section.

We conduct reviews of applications to ensure their alignment with our remit and retain the authority to reject applications considered out of remit before assessment by the FoF committee.

We may share applications with other UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) councils to consider remit and direct you to the most appropriate council.

Project partners

Involvement of industry and users as project partners is strongly encouraged. Proposals which do not have project partners are expected to clearly articulate how industry and users have shaped the project to date and how they will be engaged in the future development of the project.

The FoF applicant webinar will be held on the 8 February 2023 at 1:00pm to 2:00pm UK time. To register for this webinar, please see the ‘Additional information’ section. We will also provide a link to the recording of the webinar for those unable to attend.

The duration of this award is a maximum of two years.

Funding available

The FEC of your project can be up to £800,000.

BBSRC will fund 80% of the FEC.

What we will fund

FoF grant applications must demonstrate that the proposed work programme:

  • is based on a sound understanding of the market need and opportunity that its product, service or technology aims to satisfy
  • is robust and designed to optimise the commercial, economic, and societal benefit derived from the grant
  • has a substantial link to BBSRC funding

What we will not fund

Applications to FoF should have a primary focus on the translation of research or knowledge, or both, making the following ineligible:

  • projects focused solely on delivering training
  • new research or extending an existing research grant
  • applied or contract research conducted on behalf of commercial organisations
  • applications outside of our remit
  • supporting the direct costs associated with applying for Intellectual property (IP) protection, for example patent filing

Supporting skills and talent

We encourage you to follow the principles of the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers and the Technician Commitment .

How to apply

We are running this funding opportunity on the new UKRI Funding Service. You cannot apply on the Joint Electronic Submissions (Je-S) system.

The project lead is responsible for completing the application process on the Funding Service, but we expect all team members and project partners to contribute to the application.

Only the lead research organisation can submit an application to UK Research and Innovation (UKRI).

Select ‘Start application’ near the beginning of this Funding finder page.

  • Confirm you are the project lead.
  • Sign in or create a Funding Service account. To create an account, select your organisation, verify your email address, and set a password. If your organisation is not listed, email [email protected] Please allow at least 10 working days for your organisation to be added to the Funding Service.
  • Answer questions directly in the text boxes. You can save your answers and come back to complete them or work offline and return to copy and paste your answers. If we need you to upload a document, follow the upload instructions in the Funding Service. All questions and assessment criteria are listed in the ‘How to apply’ section on this Funding finder page.
  • Allow enough time to check your application in ‘read-only’ view before sending to your research office.
  • Send the completed application to your research office for checking. They will return it to you if it needs editing.
  • Your research office will submit the completed and checked application to UKRI.

Where indicated, you can also demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. You should:

  • use images sparingly and only to convey important information that cannot easily be put into words
  • insert each new image onto a new line
  • provide a descriptive legend for each image immediately underneath it (this counts towards your word limit)
  • ensure files are smaller than 5MB and in JPEG, JPG, JPE, JFI, JIF, JFIF, PNG, GIF, BMP or WEBP format

Watch our research office webinars about the new Funding Service .

For more guidance on the Funding Service, see:

  • how applicants use the Funding Service
  • how research offices use the Funding Service
  • how reviewers use the Funding Service

We must receive your application by 27 March 2024 at 4:00pm UK time.

You will not be able to apply after this time.

Make sure you are aware of and follow any internal institutional deadlines.

Following the submission of your application to the funding opportunity, your application cannot be changed, and applications will not be returned for amendment. If your application does not follow the guidance, it may be rejected.

Personal data

Processing personal data.

BBSRC, as part of UKRI, will need to collect some personal information to manage your UKRI Funding Service account and the registration of your funding applications. We will handle personal data in line with UK data protection legislation and manage it securely. For more information, including how to exercise your rights, read our privacy notice .

Publication of outcomes

If your application is successful, we will publish some personal information on the UKRI Gateway to Research .

Word limit: 550

In plain English, provide a summary we can use to identify the most suitable experts to assess your application.

