The 9 Parts of Speech: Definitions and Examples

  • Ph.D., Rhetoric and English, University of Georgia
  • M.A., Modern English and American Literature, University of Leicester
  • B.A., English, State University of New York

A part of speech is a term used in traditional grammar for one of the nine main categories into which words are classified according to their functions in sentences, such as nouns or verbs. Also known as word classes, these are the building blocks of grammar.

Every sentence you write or speak in English includes words that fall into some of the nine parts of speech. These include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections. (Some sources include only eight parts of speech and leave interjections in their own category.)

Parts of Speech

  • Word types can be divided into nine parts of speech:
  • prepositions
  • conjunctions
  • articles/determiners
  • interjections
  • Some words can be considered more than one part of speech, depending on context and usage.
  • Interjections can form complete sentences on their own.

Learning the names of the parts of speech probably won't make you witty, healthy, wealthy, or wise. In fact, learning just the names of the parts of speech won't even make you a better writer. However, you will gain a basic understanding of sentence structure  and the  English language by familiarizing yourself with these labels.

Open and Closed Word Classes

The parts of speech are commonly divided into  open classes  (nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs) and  closed classes  (pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions, articles/determiners, and interjections). Open classes can be altered and added to as language develops, and closed classes are pretty much set in stone. For example, new nouns are created every day, but conjunctions never change.

In contemporary linguistics , parts of speech are generally referred to as word classes or syntactic categories. The main difference is that word classes are classified according to more strict linguistic criteria. Within word classes, there is the lexical, or open class, and the function, or closed class.

The 9 Parts of Speech

Read about each part of speech below, and practice identifying each.

Nouns are a person, place, thing, or idea. They can take on a myriad of roles in a sentence, from the subject of it all to the object of an action. They are capitalized when they're the official name of something or someone, and they're called proper nouns in these cases. Examples: pirate, Caribbean, ship, freedom, Captain Jack Sparrow.

Pronouns stand in for nouns in a sentence . They are more generic versions of nouns that refer only to people. Examples:​  I, you, he, she, it, ours, them, who, which, anybody, ourselves.

Verbs are action words that tell what happens in a sentence. They can also show a sentence subject's state of being ( is , was ). Verbs change form based on tense (present, past) and count distinction (singular or plural). Examples:  sing, dance, believes, seemed, finish, eat, drink, be, became.

Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. They specify which one, how much, what kind, and more. Adjectives allow readers and listeners to use their senses to imagine something more clearly. Examples:  hot, lazy, funny, unique, bright, beautiful, poor, smooth.

Adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and even other adverbs. They specify when, where, how, and why something happened and to what extent or how often. Many adjectives can be turned into adjectives by adding the suffix - ly . Examples:  softly, quickly, lazily, often, only, hopefully, sometimes.

Preposition

Prepositions  show spatial, temporal, and role relations between a noun or pronoun and the other words in a sentence. They come at the start of a prepositional phrase , which contains a preposition and its object. Examples:  up, over, against, by, for, into, close to, out of, apart from.

Conjunction

Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses in a sentence. There are coordinating, subordinating, and correlative conjunctions. Examples:  and, but, or, so, yet.

Articles and Determiners

Articles and determiners function like adjectives by modifying nouns, but they are different than adjectives in that they are necessary for a sentence to have proper syntax. Articles and determiners specify and identify nouns, and there are indefinite and definite articles. Examples of articles:  a, an, the ; examples of determiners:  these, that, those, enough, much, few, which, what.

Some traditional grammars have treated articles  as a distinct part of speech. Modern grammars, however, more often include articles in the category of determiners , which identify or quantify a noun. Even though they modify nouns like adjectives, articles are different in that they are essential to the proper syntax of a sentence, just as determiners are necessary to convey the meaning of a sentence, while adjectives are optional.

Interjection

Interjections are expressions that can stand on their own or be contained within sentences. These words and phrases often carry strong emotions and convey reactions. Examples:  ah, whoops, ouch, yabba dabba do!

How to Determine the Part of Speech

Only interjections ( Hooray! ) have a habit of standing alone; every other part of speech must be contained within a sentence and some are even required in sentences (nouns and verbs). Other parts of speech come in many varieties and may appear just about anywhere in a sentence.

To know for sure what part of speech a word falls into, look not only at the word itself but also at its meaning, position, and use in a sentence.

For example, in the first sentence below,  work  functions as a noun; in the second sentence, a verb; and in the third sentence, an adjective:

  • Bosco showed up for  work  two hours late.
  • The noun  work  is the thing Bosco shows up for.
  • He will have to  work  until midnight.
  • The verb  work  is the action he must perform.
  • His  work  permit expires next month.
  • The  attributive noun  (or converted adjective) work  modifies the noun  permit .

Learning the names and uses of the basic parts of speech is just one way to understand how sentences are constructed.

Dissecting Basic Sentences

To form a basic complete sentence, you only need two elements: a noun (or pronoun standing in for a noun) and a verb. The noun acts as a subject, and the verb, by telling what action the subject is taking, acts as the predicate. 

In the short sentence above,  birds  is the noun and  fly  is the verb. The sentence makes sense and gets the point across.

You can have a sentence with just one word without breaking any sentence formation rules. The short sentence below is complete because it's a verb command with an understood "you" noun.

Here, the pronoun, standing in for a noun, is implied and acts as the subject. The sentence is really saying, "(You) go!"

Constructing More Complex Sentences

Use more parts of speech to add additional information about what's happening in a sentence to make it more complex. Take the first sentence from above, for example, and incorporate more information about how and why birds fly.

  • Birds fly when migrating before winter.

Birds and fly remain the noun and the verb, but now there is more description. 

When  is an adverb that modifies the verb fly.  The word before  is a little tricky because it can be either a conjunction, preposition, or adverb depending on the context. In this case, it's a preposition because it's followed by a noun. This preposition begins an adverbial phrase of time ( before winter ) that answers the question of when the birds migrate . Before is not a conjunction because it does not connect two clauses.

  • A List of Exclamations and Interjections in English
  • Sentence Parts and Sentence Structures
  • 100 Key Terms Used in the Study of Grammar
  • Closed Class Words
  • Word Class in English Grammar
  • Prepositional Phrases in English Grammar
  • Foundations of Grammar in Italian
  • The Top 25 Grammatical Terms
  • What Are the Parts of a Prepositional Phrase?
  • Open Class Words in English Grammar
  • What Is an Adverb in English Grammar?
  • Definition and Examples of Function Words in English
  • Telegraphic Speech
  • Sentence Patterns
  • Pronoun Definition and Examples
  • Lesson Plan: Label Sentences with Parts of Speech

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Parts of Speech

What are the parts of speech, a formal definition.

Table of Contents

The Part of Speech Is Determined by the Word's Function

Are there 8 or 9 parts of speech, the nine parts of speech, (1) adjective, (3) conjunction, (4) determiner, (5) interjection, (7) preposition, (8) pronoun, why the parts of speech are important, video lesson.

parts of speech

  • You need to dig a well . (noun)
  • You look well . (adjective)
  • You dance well . (adverb)
  • Well , I agree. (interjection)
  • My eyes will well up. (verb)
  • red, happy, enormous
  • Ask the boy in the red jumper.
  • I live in a happy place.
  • I caught a fish this morning! I mean an enormous one.
  • happily, loosely, often
  • They skipped happily to the counter.
  • Tie the knot loosely so they can escape.
  • I often walk to work.
  • It is an intriguingly magic setting.
  • He plays the piano extremely well.
  • and, or, but
  • it is a large and important city.
  • Shall we run to the hills or hide in the bushes?
  • I know you are lying, but I cannot prove it.
  • my, those, two, many
  • My dog is fine with those cats.
  • There are two dogs but many cats.
  • ouch, oops, eek
  • Ouch , that hurt.
  • Oops , it's broken.
  • Eek! A mouse just ran past my foot!
  • leader, town, apple
  • Take me to your leader .
  • I will see you in town later.
  • An apple fell on his head .
  • in, near, on, with
  • Sarah is hiding in the box.
  • I live near the train station.
  • Put your hands on your head.
  • She yelled with enthusiasm.
  • she, we, they, that
  • Joanne is smart. She is also funny.
  • Our team has studied the evidence. We know the truth.
  • Jack and Jill went up the hill, but they never returned.
  • That is clever!
  • work, be, write, exist
  • Tony works down the pit now. He was unemployed.
  • I will write a song for you.
  • I think aliens exist .

Are you a visual learner? Do you prefer video to text? Here is a list of all our grammar videos .

Video for Each Part of Speech

speech in english grammar with examples

The Most Important Writing Issues

The top issue related to adjectives, the top issue related to adverbs.

  • Extremely annoyed, she stared menacingly at her rival.
  • Infuriated, she glared at her rival.

The Top Issue Related to Conjunctions

correct tick

  • Burger, Fries, and a shake
  • Fish, chips and peas

The Top Issue Related to Determiners

wrong cross

The Top Issue Related to Interjections

The top issue related to nouns, the top issue related to prepositions, the top issue related to pronouns, the top issue related to verbs.

  • Crack the parts of speech to help with learning a foreign language or to take your writing to the next level.

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This page was written by Craig Shrives .

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Applied Grammar by Gail Brubaker

the 8 Parts of Speech

Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech: Definitions and Examples

Are you trying to master the grammatical rules of English? If so, understanding the 8 parts of speech is crucial. But what exactly are the parts of speech? How many are there? And how do you know which words fall into each category? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. In this comprehensive guide, we will break down the definitions and examples of the 8 parts of speech, making it easier for you to navigate the intricacies of the English language.

English can be a challenging language to learn, but by understanding the parts of speech, you’ll gain a solid foundation for constructing sentences with clarity and precision. Whether you’re a student, a writer, or simply someone looking to improve your language skills, this article will provide you with a clear understanding of each part of speech. So, let’s immerse and explore the definitions and examples of the 8 parts of speech, empowering you to communicate effectively and confidently in English.

Key Takeaways

  • Understanding the 8 parts of speech is crucial for mastering English grammar.
  • The 8 parts of speech are: nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.
  • Nouns represent people, places, things, or ideas.
  • Pronouns replace nouns to avoid repetition.
  • Verbs describe actions or states of being.
  • Adjectives provide additional details about nouns.
  • Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.
  • Prepositions show relationships between words in a sentence.
  • Conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses together.
  • Interjections express strong emotions or surprise.

