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what are case study houses

The Case Study houses that made Los Angeles a modernist mecca

Mapping the homes that helped to define an era

Los Angeles is full of fantastic residential architecture styles, from Spanish Colonial Revival to Streamline Moderne. But the modernist Case Study Houses , sponsored by Arts & Architecture and designed between the 1940s and 1960s, are both native to Southern California and particularly emblematic of the region.

The Case Study series showcased homes commissioned by the magazine and designed by some of the most influential designers and architects of the era, including Charles and Ray Eames, Richard Neutra, and Pierre Koenig. The residences were intended to be relatively affordable, replicable houses for post-World War II family living, with an emphasis on “new materials and new techniques in house construction,” as the magazine’s program intro put it.

Technological innovation and practical, economical design features were emphasized—though the homes’ scintillating locations, on roomy lots in neighborhoods like Pacific Palisades and the Hollywood Hills , gave them a luxurious allure.

With the help of photographer Julius Shulman , who shot most of the homes, the most impressive of the homes came to represent not only new styles of home design, but the postwar lifestyle of the booming Southern California region.

A total of 36 houses and apartment buildings were commissioned; a couple dozen were built, and about 20 still stand in the greater Los Angeles area (there’s also one in Northern California, a set near San Diego, and a small apartment complex in Phoenix). Some have been remodeled, but others have been well preserved. Eleven were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Here’s a guide to all the houses left to see—but keep in mind that, true to LA form, most are still private residences. The Eames and Stahl houses, two of the most famous Case Study Houses, are regularly open to visitors.

As for the unconventional house numbering, post-1962 A&A publisher David Travers writes that the explanation is “inexplicable, locked in the past.”

Case Study House No. 1

J.R. Davidson (with Greta Davidson) designed this house in 1948 (it was actually his second go at Case Study House No. 1). It was intended for “a hypothetical family" with two working parents and was designed to require "minimum maintenance.”

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The exterior of a house that is only one level. The roof is flat. There is a lawn and a path leading to the front door. There is a garage with a driveway.

Case Study House No. 2

Case Study House No. 2 was designed in 1947 by Sumner Spaulding and John Rex. Arts & Architecture wrote that the home’s layout “achieves a sense of spaciousness and flexibility,” with an open living area and glass doors that lead out to adjoining terraces.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Samuel Dematraz (@samueldematraz) on Oct 28, 2018 at 1:07am PDT

Case Study House No. 7

Case Study House No. 7 was designed in 1948 by Thornton M. Abell. It has a “three-zone living area,” with space for study, activity, and relaxation/conversation; the areas can be separated by sliding panels or combined.

The aerial view of a group of buildings. All the buildings have flat roofs. There is a yard in the center of the group of buildings.

Eames House (Case Study House No. 8)

Legendary designer couple Charles and Ray Eames designed the Eames House in 1949 and even Arts & Architecture seemed kind of blown away by it. The home is built into a hillside behind a row of Eucalyptus trees on a bluff above Pacific Palisades. It's recognizable by its bright blue, red, and yellow panels. The Eameses lived in the house until their deaths. It’s now open to visitors five days per week, though reservations are required.

The Eames house with blue, red, and yellow panels on the exterior. There is a large tree outside of the house.

Entenza House (Case Study House No. 9)

The Entenza House was built in 1949 and designed by Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen for Arts & Architecture editor John Entenza. According to the magazine, “In general, the purpose was to enclose as much space as possible within a reasonably simple construction.”

The Entenza House exterior. The roof is flat and the exterior has floor to ceiling windows. There are trees surrounding the house. There is an outdoor seating area.

Case Study House No. 10

Case Study House No. 10 was designed in 1947 by Kemper Nomland. The house is built on several levels to mold into its sloping site. Recently restored, the home sold to Kristen Wiig in 2017.

The exterior of Case Study House Number 10. There is a wide staircase leading up to the house. The house has floor to ceiling windows. There are lights on in the house.

Case Study House No. 15

Designed by J.R. Davidson in 1947, Case Study House No. 15 has south walls made of huge glass panels. Its flagstone patio and indoor floor are at the same level for that seamless indoor-outdoor feel. According to the magazine, the floorplan “is basically that of another Davidson house, Case Study House No. 11,” which has been demolished.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Samuel Dematraz (@samueldematraz) on Nov 15, 2018 at 6:13am PST

Case Study House for 1953

Craig Ellwood’s Case Study House for 1953 is usually numbered as 16 in the Case Study series . It has a modular steel structure and “the basic plan is a four-foot modular rectangle.” But the interior walls stick out past the exterior walls to bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. The Bel Air house hit the market in November with a $3 million price tag.

A photo of a single-story house with frosted panels of glass in front, shielding the house from the street.

Case Study House No. 17 (A)

Case Study House No. 17 (A) was designed by Rodney Walker in 1947. A tight budget kept the house at just 1,560 square feet, “but more space was gained through the use of many glass areas.” The house also has a large front terrace with a fireplace that connects the indoor living room fireplace. The house has been remodeled .

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Case Study House #17, 1947 (@casestudy17) on Jun 11, 2016 at 2:20pm PDT

Case Study House No. 17 (B)

Case Study House No. 17 (B) was designed in 1956 by Craig Ellwood, but “governed by a specific program set forth by the client.” Ellwood took into account the clients' collection of contemporary paintings and made the living room “purposely undersized” to work best for small gatherings. The house was extensively remodeled in the sixties by Hollywood Regency architect John Elgin Woolf and his partner, interior designer Robert Koch Woolf.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by BAUKUNST™ El Arte de Construir (@i_volante) on Aug 13, 2017 at 4:42pm PDT

West House (Case Study House No. 18 [A])

Case Study House No. 18 (A) was designed by Rodney Walker in 1948. The house is oriented toward the ocean, but set back from the cliff edge it sits on to avoid noise issues. As A&A says, "High above the ocean, the privacy of the open south and east exposures of Case Study House No. 18 can be threatened only by an occasional sea-gull." The house features a "bricked garden room" separated from the living room by a two-sided fireplace.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by CaseStudyHouse18A (@casestudyhouse18a) on Oct 6, 2018 at 8:44pm PDT

Fields House (Case Study House No. 18 [B])

Case Study House No. 18 (B) was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1958. Ellwood didn’t attempt to hide that the house was prefabricated (the magazine explains that he believed “that the increasing cost of labor and the decline of the craftsman will within not too many years force a complete mechanization of residential construction methods”). The components of the house, however, are “strongly defined with color: ceiling and panels are off-white and the steel framework is blue.” According to A&A' s website, the house has been remodeled.

View this post on Instagram A post shared by MCM Daily (@dc_hillier) on Oct 29, 2018 at 8:32pm PDT

Case Study House No. 20 [A])

This two-bedroom house was meant “to serve young parents who find they can afford just that much,” according to architect Richard Neutra’s description. He also wrote that he used several different kinds of natural wood in the house.

