essay about the battle of hastings

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Battle of Hastings

By: History.com Editors

Updated: August 10, 2022 | Original: November 9, 2009

The Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066. Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry.

At the Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066, King Harold II of England was defeated by the invading Norman forces of William the Conqueror. By the end of the bloody, all-day battle, Harold was dead and his forces were destroyed. Harold was the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, and the battle changed the course of history and established the French-speaking Normans as the new rulers of England, which in turn brought about a significant cultural, economic and military transformation, and helped to create the modern English language.

William the Conqueror

William the Conqueror was the son of Robert I, duke of Normandy in northern France, and his mistress Herleva (also called Arlette), a tanner’s daughter from Falaise. The duke, who had no other sons, designated William his heir, and with his death in 1035 William became duke of Normandy.

Did you know? William, an Old French name composed of Germanic elements (“wil,” meaning desire, and “helm,” meaning protection), was introduced to England by William the Conqueror and quickly became extremely popular. By the 13th century, it was the most common given name among English men.

William was of Viking origin. He spoke a dialect of French and grew up in Normandy, a fiefdom loyal to the French kingdom, but he and other Normans descended from Scandinavian invaders. One of William’s relatives, Rollo, pillaged northern France with Viking raiders in the late ninth and early 10th centuries, eventually accepting his own territory (Normandy, named for the Norsemen who controlled it) in exchange for peace.

King Harold II

Just over two weeks before the Battle of Hastings in October 1066, William had invaded England, claiming his right to the English throne. In 1051, William is believed to have visited England and met with his cousin Edward the Confessor , the childless English king. According to Norman historians, Edward promised to make William his heir.

On his deathbed, however, Edward granted the kingdom to Harold Godwinson , head of the leading noble family in England and more powerful than the king himself. In January 1066, King Edward died, and Harold Godwinson was proclaimed King Harold II. William immediately disputed his claim.

October 14, 1066

On September 28, 1066, William landed in England at Pevensey, on Britain’s southeast coast, with thousands of foot soldiers, horses and cavalrymen. Seizing Pevensey, he then marched to Hastings, where he paused to organize his forces and, according to some accounts, built a fortress or castle.

On October 13, Harold arrived near Hastings with his army. The next day, October 14, William led his forces out to battle before Harold’s troops had a chance to organize.

The one-day Battle of Hastings ended in a decisive victory against Harold’s men. Harold was killed—shot in the eye with an arrow, according to legend—his brothers Leofwine and Gyrth were also killed, and his English forces were scattered.

Legacy of the Battle of Hastings

After his victory at the Battle of Hastings, William marched on London and received the city’s submission. On Christmas Day of 1066, he was crowned the first Norman king of England in Westminster Abbey , and the Anglo-Saxon phase of English history came to an end.

Illiterate like most nobles of his time, William spoke no English when he ascended the throne and failed to master it. Thanks to the Norman invasion, French was spoken in England’s courts for centuries and completely transformed the English language, infusing it with new words and giving birth to modern English.

William I proved an effective king of England, and the Domesday Book , a great census of the lands and people of England, was among his notable achievements. Upon the death of William I in 1087, his son, William Rufus, became William II, the second Norman king of England.

Bayeux Tapestry

The story of the Battle of Hastings and the Norman Conquest of England is told through the Bayeux Tapestry, a 230-foot-long masterpiece of medieval artistry. Probably commissioned by Bishop Odo, William the Conqueror’s half-brother, the tapestry consists of 58 detailed panels of woolen yarn embroidered on linen.

The Bayeux Tapestry was made in England sometime in the 11th century, making it a fairly contemporary record of the Battle of Hastings and other events of the Norman Conquest. Today it hangs in the Bayeux Tapestry Museum in Bayeux, France.

The Battle of Hastings: fact and fiction. British Library . The Bayeux Tapestry. Bayeux Museum . The Battle of Hastings. Historic UK . 

essay about the battle of hastings

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How did William the Conqueror and the Normans win at the Battle of Hastings in 1066

essay about the battle of hastings

The Battle of Hastings (1066) is perhaps the most famous in Medieval Britain, if not Europe. This bloody day changed British history and had a profound impact on the development of the modern world. It led not only to a change of dynasty in England but also indirectly to the development of the English language, law, and political institutions, which have had an immense impact far beyond the British Isles.