What Are Parts of Speech?

When it comes to understanding the intricacies of English grammar, learning the different parts of speech is crucial. But what exactly are parts of speech? How many are there? And how do you determine which words belong to each part of speech? In this comprehensive guide, we’ll provide clear definitions and examples for each part of speech, helping you navigate the complexities of the English language.

Nouns are words that represent people, places, things, or ideas. They can be common or proper, singular or plural. Examples of nouns include “dog,” “New York City,” and “love.”

Pronouns are words used in place of nouns to avoid repetition. They can refer to individuals or groups. Examples of pronouns include “he,” “she,” “it,” and “they.”

Verbs are action words that describe what a subject does or the state of being. They can be in different tenses and forms. Examples of verbs include “run,” “jump,” and “is.”

Adjectives are words that describe or modify nouns, giving more details or information about them. They can describe qualities, size, shape, color, and more. Examples of adjectives include “beautiful,” “large,” and “blue.”

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, providing information on how, when, where, or to what extent. They often end in “-ly.” Examples of adverbs include “quickly,” “happily,” and “very.”

Prepositions

Prepositions show a relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence. They indicate position, direction, time, or manner. Examples of prepositions include “in,” “on,” “at,” and “from.”

Conjunctions

Conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses together. They can be coordinating or subordinating. Examples of conjunctions include “and,” “but,” “or,” and “because.”

Interjections

Interjections are short exclamations used to express emotions or surprise. They are often followed by exclamation marks. Examples of interjections include “Wow,” “Yay,” and “Ouch!”

Parts of Speech

Understanding the different parts of speech is crucial for building a strong foundation in English grammar. Each part of speech plays a unique role in the construction of sentences, providing clarity and meaning to our language. In this section, we will explore the definitions and examples of the eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition, conjunction, and interjection.

A noun is a word that identifies a person, place, thing, or idea. It can refer to both concrete objects, such as “book” or “dog,” and abstract concepts, such as “love” or “happiness.” Nouns are often referred to as “persons, places, or things,” but it is essential to recognize that they encompass much more than that. Here are some examples of nouns used in sentences:

  • The cat is sleeping on the couch.
  • I love to read a good book .
  • She has a beautiful voice .

Pronouns are words that are used to replace nouns in a sentence. They help avoid repetitive use of nouns and add fluency to our language. Personal pronouns, such as “he,” “she,” or “they,” refer to specific individuals or groups of people. Here are some examples of pronouns used in sentences:

  • She is going to the store.
  • We had an amazing time at the party.
  • Please give me the book.

Verbs are action words that express an action, occurrence, or state of being. They are the backbone of a sentence and provide information about what is happening. Verbs can be either transitive or intransitive, depending on whether they require an object to complete their meaning. Here are some examples of verbs used in sentences:

  • The dog ran in the park.
  • I love to swim in the ocean.
  • They are studying for the exam.

Adjectives are words that describe or modify nouns. They provide additional information about the nouns they accompany, such as their size, color, or quality. Adjectives help make our language more vivid and expressive. Here are some examples of adjectives used in sentences:

  • She has a beautiful smile.
  • The blue sky is clear today.
  • He is a talented musician.

Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. They provide information about how, when, where, or to what extent an action is performed. Adverbs enhance the meaning of a sentence and add precision to our language. Here are some examples of adverbs used in sentences:

  • He quickly finished his assignments.
  • She sings beautifully .
  • They went outside to play.

Preposition

Prepositions are words that indicate the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence. They often express location, direction, time, or manner. Prepositions are essential for understanding spatial and temporal relationships. Here are some examples of prepositions used in sentences:

  • The cat is under the table.
  • We walked through the park.
  • The book is on the shelf.

Conjunction

Conjunctions are words that connect words, phrases, or clauses within a sentence. They help establish relationships between different parts of a sentence, coordinating or subordinating their meaning. Conjunctions are essential for creating complex sentences. Here are some examples of conjunctions used in sentences:

  • I will go to the store, but I need to buy milk.
  • Because it was raining, we stayed indoors.
  • He likes both chocolate and vanilla ice cream.

Interjection

Interjections are words or phrases used to convey strong emotions or reactions. They are often standalone expressions and can add emphasis or express surprise, joy, or frustration. Interjections bring life and emotion to our language. Here are some examples of interjections used in sentences:

  • Wow , that’s an impressive performance!
  • Ouch , that hurt!
  • Alas , I lost my wallet.

Understanding and mastering the eight parts of speech will greatly enhance your language skills and enable you to effectively communicate in English. From nouns that identify people and things to verbs that express actions, each part of speech contributes to the overall structure and meaning of a sentence. Keep practicing and exploring the various functions of these parts of speech to become a confident English speaker and writer.

Examples of Each Part of Speech

Nouns play a crucial role in sentence construction as they represent people, places, things, or ideas. Here are some examples of nouns:

Pronouns, on the other hand, replace nouns to avoid repetition. Here are a few examples for better understanding:

  • If you leave now, only James and I will remain behind.
  • Their feet ached more than ours .

Verbs express actions, feelings, or states of being. Check out these verb examples:

  • We sang songs , danced all night , and by the morning had fallen in love .
  • Can you bring me something from the kitchen?

Adjectives add descriptions to nouns. Here are a few examples:

  • The tall building stood out in the city skyline.

Adverbs add meaning to verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Take a look at these examples:

  • The car drove quickly down the street.
  • She performed very well in the competition.

Prepositions express the relationship between nouns, pronouns, and other words. Here are some examples:

  • The book is on the table.
  • The cat jumped over the fence.

Conjunctions connect words, phrases, or clauses within a sentence. Check out these examples:

  • He likes tea and coffee.
  • She is tired, but she is determined to finish the project.

Interjections convey strong emotions or sudden reactions. Here are a few examples:

  • Wow , what a beautiful sunset!
  • Oh no , I forgot to bring my umbrella.

Remember, understanding the different parts of speech and their functions is crucial in constructing meaningful sentences. Keep practicing and exploring the various examples to strengthen your language skills.

Now that you have a clear understanding of the eight parts of speech in English grammar, you are equipped with the knowledge to construct sentences with precision and clarity. By mastering the definitions and examples of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections, you can effectively communicate in English.

Each part of speech serves a unique purpose in sentence construction, providing meaning and structure to our language. Nouns name people, places, things, or ideas, while pronouns replace nouns to avoid repetition. Verbs express actions or states of being, while adjectives and adverbs provide descriptions and modify other words. Prepositions indicate relationships between words, conjunctions connect words or phrases, and interjections express strong emotions.

By practicing and exploring the functions of these parts of speech, you will become a confident English speaker and writer. Remember to apply this knowledge in your daily conversations and written communication to enhance your language skills.

Continue to refine your understanding and usage of the eight parts of speech, and watch as your language abilities flourish.

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What are the parts of speech?

Today's the day for you to learn about this important grammatical concept! But first...let's see what the parts of speech have to do with your clothes.

Parts of Speech Chart

Imagine that it's laundry day, and you've just finished washing and drying your clothes. You dump the contents of the laundry basket onto your bed, and you begin to organize everything. You fold matching socks together, you create a pile of perfectly folded shirts that you would be proud to show Marie Kondo, and you do the same thing with your pants, jackets, and everything else.

In the same way that we organize our clothes into groups based on each item's function and features, we organize our words into categories based on each word's function and features. We call these categories of words the parts of speech .

Some people categorize words into eight parts of speech, and some people categorize them into nine parts of speech. Neither one is wrong; they're just two ways of looking at things. We'll go over these categories below. Here at English Grammar Revolution, we categorize words into eight groups, but I'll tell you about the ninth one as well.

There's one important thing for you to know before we look at these categories: most words can function as more than one part of speech . They will only do one job at a time, but they can do different things in different sentences. Look at the word love in the following sentences.

My  love  of grammar inspired me to make this website.

Here, love is functioning as a noun. It's the subject of the sentence. 

I  love  you.

Now, love is acting as a  verb ! It's telling us an action.

The only way we can know how to categorize a word is to look at how it's acting within a sentence.

Okay, let's check out the parts of speech!

The 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns  name people, places, things, or ideas. They're important parts of our sentences because they perform  important jobs  (subjects, direct objects, predicate nouns, etc.).

A peacock walked through our yard .

The dog howled during the night , and it woke up our whole family .

Sometimes people get bogged down with this part of speech because there are also many subcategories of nouns. This is similar to the way that we have subcategories for our clothes. You may have a whole drawer full of pants, but you may also have different types of pants that you use for different purposes (workout pants, lounge pants, work pants, etc.). This is similar to the way that we can further categorize nouns into smaller groups. 

Here are a few of the subcategories of nouns:  proper nouns, common nouns ,  collective nouns ,  possessive nouns , and compound nouns.

Tip : Other parts of speech also have subcategories. If you're studying this information for the first time, ignore the subcategories and focus on learning about each broader category.

2. Pronouns

Pronouns  take the place of nouns. When most people hear the word pronoun , they think of words like I, we, me, he,   she, and they . These are indeed all pronouns, but they're a part of a subcategory called personal pronouns. Know that there are other kinds of pronouns out there as well. Here are some examples: myself, his, someone , and who .

Here are a few of the subcategories of pronouns:  reflexive pronouns ,  indefinite pronouns ,  possessive pronouns , and  relative pronouns . 

When we walked across the bridge,  we saw someone who  knows you .

I will fix the dishwasher  myself .

Verbs  show actions or states of being. They are integral elements of  sentences .   

The shuttle will fly into space.

The loving mother comforted  and soothed the baby.

In the Montessori tradition of education, they use a large red circle or ball to symbolize a verb, and they often teach children to think of verbs as a sun providing the energy of a sentence. Isn't that a lovely way to think of verbs?

I know that you're getting tired of hearing about subcategories, but linking verbs, action verbs, and helping verbs are described on the  verb page here . 

Modal verbs  are described on that link, and you can learn even more about  action verbs  and  linking verbs  from those links.