A living room that opens out to a patio, where a woman watches a young child ride a tricycle

Bass House (Case Study House No. 20 [B])

The Bass House was designed in 1958 by Buff, Straub, and Hensman for famed graphic designer Saul Bass. It's “unique in that it was based upon the experimental use of several prefabricated Douglas fir plywood products as part of the structural concept,” including hollow-core plywood vaults that covered the central part of the house.

A house with glass walls and a canopy with an opening to let in sunlight

Case Study House No. 21

Pierre Koenig designed Case Study House No. 21 in 1958. It was originally completely surrounded by water, with a walkway and driveway spanning the moat at the front door and carport, respectively. The house was severely messed with over the years, but restored in the ’90s with help from Koenig.

A woman sits on a black sofa in a sparsely furnished room. A man standing at a long bureau looks at her.

Stahl House (Case Study House No. 22)

Pierre Koenig's Stahl House , designed in 1960, is probably the most famous house in Los Angeles, thanks to an iconic photo by Julius Shulman . The house isn't much to look at from the street, but its backside is mostly glass surrounding a cliff's-edge pool. Tours are available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Friday—but book well ahead of time, as they sell out quickly.

The exterior of the Stahl house in Los Angeles. There is a swimming pool next to the house with a lounge area. The pool is situated on a cliff edge.

Case Study House for 1950

The unnumbered Case Study House for 1950 was designed by Raphael Soriano. It's rectangular, with living room and bedrooms facing out to the view. However, in the kitchen and eating areas, the house “turns upon itself and living develops around a large kitchen-dining plan opening upon a terrace which leads directly into the living room interrupted only by the mass of two fireplaces.” According to A&A 's website, the house has been remodeled.

A simple, rectangular house with a long flat roof under construction.

Frank House (Case Study House No. 25)

The two-story Frank House was designed by Killingsworth, Brady, and Smith and Associates in 1962 and it sits on a canal in Long Beach. A reflecting pool with stepping stones leads to its huge front door and inside to an 18-foot high courtyard. The house sold in 2015 with some unfortunate remodeling .

A white living room furnished with a rectangular sofa and a grand piano. A glass sliding door leads outside.

Case Study House No. 28

Case Study House No. 28 was designed in 1966 by Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman. According to the magazine, “the architects were asked to design a house that incorporated face brick as the primary structural material to demonstrate its particular advantages.” They came up with a plan for two symmetrical wings joined by glass galleries.

A living room furnished with a green sofa and yellow chairs. A woman on the outside patio looks through the glass doors.

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what are case study houses

Case Study Houses

The Case Study Houses served as a blueprint and inspiration for Mid-Century homes in Southern California.

In 2013, ten Case Study House program residences were added to the National Register of Historic Places.

what are case study houses

Relevant Places

what are case study houses

Bass House (Case Study House #20B)

Case Study House #1

Case Study House #1

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #10

Case Study House #16

Case Study House #16

Case Study House #28

Case Study House #28

CaseStudyHouse9

Entenza House (Case Study House #9)

A view of the pool and the Stahl house

Stahl House (Case Study House #22)

Case Study House 23A

Triad (Case Study House #23A)

Triad (Case Study House #23C)

Triad (Case Study House #23C)

West House (Case Study House #18)

West House (Case Study House #18)

Launched in 1945 by John Entenza’s  Arts + Architecture  magazine, the Case Study House program commissioned architects to study, plan, design, and ultimately construct houses in anticipation of renewed building in the postwar years.

While the Case Study House program did not achieve its initial goals for mass production and affordability, it was responsible for some of Los Angeles’ most iconic and internationally recognized modern residences, such as the  Eames House (Case Study House #8)  by Charles and Ray Eames and the Pierre Koenig-designed  Stahl House (Case Study House #22) , famously photographed by Julius Shulman.

After a decade-long effort, L.A. Conservancy’s Modern Committee succeeded in listing ten Case Study residences on the National Register of Historic Places.

About This Issue

With an emphasis on experimentation, and a goal of promoting good, modern, affordable design for single-family homes, the program helped to disseminate the midcentury modern aesthetic through its thirty-five published plans. Of these, twenty-five houses and one apartment building were built in California and Arizona.

The program offered an unparalleled opportunity for commissions and publicity for established architects including Richard Neutra, J. R. Davidson, Sumner Spaulding, and William Wurster. It helped raise the profile of then-lesser-known designers including Craig Ellwood, A. Quincy Jones, Edward Killingsworth, Ralph Rapson, Eero Saarinen, and Raphael Soriano.

Our Position

On November 21, 2013, the  Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee was awarded a Governor’s Historic Preservation Award to recognize its work in nominating eleven Case Study Houses to the National Register of Historic Places.

Through the efforts of the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee, eleven Case Study House residences in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Ventura counties are now recognized as nationally historic. Ten are officially listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and an eleventh was deemed eligible for listing.

Few of the Case Study Houses currently have preservation protections, and some have been demolished or significantly altered. This proactive step recognizes the eleven nominated homes and raises greater awareness about the Case Study House program while providing a historic context for future designation of the remaining eligible properties.

On May 1, 2013, the State Historical Resources Commission voted to recommend listing of ten Case Study Houses in the National Register of Historic Places.  These ten residences with certifying recommendations were submitted to the National Park Service for final review and listing by the Keeper of the National Trust.  They were formally listed on July 24, 2013.

An eleventh nominated residence, Case Study House #23A, was not formally listed because of owner objection, but it received a determination of eligibility for listing in the National Register. All eleven residences will be considered historic resources and will enjoy the same protections under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

Several Case Study Houses were not included in the nomination — if they’ve been altered or demolished, or for other reasons — but with this platform in place, it will be easier for other CSH homes to be nominated in the future.

Likewise, a few CSH houses, such as the  Eames House  (CSH #8), weren’t included because they’re already individually listed.

Case Study House residences included in nomination:

Los Angeles County

  • Case Study House #1 , 10152 Toluca Lake Ave., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #9 , 205 Chautauqua Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #10 , 711 S. San Rafael Ave., Pasadena
  • Case Study House #16 , 1811 Bel Air Rd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #18 , 199 Chautauqua Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #20 , 2275 N. Santa Rosa Ave., Altadena
  • Case Study House #21 , 9038 Wonderland Park Ave., Los Angeles
  • Case Study House #22 , 1635 Woods Dr., Los Angeles

San Diego County 

  • Case Study House #23A , 2342 Rue de Anne, La Jolla, San Diego (determined eligible)
  • Case Study House #23C , 2339 Rue de Anne, La Jolla, San Diego

Ventura County

  • Case Study House #28 , 91 Inverness Rd., Thousand Oaks

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THE CASE STUDY HOUSES

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SURPRISINGLY THE AMERICAN ARCHITECTURAL magazine most often found in the foreign architect’s office or School of Architecture is the California publication Arts & Architecture . In its pages the foreign archi­tect and student is exposed to an array of buildings of a remarkably high degree of quality. (He is also exposed to the writings of two of America’s most gifted critics, Peter Yates, in music, and Dore Ashton, in painting and sculpture). The wide acceptance and influence of Arts & Architecture  abroad has cer­tainly been due to its view of architecture as an art, rather than as a vast business enterprise, the ap­proach which underlies a majority of America’s archi­tectural publications. Related POP ART, USA MUSE AND EGO