The battle followed in the wake of the Normans, landing on the southern coast of England. After defeating a Viking invasion at Stamford Bridge in the north of England, King Harold II headed south to meet the invaders. The two sides met at Hastings in Sussex on the 16th of October 1066. The battle lasted all day and only ended with the death of Harold II. At Hastings, the Normans routed the Anglo-Saxons, and this allowed them to conquer and occupy England. The Battle of 1066 is so famous that many think they know what happened. This is not the case, and there are many myths about the battle that many people accept as historical facts.

In reality, the surviving accounts of the Battle of Hastings are all suspect. They were either written by Anglo-Saxon writers who hated the Normans as foreign overlords, or they were authored by Normans who had an interest in misrepresenting events. This article will disentangle fact from fiction and truth from myth about the Battle of Hastings.

Why did the Normans Invade Britain?

essay about the battle of hastings

The background to Hastings was the death of Edward the Confessor, king of England from 1042-1066. He died without an heir, and this, as usual in the Middle Ages, led to a succession crisis. [1] There were two main contenders for the crown of England; Harold Godwinson, a member of one of the most powerful Anglo-Saxon families and Duke William of Normandy, the future William the Conqueror.

William and his Normans were the descendants of Norse Vikings who had been given land in northern France and were largely independent of the French King. The Anglo-Saxon had been the brother-in-law of Edmund the Confessor. It is widely reported from sources that the dying king made Harold his heir and left his widow and Kingdom in his care. However, there is a different Norman account, and it holds that Edward the Confessor during a period of exile made Duke William his heir if he died without an heir. Historians have long debated which claim was the strongest, and most believe that Harold was the legal heir of Edward the Successor.

The story that Duke William was the legitimate successor of Edward is unlikely and was Norman propaganda. Even if Edward had made him his heir, he had almost certainly changed his mind before his death. Indeed, Harold had even been legitimately elected by the Witan, the assembly of the Anglo-Saxons, and they viewed him as their rightful ruler. King Harold II was defending his realm at the battle, and William the Conqueror was an invader who had no real support in the wider country. The Battle of Hastings was the result of William's naked ambitions. [2]

Why were the Anglo-Saxons defeated at the Battle of Hastings?

The Anglo-Saxons were forced to march south at speed in the wake of their victory over the Norwegian King Harald Hardrada and his Anglo-Saxon allies at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. This was a bloody clash, and the forces of Harold suffered numerous casualties even though he decisively defeated the Viking army. The victors at Stamford Bridge then had to make a forced march from the north of England to the south coast, and it is widely argued that this was a contributory factor in the Anglo-Saxon defeat.

However, not all historians agree with this, and they point out that the army of Harold fought very well during the battle. Indeed, even in the Norman accounts, the Anglo-Saxons are fighting fiercely, from early morning until the evening. Based on the distance between the two battles, it would seem that the Anglo-Saxon army marched 27 miles (39 km) a day but that they had a day’s rest before the fight. [3] Indeed, Harold was able to seize the high ground and establish a strong defensive position on the battlefield. It is not correct to state that the Anglo-Saxons were tired after their forced march and earlier battle and that this led to their defeat at the hands of the Normans.

What happened at the Battle of Hastings?

The heavy infantry of the English was famous, and they carried long spears and shields. Harold’s Anglo-Saxons used their traditional battle tactic of a shield-wall. They would stand side-by-side, and their interlocking shields would form a solid wall. The shield-wall was very difficult to break down, and it was a tactic used very successfully by Alfred the Great against the Vikings. The infantry of Harold II set up a shield-wall on a hill, and broken ground, and they were in a powerful position. This is agreed to have been the right decision.