We may make this summary publicly available on external-facing websites, so make it suitable for a variety of readers, for example:

  • opinion-formers
  • policymakers
  • the wider research community

Guidance for writing a summary

Clearly describe your proposed work in terms of:

  • the challenge the project addresses
  • aims and objectives
  • potential applications and benefits

List the key members of your team and assign them roles from the following:

  • project lead (PL)
  • project co-lead (UK) (PcL)
  • researcher co-lead (RcL)
  • research and innovation associate

Only list one individual as project lead.

Find out more about UKRI’s core team roles in funding applications .

Application questions

Word count: 2,000

What is the background to this application, including the direct link to current or previous BBSRC funding, and the technical development work that has preceded?

What the assessors are looking for in your response

Provide a brief overview of the background to this application including:

  • the key grants (and funders) that have enabled and informed the work proposed in the application, specifying any previous BBSRC grant references
  • details of the development steps that have progressed the research/innovation to this translation stage
  • how the proposed work aligns with and addresses the priorities detailed within our Strategic Delivery Plan

Within the ‘Background’ section we also expect you to:

  • identify if the application is a resubmission (including invited resubmission) and how the proposed work has developed
  • reference any other correspondence with us relevant to and regarding the application

Within this section you can also demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. Further instructions are provided within the Funding Service.

Number your references in this section using a superscript citation style. Then include the details of these references in a corresponding list, in the ‘References’ section of this application.

Please note, external weblinks are not permitted in this section.

Opportunity and market

Word count: 1,200

What is the opportunity or challenge you are seeking to exploit or address, that could lead to the development or deployment of a new or improved product, service or technology?

You should:

  • describe the market opportunity or need that this proposal will seek to address, including the sector and scale
  • outline the proposed solution to address the opportunity or need, considering the scalability of the proposed approach
  • where there is existing or competing innovations or solutions, explain how your proposed approach improves on them
  • identify the end-user or customer base, explaining how the proposed solution provides a practical solution to their needs

You can use the upload file function to provide directly relevant excerpts of market research reports. This must be no longer than 10 sides of A4 in Arial 11pt and uploaded as a PDF of no more than 8MB. Upload details are provided within the service on the actual application.

Development plan

Word count: 1,600

How has the idea or solution been developed to date and what is the proposed approach for further development?

  • detail the current understanding or maturity of the innovation or technology and how the proposed work will enable its development, referencing any pertinent data from previous research
  • explain how key users, customers and any investors will be engaged throughout the project, referencing any prior interactions
  • include specific project deliverables and the resourcing necessary to deliver the proposed work using a Gantt chart or similar aide
  • detail any necessary access to facilities, expertise, or consultancy essential to delivering the proposed work
  • outline where intellectual property (IP) and freedom to operate considerations will need to be accounted for (for example: where licenses will need to be obtained)
  • make clear any risks that exist, outlining mitigation strategies for the issues that may limit this project from delivering on its financial, commercial, and technical objectives
  • detail the contribution of any industry or other organisation with whom you plan to partner

You must include a Gantt chart (or similar aide). Ensure your file is no larger than an A4 page and accompanied by no more than 50 words, in a single PDF that’s a maximum of 8MB. Upload details are provided within the service on the actual application.

Route to market and intellectual assets

How will the proposed project progress the innovation or technology towards achieving market or application?

  • describe how the proposed work will inform or deploy the product, service or technology using the most appropriate route to market
  • outline what further support you may need, following this funding, to deliver your product, service, or technology, for example: access to networks, further funding, private investment, and skills
  • outline how any intellectual assets generated, including IP, will be managed throughout the project to enable further development and ensure future success

Please see our guidance on intellectual property management in the ‘Additional Information’ section.

Intellectual property rights (IPR)

Word count: 500

Provide a brief description of the intellectual assets underpinning the proposed work

Include any IPR if appropriate. If your IPR is a patent, please include the patent number or numbers along with a summary scope of the claims. We recognise that not all applications to the FoF will have a patent or other IPR.

Wider benefits

Beyond the commercial opportunity, what are the potential societal, environmental, and economic benefits of the proposed approach?