One of the magazine’s most influential and far reaching programs has been its sponsorship of a series of Case Study Houses , where new concepts of form, material and structure could be tested out in residential architecture. The program was insti­tuted in 1945 and the first of these experimental houses was built the following year. Since this date, over 25 houses have been constructed and several are at present in the design stage or are in process of being built. Photographs and plans of these case study houses have recently been brought together by Esther McCoy in a single volume entitled Modern California Houses, Case Study Houses 1945–1962 , (published by Reinhold Publishing Corp., New York, 1962, $15.00). Esther McCoy has long been associated with Arts & Architecture . As a critic and historian she has con­tributed immensely to our understanding of 20th century architecture in California. Her writing on the work of Irving Gill, Bernard Maybeck the brothers Charles and Henry Greene and R. M. Schindler has re­vealed to us an almost entirely unknown chapter in the history of modern architecture. As we should ex­pect, this book, its text, the quality of its plates and its design layout are as distinguished as the buildings which it discusses and illustrates.

To fully appraise the Case Study program one should first see it within the context of similar endeavors which have been tried from time to time in this country and abroad. Throughout the 20th century, nu­merous “Idea houses” or “Houses of the future” have appeared in exhibitions and others have been spon­sored by home and women’s magazines. In 1927–28 the internationally famous Weissonhof housing proj­ects featured designs by Le Corbusier, Gropius, Mart Stam, J. J. P. Oud and others. A similar project to encourage the acceptance of modern architecture was instituted before the Second World War by the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in their first “Idea house,” and continued in a second “Idea house” con­structed in 1947 behind the Center. In 1948 The Museum of Modern Art commissioned Marcel Breuer to build an exhibition house in the Museum court­yard; a second house was commissioned in 1950 to the California architect Gregory Ain. In the 1950’s the Guggenheim Museum, as part of its exhibition of Frank Lloyd Wright, built one of his “Usonian” houses.

Few of these programs have been able to sustain themselves for any appreciable length of time and it is difficult to say whether they have actually pro­duced their desired result. Even the influential ex­hibition and publication program of the Museum of Modern Art in architecture and design, first under Phillip Johnson in the early 1930’s, and later in the 40’s and early 50’s under Edgar Kaufman has pretty well fallen into a respectable intellectual doldrum in the hands of Arthur Drexler.

That this path is a precarious one is well illustrated by several of the most recent Case Study Houses, especially the Towri House on the Rivo Alto Canal, near Long Beach, and the Triad Development of houses at La Jolla, all by the firm of Killingsworth, Brady and Smith. In each of these houses there is a decided tinge of what has so aptly been labeled “Hollywood Regency.” Not that their forms are in any way eclectic––there is no evidence whatsoever of “French Provincial” or “English Regency” which is the normal mode of the Beverly Hills version of “Holly­wood Regency.” Yet their own involvement with formalism, with forced symmetry and their self-con­scious concern for uncluttered forms and surfaces has created a preciousness which compromises their total architectural statement. Man’s physical frame may well be symmetrical, but this does not mean that he necessarily lives or operates in this way. There is something dramatic about entering a house over a bridge, or via a series of stepping stones over a pool of water, but in the end is this architecture or simply a stage setting? In their house “A” at La Jolla, Kil­lingsworth, Brady and Smith provide this stagey, im­pressive entrance for guests and visitors and then they furnish an entrance for the family directly off the garage area which frankly conveys the informality of the contemporary California scene.

The view of architecture as an intellectual exercise in the realm of pristine sharp-edged forms and pre­cise proportions has long been a dominant theme in the Case Study program (as it has continually cropped up throughout the history of architecture), but in the earlier Case Study Houses by Craig Ellwood and Pierre Koenig the esthetic articulation of planes and volumes defined by precise rectangular shapes had been dominated by the structural form of the building. In Killingsworth, Brady and Smith there is a tendency to play down the structure as the salient motif and in its place to substitute an involvement with form.

The most recent of the Case Study Houses reveals as well a marked shift in the use of materials and the way in which they are exposed. The employment of steel as a relatively new building material in do­mestic architecture was initiated in the Case Study House program by Charles Eames for his own house and studio, built in 1949. The Eames house was the most successful of all the Case Study Houses in that it illustrated how the mass-produced product might be used in domestic architecture. The Eames house used materials, primarily steel and glass, in such a way that their quality of regularity and order never dominated the total form. In the later Case Study Houses of Ellwood and Koenig the steel frame did become the controlling element in the design, forci­bly establishing the surface, the proportion and the volume of the building. In several of the most recent examples of the Case Study Houses this directness of approach to materials and structure has been par­tially abandoned. The materials and structure no longer are an organic part of the design. As Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius and even Frank Lloyd Wright have pointed out, good design, especially in our century and here in America, is as much a result of negative self-restraint as it is positive affirmation. Certainly the success of the Eames house was the result of his adherence to the principle of self-re­straint.

Originally the Case Study House program had an­other dominating characteristic and that was its interest in the direct solution of the problems of the mass-produced project house. The first Case Study House by J. R. Davidson was an admirable and highly influential minimal house (of 1100 sq. ft.) and was reproduced as a mass-produced house. The same was true of Summer Spaulding’s and John Rex’s 1947 Case Study House, where a strict modular system was ad­hered to.

By the 1950’s Arts & Architecture had pretty well abandoned any direct concern for mass housing. The houses of the last 12 to 13 years seemed to be based upon the premise of influencing design through osmosis––by creating visual and structural “master­pieces” which will serve as a source of inspiration in the area of project and mass-produced housing. That the Case Study House Project has created significant monuments of the “modern movement” is undeniable and it is hoped that it will continue to do so, but whether this approach, as opposed to its direct in­volvement, can or will affect mass housing (which constitutes well over 90% of all houses built in the U.S.) is open to serious doubt.

–– David Gebhard

what are case study houses

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The Only Surviving Craig Ellwood Case Study House Asks $2.9M

The Only Surviving Craig Ellwood Case Study House Asks $2.9M

what are case study houses

One of Craig Ellwood’s architectural masterpieces is now on the market. Completed in 1953, the single-story, flat-roofed home was the first of three contributions Ellwood made to  Arts & Architecture magazine’s Case Study House Program. Today, the two-bedroom abode is the only surviving member of the trio, as the other two homes were since heavily remodeled.

The home’s front facade is wrapped with translucent glass panels.

The home’s front facade is wrapped with translucent glass panels.

Located at 1811 Bel Air Road, Case Study House #16 was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1953. The residence has been meticulously maintained over the years by its two owners, and today it’s the only surviving Case Study design by Ellwood.

Located at 1811 Bel Air Road, Case Study House #16 was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1953. The residence has been meticulously maintained over the years by its two owners, and today it’s the only surviving Case Study design by Ellwood.

Set on a flat site in the hills of Bel Air, the residence has had only two owners since its completion. With the exception of a few minor changes over the years, it remains in its original condition—and it’s now recognized as a city landmark by the Los Angeles Conservancy.