4. Adjectives

Adjectives  describe, or  modify , nouns and pronouns. I like to think of them as adding color to language. It would be hard to describe a beautiful sunset or the way a touching story makes us feel without using adjectives.

The wise, handsome owl had orange eyes.

The caring father rocked the baby.

One helpful strategy for learning about and identifying adjectives is to learn how they are diagrammed . Sentence diagrams are pictures of sentences that help us see how all of the words are grammatically related. Since adjectives modify nouns and pronouns, we diagram them on slanted lines under the nouns/pronouns that they are modifying. 

Sentence diagram of adjectives

My green and white book fell.

Book is a noun. It's the subject of this sentence. My, green , and white are all adjectives describing book , so we diagram them on slanted lines underneath book . Isn't that a great way to SEE what adjectives do?

Nine Parts of Speech

When people categorize words into eight parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners ( a, an,   the, this, that, etc. ) are subcategories of adjectives.  

When people categorize words into nine parts of speech, they say that articles/determiners make up their own category and are not a part of the adjective category. 

Adverbs  modify (describe) verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. Adverbs are similar to adjectives in that they both modify things. 

The extremely cute koala hugged its mom very tightly .

The dog howled loudly .

Sentence diagrams also make it really easy to see what adverbs do. Take a look at this diagram. What do you notice about the way the adverbs are diagrammed? 

Sentence diagram with adverbs

James ran very quickly.

Did you notice that the adverbs are diagrammed on slanted lines under the words that they are modifying?

Ran is a verb. Quickly is an adverb telling us more about the verb ran . Very is an adverb telling us more about the adverb quickly .

Doesn't the diagram make it easier to SEE what adverbs do?

6. Prepositions

Prepositions  are probably the most difficult part of speech to explain, but people generally have an easier time understanding them when they look at lots of examples. So...let's start with some examples of commonly used prepositions! 

in, for, of, off, if, until

The frog sat in the flower.

The baby cried for a long time.

I'm so convinced that memorizing some of the prepositions will be helpful to you that  I'll teach you a preposition song . 

Okay, now that we've looked at some examples, let's look at the definition of a preposition. 

Prepositions show the relationship between a noun or a pronoun and some other word in the rest of the sentence. 

Sentence diagrams will come to the rescue again to help us visualize what prepositions do. Think of prepositions as "noun hooks" or "noun bridges." In the diagram below, notice how the preposition down links the noun tree to the rest of the sentence.  

Sentence diagram of a preposition

The cat ran down the tree.

Since prepositions always function as "noun hooks," they'll always be accompanied by a noun. The preposition plus its noun is called a prepositional phrase .

If you find a word from the preposition list that's not a part of a prepositional phrase, it's not functioning as a preposition. (You remember that words can function as different parts of speech , right?)

7. Conjunctions

Conjunctions  join things together. They can join words or groups of words (phrases and clauses).

The hummingbird sat   and   waited .

The conjunction and is joining the words sat and waited .

Do you live  near the park or near the hospital ?

The conjunction or is joining the phrases near the park and near the hospital.  

The two conjunctions we just looked at ( and and or ) belong to a subcategory called coordinating conjunctions, but there are other subcategories of conjunctions as well. The other one that we use most often is  subordinating conjunctions . Subordinating conjunctions are a little trickier to learn because they involve a more complicated concept ( dependent adverb clauses ).

For now, just know that all conjunctions, no matter what type they are, connect things together. In fact, let's LOOK at how they do this by looking at a sentence diagram.

Here is a sentence diagram  showing how the coordinating conjunction  and  connects two clauses. 

speech in english grammar with examples

She cooked, and he cleaned. 

8. Interjections

Interjections show excitement or emotion. 

Wow ! That jump was amazing!

Phew , the baby finally fell asleep.

They are different from the other parts of speech in that they're not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence, and the way that we diagram them reflects that. Look at how we diagram interjections :

Sentence diagram with interjection

Yes ! We won the lottery!

The interjection yes sit sits there on its own line floating above the rest of the sentence. This helps show that it's not grammatically related to the other words in the sentence. 

It's time to review what we covered on this page.

  • We can categorize the words that we use into groups based on their functions and features. We call these groups the parts of speech.
  • Many words can function as multiple parts of speech. You need to look at each word in the context of a sentence in order to say what part of speech it is. 
  • The eight parts of speech are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections. 
  • You just learned about all of the parts of speech. Give yourself a high five! 

If you'd like to teach or learn grammar the easy way—with sentence diagrams—check out our  Get Smart Grammar Program .

It starts from the very beginning and teaches you grammar and sentence diagramming in easy, bite-size lessons. 

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Hello! I'm Elizabeth O'Brien, and my goal is to get you jazzed about grammar. 

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The 8 Parts of Speech in English Grammar

Parts of Speech In English

Table of Contents

Introduction.

In English grammar, The fundamental components of language that are essential for constructing meaningful and grammatically correct sentences are known as parts of speech. This article will delve into the eight parts of speech, providing definitions, examples, and insights into their distinct roles within sentences.

What are Parts of Speech?

Parts of Speech Defined

In grammar, parts of speech , also referred to as lexical categories, grammatical categories, or word classes, categorize words based on their linguistic functions. These parts play a crucial role in sentence construction by conveying specific meanings and relationships between words.

In English, there are eight parts of speech:

  • Adjectives.
  • Interjection.
  • Conjunction.

Prepositions

Let’s explore these parts of speech in more detail!

A List of 8 Parts of Speech

Definition: Verbs express actions or states of being within a sentence.

  • She goes to school every day.
  • He writes a diary entry every night.
  • The unicorn exists only in myths.
  • They are happy together.

English has various types of verbs:

A. Action Verbs : Action verbs denote physical or mental actions and are the most common type of verbs. These verbs can be conjugated in simple and continuous tenses

  • She runs in the park every morning. (Simple Present
  • He thought deeply about life. (Simple past)
  • Look at the students are copying the lesson. (Present Continuous)

B. Stative Verbs:  Stative verbs express a state of being or conditions that are not changing or likely to change. In contrast to action verbs, these verbs can’t be conjugated into continuous tenses. It is incorrect to say “The book is belonging to Jane.”

  • The necklace belongs to her.
  • They love each other deeply.
  • He prefers tea to coffee.

C. Linking Verbs: Linking verbs connect the subject of a sentence to a subject complement, which describes or identifies the subject.

  • She is a teacher.
  • The plan seems perfect.
  • They become friends quickly.

D. Helping (Auxiliary) Verbs:   Helping verbs work in conjunction with the main verb to express nuances such as tense, mood, or voice.

  • She has finished her homework.
  • They will come to the party.
  • He is working on a project.

E. Modal Verbs:  Modal verbs express ability, possibility, necessity, or permission.

  • She can swim very well.
  • You must finish your assignment.
  • He may join us later.

F. Transitive Verbs: Transitive verbs require a direct object to complete their meaning.

  • She eats an apple.
  • They built a sandcastle.
  • He reads a book every night.

G. Intransitive Verbs : Intransitive verbs do not require a direct object to convey a complete meaning.

  • She runs every morning.
  • They laughed loudly.
  • He arrived early.

READ MOR ABOUT VERBS

Definition: Nouns represent people, animals, objects, substances, states, events, ideas, and feelings. They function as subjects or objects and can be modified by adjectives.

Here are the major noun characteristics: 

  • Nouns identify people, places, things, or ideas in a sentence.
  • Nouns can serve as subjects, objects, or indirect objects.
  • Nouns can be modified by adjectives or possessive pronouns.
  • Nouns can be singular or plural.

There are different types of nouns:

  • Common Nouns: Refer to general, non-specific entities (e.g., dog, city).
  • Proper Nouns: Refer to specific, unique entities and are capitalized (e.g., John, Paris).
  • Countable Nouns: Can be counted and have both singular and plural forms (e.g., book, books).
  • Uncountable Nouns: Cannot be counted individually and lack a plural form (e.g., water, knowledge).
  • Concrete Nouns: Refer to tangible, physical entities (e.g., table, tree).
  • Abstract Nouns: Refer to intangible concepts or qualities (e.g., love, courage).
  • Collective Nouns: Denote a group or collection of individuals (e.g., team, family).
  • Compound Nouns: Comprise two or more words to express a single concept (e.g., toothpaste, basketball).

Example sentences with nouns:

  • John is my neighbor.
  • lion: The lion roared loudly.
  • table: The table is made of oak.
  • freedom: Freedom is a precious gift.
  • love: Love conquers all.

READ MOR ABOUT NOUNS

Definition: Adjectives describe or specify nouns or pronouns. Examples of adjectives include good, beautiful, nice, my, etc.

  • It’s a good day.
  • She wears a beautiful dress.
  • He has a nice car.
  • This is my house.

READ MORE ABOUT ADJECTIVES

Definition: Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. Adverbs often end in -ly as in nicely, beautifully, slowly, etc (formed by adding -ly to an adjective). But that’s not always the case. 

There are various types of adverbs in English:

  • Adverbs of Time: Indicate when an action occurs. ( Today, now, later, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Place: Specify the location of an action. ( Here, there, everywhere, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Manner: Describe how an action is performed. ( Quickly, softly, well, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Frequency: Express how often an action occurs. ( Always, rarely, sometimes, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Degree: Modify the intensity or degree of an adjective or adverb. ( Very, too, quite, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Certainty: Indicate the level of certainty about an action. ( Surely, certainly, maybe, etc. )
  • Adverbs of Purpose: Describe why an action is performed. ( In case, so that, in order to, etc.)

Example sentences with adverbs:

  • She is completely unaware.
  • I never expected this.
  • The book is there on the shelf.
  • She speaks slowly .

READ MORE ABOUT ADVERBS

Definition: Pronouns replace nouns or phrases.

Pronouns can be categorized based on their functions:

  • Example: She, they, it
  • Example: His, hers, theirs
  • Example: Himself, herself, themselves
  • Example: Who, which, that
  • Example: This, these, those

Example sentences with pronouns:

  • I love chocolate.
  • This is for you.
  • He is coming tomorrow.
  • She likes ice cream.
  • It is on the table.

READ MORE ABOUT PRONOUNS

Definition: Prepositions indicate the relationship between nouns and other words in a sentence. A preposition is positioned before a noun or pronoun, creating a phrase that modifies another word within the sentence.