  • explain why public funding is appropriate and essential for the proposed programme of work, including why private investment cannot, or will not enable this
  • consider the potential impact on high-level societal challenges, for example: gender equality, diversity, social inclusion, and climate change
  • outline any wider economic impacts, for example: job creation, skills, and capacity building
  • describe the steps you will take to maximise any potential benefits

Your organisation’s support

Word limit: 10

Provide details of support from your research organisation.

Provide a Statement of Support from your research organisation detailing why the proposed work is needed. This should include details of any matched funding that will be provided to support the activity and any additional support that might add value to the work.

The committee will be looking for a strong statement of commitment from your research organisation.

We recognise that in some instances, this information may be provided by the Research Office, the Technology Transfer Office (TTO) or equivalent, or a combination of both.

You must also include the following details:

  • a significant person’s name and their position, from the TTO or Research Office, or both
  • office address or web link

Upload details are provided within the Funding Service on the actual application.

Add details about any project partners’ contributions. If there are no project partners, you can indicate this on the Funding Service.

A project partner is a collaborating organisation who will have an integral role in the proposed research. This may include direct (cash) or indirect (in-kind) contributions such as expertise, staff time or use of facilities.

Add the following project partner details:

  • the organisation name and address (searchable via a drop-down list or enter the organisation’s details manually, as applicable)
  • the project partner contact name and email address
  • the type of contribution (direct or in-direct) and its monetary value
  • for more guidance, refer to the BBSRC grants guide Collaborations section

If a detail is entered incorrectly and you have saved the entry, remove the specific project partner record and re-add it with the correct information.

Please see our guidance on intellectual property management in the ‘Additional Information’ section, which covers our policy on the required contributions from project partners seeking access to foreground IP.

For audit purposes, UKRI requires formal collaboration agreements to be put in place if an award is made.

Project partners: letters (or emails) of support

Word limit: 500

Upload a single PDF containing the letters or emails of support from each partner you named in the ‘Project partners’ section.

Enter the words ‘attachment supplied’ in the text box. Each letter or email you provide should:

  • confirm the partner’s commitment to the project
  • clearly explain the value, relevance, and possible benefits of the work to them
  • describe any additional value that they bring to the project

Applications without project partners must clearly articulate how industry, users or both have contributed to the development of the project to date and how they will be engaged in the future progress of the project.

Save letters or emails of support from each partner in a single PDF no bigger than 8MB. Unless specially requested, please do not include any sensitive personal data within the attachment.

For the file name, use the unique Funding Service number the system gives you when you create an application, followed by the words ‘Project partner’.

If the attachment does not meet these requirements, the application will be rejected.

The Funding Service will provide document upload details when you apply. If you do not have any project partners, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

Ensure you have prior agreement from project partners so that, if you are offered funding, they will support your project as indicated in the contributions template.

Do not provide letters of support from host and project co-leads’ research organisations.

Applicant and team capability to deliver

Word limit: 1,500

Why are you the right individual or team to successfully deliver the proposed work?

Evidence of how you, and if relevant your team, have:

  • the relevant experience (appropriate to career stage) to deliver the proposed work
  • the right balance of skills and expertise to cover the proposed work
  • the appropriate leadership and management skills to deliver the work and your approach to develop others
  • contributed to developing a positive research environment and wider community

You may demonstrate elements of your responses in visual form if relevant. Further details are provided in the Funding Service.

The word count for this section is 1,500 words: 1,000 words to be used for R4RI modules and, if necessary, a further 500 words for Additions.

Use the Résumé for Research and Innovation (R4RI) format to showcase the range of relevant skills you and, if relevant, your team (project and project co-leads, researchers, technicians, specialists, partners and so on) have and how this will help deliver the proposed work. You can include individuals’ specific achievements but only choose past contributions that best evidence their ability to deliver this work.