The Normans had to inflict a defeat on the English as they were in enemy territory and had only a limited supply. [4] This meant that William the Conqueror’s army was forced to go on the offensive, and it was essential that he broke the massed ranks of the heavy infantry of Harold. The Normans knew that if they broke the formation of the Anglo-Saxons that they would be victorious. From the early morning of the 18th of October, William attacked the Anglo-Saxon shield wall. They had numerical superiority in cavalry, and the Norman knights were among the finest in Europe. They still failed to break the shield-wall. Then William ordered his archers to unleash volleys of arrows at the enemy’s line. They were mostly Bretons and acknowledged to be great archers, but they could not break the English lines.

Norman and some Anglo-Saxon sources claim that the decisive moment in the battle was the Normans invaders' feigned retreat. William ordered his men to retreat, and this tempted the Anglo-Saxons to break their defensive formation and go on the offensive. [5] They left the high ground and the shield-wall was no longer intact. The Normans wheeled round and engaged the onrushing English, who were very exposed. The cavalry of William was able to inflict terrible casualties on the army of Harold II, and this maneuver turned the battle decisively in favor of the Normans. [6]

Did the death of Harold changed the tide of battle?

essay about the battle of hastings

In many modern accounts, the Battle of Hastings was closely fought, and as long as the Anglo-Saxons shield-wall held, they were able to repel the Normans. It is widely reported that the death of Harold changed the tide of battle. Until his death, the battle was headed to a bloody stalemate. The sudden death of the king of England changed the course of the clash and probably altered English and global history.

However, while it is known for certain that Harold was killed during the battle, his death did not doom the Anglo-Saxons to defeat. [7] The last Anglo-Saxon king was killed after the tide of battle had shifted decisively in favor of the invaders from France. The feigned retreat ordered by William had worked brilliantly, and his counterattack had effectively won the day. One of the greatest myths about the battle was that Harold’s death doomed the Anglo-Saxons to defeat and to their eventual domination by the Normans.

How did Harold die at the Battle?

One of the apparently undisputed facts about the battle was that King Harold II was killed after an arrow in the eye struck him. This is based on one account and a scene from the Bayeux Tapestry. This tapestry is a 70-foot-long (200 meters) work of embroidery that depicts the Battle of Hastings. It was created in the 1070s and is one of the most significant accounts for the events of 1066. It shows a man being hit by an arrow to the eye, which is widely believed to have been a visualization of the death of the last Anglo-Saxon king. However, there are different accounts of Harold's death, but they all agree that he died in battle. [8]

In one Norman chronicle, the Anglo-Saxon monarch was slain as he ran away, but this was probably an invention to discredit the memory of a man still revered by many people in England for decades after 1066. There is another account of Harold’s death that states he was hit by several arrows, and as he lay wounded, he was hacked to pieces by some foot soldiers. How Harold died on that fateful day in October 1066 will never be fully established, and even the burial place of the last Anglo-Saxon king has not been identified. [9]

Did the Anglo-Saxons continue to fight the Normans after the Battle of Hastings?

In most historical accounts, the Battle of Hastings is so decisive that it ended all resistance against the Norman invaders and the Normans were able to impose their will on England. The reality is more complicated. While the Battle was decisive, resistance to the invaders remained. While the English nobles had submitted to William before his coronation as King in Westminster Abbey in 1066, Norman control was somewhat challenged. The Harold's repeatedly raided the coast of England from Ireland, and there were sporadic revolts against William I.

In 1069 the Danes landed in northern England to support a rebellion by the Northern Anglo-Saxon Earls. The Norman king was forced to pay the Danes to leave England. When the rebels refused to do battle, William the Conqueror launched a scorched earth policy, which caused a famine. This came to be known as the Harrying of the North, and some modern writers claim that it was tantamount to an act of genocide against the local population. The facts do not bear out the myth that the Battle of Hastings was the conquest's end. [10] Indeed, it was only in 1070 with the complete suppression of the Northern Earls.

There are many myths around the Battle of Hastings. Instead of being a contest for the English crown, it was an illegitimate bid for power by William, who had a weak claim to the English throne. Next, Harold's army did not lose the battle because of a forced march, nor did Harold's death turn the tide of war because he died after the Normans had taken advantage. William's feigned retreat was brilliant, which led to a decisive victory. Finally, William’s victory in 1066 did not resistance to the Norman invaders. English rebels fought for another four years before William consolidated control over England.