Although he was an engineer by trade and had no formal architectural training, Ellwood had a passion for using industrial materials and construction techniques in residential architecture. His approach is exhibited in Case Study House #16, which is primarily constructed of steel, glass, and concrete.

Although he was an engineer by trade and had no formal architectural training, Ellwood had a passion for using industrial materials and construction techniques in residential architecture. His approach is exhibited in Case Study House #16, which is primarily constructed of steel, glass, and concrete.

From the moment it was built, the home was celebrated for its innovative design. Translucent glass panels shield the modular steel structure, making the residence read as a floating pavilion from the street. Now, for the first time in 50 years, the property is back on the market—currently listed for $2,995,000. Scroll ahead to see inside.

"The house was innovative in its use of exposed steel structural framing, and floor-to-ceiling glass walls took advantage of spectacular views," notes the Los Angeles Conservancy. The home is located on an 8,427-square-foot lot in Bel Air, and its "layout and siting align with the views and sun orientation, taking full advantage of both."

"The house was innovative in its use of exposed steel structural framing, and floor-to-ceiling glass walls took advantage of spectacular views," notes the Los Angeles Conservancy. The home is located on an 8,427-square-foot lot in Bel Air, and its "layout and siting align with the views and sun orientation, taking full advantage of both."

Floor-to-ceiling glass walls invite warm natural light into the 1,664-square-foot interior.

Floor-to-ceiling glass walls invite warm natural light into the 1,664-square-foot interior.

In the living room, an original natural rock fireplace continues through the glass to divide the patio.

In the living room, an original natural rock fireplace continues through the glass to divide the patio.

The home’s free-flowing floor plan seamlessly connects the main living areas.

The home’s free-flowing floor plan seamlessly connects the main living areas.

Steel beams support the home’s roof while creating a trellised covering for the side patio.

Steel beams support the home’s roof while creating a trellised covering for the side patio.

The home displays several applications of the same materials—metal, glass, and concrete—a key characteristic of most Ellwood homes.

The home displays several applications of the same materials—metal, glass, and concrete—a key characteristic of most Ellwood homes.

Tucked away in the hills of Bel Air, Case Study House #16 is a serene oasis in the center of Los Angeles.

Tucked away in the hills of Bel Air, Case Study House #16 is a serene oasis in the center of Los Angeles.

1811 Bel Air Road in Los Angeles, CA, is currently listed for $2,995,000 by Aaron Kirman, Dalton Gomez, and Weston Littlefield of the Aaron Kirman Group at Compass.

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Julius Shulman’s Case Study House #22

Holden Luntz Gallery

The Greatest American Architectural Photographer of the 20th Century

Julius Shulman is often considered the greatest American architectural photographer of the 20th century. His photography shaped the image of South Californian lifestyle of midcentury America. For 70 years, he created on of the most comprehensive visual archives of modern architecture, especially focusing on the development of the Los Angeles region. The designs of some of the world’s most noted architectures including Richard Neutra, Ray Eames and Frank Lloyd Wright came to life though his photographs. To this day, it is through Shulman’s photography that we witness the beauty of modern architecture and the allure of Californian living.

Neutra and Beyond

Born in 1910 in Brooklyn, Julius Shulman grew up in a small farm in Connecticut before his family moved to Los Angeles at the age of ten. While in Los Angeles, Shulman was introduced to Boy Scouts and often went hiking in Mount Wilson. This allowed him to organically study light and shadow, and be immersed in the outdoors. While in college between UCLA and Berkeley, he was offered to photograph the newly designed Kun House by Richard Neutra. Upon photographing, Shulman sent the six images to the draftsman who then showed them to Neutra. Impressed, Richard Neutra asked Shulman to photograph his other houses and went on to introduce him to other architectures.

The Case Study Houses

Julius Shulman’s photographs revealed the true essence of the architect’s vision. He did not merely document the structures, but interpreted them in his unique way which presented the casual residential elegance of the West Coast. The buildings became studies of light and shadow set against breathtaking vistas. One of the most significant series in Shulman’s portfolio is without a doubt his documentation of the Case Study Houses. The Case Study House Program was established under the patronage of the Arts & Architectue magazine in 1945 in an effort to produce model houses for efficient and affordable living during the housing boom generated after the Second World War. Southern California was used as the location for the prototypes and the program commissioned top architects of the day to design the houses. Julius Shulman was chosen to document the designs and throughout the course of the program he photographed the majority of the 36 houses. Shulman’s photography gave new meaning to the structures, elevating them to a status of international recognition in the realm of architecture and design. His way of composition rendered the structures as inviting places for modern living, reflecting a sense of optimism of modern living.

Julius Shulman, Case Study House #22, Pierre Koenig, Los Angeles, California, 1960, Silver gelatin photograph

Case Study House #22

Case Study House #22, also known as the Stahl House was one of the designs Julius Shulman photographed which later become one of the most iconic of his images. Designed by architect Pierre Koenig in 1959, the Stahl House was the residential home of American football player C.H Buck Stahl located in the Hollywood Hills. The property was initially regarded as undevelopable due to its hillside location, but became an icon of modern Californian architecture. Regarded as one of the most interesting masterpieces of contemporary architecture, Pierre Koenig preferred merging unconventional materials for its time such as steel with a simple, ethereal, indoor-outdoor feel. Julius’s dramatic image, taking in a warm evening in the May of 1960, shows two young ladies dressed in white party dresses lounging and chatting. The lights of the city shimmer in the distant horizon matching the grid of the city, while the ladies sit above the distant bustle and chaos. Pierre Koenig further explains in the documentary titled Case Study Houses 1945-1966 saying;

“When you look out along the beam it carries your eye right along the city streets, and the (horizontal) decking disappears into the vanishing point and takes your eye out and the house becomes one with the city below.”

The Los Angeles Good Life

The image presents a fantasy and is a true embodiment of the Los Angeles good life. By situating two models in the scene, Shulman creates warmth, helping the viewer to imagine scale as well as how life would be like living in this very house. In an interview with Taina Rikala De Noriega for the Archives of American Art Shulman recalls the making of the photograph;

“ So we worked, and it got dark and the lights came on and I think somebody had brought sandwiches. We ate in the kitchen, coffee, and we had a nice pleasant time. My assistant and I were setting up lights and taking pictures all along. I was outside looking at the view. And suddenly I perceived a composition. Here are the elements. I set up the furniture and I called the girls. I said, ‘Girls. Come over sit down on those chairs, the sofa in the background there.’ And I planted them there, and I said, ‘You sit down and talk. I’m going outside and look at the view.’ And I called my assistant and I said, ‘Hey, let’s set some lights.’ Because we used flash in those days. We didn’t use floodlights. We set up lights, and I set up my camera and created this composition in which I assembled a statement. It was not an architectural quote-unquote “photograph.” It was a picture of a mood.”

Purity in Line and Design to Perfection

Shulman’s preference to shoot in black and white reduces the subject to its geometrical essence allowing the viewer to observe the reflections, shadows and forms. A Shulman signature, horizontal and vertical lines appear throughout the image to create depth and dimensional perspective. A mastery in composition, the photograph catches purity in line and design to perfection.