Complete this section using the R4RI module headings listed. Use each heading once and include a response for the whole team, see the UKRI guidance on R4RI . You should consider how to balance your answer, and emphasise where appropriate the key skills each team member brings:

  • contributions to the generation of new ideas, tools, methodologies, or knowledge
  • the development of others and maintenance of effective working relationships
  • contributions to the wider research and innovation community
  • contributions to broader research or innovation users and audiences and towards wider societal benefit

Provide any further details relevant to your application. This section is optional and can be up to 500 words. You should not use it to describe additional skills, experiences, or outputs, but you can use it to describe any factors that provide context for the rest of your R4RI (for example, details of career breaks if you wish to disclose them).

Complete this as a narrative. Do not format it like a CV.

UKRI has introduced new role types for funding opportunities being run on the new Funding Service.

For full details, see Eligibility as an individual .

Data management and sharing

Word limit: 700

How will you manage and share data collected or acquired through the proposed research?

Provide a data management plan that clearly details how you will comply with UKRI’s published data sharing policy , which includes detailed guidance notes.

Ethics and responsible research and innovation (RRI)

What are the ethical or RRI implications and issues relating to the proposed work? If you do not think that the proposed work raises any ethical or RRI issues, explain why.

Demonstrate that you have identified and evaluated:

  • the relevant ethical or responsible research and innovation considerations
  • how you will manage these considerations

Genetic and biological risk

Does your proposed research involve any genetic or biological risk?

In respect of animals, plants or microbes, are you proposing to:

  • use genetic modification as an experimental tool, like studying gene function in a genetically modified organism
  • release genetically modified organisms
  • ultimately develop commercial and industrial genetically modified outcomes

If yes, provide the name of any required approving body and state if approval is already in place. If it is not, provide an indicative timeframe for obtaining the required approval.

Identify the organism or organisms as a plant, animal or microbe and specify the species and which of the three categories the research relates to.

Identify the genetic and biological risks resulting from the proposed research, their implications, and any mitigation you plan on taking. Assessors will want to know you have considered the risks and their implications to justify that any identified risks do not outweigh any benefits of the proposed research.

If this does not apply to your proposed work, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

Research involving the use of animals

Does your proposed research involve the use of vertebrate animals or other organisms covered by the Animals Scientific Procedures Act?

If you are proposing research that requires using animals, download and complete the Animals Scientific Procedures Act template (DOCX, 74KB) , which contains all the questions relating to research using vertebrate animals or other Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 regulated organisms.

Save it as a PDF. The Funding Service will provide document upload details when you apply. If this does not apply to your proposed work, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

Conducting research with animals overseas

Will any of the proposed animal research be conducted overseas?

If you are proposing to conduct overseas research, it must be conducted in accordance with welfare standards consistent with those in the UK, as in Responsibility in the use of animals in bioscience research, page 14 .

Ensure all named applicants in the UK and overseas are aware of this requirement. Provide a statement to confirm that:

  • all named applicants are aware of the requirements and have agreed to abide by them
  • this overseas research will be conducted in accordance with welfare standards consistent with the principles of UK legislation
  • the expectation set out in Responsibility in the use of animals in bioscience research will be applied and maintained
  • appropriate national and institutional approvals are in place

Overseas studies proposing to use non-human primates, cats, dogs, equines or pigs will be assessed during NC3Rs review of research applications. Provide the required information by completing the template from the question ‘Research involving the use of animals’.

For studies involving other species, select, download, and complete the relevant Word checklist or checklists from this list:

  • Additional questions on the use of rodents overseas (DOCX, 49.1KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of rabbits overseas (DOCX, 49.2KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of sheep overseas (DOCX, 50.9KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of goats overseas (DOCX, 47.3KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of pigs overseas (DOCX, 51.4KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of cattle overseas (DOCX, 57.0KB)
  • Additional questions on the use of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis overseas (DOCX, 57.3KB)

Save as a PDF. If you use more than one checklist, save it as a single PDF.

The Funding Service will provide document upload details when you apply. If this does not apply to your proposed work, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

Research involving human participation

Will the project involve the use of human subjects or their personal information?

If you are proposing research that requires the involvement of human subjects, provide the name of any required approving body and whether approval is already in place.

Justify the number and the diversity of the participants involved, as well as any procedures.

Provide details of any areas of substantial or moderate severity of impact.

Research involving human tissues or biological samples

Does your proposed research involve the use of human tissues, or biological samples?