Consequently, a preposition is an integral component of a prepositional phrase, typically functioning either as an adjective or an adverb. 

Below is a compilation of the most frequently used prepositions:

  • in, on, under
  • with, without, beside
  • for, during, after
  • between, among, beyond

Example sentences with prepositions:

  • The cat is in the basket.
  • The plane is above the clouds.
  • She went to the market.
  • This gift is for you.

READ MORE ABOUT PREPOSITIONS

Conjunctions

Definition: Conjunctions connect clauses, sentences, or words.

There are three types of conjunctions in English:

Coordinating Conjunctions:

  • Examples: and, but, or
  • Sentence: She likes tea and coffee.

Correlative Conjunctions:

  • Examples: not only…but also, either…or
  • Sentence: He is not only smart but also diligent.

Subordinating Conjunctions:

  • Examples: although, because, since
  • Sentence: Although it’s raining, we will go out.

More example sentences:

  • She is rich and successful.
  • He is intelligent, but he is shy.
  • Although it’s raining, we will go out.
  • They won because they worked hard.

READ MORE ABOUT CONJUNCTIONS

Interjections

Definition: Interjections express surprise or emotion. Examples of interjections include oh, wow, alas, yippee, etc.

  • oh!: Oh! That was unexpected.
  • Good Lord: Good Lord, what a mess!

READ MORE ABOUT INTERJECTIONS

Analyzing Sentence Structure (Parts of Speech) 

In the following examples, we will analyze the structure of sentences to identify the different parts of speech used.

Sample Sentences:

  • My (adjective) friend (noun) speaks (verb) English (noun) fluently (adverb).
  • Oh! (interjection) I (pronoun) went (verb) to (preposition) school (noun) and (conjunction) I (pronoun) met (verb) Fred (noun).

In conclusion, parts of speech serve as crucial categories that describe the distinct roles words play within a sentence. A comprehensive grasp of these categories empowers you to discern how words function, fostering a deeper understanding of language nuances. 

1. How many parts of speech are used in English? In English, there are traditionally eight parts of speech.

2. Are there 9 parts of speech? No, there are traditionally eight parts of speech in English.

3. Are articles and determiners parts of speech? Yes, articles and determiners are considered parts of speech. They fall under the category of adjectives.

4. How do you identify parts of speech in a sentence? To identify parts of speech in a sentence, analyze the function of each word. Determine whether it expresses an action (verb), describes a noun (adjective), modifies a verb, adjective, or adverb (adverb), replaces a noun (pronoun), connects words or groups of words (conjunction), shows a relationship (preposition), or expresses strong emotion (interjection).

speech in english grammar with examples

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Parts of speech in english – video.

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Parts of Speech thumbnail

In this lesson, you can learn about parts of speech in English.

How many parts of speech are there in english can you name them, and explain what they do, understanding parts of speech —nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on—can help you to understand english sentence structure and how english grammar works., in this class, you’ll learn the basic information about parts of speech, you’ll see some ways that parts of speech can be more complicated than you might expect, and you’ll have several chances to practice, quiz: parts of speech in english.

Now test your understanding of the different parts of speech by trying this quiz. There are 20 questions, which get harder as you go through it!

When you have finished, click ‘View Questions’ to see all the correct answers and read the explanations. There are links to further study resources in the explanations.

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A perfect score on an incredibly difficult quiz! Congratulations!

1 . Question

For the first five questions, answer true or false.

True or false: a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function and meaning in the sentence.

Review part three of the lesson if you need help with this one.

2 . Question

True or false: a noun can be a word or a phrase.

3 . Question

True or false: if a word can be a noun, it can only be a noun.

4 . Question

True or false: when analysing parts of speech, you don’t need to think about what the sentence means.

5 . Question

True or false: articles (‘the’, ‘a’), demonstratives (‘this’, ‘that’), quantifiers (‘some’, ‘few’) and possessive adjectives (‘your’, ‘their’) are all determiners.

Remember that determiners specify the noun you’re referring to. Do all these words do this?

6 . Question

For the next five questions, choose the part of speech described.

What part of speech can be an action or a state?

  • Interjections
  • Conjunctions

‘Run’ is an action and ‘understand’ is a state.

7 . Question

What part of speech can describe verbs, adjectives, adverbs or whole sentences?

  • Prepositions

8 . Question

What part of speech represents or replaces nouns?

9 . Question

What part of speech expresses an emotion or can be used to react to something?

10 . Question

Which part of speech doesn’t indicate something about a noun?

  • Determiners

11 . Question

For the next five questions, match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“He slept badly.”

Sort elements

12 . question.

Match the words in the sentence with the parts of speech.

“She has bought a second-hand car.”

  • noun phrase

This time, you’re not analysing each word but the function of word groups and phrases in the sentence.

13 . Question

“Um, can you stop making so much noise, please?”

  • ‘um’ and ‘please’
  • 'can' and 'stop'
  • 'you'
  • 'making so much noise'

14 . Question

“Is this your bag or mine?”

  • conjunction
  • (possessive) pronoun

15 . Question

“Hey! Give his new watch back to him.”

  • interjection
  • preposition

16 . Question

For the last five questions, tick all the words that are correct.

Which words can be nouns?

You need to choose three answers.

17 . Question

Which words can be adverbs?

Only one word here is not an adverb.

18 . Question

Which words can be determiners?

This time there are two correct answers.

19 . Question

Which words can be more than one part of speech?

Two answers are correct; one of the others doesn’t even exist!

20 . Question

Which words are conjunctions?

  • nevertheless

This is a deliberately difficult question to end with! A conjunction must be followed by a noun (or noun phrase) and then a verb, with no commas.

So, first question: how many parts of speech are there?

Well, we did a Google search, and many of the top results said ‘eight’. So there must be eight parts of speech in English.

Wrong! There are nine.

So, what are they?

1. Guide to Parts of Speech in English

Number one: nouns. Nouns can be things, animals, or people, like doctor, pencil, tree or cat.

Nouns can also be ideas or abstract things, like idea, happiness, time or money.

Parts of Speech in English - cat image

Number two: verbs. Verbs can be actions, like do, run, fly or win.

Verbs can also describe states, like be, love, believe or understand.

Number three: adjectives. Adjectives describe nouns. For example: red, big, metal, or beautiful.

Number four: adverbs . Adverbs can describe verbs, meaning they describe how someone does something. For example, quickly, loudly, angrily or well.

Adverbs can also describe adjectives, other adverbs, or even whole sentences. For example, very is an adverb which can describe an adjective— very slow —or another adverb— very slowly.

Unfortunately or sometimes are adverbs which can be used to add information to a whole sentence.

For example:

  • Unfortunately, they missed the train and were late to their own wedding!
  • Sometimes, I wish I’d made different choices in life.

So, adverbs are a little more complicated. Here’s a good way to remember it: adjectives and adverbs both describe other words. They are both used to add information to something else.

Adjectives describe nouns, and adverbs describe everything else: verbs, adjectives, adverbs and whole sentences.

Number five: pronouns.

Pronouns replace or represent nouns. For example, I, you, she or they are pronouns which represent different people.

You use pronouns to avoid repeating the same word, or to refer to something when it’s obvious what you mean.

  • How was the weather there?

There is a pronoun which refers to a place. If you’ve already mentioned the place you’re talking about, you don’t need to say it again.

Another example:

  • Give me two, please.

Two is a pronoun which refers to a quantity of something which has already been mentioned. The person you’re talking to already knows what you’re talking about.

Number six: prepositions.

Prepositions usually go before a noun or noun phrase. What’s their job?

Prepositions can do two basic things: first, they can add an idea of time, place, or movement to a noun. For example:

  • on Wednesday
  • in the corner
  • towards the door

Secondly, prepositions can connect other words to a noun, or a pronoun.

For example, think about the verb depend on. The preposition on connects the verb depend to the object of the verb. For example:

  • It depends on the cost.

Usually, the noun or noun phrase goes after the preposition.

However, sometimes the preposition can link to a noun (or pronoun) earlier in the sentence. For example:

  • What does it depend on?

Here, on links to the pronoun what.

Number seven: conjunctions.

Conjunctions connect two things. A conjunction can connect two words:

  • I like cake and ice-cream.

A conjunction can connect two phrases:

  • Do you want to go now or wait till this afternoon?

You can also use a conjunction to connect two clauses:

  • Although I’ve been trying to learn for years, I’m still really bad at drawing.

Number eight: determiners

Determiners go before a noun. They include words like a, the, this or that, which help to specify which noun you’re talking about.

Words like my, your, his, her, etc. are also determiners. They specify which noun you’re talking about by saying who something belongs to.

Determiners can also tell you how many of something there are. Look at three examples:

  • ten bananas
  • some people
  • both of my brothers

The words ten, some and both are determiners.

Number nine: interjections

Interjections are different, because they aren’t normally part of a sentence.

Interjections are words or phrases which show how you feel. For example:

Parts of Speech in English - interjections

So, now you know about the nine parts of speech in English.

2. Practice with Parts of Speech in English

Let’s practice! Look at three sentences. Each sentence has five words.

  • They told me about it.
  • Look in the big cupboard.
  • Put it there, but carefully.

Can you identify which part of speech each word is? Pause the video and think about your answers.

How did you do? Could you identify the parts of speech correctly?

Let’s look at one more.

  • I’m staying in this evening.

What part of speech are these words? Think about it.

So, I is a pronoun, am is a verb, and staying is also a verb.

What about in? Did you say it’s a preposition?

It’s not a preposition; it’s an adverb.

How does this work? We had the word in in one of the sentences you saw before, and it was a preposition.

So, what’s going on?

3. The Same Word Can be More than One Part of Speech

Some words can only be one thing.

For example, the words independence or hair can only be nouns.

Believe and destroy can only be verbs.

However, many words can be more than one part of speech.

There are two things happening here.

First, a word can be two different things, which have the same written form and the same pronunciation.

Think about the word win. Is it a noun or a verb?

It can be both.

  • I’m sure they’ll win the game this weekend.
  • We’ll be hoping for a win in the big game this weekend.

Many words are like this. Another example: red can be an adjective or a noun.

  • What do you think about this red for the kitchen?
  • I like that red top she was wearing.