A Lifetime of Achievements

Julius Shulman retired from active architectural work in 1989, leaving behind an incredibly rich archive chronicling the development of modern living in Southern California. A large part of his archive resides at the Getty Museum in California. For the next twenty years he participated in major museum and gallery exhibitions around the world, and created numerous books by publishers such as Taschen and Nazraeli Press. Among his honors, Shulman is the only photographer to have been granted honorary lifetime membership in the American Institute of Architects. In 1998 he was given a lifetime achievement award by ICP. Julius passed away in 2009 in his home in Los Angeles.

Milton Greene's Marilyn Monroe – Ballerina Sitting

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The Case Study Houses Program: Craig Ellwood’s Case Study House 18

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case study house #18 - craig ellwood

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case study house #18 - craig ellwood

Craig Ellwood’s series of Case Study Houses was seen most successfully in the Case Study House  18, otherwise known as Fields House, that introduced many design enhancements on previous models.

The no. 18 was built in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, which provided sweeping views of the surrounding hills from a prime location.

One of the most significant progressions of the Case Study House 18, was to prefabricate its frame in a factory to which were later added fixtures such as walls, floors and tiling.

Ellwood kept the design for the Case Study House 18, basic. He divided the rectangular shaped plan in two separate sections: the bedrooms, the lounge and the music room were on one side while the kitchen, the entrance hall and the covered entryway on the other.

A translucent glass wall protects the house from the street-view but makes the light to filter through while offering privacy to the people inside. The inside-outside continuity was guaranteed by sliding doors connecting the living room with the terrace.

As other Case Study Houses, the no. 18 had many inclusions such as a swimming pool, modern appliances and a central vacuum system. Also, Ellwood placed many electrical outlets around the house to help its owners to tailor the spaces as they liked. Over time this made the original design almost unrecognisable.

The glass and beams prefabricated structure together with a flexible open plan, made the Case Study House 18 the perfect example of what the Case Study Houses Program was trying to achieve: an architectural model for affordable and modern housing.

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Study: Gen Z is choosing pets over kids, homes over weddings

(Gray News) – Gen Z is shifting life’s priorities away from marriage and babies.

According to a new study published Thursday, Gen Z is focusing on pets over children and houses over weddings.

The study found that 62% of Gen Zers are in no rush to have children or don’t want them, opting for having pets instead.

Over 40% of Gen Zers don’t see marriage as necessary and are staying single by choice.

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Copyright 2024 Gray Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Do you think New York’s filthy sidewalks, gross subway cars and rat infestations make it America’s dirtiest city? You’re in for quite a surprise.

A recent study by LawnStarter has crowned Houston, Texas, as the nation’s dirtiest city — bumping Newark, New Jersey from the top spot.

New York City, despite its notorious grime, didn’t even crack the top 10. It landed in 12th place. While the Big Apple dodged the title of dirtiest, it’s still grappling with its trash and pest problems.

A recent study found thta Houston currently stands as the dirtiest city in America.

Houston’s new dubious honor stems from its terrible air quality, infrastructure woes and a staggering number of pests invading homes.

LawnStarter’s sister site PestGnome pulled data showing Houston has the worst cockroach problem, with the city crawling with the creepy critters.

It’s not just Houston; southern cities seem to be a haven for cockroaches. San Antonio, Texas and Tampa, Florida, join Houston in the top three for cockroach infestations.

If cockroaches aren’t your nightmare, steer clear of Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore. These cities top the list for rodent-infested homes.

dirtiest cities

Despite California’s hefty spending on cleaning efforts, several of its cities still rank poorly. San Bernardino, notorious as the “armpit” of California, ranks fourth dirtiest due to atrocious air quality.

Riverside and Ontario, also in the LA metro area, share this dismal air status, now plagued by pollution-heavy warehouses that have replaced orange groves and vineyards.

San Francisco, however, shines as a cleaner gem in California. With a $72.5 million street cleaning spree in 2019 and an additional $16.7 million budget in 2023, it’s among the cleaner half of US cities.

Aerial panorama of Newark New Jersey skyline

But this doesn’t account for the rising homeless and drug epidemic facing the city.

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A recent study found thta Houston currently stands as the dirtiest city in America.

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Officer in Scottie Scheffler case thanks the golfer but takes aim at his attorney in statement

LOUISVILLE, Ky. ( WAVE /Gray News) -The officer at the center of the case against pro golfer Scottie Scheffler issued his statement after the charges against Scheffler were dismissed.

In the letter, Detective Bryan Gillis thanked Scheffler for his demeanor throughout the ordeal.

“Mr. Scheffler and I both agree that there will be no ill will over this going forward,” Gillis wrote. “Instead of giving a negative public reaction, he chose to speak with dignity, humility and respect. My family and I appreciate that.”

However, Gillis took issue with claims made by Scheffler’s high-profile attorney, Steve Romines, calling his comments them “unfortunate and disturbing.” During a press conference after the court hearing on Wednesday, Romines said Gillis was never dragged and that it was a “false arrest.”

“I’d be surprised and disappointed if Mr. Scheffler actually had any part in making those statements,” Gillis said. “To be clear, I was drug by the car, I went to the ground, and I received visible injuries to my knees and wrist. I’m going to recover from it, and it will be OK.”

During the press conference, Romines also stated the only reason why Scheffler was not suing the Louisville Metro Police Department was that the taxpayers would end up with the bill.

“He didn’t do anything wrong,” he said. “And I’ve said repeatedly, the more evidence comes out, the more it shows that Scottie was a victim in all this.”

During the press conference, Romines issued a response when asked about statements made by Scheffler moments after he was read his Miranda Rights. In a video of Scheffler’s arrest, he is heard apologizing and telling the officer he didn’t know Gillis was a police officer when he tried to stop him. Scheffler also tells the officer he was afraid he was late for his tee time, so he decided to move forward and admits he should have stopped.

When asked why the statement Scheffler made in the video did not align with what Romines was saying, Romines said Scheffler was “being interrogated after the most stressful situation of his life” and that Gillis was “asking him leading questions. ... And that’s why you don’t talk to police.”

Scheffler’s own words after the hearing were of a different tone than his own attorney.

“As I stated previously, this was an unfortunate misunderstanding,” Scheffler wrote. “I hold no ill will toward Officer Gillis. I wish to put this incident behind me and move on, and I hope he will do the same. Police officers have a difficult job, and I hold them in high regard. This was a severe miscommunication in a chaotic situation.”

Scheffler also talked about the life that was lost that morning during the fatal crash, a sentiment that Gillis echoed.

“The reality is there are more important things in the world right now than a back-and-forth over this,” Gillis said. “A person lost his life that day, and a family lost a loved one. At the end of the day, I take pride in working for the people in the community to preserve their safety.”

Gillis said he would like to continue serving the community as he has for the last two decades “without the distractions caused by this series of events.”

“I wish Scottie Scheffler and his family all the best,” he said.

Gillis ended his statement with a joke about his pants that had ripped during the incident.