If you are proposing work that involves human tissues or biological samples, provide the name of any required approving body and whether approval is already in place.

Justify the use of human tissue or biological samples specifying the nature and quantity of the material to be used and its source.

Resources and cost justification

Word limit: 2,000

What will you need to deliver your proposed work and how much will it cost?

Justify the application’s more costly resources, in particular:

  • project staff
  • significant travel for field work or collaboration (but not regular travel between collaborating organisations or to conferences)
  • any equipment that will cost more than £10,000
  • any consumables beyond typical requirements, or that are required in exceptional quantities
  • all facilities and infrastructure costs
  • all resources that have been costed as ‘Exceptions’

Assessors are not looking for detailed costs or a line-by-line breakdown of all project resources. Overall, they want you to demonstrate how the resources you anticipate needing for your proposed work:

  • are comprehensive, appropriate, and justified
  • represent the optimal use of resources to achieve the intended outcomes
  • maximise potential outcomes and impacts

Does your proposed research require the support and use of a facility?

If you will need to use a facility, follow your proposed facility’s normal access request procedures. Ensure you have prior agreement so that if you are offered funding, they will support the use of their facility on your project.

For each requested facility you will need to provide the:

  • name of facility, copied and pasted from the facility information list (DOCX, 35KB)
  • proposed usage or costs, or costs per unit where indicated on the facility information list
  • confirmation you have their agreement where required

If you will not need to use a facility, you will be able to indicate this in the Funding Service.

Word limit: 1000

List the references you have used to support your application.

Include all references in this section, not in the rest of the application questions.

You should not include any other information in this section.

We advise you not to include hyperlinks, as assessors are not obliged to access the information they lead to or consider it in their assessment of your application.

If linking to web resources, to maintain the information’s integrity, include persistent identifiers (such as digital object identifiers) where possible.

You must not include links to web resources to extend your application.

How we will assess your application

Assessment process.

We will assess your application using the following process.

All applications will be assessed by the FoF committee. The FoF committee are a panel of experts selected with the oversight of the BBSRC Appointments Assurance Committee . Collectively, the committee review your application against the criteria and rank it alongside other applications.

BBSRC will make the final funding decision.

We will give feedback with the outcome of your application.

Principles of assessment

We support the San Francisco declaration on research assessment and recognise the relationship between research assessment and research integrity.

Find out about the UKRI principles of assessment and decision making .

Assessment criteria

The criteria we will assess your application against are:

Scientific and technical merit

To what extent does the proposal identify or demonstrate:

  • high scientific quality (including technical feasibility, objectives and deliverables)
  • potential risks with any mitigation strategies
  • novelty regarding any existing technology
  • a technology readiness level gain throughout project
  • quality of the development and implementation plan, including strength of the consortia (both academic and project partners where relevant)
  • input from end users and customers

Societal impact

To what extent does the proposal articulate:

  • the societal benefits of the proposed innovation, including non-monetary benefits, for example: time saved, patients care improved and so on
  • a knowledge exchange plan, including dissemination of expertise into the challenge area
  • how it addresses the needs of end users or customers
  • consideration of regulatory alignment, engagement or both (where relevant)
  • consideration of societal sensitivities, for example: reduced plastic, data security and so on

Economic impact

To what extent does the proposal demonstrate:

  • a robust business plan, for example: need, size, competitors, value, and location
  • the likelihood of commercialisation and route to market (including project partner support, if relevant)
  • economic benefit, both UK and globally
  • consideration of intellectual property management

Added value

  • that the resources requested, relative to the anticipated outputs, represent an appropriate investment of our funds (value for money)
  • the degree of support from project partners, both during project and after funding (if relevant)
  • a consideration of the future of the project after FoF funding has finished

Find details of assessment questions and criteria under the ‘Application questions’ heading in the ‘How to apply’ section.

Contact details

Get help with your application.