This is very common: very often, a word with one written form can be two (or more) different parts of speech.

We told you there are two things happening here; what’s the other?

Sometimes, a word can be different parts of speech depending on its function in the sentence.

Look at two sentences:

  • I have a few photos of my grandparents.
  • Sure, you can have a few.

Here’s a question: what part of speech is few in these sentences?

In the first sentence, few is a determiner; in the second, it’s a pronoun.

Can you explain why this is?

Think about what few does in these two sentences.

In the first sentence, few adds a quantity to the noun photos. It tells us how many photos you have. This makes it a determiner.

In the second sentence, few replaces a noun. You don’t know which noun it replaces, but in context, you would understand what the person meant.

Maybe it was ‘a few biscuits’, or ‘a few pieces of paper.’

We don’t know! But, you do know that few replaces a noun, which makes it a pronoun.

Another example is the sentence we saw before:

Prepositions go with nouns, and connect nouns to other words in the sentence. In here doesn’t go with a noun, so it can’t be a preposition.

Learn more with this Oxford Online English lesson on adverbs – to, in, at .

In here means ‘at home’, and it adds information to the verb stay. What kind of words add information to verbs?

Adverbs! So, in is an adverb.

Wait a minute, did we ever finish explaining what parts of speech are in this sentence?

You’re right! We didn’t. Let’s do it now. You need to say what parts of speech the words this evening are.

Can you do it?

Maybe you said that this is a determiner, and evening is a noun. That’s technically correct, but it’s not the best answer.

The best answer is that this evening is an adverb.

How do you explain that?

4. Compound Parts of Speech in English

Until now, you’ve seen single words, and how single words can be nouns, verbs, etc.

However, when you’re thinking about parts of speech, you can’t just think about single words. Phrases can also be nouns, verbs, adjectives, and so on.

Let’s do an example:

  • Add a small spoonful of brown sugar, then turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

Think about the first part of this sentence: add a small spoonful of brown sugar.

What parts of speech do we have here?

Of course, you can go through it word by word. You can say, add is a verb, a is a determiner, small is an adjective and so on.

But, is that the most useful way of looking at it?

It makes more sense to see this as a verb— add —and a noun— a small spoonful of brown sugar.

The noun is made up of several parts of speech: determiners, adjectives, prepositions and nouns, but together they have one meaning. These words refer to one thing.

You can analyse a sentence in several different layers. So, you can see a small spoonful of brown sugar as six individual words, or one noun phrase.

You could also see it as three parts: a determiner— a small spoonful —a preposition— of —and a noun— brown sugar.

Confused? We understand! You want to know the answer. You want to know which way is ‘correct’.

There isn’t one ‘correct’ way to see this. There are different perspectives.

A better question is: which perspective makes more sense?

In this sentence, a small spoonful of brown sugar refers to one thing in the world. So it makes sense to think of it as one part of speech in the sentence.

What about the second part of the sentence? How would you analyse the parts of speech?

As you saw before, there isn’t one right answer, but here’s a suggestion.

The sentence contains a conjunction— then —and then two verb phrases linked with the conjunction and.

This makes sense because the sentence is telling you to do two things: turn the heat down and stir the mixture gently.

So, it makes sense to see turn the heat down as one part of speech, because it’s telling you do to one thing.

Let’s put these ideas together.

First, when you think about parts of speech, you can’t just memorise information. You have to look at each sentence individually, and think about what each word is doing.

Secondly, always think about what the sentence means in the real world. Sentences aren’t abstract things; they refer to real people, real things and real actions.

There is always more than one way to analyse the parts of speech in a sentence: choose the way that makes sense based on what the sentence is telling you about real life!

Let’s do a more challenging practice exercise so you can see these ideas in action.

5. More Challenging Practice with English Parts of Speech

Look at three sentences:

  • Amazing! It’s way better than I ever thought it would be.
  • She was an amazing clinician , who came up with many innovative ways to treat patients.
  • I don’t believe it!

How would you analyse the parts of speech in these sentences? Think about the ideas we talked about in the last section. Does it make sense to break the sentences into individual words, or is it better to group words into phrases?

Pause the video and think about your ideas.

You can pause the video again to look at these in more detail.

Notice how the same word can be different parts of speech in different sentences. For example, amazing is an interjection in one sentence, and an adjective in another.

Notice also the different layers of analysis. For example, look at the phrase many innovative ways. You can see this as one noun phrase, or as a determiner plus a noun phrase, or as three individual parts: a determiner, an adjective and a noun.

Which is correct? They all are! Choose the perspective which makes more sense to you.

Thanks for watching!

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  • Parts of Speech

Parts of Speech - Definition, 8 Types and Examples

In the English language , every word is called a part of speech. The role a word plays in a sentence denotes what part of speech it belongs to. Explore the definition of parts of speech, the different parts of speech and examples in this article.

Table of Contents

Parts of speech definition, different parts of speech with examples.

  • Sentences Examples for the 8 Parts of Speech

A Small Exercise to Check Your Understanding of Parts of Speech

Frequently asked questions on parts of speech, what is a part of speech.

Parts of speech are among the first grammar topics we learn when we are in school or when we start our English language learning process. Parts of speech can be defined as words that perform different roles in a sentence. Some parts of speech can perform the functions of other parts of speech too.

  • The Oxford Learner’s Dictionary defines parts of speech as “one of the classes into which words are divided according to their grammar, such as noun, verb, adjective, etc.”
  • The Cambridge Dictionary also gives a similar definition – “One of the grammatical groups into which words are divided, such as noun, verb, and adjective”.

Parts of speech include nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections.

8 Parts of Speech Definitions and Examples:

1. Nouns are words that are used to name people, places, animals, ideas and things. Nouns can be classified into two main categories: Common nouns and Proper nouns . Common nouns are generic like ball, car, stick, etc., and proper nouns are more specific like Charles, The White House, The Sun, etc.

Examples of nouns used in sentences:

  • She bought a pair of shoes . (thing)
  • I have a pet. (animal)
  • Is this your book ? (object)
  • Many people have a fear of darkness . (ideas/abstract nouns)
  • He is my brother . (person)
  • This is my school . (place)

Also, explore Singular Nouns and Plural Nouns .

2. Pronouns are words that are used to substitute a noun in a sentence. There are different types of pronouns. Some of them are reflexive pronouns, possessive pronouns , relative pronouns and indefinite pronouns . I, he, she, it, them, his, yours, anyone, nobody, who, etc., are some of the pronouns.

Examples of pronouns used in sentences:

  • I reached home at six in the evening. (1st person singular pronoun)
  • Did someone see a red bag on the counter? (Indefinite pronoun)
  • Is this the boy who won the first prize? (Relative pronoun)
  • That is my mom. (Possessive pronoun)
  • I hurt myself yesterday when we were playing cricket. (Reflexive pronoun)

3. Verbs are words that denote an action that is being performed by the noun or the subject in a sentence. They are also called action words. Some examples of verbs are read, sit, run, pick, garnish, come, pitch, etc.

Examples of verbs used in sentences:

  • She plays cricket every day.
  • Darshana and Arul are going to the movies.
  • My friends visited me last week.
  • Did you have your breakfast?
  • My name is Meenakshi Kishore.

4. Adverbs are words that are used to provide more information about verbs, adjectives and other adverbs used in a sentence. There are five main types of adverbs namely, adverbs of manner , adverbs of degree , adverbs of frequency , adverbs of time and adverbs of place . Some examples of adverbs are today, quickly, randomly, early, 10 a.m. etc.

Examples of adverbs used in sentences:

  • Did you come here to buy an umbrella? (Adverb of place)
  • I did not go to school yesterday as I was sick. (Adverb of time)
  • Savio reads the newspaper everyday . (Adverb of frequency)
  • Can you please come quickly ? (Adverb of manner)
  • Tony was so sleepy that he could hardly keep his eyes open during the meeting. (Adverb of degree)

5. Adjectives are words that are used to describe or provide more information about the noun or the subject in a sentence. Some examples of adjectives include good, ugly, quick, beautiful, late, etc.

Examples of adjectives used in sentences:

  • The place we visited yesterday was serene .
  • Did you see how big that dog was?
  • The weather is pleasant today.
  • The red dress you wore on your birthday was lovely.
  • My brother had only one chapati for breakfast.

6. Prepositions are words that are used to link one part of the sentence to another. Prepositions show the position of the object or subject in a sentence. Some examples of prepositions are in, out, besides, in front of, below, opposite, etc.

Examples of prepositions used in sentences:

  • The teacher asked the students to draw lines on the paper so that they could write in straight lines.
  • The child hid his birthday presents under his bed.
  • Mom asked me to go to the store near my school.
  • The thieves jumped over the wall and escaped before we could reach home.

7. Conjunctions are a part of speech that is used to connect two different parts of a sentence, phrases and clauses . Some examples of conjunctions are and, or, for, yet, although, because, not only, etc.

Examples of conjunctions used in sentences:

  • Meera and Jasmine had come to my birthday party.
  • Jane did not go to work as she was sick.
  • Unless you work hard, you cannot score good marks.
  • I have not finished my project,  yet I went out with my friends.

8. Interjections are words that are used to convey strong emotions or feelings. Some examples of interjections are oh, wow, alas, yippee, etc. It is always followed by an exclamation mark.

Examples of interjections used in sentences:

  • Wow ! What a wonderful work of art.
  • Alas ! That is really sad.
  • Yippee ! We won the match.

Sentence Examples for the 8 Parts of Speech

  • Noun – Tom lives in New York .
  • Pronoun – Did she find the book she was looking for?
  • Verb – I reached home.
  • Adverb – The tea is too hot.
  • Adjective – The movie was amazing .
  • Preposition – The candle was kept under the table.
  • Conjunction – I was at home all day, but I am feeling very tired.
  • Interjection – Oh ! I forgot to turn off the stove.

Let us find out if you have understood the different parts of speech and their functions. Try identifying which part of speech the highlighted words belong to.

  • My brother came home  late .
  • I am a good girl.
  • This is the book I  was looking for.
  • Whoa ! This is amazing .
  • The climate  in  Kodaikanal is very pleasant.
  • Can you please pick up Dan and me on  your way home?

Now, let us see if you got it right. Check your answers.