“To those concerned, they were indeed ruined. But Scottie, it’s all good,” he said. “I never would’ve guessed I’d have the most famous pair of pants in the country for a few weeks because of this. Take care and be safe.- Bryan.”

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Case Study Houses: The Latest Architecture and News

Foster + partners reimagines william pereora's television city in california, united states.

Foster + Partners Reimagines William Pereora's Television City in California, United States - Featured Image

Foster + Partners, l ed by Normal Foster, has just been selected to reimagine the Television City studio complex in Los Angeles, following a global competition. The project involves the restoration of William Pereira’s iconic 1952 buildings and the transformation of the 25-acre site into a low-rise multi-modal campus and draws inspiration from the Los Angeles’ renowned Case Study Houses. The campus will feature new sound stages, production offices, creative workspace, and retail surrounding its perimeter.

Foster + Partners Reimagines William Pereora's Television City in California, United States - Image 1 of 4

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Defining Afro-Contemporary Homes: The Role of Case Study Houses

Defining Afro-Contemporary Homes: The Role of Case Study Houses - Featured Image

The home is a fundamental expression of architectural movements within the fabric of a city. As one of the smallest typologies, it is the simplest canvas to exhibit the design ethos of any particular era. African cities have continuously negotiated the meaning of their residential dwellings, from traditional architecture to colonial architecture, and the influx of post-colonial modern architecture. Vernacular architecture explored homes with spatial patterns rooted in cultural dexterity, envelopes built with indigenous materials and forms, endowed with traditional motifs. These were in stark contrast to colonial homes that featured a range of imported architectural styles across the continent, neglecting their climatic and cultural contexts while amplifying social class.

Defining Afro-Contemporary Homes: The Role of Case Study Houses - Image 1 of 4

How Did Materials Shape the Case Study Houses?

How Did Materials Shape the Case Study Houses? - Featured Image

The Case Study Houses (1945-1966), sponsored by the Arts & Architecture Magazine and immortalized by Julius Shulman ’s iconic black-and-white photographs, may be some of the most famous examples of modern American architecture in history. Designed to address the postwar housing crisis with quick construction and inexpensive materials, while simultaneously embracing the tenets of modernist design and advanced contemporary technology, the Case Study Houses were molded by their central focus on materials and structural design. While each of the homes were designed by different architects for a range of clients, these shared aims unified the many case study homes around several core aesthetic and structural strategies: open plans, simple volumes, panoramic windows, steel frames, and more. Although some of the Case Study Houses’ materials and strategies would become outdated in the following decades, these unique products and features would come to define a historic era of architectural design in the United States.

Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study House Program

Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study House Program - Featured Image

Between 1945 and 1966, the Case Study Houses program , following the Weißenhof-siedlung exposition, commissioned a study of economic, easy-to-build houses. The study included the creation of 36 prototypes that were to be built leading up to post-war residential development. The initiative by John Entenza, editor of Arts & Architecture magazine, brought a team to Los Angeles that featured some of the biggest names in architecture at the time, including Richard Neutra , Charles & Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig, and Eero Saarinen , among others.

The program's experiment not only defined the modern home and set it apart from its predecessors, but it also pioneered new construction materials and methods in residential development that continue to influence international architecture to this day. Take a detailed look at some of the program's most emblematic work together with recommendations for facing contemporary challenges. 

When Minimalism Gets Extravagant: A Virtual Look at the Case Study House 17(2)

When Minimalism Gets Extravagant: A Virtual Look at the Case Study House 17(2) - Featured Image

Arts & Architecture ’s Case Study House program was supposed to be about creating replicable, affordable designs for post-war living—stylish but modest homes for young families on a budget. And then came house #17(2).

To be fair, this house was designed for real clients, with specific and ambitious requirements. The Hoffmans had four children, a household staff, and an art collection. So this was never going to be just another suburban three-bedroom.

what are case study houses

A Virtual Look Into J R Davidson's Case Study House #11

The editorial notes on Arts & Architecture ’s 11th Case Study House set out the “basic principles of modern architecture”: an emphasis on “order, fitness and simplicity.” Livability and practicality are key, and “sham” is frowned on. As with other houses in the series, this design by JR Davidson adheres to these goals with clean, horizontal lines, an open floor plan, and integration of the outdoor space.

It’s a modest, compact home, less high-concept than some of the other houses in the programme—no indoor plantings or reflecting pools; no complicated backstory for the imagined clients (think of the next two, #12 and especially #13 )—but arguably more successful in providing a model for the average American home. Its value doesn’t depend on dramatic landscaping or views, but on thoughtful design and attention to solving everyday problems. Walking through Archilogic ’s 3D model reveals the elegance of Davidson’s approach.

A Virtual Look Inside Case Study House #10 by Kemper Nomland & Kemper Nomland Jr

The tenth Case Study House wasn’t actually intended for the Arts & Architecture programme. It was added on its completion in 1947, to fill out the roster, as many houses remained unbuilt. Clearly, the Nomland design earned its place on the list, having many features in common with other Case Study homes and, most importantly, meeting the stated aims of economy, simplicity, new materials and techniques, and indoor/outdoor integration. The different departure point, however, can be seen in the layout. Whereas Case Study homes were designed primarily for families, this plan is for “a family of adults”—which is to say, a childless couple.

The World's First Freeform 3D-Printed House Enters Development Phase

The World's First Freeform 3D-Printed House Enters Development Phase - Featured Image

WATG Urban's first prize design for The Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016 is now moving one step closer to becoming a reality. Since winning the competition, WATG 's Chicago office has been developing the winning design, dubbed Curve Appeal, alongside Branch Technology . Curve Appeal is now undergoing the "wall section testing, research and development phase" with an anticipated goal of breaking ground later this year. This revolutionary project could change the way we construct complex, freeform structures.

The World's First Freeform 3D-Printed House Enters Development Phase - Image 1 of 4

A Virtual Look Inside Case Study House #7 by Thornton M Abell

The seventh house in the Arts & Architecture Case Study program was built with real clients in mind: a family of three with creative hobbies. The result, designed by Thornton M Abell , is a flexible home with a distinctive functional character.

The house divides neatly into three separate areas: to the left of the entrance, working spaces make up nearly half of the full floorplan, with living and sleeping areas off to the right and extending forward into the garden. Sliding panels between the roomy central reception/dining area and the cozy living room create the option of privacy or extra space, as required, with the terrace and splash pool beyond offering further possibilities for summer entertaining. A small planting area beside the sliding door blurs the line between indoors and out.

A Virtual Look Inside Case Study House #4, Ralph Rapson’s "Greenbelt House"

The fourth house in Arts & Architecture ’s Case Study program departed from the trend with a noticeably more introverted design. Intended for a modestly sized urban lot, rather than the dramatic and expansive canyon or forest locations of so many other Case Study homes, it couldn’t borrow drama from the landscape, nor would the residents welcome curious glances from their close neighbors—so the house looks entirely inward.