If you have a question and the answers aren’t provided on this page

Important note: The Helpdesk is committed to helping users of the UKRI Funding Service as effectively and as quickly as possible. In order to manage cases at peak volume times, the Helpdesk will triage and prioritise those queries with an imminent opportunity deadline or a technical issue. Enquiries raised where information is available on the Funding Finder opportunity page and should be understood early in the application process (for example, regarding eligibility or content/remit of an opportunity) will not constitute a priority case and will be addressed as soon as possible.

For help and advice on costings and writing your proposal please contact your research office in the first instance, allowing sufficient time for your organisation’s submission process.

For questions related to this specific funding opportunity please contact: [email protected]

Any queries regarding the system or the submission of applications through the Funding Service should be directed to the helpdesk.

Email: [email protected] Phone: 01793 547490

Our phone lines are open:

  • Monday to Thursday 8:30am to 5:00pm
  • Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm

To help us process queries quicker, we request that users highlight the council and opportunity name in the subject title of their email query, include the application reference number, and refrain from contacting more than one mailbox at a time.

Find out more information on submitting an application .

Sensitive information

If you or a core team member need to tell us something you wish to remain confidential, email [email protected]

Include in the subject line: [the funding opportunity title; sensitive information; your Funding Service application number].

Typical examples of confidential information include:

  • individual is unavailable until a certain date (for example due to parental leave)
  • declaration of interest
  • additional information about eligibility to apply that would not be appropriately shared in the ‘Applicant and team capability’ section
  • conflict of interest for UKRI to consider in reviewer or panel participant selection
  • the application is an invited resubmission

For information about how UKRI handles personal data, read UKRI’s privacy notice .

Additional info

Guidance for intellectual property (ip) management.

We encourage all applicants to carefully consider the management of foreground IP generated on Follow-on Fund awards.

Project partners seeking pre-negotiated access to foreground IP must contribute a minimum of 50% total project costs. Project partners seeking to secure the right to negotiate access to foreground IP at the end of the award must contribute a minimum of 10% total project costs.

Empty shell companies (no investment, staff, or premises) formed for the sole purpose of commercialising foreground IP generated during the project are exempt from contributing project costs.

Applicants are advised against the direct assignment of foreground IP to a newly formed spin-out company. Instead, option agreements should be utilised until the spin-out has secured enough funding to drive the translation of foreground IP, when a substantive agreement should be executed.

You must clearly justify why your chosen approach is the best for your foreground IP within the relevant sections of the application. We reserve the right to request further information on IP management plans and IP rights of third parties should your application be recommended for funding.

Webinar for potential applicants

We held a webinar on 8 February 2023. This provided more information about the funding opportunity and a chance to ask questions.

Watch the webinar recording on YouTube .

Research disruption due to COVID-19

We recognise that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused major interruptions and disruptions across our communities. We are committed to ensuring that individual applicants and their wider team, including partners and networks, are not penalised for any disruption to their career, such as:

  • breaks and delays
  • disruptive working patterns and conditions
  • the loss of ongoing work
  • role changes that may have been caused by the pandemic

Reviewers and panel members will be advised to consider the unequal impacts that COVID-19 related disruption might have had on the capability to deliver and career development of those individuals included in the application. They will be asked to consider the capability of the applicant and their wider team to deliver the research they are proposing.

Where disruptions have occurred, you can highlight this within your application if you wish, but there is no requirement to detail the specific circumstances that caused the disruption.

  • 23 February 2024 Webinar recording added in Additional info section.

This is the website for UKRI: our seven research councils, Research England and Innovate UK. Let us know if you have feedback or would like to help improve our online products and services .

IMAGES

  1. Call for Full Proposals for Funding by the NIH Faculty and REPS

    research grants 2024 round 1

  2. Research Grants Uncovered: A Step-by-Step Guide for 2024

    research grants 2024 round 1

  3. Expressions of Interest for 2024 research funding opportunities with

    research grants 2024 round 1

  4. 2024 Research Grant

    research grants 2024 round 1

  5. 35 Grant Statistics for 2024: The Ultimate List

    research grants 2024 round 1

  6. Boost your research in 2024 with one of our Research Foundation grants

    research grants 2024 round 1

COMMENTS

  1. Research grants

    Research grants . A scheme for scientists in the UK who are at an early stage in their career or returning from a career break and want to purchase specialised equipment and consumables. ... 2024 round 2. Open date. 31 January 2024. Close date. 27 March 2024. Decision by. 31 August 2024. 2025 round 1. Open date. 07 August 2024. Close date. 02 ...