  • My – Pronoun, Home – Noun, Late – Adverb
  • Am – Verb, Good – Adjective
  • I – Pronoun, Was looking – Verb
  • Whoa – Interjection, Amazing – Adjective
  • Climate – Noun, In – Preposition, Kodaikanal – Noun, Very – Adverb
  • And – Conjunction, On – Preposition, Your – Pronoun

What are parts of speech?

The term ‘parts of speech’ refers to words that perform different functions in a sentence  in order to give the sentence a proper meaning and structure.

How many parts of speech are there?

There are 8 parts of speech in total.

What are the 8 parts of speech?

Nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections are the 8 parts of speech.

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8 Parts of Speech

The 8 parts of speech in English are: Nouns, Adjectives, Adverbs, Verbs, Prepositions, Pronouns, Conjunctions, and Interjections.

A part of speech is a category of words that have similar grammatical functions or properties. In other words, they play similar roles in a sentence. For instance, a verb shows the action of a subject or the subject's state of being. 

The 8 parts of speech table

We'll now look in more detail at the function of each of these parts of speech. 

Understanding the 8 Parts of Speech

Nouns are words used to talk about people, places, things, or ideas/concepts. Here are some examples:

  • Person: The President
  • Place: London
  • Thing: Table
  • Idea/concept: Neo-liberalism

So it may be naming something we can touch ( e.g. table; book; car ) or something we cannot touch ( e.g. Neo-liberalism; happiness; wish ).

There are both common nouns, used for classes of   people, places, things, or ideas/concepts,  and proper nouns, which is their given name, always with a capital letter.

Common Nouns

  • political party

Proper Nouns

  • Chester Avenue

Learn more about the various types of noun >>

Another of the 8 parts of speech are adjectives. They describe nouns or pronouns. They can come before or after the noun/pronoun they describe:

Absolute Adjectives

  • The  large  shopping complex
  • The  excited  child
  • She is  happy
  • It was a  shocking  film
  • Her dress was  lovely
  • He's a  good-looking  man

These are  absolute adjectives , but they can also be  comparative  (comparing two or more things) or  superlative  (showing degree or quality):

Comparative Adjectives

  • She's  fitter than the others
  • Their house is bigger
  • I ran faster  than you
  • Cats are more agile than dogs
  • Sue's  more tired than Tim

Superlative Adjectives

  • She's the fittest
  • Their house is the biggest
  • I ran the fastest
  • Cats are the most agile
  • Sue's the most tired

There are various other types of adjective. Learn more about the different types of adjectives >>

Adverbs modify verbs, other adverbs, and adjectives. There are adverbs of manner, time, place and degree . Here are examples of each being modified in relation to verbs, adverbs, and adjectives (the word being modified is underlined):

Adverbs Modifying Verbs

  • He runs fast
  • Ian quickly left the room
  • She spoke slowly

Adverbs Modifying Other Adverbs

  • He runs exceptionally  fast
  • Ian very  quickly left the room
  • She spoke extremely  slowly

Adverbs Modifying Adjectives

  • She's really excited
  • He's happily married
  • The elegantly designed dress is mine

Verbs form part of the predicate of a sentence.

In relation to the subject, they are used to express a physical action (e.g. walk; speak; show) or a mental action (e.g. think; feel; want). They can also express a state of being , mainly with the verb 'to be' but also some others.

Here are some examples:

Physical Action

  • He ran home
  • They chose the blue one

Mental Activity

  • I am thinking about it
  • Ian guessed the answer
  • She believes in ghosts

State of Being

  • She is a police woman
  • They seem worried

These though are main verbs. They have many other uses in a sentence so you should read about all the types of verbs further. 

Prepositions

Another of the 8 parts of speech are prepositions. These show the relationship between two words or phrases in a sentence. They precede a noun or pronoun.

Commons examples of prepositions are  above,  up, upon,  at, before, behind,  since, to, through, under, until, with, within,  about, against, along, around,  beside, between,  down, during,  below, by,  except, for, from, in, into, like, near, of, off, on,  toward.

In these example sentences with prepositions, the two words whose relationship is being expressed are underlined and the prepositions are in bold:

  • The book is on the table
  • He is the leader of the conservative party
  • The boy picked up the toy under the sofa
  • This is a present for your mother

Pronouns replace nouns and they prevent us from repeating the noun in a sentence. These are the types of pronouns with some examples:

  • Personal e.g. I; you; they; she
  • Possessive e.g. mine; yours; his; theirs
  • Relative e.g. who; which; that; whom
  • Demonstrative e.g. this; these; those
  • Reciprocal e.g. one another; each other
  • Emphatic / Reflexive e.g. myself; herself; itself; ourselves
  • Interrogative e.g. what; which; whom; whose

Here are some examples of these words used in sentences:

  • Martha decided she would leave
  • Why don't you use his  car instead of mine
  • Mick is a person who learns quickly
  • Shall we buy some of these ?
  • They began to argue with each other
  • Jenny is pleased with  herself
  • What time is he coming?

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are the of the 8 parts of speech responsible for joining together words, phrases, or clauses. There are three types:

  • Coordinating: and; or; but; so; yet; for; nor
  • Correlative: neither/nor; either/or; not only/but also
  • Subordinating: e.g. although; because; while; which; where; until

Coordinating Conjunctions

Used to connect like for like words (e.g. noun+noun):

  • I like apples and oranges ( 2 nouns )
  • His speech was slow but effective ( 2 adjectives )
  • Shall I say it loudly or quietly? ( 2 adverbs )

Or simple sentences (independent clauses):

  • I find the music annoying but she finds It pleasant
  • She came to the lecture late so she missed everything important
  • She took her umbrella for it was raining hard

Correlative Conjunctions

Used to join alternative or equal elements:

  • He felt neither happy nor sad about it
  • Sue had to decide to either quit or carry on
  • I went not only to Australia but also to New Zealand

Subordinating Conjunctions

Used to join subordinate clauses to main clauses:

  • The government won't vote on the bill until both parties agree
  • I'm still not tired although it is late
  • I'll eat the dish which you don't like

Interjections

Interjections are words used to express an emotion or a sentiment such as surprise, joy, disgust, fear, excitement, pain, or enthusiasm.

They usually appear at the start of a sentence and are not connected to it grammatically. Here are some examples of interjections in sentences:

  • Wow , that's an amazing score!
  • Oh , I didn't know you failed the exam
  • Well , we better not leave too late
  • Ow , that really hurt!
  • Ah , I understand now
  • Oops , I've forgotten to bring the sandwiches

Are there only 8 Parts of Speech?

Sometimes rather than 8 parts of speech, you may see 9 or 10 listed. This is because some people treat articles and determiners  as separate categories. 

However, when there are only 8 parts of speech considered (as above), this is because as these two types of word modify nouns, they are classified under adjectives. 

Now practice what you have learned in our identifying parts of speech quiz

More on Sentence Structure:

View examples of parallelism in English grammar that show you correct and incorrect parallel sentences.

Examples of Parallelism in English Grammar

View examples of parallelism in English grammar that show you correct and incorrect parallel sentences.

Parallelism is about balancing the grammatical structure of words, phrases and clauses in your sentences. Parallel structure will improve your writing's coherence.

Parallelism Grammar Rules (Parallel Structure)

Parallelism is about balancing the grammatical structure of words, phrases and clauses in your sentences. Parallel structure will improve your writing's coherence.

Using object complements in a sentence enhances your ability to convey specific information about actions and their outcomes.

Using Object Complements in a Sentence

Using object complements in a sentence enhances your ability to convey specific information about actions and their outcomes.

Here we demystify subject complements, predicate adjectives, and predicate nominatives with simple explanations and examples.

Subject Complements: Predicate Adjectives and Predicate Nominatives

Here we demystify subject complements, predicate adjectives, and predicate nominatives with simple explanations and examples.

Direct and indirect objects are key parts of most sentences. A direct object is the receiver of action while indirect object identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed.

Direct and Indirect Objects: The Differences

Direct and indirect objects are key parts of most sentences. A direct object is the receiver of action while indirect object identifies to or for whom or what the action of the verb is performed.

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

Nominalisation in English Grammar: High Level Writing Tips

Nominalisation is an important aspect of academic writing. This lesson teachers you what this is and how you can use it effectively in your writing.

The main parts of a sentence are subjects, verbs, objects, predicates, and subject complements. All of these have a specific purpose within the structure of a sentence.

Parts of a Sentence: Subject, Verbs, Objects, Predicates, Complements

The main parts of a sentence are subjects, verbs, objects, predicates, and subject complements. All of these have a specific purpose within the structure of a sentence.

Phrases and clauses are the key building blocks of sentences. A clause contains a subject and a verb and can express a complete thought. A phrase does not contain a subject or verb.

Phrases and Clauses - Building good sentences

Phrases and clauses are the key building blocks of sentences. A clause contains a subject and a verb and can express a complete thought. A phrase does not contain a subject or verb.

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction.

Types of Clauses in English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clause

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction.

Advice on how to use either and neither in English grammar. They can be adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and conjunctions.

How to Use Either and Neither with Examples

Advice on how to use either and neither in English grammar. They can be adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and conjunctions.

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Parts of Speech in English Grammar with Examples

Exploring Parts of Speech in English Grammar with Examples

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Parts of Speech in English Grammar with All Practical Examples in Sentence

Understanding the parts of speech in English grammar is fundamental for effective communication. These elements serve as the building blocks of sentences, providing structure and meaning. This article will delve into each part of speech with practical examples, making the learning process enjoyable and comprehensive.

  • Definition and Types Nouns, the foundation of any sentence, come in various forms. Common, proper, concrete, and abstract nouns are among the different types. For instance, “ dog ” (common) and “ Mount Everest ” (proper) showcase this diversity.
  • Practical Examples in Sentences In everyday language, nouns are omnipresent. “ The cat chased the mouse ” exemplifies the use of nouns, with “ cat ” and “ mouse ” as subjects.
  • Explanation and Examples Pronouns replace nouns in sentences. “ He ,” “ she ,” and “ it ” are common pronouns, simplifying language. For example, “ John loves chocolate; he can’t resist it .”
  • Role in Sentence Structure Pronouns contribute to sentence flow and cohesion, reducing redundancy. Their application facilitates smooth communication.
  • Types of Verbs Verbs convey actions or states of being. Action verbs, linking verbs, and auxiliary verbs are essential. “ Run ,” “ am ,” and “ have ” showcase these distinctions.
  • Application in Sentences with Examples Verbs breathe life into sentences. “ She dances gracefully ” illustrates the action, while “ I am a teacher ” employs a linking verb.