Rapson called his design the “Greenbelt House” for the glass-covered atrium that divides the living and sleeping areas. In his original drawings and model, as in Archilogic ’s 3D model shown here, this strip is shown filled with plant beds in a striking geometric pattern. However, Rapson imagined that it could be put to many uses, according to the residents’ tastes: a croquet court or even a swimming pool could find their place here. This “brings the outdoors indoors” rather more literally than, for instance, Richard Neutra ’s expansive, open-door designs.

A Virtual Look Inside the Case Study House #23A by Killingsworth, Brady & Smith

Only three of the Arts & Architecture Case Study Houses were built outside Los Angeles , and those three formed a united concept. The Triad Houses in La Jolla, a seaside suburb of San Diego , share a single driveway, motor court, and design vocabulary, while being created to meet different needs.

In keeping with the Case Study mission, all three houses used open-plan design, affordable modern materials (such as aluminium and concrete with wood frames), and plenty of glass to create a fresh and open mood. The emphasis was on strong geometric forms, careful detailing, horizontal lines (with perfectly flat roofs) and – this being the Californian coastline – dramatic views and outdoor living space, creating the illusion of more interior space than was actually present.

AD Classics: The Entenza House (Case Study #9) / Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen & Associates

AD Classics: The Entenza House (Case Study #9) / Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen & Associates - Houses Interiors, Facade, Door

Nestled in the verdant seaside hills of the Pacific Palisades in southern California, the Entenza House is the ninth of the famous Case Study Houses built between 1945 and 1962. With a vast, open-plan living room that connects to the backyard through floor-to-ceiling glass sliding doors, the house brings its natural surroundings into a metal Modernist box, allowing the two to coexist as one harmonious space.

Like its peers in the Case Study Program, the house was designed not only to serve as a comfortable and functional residence, but to showcase how modular steel construction could be used to create low-cost housing for a society still recovering from the the Second World War. The man responsible for initiating the program was John Entenza , Editor of the magazine Arts and Architecture. The result was a series of minimalist homes that employed steel frames and open plans to reflect the more casual and independent way of life that had arisen in the automotive age.[1]

AD Classics: The Entenza House (Case Study #9) / Charles & Ray Eames, Eero Saarinen & Associates - Houses Interiors, Door, Table, Chair

A Virtual Look Inside the Case Study House #3 by William W Wurster & Theodore Bernardi

The third Arts & Architecture Case Study House has a noticeably different sensibility to that of many of the other designs in the series. While equally engaged with the goal of maximizing enjoyment of the natural surroundings, in this design the architects show more concern for privacy and protection.

The approach from the street is somewhat forbidding; aluminum siding presents an impenetrable front. Besides the front and garage doors, the small, high kitchen windows are the only visible openings, though it is possible to peer over the fence of grape stakes into the children’s private garden.

A Virtual Look Inside the Case Study House #2 by Sumner Spaulding and John Rex

The second house in Arts & Architecture magazine’s Case Study Houses program shows the hallmarks of the series: an emphasis on light-soaked living areas, indoor-outdoor living, strong horizontal lines dominated by a flat roof, and so on. It is distinguished, though, by particularly creative details linking the indoor and outdoor areas, and by a strong awareness of function.

A Virtual Look Into Richard Neutra's Case Study House #20, the Bailey House

The Bailey house—one of Richard Neutra ’s four Case Study designs for Arts & Architecture —forms one of five Bluff houses, standing high above the ocean. The brief was to create a low-budget home for a young family, with just two bedrooms, but offering the possibility of expansion as time went by (which did in fact transpire; additional Neutra-designed wings were later built).

Neutra employed the same indoor-outdoor philosophy that can be seen at work in his unbuilt Alpha and Omega houses, using large sliding glass doors to create light and a visual sense of space, as well as ensuring that the house physically opened up to, as he put it, “borrow space from the outdoors.” With this sunny Californian ocean-view setting, it made perfect sense to use the back garden and terrace as living and dining room.

A Virtual Look Inside the Case study house #12 by Whitney R Smith

A Virtual Look Inside the Case study house #12 by Whitney R Smith - Featured Image

In designing his (unbuilt) house for the Arts & Architecture Case Study program , Whitney Smith, like Richard Neutra , prioritized the connection to outdoor space. His motivation, however, was more specific than a desire to extend the living area of a small house. Rather, he wanted to create a highly personal space, geared to the passion of his hypothetical client. Seeing conventional plans as a straitjacket for residents who craved appropriate working space within their home (be it a sewing studio or a photography darkroom), he aspired to fit this house to the needs of a keen horticulturist.

A Virtual Look Into Richard Neutra's Unbuilt Case Study House #13, The Alpha House

A Virtual Look Into Richard Neutra's Unbuilt Case Study House #13, The Alpha House - Featured Image

Of the four homes designed by Richard Neutra for the Case Study Houses program, post-war thought experiments commissioned by Arts & Architecture , only one was ever realized. In the imaginary village of the program's many unbuilt homes, next to #6, the Omega house , stands #13, named Alpha. Archilogic ’s 3D model gives us a unique chance to experience this innovative concept home.

Each of Neutra’s projects was designed for a family of five, and each reveals his psychoanalytic approach to architecture, in which the house itself is an intimate part of family relationships, as important as the personalities involved. (Neutra was personally acquainted with Freud, and a committed follower of birth trauma theorist Otto Rank.) Underlining this Freudian view, his imaginary clients are not just neighbours—they are related; Mrs Alpha being sister to Mrs Omega.

A Virtual Look Into Mies van der Rohe's Core House

Architecture depends on its time. It is the crystallization of its inner structure, the slow unfolding of its form. – Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

In 1951, Mies van der Rohe designed the Core House, a participative design structure which could be completed by its inhabitants.

This flexible model challenged certain architectural concepts, explored new industrial technologies, and proposed a modular system to improve the quality and affordability of housing.

IMAGES

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  3. Pierre Koenig Case Study House No. 21 Asks $3.6M » Digs.net

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  5. Iconic House: The Eames House, Case Study House 8

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  6. Case Study House No. 22, designed by architect Pierre Koenig, photo by

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VIDEO

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COMMENTS

  1. Case Study Houses

    The Stahl House, Case Study House #22. The Case Study Houses were experiments in American residential architecture sponsored by Arts & Architecture magazine, which commissioned major architects of the day, including Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, Craig Ellwood, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig, Eero Saarinen, A. Quincy Jones, Edward Killingsworth, Rodney Walker, and Ralph Rapson to ...

  2. Los Angeles Case Study houses: Mapping the midecentury modern

    Case Study House No. 7 was designed in 1948 by Thornton M. Abell. It has a "three-zone living area," with space for study, activity, and relaxation/conversation; the areas can be separated by ...

  3. The Case Study Houses Forever Changed American Architecture

    The Case Study House Program served as a model for post-war living, providing the public and the building industry an opportunity to access affordable, mid-century modernism and simple designs.

  4. Modern, Low-Budget and Easy to Build Living Spaces: the Case Study

    Case Study House 8. Image via Flickr User: edward stojakovic Licensed under CC BY 2.0. Another interesting factor was the attention given to storage spaces such as cabinets, shelves, and closets ...