  2. Standard research grant: 2024 round 1: responsive mode

    Publication date: 30 October 2023. Opening date: 30 October 2023 9:00am UK time. Closing date: 17 January 2024 4:00pm UK time. Standard research grants are available for researchers at eligible research organisations. This scheme supports excellent investigator-led research across the breadth of Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research ...

  3. Research Fund

    Apply to the Royal Society of Chemistry's Research Fund for grants of up to £4000 to purchase chemicals and/or equipment for your research project. ... Round 1 2024. Applications open: 3 June 2024: Application close: 8 July 2024 1400 UK time (BST) Initial eligibility decisions: Week commencing 22 July 2024:

  4. ESRC responsive mode: research grants round one

    Proposals can draw from the wider sciences, as long as the social sciences are more than 50% of the research focus and effort. Applications are via the UKRI Funding Service and will run as consecutive rounds with closing dates. The full economic cost of your project can range from £350,000 to £1,000,000. ESRC will fund 80% of the full ...

  5. AHRC responsive mode: standard research grant: round one

    11 September 2023. Second round opening date now 28 September 2023. 2 August 2023. Dates of future rounds added in 'How to apply' section. 16 June 2023. Amended opening date from 22 June 2023 to 29 June 2023. AHRC standard research grants support well-defined collaborative projects across the arts and humanities in areas covered by AHRC's remit.

  6. Application dates

    International Exchanges Global Round 1: 10 January 2024 : 12 March 2024 : June 2024: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Postdoctoral Fellowship 10 January 2024: 12 March 2024 ... Research Grants : 7 August 2024: 2 October 2024: January 2025 : Faraday Discovery Fellowships - Stage 1: 14 August 2024: 2 October 2024: November 2024 ...

  7. Apply now for LEO Foundation research grants

    Research Networking Grants 2024 - Round 1: 27 Feb 2024: 10 Apr 2024: Closed: Through our Research Networking Grants, we seek to enable knowledge-sharing and facilitate networking and collaborations within the skin research community by providing researchers and student s with opportunities to present and discuss the newest research within ...

  8. International Exchanges

    Please note that from 2024, the Cost Share call with the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) will be part of Round 2 (opening on 10 April 2024) instead of Round 3. What does the scheme offer? Funds can cover travel, subsistence and research expenses. Global rounds. The funding available is dependent upon the length of the visit:

  9. Linkage Projects 2024

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  10. NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships

    16 April 2024. Closes. 11 July 2024. Contact. For more information about the funding Programme, visit the Global Health Page; Supporting Information. Guidance Notes: NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships - Round 1 - 2024. Application Form Guidance: NIHR Global Advanced Fellowship - Round 1 - 2024. FAQs. Funding Committee Webinar recording

  11. Apply for 2024 Climate Research Innovation Grants

    Download the RFP to get the full details on the 2024 round of CRISP grants, including eligibility and review criteria. Submit proposals by Monday, February 26, 2024 at 5:30 p.m. ET. Register for an informational webinar on December 12, 2023, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Email questions to: [email protected].

  12. Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 24-1)

    In fiscal year 2024, NSF expects to evaluate over 46,500 proposals through a competitive merit review process and make over 12,900 awards of which about 10,800 are expected to be new research grants and the remainder cooperative agreements.

  13. Now Open: Applications for Linkage Projects 2024 Round 1

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  14. NIHR Global Advanced Fellowships 2024

    Deadline: July 11, 2024. Applications for the first round of the National Institute for Health and Care research (NIHR) Global Advanced Fellowships 2024 are now open. The Global Advanced Fellowship is a mid-career postdoctoral award. The scheme will create a career pathway for Global Health researchers from the UK and low- and middle-income ...