Also Read : 20 Top Most Common Slang Words Used Everyday with Examples

  • Definition and Characteristics Adjectives modify nouns, providing details. “ Beautiful ,” “ tall ,” and “ red ” are examples. “ The vibrant flowers bloomed .”
  • Illustrative Sentence Examples Adjectives enhance descriptions. “ The old, majestic castle stood on the hill ” paints a vivid picture using multiple adjectives.
  • Role and Types Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. “ Quickly ,” “ very ,” and “ often ” are common adverbs. “ She sings beautifully .”
  • Sentence Demonstrations Adverbs add depth to sentences. “ He ran quickly ” emphasizes the speed, enhancing the overall narrative.

Prepositions

  • Definition and Usage Prepositions express relationships between elements in a sentence. “ On ,” “ in ,” and “ under ” are examples. “ The book is on the table .”
  • Sentence Structures Showcasing Prepositions Prepositions establish connections. “ She walked through the park ” clarifies the route taken.

Conjunctions

  • Types and Functions Conjunctions link words or groups of words. “ And ,” “ but ,” and “ or ” are common. “ I want coffee, but he prefers tea .”
  • Examples in Sentences Conjunctions provide coherence. “ She enjoys both reading and writing ” emphasizes the harmony between the two activities.

Interjections

  • Explanation and Instances Interjections convey emotions or sudden exclamations. “ Wow ,” “ ouch ,” and “ bravo ” fall into this category . “ Ah, I understand now! “
  • Impact on Sentence Tone Interjections inject emotion into sentences. “ Oops, I made a mistake ” reflects a sense of realization.

Determiners

  • Definition and Significance Determiners introduce nouns, providing context. “ This ,” “ those ,” and “ each ” are examples. “ I’ll take this book .”
  • Practical Sentence Applications Determiners establish clarity. “ Every student passed the exam ” specifies the entire group’s success.
  • Different Types of Articles Articles, like “ a ,” “ an ,” and “ the ,” precede nouns. “ A cat ,” “ an apple ,” and “ the sky ” showcase their varied applications.
  • Examples Highlighting Article Usage Articles refine meaning. “ A car ” refers to any car, while “ the car ” points to a specific one.
  • Overview of Tenses Tenses denote the time of an action or state. Past, present, and future tenses shape language. “ She will sing at the concert .”
  • Sentence Constructions Exhibiting Various Tenses Tenses convey temporal nuances. “ I ate breakfast ” (past) differs from “ I am eating breakfast ” (present).

Direct and Indirect Speech

  • Explanation and Transformation Examples Direct speech quotes words verbatim, while indirect speech conveys the message indirectly. “ She said, ‘I love you ‘” becomes “ She expressed her love .”
  • Application in Conveying Messages I understand direct and indirect speech aids effective communication, adapting expressions as needed.

Active and Passive Voice

  • Understanding Active and Passive Voice Active voice emphasizes the doer of an action, while passive voice shifts focus to the receiver. “ The cat chased the mouse ” (active) contrasts with “ The mouse was chased by the cat ” (passive).
  • Examples Differentiating the Two Active and passive voices offer different perspectives. Writers choose based on emphasis and style.

Also Read : 20 Top Common English Grammar Used Everyday with Examples

The Fluent Life offers tailored personalized English Communication Course language learning experiences to meet individual needs and goals. This course is designed to enhance communication skills in English through a customized curriculum that addresses specific areas of improvement, whether it’s speaking, listening, writing, or reading. With personalized instruction, learners receive targeted feedback and guidance, allowing them to progress at their own pace and focus on areas where they need the most support. Through interactive activities, engaging exercises, and one-on-one sessions with experienced instructors, participants can develop confidence and fluency in English communication, making it a valuable investment for anyone looking to excel in their personal, academic, or professional endeavors.

Recap of the Importance of Mastering Parts of Speech

Mastering parts of speech enhances communication skills, fostering effective expression and comprehension.

Encouragement for Continued Learning

Language is dynamic; continuous learning ensures mastery. Dive deeper into each part of the speech for a thorough understanding.

5 Unique FAQs on Parts of Speech

Q.1: Why are parts of speech essential in English grammar? A: Parts of speech provide the structure and meaning necessary for clear and effective communication.

Q.2: How can I improve my understanding of tenses? A: Practice using different tenses in sentences and notice how they convey time-related nuances.

Q.3: Are there exceptions to the rules of pronoun usage? A: Yes, some pronouns have irregular forms, so it’s essential to familiarize yourself with these exceptions.

Q.4: Can a sentence have multiple adjectives and adverbs? A: Yes, combining multiple adjectives and adverbs can create rich and detailed descriptions in a sentence.

Q.5: Why is it important to know the difference between active and passive voice? A: Understanding active and passive voice allows writers to control the focus and emphasis in their sentences, influencing how the message is perceived.

Also Read : Top 100 Commonly Used A to Z Phrasal Verbs for English Fluency

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Reported Speech

Perfect english grammar.

speech in english grammar with examples

Reported Statements

Here's how it works:

We use a 'reporting verb' like 'say' or 'tell'. ( Click here for more about using 'say' and 'tell' .) If this verb is in the present tense, it's easy. We just put 'she says' and then the sentence:

  • Direct speech: I like ice cream.
  • Reported speech: She says (that) she likes ice cream.

We don't need to change the tense, though probably we do need to change the 'person' from 'I' to 'she', for example. We also may need to change words like 'my' and 'your'. (As I'm sure you know, often, we can choose if we want to use 'that' or not in English. I've put it in brackets () to show that it's optional. It's exactly the same if you use 'that' or if you don't use 'that'.)

But , if the reporting verb is in the past tense, then usually we change the tenses in the reported speech:

  • Reported speech: She said (that) she liked ice cream.

* doesn't change.

  • Direct speech: The sky is blue.
  • Reported speech: She said (that) the sky is/was blue.

Click here for a mixed tense exercise about practise reported statements. Click here for a list of all the reported speech exercises.

Reported Questions

So now you have no problem with making reported speech from positive and negative sentences. But how about questions?

  • Direct speech: Where do you live?
  • Reported speech: She asked me where I lived.
  • Direct speech: Where is Julie?
  • Reported speech: She asked me where Julie was.
  • Direct speech: Do you like chocolate?
  • Reported speech: She asked me if I liked chocolate.

Click here to practise reported 'wh' questions. Click here to practise reported 'yes / no' questions. Reported Requests

There's more! What if someone asks you to do something (in a polite way)? For example:

  • Direct speech: Close the window, please
  • Or: Could you close the window please?
  • Or: Would you mind closing the window please?
  • Reported speech: She asked me to close the window.
  • Direct speech: Please don't be late.
  • Reported speech: She asked us not to be late.

Reported Orders

  • Direct speech: Sit down!
  • Reported speech: She told me to sit down.
  • Click here for an exercise to practise reported requests and orders.
  • Click here for an exercise about using 'say' and 'tell'.
  • Click here for a list of all the reported speech exercises.

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speech in english grammar with examples

Motivational Speaker Techniques To Encourage Students’ English Speaking Skills

A student stands at the front of the class demonstrating his English speaking skills

As teachers, we’re always looking for ways to improve our students’ English speaking skills and build their confidence in speaking English. An effective way to do this is to integrate motivational speaking techniques into our teaching methods and teach our students some engaging speaking strategies to use. 

It is important to point out to students that speakers in public talks such as TED talks or other significant speeches sound confident because of the key components that make up a successful talk. By adopting some of these, students can begin their journey to confidence and enjoyment in speaking English.

Great motivational speaker techniques 

Knowledge and clarity.

Great motivational speakers possess a deep knowledge of their subject, which helps their audience trust in the speaker. 

  • For students, this emphasises the importance of understanding the content they are speaking about. 
  • Encourage students to research and fully understand the topics they discuss. This will ensure they can present information clearly and confidently. 
  • This can be practised through classroom presentations or group discussions where the focus is on explaining concepts in simplified terms.

Confidence and purpose

Confidence often comes from speakers feeling well-prepared and passionate about their subject. 

  • Teach students to define the purpose of their speeches and talks – whether to inform, persuade or entertain. This clarity helps them deliver their message with conviction and engage their audience more effectively. 
  • Role-playing different scenarios in class can help students build confidence and define their speaking goals.

Storytelling

Whether it’s a personal anecdote or something else, stories can captivate an audience and make the speech memorable. 

  • Remind students that by telling a story, the audience is instantly more engaged and likely to follow along throughout the talk. 
  • Help students develop their storytelling skills by integrating stories into language lessons. They could start with narrating simple personal experiences and gradually move to more complex narratives as their skills improve.

Audience awareness

Understanding the audience is crucial for effective communication. 

  • Have students think of a talk or presentation they’ve recently seen. Then, have them think about who the audience for the talk was. 
  • Tell students that speakers tailor their content and delivery to match the audience’s knowledge level and background. This involves using appropriate language, examples and explanations that the audience understands and can relate to. 
  • In class, students can practise audience awareness by presenting the same information in different ways to different groups and tailoring the language they are using and the way they are presenting the information. 

A strong conclusion

A strong finish is essential in great motivational speaking. It reinforces the message and often includes a call to action that leaves the audience inspired. 

  • Teach students to summarise their key points effectively and end with a compelling conclusion that prompts further thought or action. 
  • This could be practised through debates or persuasive speeches in class, where students are encouraged to conclude with strong statements and a call to action.

Practical exercises to enhance English speaking skills

  • Focus on activities that enhance clarity in communication. For example, paraphrasing or connecting complex ideas with simpler concepts.
  • Have students do exercises that improve non-verbal communication, such as maintaining eye contact, using gestures and controlling hesitations.
  • Help students reflect on the purpose of their talk or presentation, and choose language that aligns with their goals, for example, to convince, inform, teach or entertain.
  • Have students discuss how best to explain complex ideas. Remind them that any information should be appropriate and understandable to the audience without requiring much prior knowledge.
  • Explore the use of extreme adjectives and the connotations of words with your students, emphasising how language choice can inspire and motivate an audience.