  5. AD Classics: Stahl House / Pierre Koenig

    The Case Study House Program produced some of the most iconic architectural projects of the 20th Century, but none more iconic than or as famous as the Stahl House, also known as Case Study House ...

  6. AD Classics: Eames House / Charles and Ray Eames

    The house is situated on a three-acre site on top of an 150-foot cliff that overlooks the Pacific Ocean. The site is a flat parcel on otherwise steep land that creates a retaining wall to the west.

  7. Case Study Houses

    Few of the Case Study Houses currently have preservation protections, and some have been demolished or significantly altered. This proactive step recognizes the eleven nominated homes and raises greater awareness about the Case Study House program while providing a historic context for future designation of the remaining eligible properties.

  8. Southern California's Case Study Homes Reimagined Modern Living, and

    The 16 Case Study Houses that remain in close-to or in their original forms, designed by architecture greats including Craig Ellwood and Richard Neutra, are owned and lived in by private ...

  9. The Case Study Houses

    The first Case Study House by J. R. Davidson was an admirable and highly influential minimal house (of 1100 sq. ft.) and was reproduced as a mass-produced house. The same was true of Summer Spaulding's and John Rex's 1947 Case Study House, where a strict modular system was ad­hered to. By the 1950's Arts & Architecture had pretty well ...

  10. Arts & Architecture: Case Study House Program Introduction

    The houses were so conceived and realized. I urge everyone to read the Case Study House Program announcement [PDF] from the January 1945 issue of Arts & Architecture. As an end note, the peculiarities of the CSH numbering system are inexplicable, locked in the past. Not serious, perhaps, but perplexing to the researcher.

  11. Ten Things You Should Know About the Case Study House Program

    The case study house program was an experimental program set up by John Entenza through Arts and Architecture Magazine, that facilitated the design, construction and publishing of modern single-family homes. The goal was to highlight modern homes constructed with industrial materials and techniques that could help solve the housing needs after ...

  12. Modernism Week 2019: Casing The Case Study Houses

    January 23, 2019. The Case Study House program, an experiment sponsored and promoted by Arts + Architecture magazine, was commissioned to design and construct low-cost homes in Southern California's residential area between 1946 and 1965. Following the end of the Second World War and with that the return of millions of soldiers, the United ...

  13. Case Study House #16 by Craig Ellwood

    Located at 1811 Bel Air Road, Case Study House #16 was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1953. The residence has been meticulously maintained over the years by its two owners, and today it's the only surviving Case Study design by Ellwood. Set on a flat site in the hills of Bel Air, the residence has had only two owners since its completion.

  14. The Case Study Houses Program

    The Case Study Houses program aimed to bring Modernist principles to the masses. Architects as Richard Neutra, Pierre Koenig, Craig Ellwood and Rodney Walker participated into the program with one or more projects. Unfortunately not all projects proposed were built but many still stand, we selected the most representative ones.

  15. Julius Shulman's Case Study House #22

    The Case Study House Program was established under the patronage of the Arts & Architectue magazine in 1945 in an effort to produce model houses for efficient and affordable living during the housing boom generated after the Second World War. Southern California was used as the location for the prototypes and the program commissioned top ...

  16. How Did Materials Shape the Case Study Houses?

    The Case Study Houses (1945-1966), sponsored by the Arts & Architecture Magazine and immortalized by Julius Shulman's iconic black-and-white photographs, may be some of the most famous examples ...

  17. The Case Study Houses Program: Craig Ellwood's Case Study House 18

    Ellwood kept the design for the Case Study House 18, basic. He divided the rectangular shaped plan in two separate sections: the bedrooms, the lounge and the music room were on one side while the kitchen, the entrance hall and the covered entryway on the other. A translucent glass wall protects the house from the street-view but makes the light ...

  18. Modern California Houses Case Study Houses 1945 1962

    The Case Study House program continued yearly for about twenty years. Through their contributions, unknown architects and designers sprang into prominence. Charles Eames, for example, was virtually unknown before his Case Study House. Esther McCoy, a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of "Arts & Architecture" magazine, observed the progress ...

  19. Rare Case Study House With Ocean Views in Pacific Palisades ...

    A rare Case Study House melding high design and ocean views in Pacific Palisades, CA, is seeking its next owner. The two-bedroom, 2.5-bath home was listed for $8,900,000 with Crosby Doe of Crosby ...

  20. CASE STUDIES

    Case Study: Tribeca Penthouse by Min Design. The penthouse apartment in the converted 1874 warehouse in New York had soaring ceiling heights, an abundance of daylight, and…. S. Claire ConroyMay 7, 2024. ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS, CASE STUDIES, URBANFebruary 21, 2024. Case Study: Two Gables by Wheeler Kearns.

  21. Study: Gen Z is choosing pets over kids, homes over weddings

    The study found 53% of Gen Zers in America are unsure if they will ever be able to afford a house in their lifetime. More than 1 in 3 believe the lack of affordable housing is the biggest ...

  22. Houston is the dirtiest city in America

    You're in for quite a surprise. A recent study by LawnStarter has crowned Houston, Texas, as the nation's dirtiest city — bumping Newark, New Jersey from the top spot. New York City, despite ...

  23. AD Classics: The Entenza House (Case Study #9) / Charles ...

    Nestled in the verdant seaside hills of the Pacific Palisades in southern California, the Entenza House is the ninth of the famous Case Study Houses built between 1945 and 1962. With a vast, open ...

  24. IT Modernization of Right-of-Way Management Technology

    Challenge. A large state transportation agency engaged Guidehouse to support the modernization of their right-of-way management processes. The agency required an updated framework to manage the end-to-end identification, acquisition, and management of billions of dollars in real property to reduce the risk of delays and fraud to their multi-year construction project.

  25. The Zero Down Mortgage Is Back -- But Is It a Financial Mistake?

    The 2008 real estate market crash: A case study in underwater mortgages. Let's look at the real estate market crash in 2008 as a great case study in how underwater mortgages inevitably recover ...

  26. Live Updates: Trump Lashes Out After Conviction in Misleading Speech

    After a five-year investigation and a seven-week trial, Donald J. Trump was convicted on Thursday of falsifying records to cover up a sex scandal. But that will not be the last word on the case ...

  27. LA's Iconic Case Study Houses (Finally!) Make National Register

    Case Study House #23C, 2339 Rue de Anne, La Jolla, San Diego. Ventura County Case Study House #28, 91 Inverness Rd., Thousand Oaks. A selection of photos from the Case Study Homes can be found here.

  28. Officer in Scottie Scheffler case thanks the golfer but takes ...

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. ( WAVE /Gray News) -The officer at the center of the case against pro golfer Scottie Scheffler issued his statement after the charges against Scheffler were dismissed. In the ...

  29. House v. NCAA: College sports could see a dramatic change. Here's what

    College athletes could soon get dramatically different paychecks. At issue is a lawsuit called House v. the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA), a class action that seeks to change ...

  30. Case Study Houses

    Arts & Architecture 's Case Study House program was supposed to be about creating replicable, affordable designs for post-war living—stylish but modest homes for young families on a budget ...