  15. BA/Leverhulme Small Research Grants 2024 guidance notes

    The British Academy has partnered with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) who will co-fund two Small Research Grants for this round. UK applicants should submit an application for a British Academy Small Grant and ensure that their Chinese co-applicant submits an application to CASS in English and Chinese (on its prescribed ...

  16. Funding Opportunities

    2024 Round 3 - Programs Opening 1/11/2024; Program Amount RFA Release Date LOI Deadline Application Deadline; OREF/Goldberg Arthritis Research Grant: $50,000: 1/11/2024: N/A: ... Provides $50,000 in funding for research that aims to help us better understand how to prevent and treat osteoarthritis, one of the most common causes of disability in ...

  17. Biden-Harris Administration Opens Applications for $1.3 Billion in

    May 30, 2024. The Biden-Harris Administration opened applications today for a historic $1.3 billion funding opportunity for electric vehicle (EV) charging and alternative-fueling infrastructure in urban and rural communities and along designated highways, interstates, and major roadways. This is the largest single grant funding opportunity for EV charging in the nation's history and it will ...

  18. Denmark: LEO Foundation Visiting Researchers 2024 (Round 1)

    Deadline: 10 April 2024 The LEO Foundation is seeking applications for the round one of Visiting Researchers Program. The purpose of the LEO Foundation Visiting Researchers program is to stimulate a cohesive and agile skin research ecosystem by supporting temporary embedment of skin researchers in a foreign research environment with the aim of fostering genuine

  19. ROSES 2024: Mentorship and Opportunities in STEM with Academic

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  20. 2024-2026 IRP Extramural Large Grants

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  21. PDF Royal Society Research Grants 2024 Round 2 Contents

    Royal Society Research Grants 2024 Round 2 The following scheme notes set out the eligibility and application process of the Research Grants scheme. ... Expected results September 2024 3 Finance 3.1 Total Funding Available Up to £20,000 (including VAT) is available for the purchase of specialised equipment directly related to the ...

  22. PDF Funding Opportunities June 2024

    NIH funding opportunities focusing on global health and foreign collaboration: • Centers for Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases (CREID) Network (U01 Clinical Trial Not. Allowed) (RFA-AI-24-006) Application due date: June 21, 2024. • Centers for Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases (CREID) Network Coordination Center (U01 Clinical ...

  23. GRANTS FOR ARTS PROJECTS

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  24. Announcing the 2024 A-School Research Grant Recipients

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  25. 2024 Upjohn research grants

    2024 Upjohn research grants - call for submissions is open. and professional practice knowledge. Academic institutions, firms, practice, and other research and non-profit organizations are all eligible for grants. Luz Toro Intl. Assoc. AIA. CPNAA.

  26. FY 2022 By the Numbers: Extramural Grant Investments in Research

    In FY2022, NIH spent $33.3 billion of its total $45.2 billion appropriation for competing and noncompeting grant awards. This is a 3.1% increase (or $1.02 billion) in spending over the previous year. Monies for grants and Other Transaction awards are included while research and development contracts are excluded.

  27. Texas organization grants over $40M to cancer-fighting research in

    Jun 11, 2024, 10:58 am. In all, the Welch Foundation on June 4 announced more than $40.5 million in academic research grants, equipment grants, and fellowships. ... Since 1954, the Welch Foundation has contributed over $1.1 billion for Texas-nurtured advancements in chemistry through research grants, endowed chairs, and other chemistry-related ...

  28. Funding Opportunities · Joint Office of Energy and Transportation

    Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) - Joint Office of Energy and Transportation: Communities Taking Charge Accelerator, Fiscal Year 2024 Funding Opportunity Announcement. The purpose of Communities Taking Charge is to expand community e-mobility access and provide clean reliable energy. The funding will drive innovation in equitable clean ...

  29. BBSRC follow-on fund: 2024 round 1

    FoF awards aim to take ideas through to a stage where the route to practical application is clear. The full economic cost (FEC) of your project can be up to £800,000. BBSRC will fund 80% of the FEC. FoF awards support defined programmes of work for up to two years. The funding opportunity will open on 24 January 2024. Open all.

  30. IES Announces Availability of CTE Research Grants

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