Incorporating motivational speaking techniques into your lessons can have a significant impact on students’ engagement and confidence in communicating their ideas. By having these skills, students will not only improve their English proficiency but also gain valuable life skills in speaking and presenting to audiences. 

You can read more about teaching your students presentation skills here. Or read our paper for in-depth advice on teaching English pronunciation.

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speech in english grammar with examples

Independence Day Speech

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speech in english grammar with examples

An Independence Day speech is a formal address delivered during celebrations marking a nation’s independence from colonial rule or oppressive governance. This speech is typically given by prominent figures such as political leaders, educators, or community representatives. The purpose of an Independence Day speech is to commemorate the historical significance of the nation’s independence, honor the struggles and sacrifices of those who fought for freedom, and inspire patriotism and unity among the citizens.

What is Independence Day Speech?

Independence Day Speech Examples Bundle

Independence Day Speech Bundle Download

Independence Day Speech Format

1. introduction.

Greeting : Start with a warm welcome to the audience. Significance : Mention the importance of Independence Day. Theme : Introduce the main themes of your speech.

2. Historical Context

Brief History : Summarize the events leading to independence. Key Figures : Highlight important leaders and freedom fighters.
Recognition : Honor the sacrifices and contributions of those who fought for freedom. Gratitude : Express gratitude for their efforts.

4. Patriotism

Achievements : Celebrate the nation’s achievements since independence. Values : Emphasize the national values and ideals.

5. Reflection

Progress : Reflect on the progress made. Challenges : Acknowledge ongoing challenges and areas for improvement.

6. Conclusion

Summary : Recap the key points of your speech. Closing : End with a motivating and patriotic statement.

Independence Day Speech Example

Introduction Good morning everyone! Today, we gather to celebrate the most significant day in our nation’s history—Independence Day. This day marks our freedom and the birth of our nation as a sovereign state. I am honored to share a few words with you on this special occasion.   Historical Context On this day, [specific date], our forefathers declared our independence from colonial rule. The struggle for freedom was long and arduous, marked by immense bravery and sacrifice. Leaders like [Key Figure 1], [Key Figure 2], and many others led the way, inspiring the masses to stand up for their rights and fight for a better future.     Tribute We pay tribute to the heroes who fought tirelessly for our freedom. Their sacrifices laid the foundation for the country we cherish today. We owe our liberty and opportunities to their relentless efforts and unwavering spirit. Let us remember and honor their legacy by upholding the values they fought for.   Patriotism Since gaining independence, our nation has made remarkable progress in various fields. We have built a society based on the principles of liberty, equality, and justice. Our achievements in science, technology, education, and the arts are a testament to our collective hard work and determination. As we celebrate our successes, let us also reflect on the values that define us as a nation—unity, diversity, and resilience.   Reflection While we have achieved much, we must also recognize the challenges that lie ahead. Issues such as poverty, inequality, and climate change require our attention and action. It is our duty to continue working towards a brighter future for all citizens, ensuring that the benefits of independence are shared by everyone, regardless of their background or circumstances.   Call to Action Let us take pride in our nation and commit ourselves to its continued growth and prosperity. Each of us has a role to play in building a better future. Whether through community service, innovation, or simply by being kind to one another, we can all contribute to making our nation stronger and more united.   Conclusion As we celebrate this Independence Day, let us remember the importance of unity, freedom, and patriotism. Let us honor the sacrifices of those who came before us and strive to create a legacy that future generations will be proud of. Happy Independence Day to all! Thank you for listening.

Short Independence Day Speech Example

Introduction Good morning everyone! Today, we gather to celebrate our nation’s most significant day—Independence Day. This day marks our freedom and the birth of our nation as a sovereign state.   Historical Context On this day, [specific date], our forefathers declared our independence from colonial rule. Their struggle and sacrifices paved the way for the freedom we enjoy today.   Tribute We honor the heroes who fought tirelessly for our freedom. Their bravery and dedication laid the foundation for the country we cherish.   Patriotism Since gaining independence, our nation has made remarkable progress. We have built a society based on liberty, equality, and justice. Let us celebrate our achievements and the values that define us—unity, diversity, and resilience.   Reflection While we have achieved much, challenges such as poverty and inequality remain. It is our duty to work towards a brighter future for all citizens.   Call to Action Let us take pride in our nation and commit to its continued growth. Each of us can contribute to making our nation stronger and more united.   Conclusion As we celebrate this Independence Day, let us remember the importance of unity, freedom, and patriotism. Happy Independence Day to all! Thank you for listening.
  • Independence Day Speech for Kids

 Independence Day Speech for Kids

  • Independence Day Speech for Students

Independence Day Speech for Students

  • Independence Day Speech for School

Independence Day Speech for School

More Independence Day Speech Topics

  • Independence Day Speech for Teachers
  • Independence Day Speech for Class 1
  • Independence Day Speech for Class 2
  • Independence Day Speech for Class 3

How to Write Independence Day Speech

  • Greeting : Begin with a warm welcome to the audience.
  • Significance : Mention the importance of Independence Day.

Example : “Good morning everyone! Today, we gather to celebrate our nation’s most significant day—Independence Day.”

  • Brief History : Summarize the events leading to independence.

Example : “On this day, [specific date], our forefathers declared our independence from colonial rule. Their struggle and sacrifices paved the way for the freedom we enjoy today.”

  • Recognition : Honor the sacrifices and contributions of those who fought for freedom.

Example : “We honor the heroes who fought tirelessly for our freedom. Their bravery and dedication laid the foundation for the country we cherish.”

  • Achievements : Celebrate the nation’s achievements since independence.

Example : “Since gaining independence, our nation has made remarkable progress. We have built a society based on liberty, equality, and justice.”

5. Call to Action

  • Inspiration : Encourage the audience to take pride in their nation and contribute positively.

Example : “Let us take pride in our nation and commit to its continued growth. Each of us can contribute to making our nation stronger and more united.”

  • Summary : Recap the key points.
  • Closing : End with a motivating and patriotic statement.

Example : “As we celebrate this Independence Day, let us remember the importance of unity, freedom, and patriotism. Happy Independence Day to all! Thank you for listening.”

Tips for Independence Day Speech

  • Know Your Audience : Tailor your content to resonate with the values and patriotism of your audience.
  • Start with a Strong Opening : Use a powerful quote, historical fact, or anecdote to grab attention.
  • Be Relatable : Share personal stories or historical events that the audience can connect with.
  • Use Patriotic Elements : Incorporate references to national symbols, heroes, and milestones.
  • Keep it Engaging : Use dynamic delivery, expressive body language, and a varying tone to maintain interest.
  • Include Transitions : Smoothly move from one point to another to maintain a natural flow.
  • Be Inspiring : Use uplifting language, motivational quotes, and vivid descriptions to inspire pride and unity.
  • End on a High Note : Conclude with a memorable quote, a heartfelt message, or a call to action.
  • Practice : Rehearse your speech multiple times to become comfortable and confident in your delivery.

Uses of Independence Day Speech

  • Commemorating Historical Events : Independence Day speeches highlight the historical events that led to a nation’s independence. They provide a narrative of the struggle for freedom, paying tribute to the leaders and heroes who played pivotal roles in achieving independence.
  • Promoting National Unity : These speeches emphasize the importance of national unity and solidarity. By reflecting on the collective efforts that secured independence, they inspire citizens to work together for the common good, fostering a sense of belonging and community.
  • Honoring National Heroes : Independence Day speeches honor the sacrifices and contributions of national heroes and freedom fighters. They acknowledge the individuals who fought for freedom, ensuring their legacy is remembered and respected.
  • Inspiring Patriotism : Speeches delivered on Independence Day aim to evoke a sense of patriotism and national pride among citizens. They highlight the country’s achievements and strengths, encouraging citizens to contribute positively to their nation’s development.
  • Addressing Current Issues : Leaders use Independence Day speeches to address current national issues and challenges. By discussing these topics, they can rally support, propose solutions, and inspire collective action to overcome difficulties.
  • Setting Future Goals : These speeches often outline the nation’s future goals and aspirations. Leaders use the occasion to present their vision for the country, motivating citizens to strive for progress and prosperity.
  • Educational Purpose : Independence Day speeches educate the younger generation about the significance of independence and the values of freedom, democracy, and justice. They serve as a reminder of the importance of preserving and upholding these values.
  • Strengthening Cultural Identity : These speeches celebrate the nation’s cultural heritage and identity. They recognize the diverse traditions and customs that contribute to the nation’s uniqueness, promoting cultural pride and inclusivity.
  • Encouraging Civic Responsibility : Independence Day speeches emphasize the role of citizens in maintaining and strengthening democracy. They encourage civic responsibility, active participation in governance, and adherence to national laws and principles.
  • Fostering International Relations : Leaders may use Independence Day speeches to address the international community, highlighting the country’s diplomatic achievements and its role in global affairs. This fosters goodwill and strengthens international relations.

How do I start an Independence Day speech?

Begin with a powerful quote, historical reference, or patriotic greeting to capture attention.

What should I include in an Independence Day speech?

Include historical facts, achievements, national heroes, and messages of unity and progress.

How long should an Independence Day speech be?

Aim for 5 to 10 minutes to keep the audience engaged without overwhelming them.

Who typically delivers Independence Day speeches?

National leaders, politicians, educators, and community leaders commonly deliver these speeches.

How can I make my Independence Day speech engaging?

Use anecdotes, vivid imagery, and a passionate tone to engage your audience.

What themes are common in Independence Day speeches?

Common themes include freedom, unity, patriotism, national progress, and honoring past sacrifices.

How do I conclude an Independence Day speech?

End with a call to action, a hopeful message for the future, or a patriotic quote.

What tone should I use for an Independence Day speech?

Use a respectful, inspiring, and optimistic tone to evoke pride and unity.

How can I incorporate historical facts effectively?

Weave historical facts into the speech by connecting them to present-day achievements and future goals.

Why is it important to mention national heroes in the speech?

Mentioning national heroes honors their sacrifices and inspires current and future generations.

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