Further Reading

Palliser, D. M. (1993). Domesday Book and the ‘Harrying of the North.' Northern History, 29(1), 1-23.

Brown, R. Allen. The Normans and the Norman conquest (Leeds, Boydell & Brewer Ltd, 1985).

Chibnall, Marjorie. The debate on the Norman Conquest (Manchester, Manchester University Press, 1999).

Bradbury, Jim. Battle of Hastings. (London, The History Press, 2010).

  • ↑ Lawson, M. K. The Battle of Hastings: 1066 (Stroud, UK: Tempus, 2002), p 12
  • ↑ Marren, Peter. 1066: The Battles of York, Stamford Bridge & Hastings. Battleground Britain. (Barnsley, UK: Leo Cooper, 2007), p. 113
  • ↑ Marren, p 201
  • ↑ Morillo, Stephen. "Hastings: an unusual battle." In Medieval Warfare 1000–1300, (London, Routledge, 2017) pp. 313-321
  • ↑ Bachrach, Bernard S. "The feigned retreat at Hastings." Mediaeval Studies 33 (1971): 344-347
  • ↑ Morillo, p 318
  • ↑ Marren, p 119
  • ↑ Marren, p 118
  • ↑ Rex, Peter. Harold II: The Doomed Saxon King (Stroud, UK: Tempus, 2005), p 119
  • ↑ Lawson, p 118
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essay about the battle of hastings

Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings Essay

Introduction, preliminary stage, belligerents’ forces, battle chronology.

Bibliography

The Battle of Hastings had substantial meaning for the further history of the English lands. It is interesting to analyze whether the outcome of the battle could be an alternative to the real one.

Could Harold prevent the landing of the Norman army on the shore of the English Channel? Such possibility is rather doubtful. Before the Battle of Hastings, the English army fought at Stamford Bridge. The battle was also rather exhausting and involved whole Harold’s military power. To leave some troops near the English Channel would be not reasonable: firstly, the exact date of William’s landing could not be predicted; besides, the minor force could not resist the whole power of William’s troops.

Analogically, it is difficult to find any possibility for Harold to thwart William’s preparations for the battle. As soon as Harold was informed about Normans’, he led his troops toward the English Channel. When the Anglo-Saxons neared, William’s forces were aware of that rather quickly. Besides, the event of Hastings was rather swift: on October 11, Harold’s troops were in London; in two days, William’s scouts found Anglo-Saxon army; and, finally, October 14, a dynamic one-day battle took place. Thus, it is difficult to talk about any preliminary maneuver, possible for Harold. Only the battle itself can be argued in terms of a possible alternative outcome.

It is difficult to talk about any numerical superiority: different sources provide different estimations of the belligerents’ strength: from 7 to 12 thousand. However, it is considered that either the armies were equal, or the Normans had a slight superiority. It is more important to focus on the qualitative characteristic of the sides.

The structure of William’s army was rather diverse: it included both cavalry and infantry. It was perfectly armed and included high-class warriors. Cavalry was equipped with swords, spears, shields, and bows with arrows. Horses were also armored thoroughly. William was supported by Bretons, Flemings, and the French. The Normans built three wooden fortifications (Creasy 193).

English army was exhausted by the previous battles and a swift passage from the North. Harold did not manage to gather enough reinforcement to join his ranks. His troops included only infantry, armed rather heterogeneously. The core of Harold’s troops was the fyrdmen and the housecarls. English troops are also considered to have built a fortification (Creasy 192).

It is reasonable to mention one more weapon which seems to be significant in this battle: the sides’ morale. William had performed himself as a perfect leader; his words of encouragement and the effort put into uniting the warriors passed into history. At the same time, being tired of the previous battles, the English army was rather relaxed and “spent time in feasting and rejoicing, singing songs, and quaffing bumpers of ale and wine” (Chambers 444).

The struggle was rather tense and did promise any predictable outcome. The first two attacks of the Normans were not successful: the English troops were dislocated at the height, and the Normans’ arrows could not make much harm to them. Finally, the Norman army used the tactics of not synchronous false retreat, making Harold’s soldiers leave their shelter and break ranks without proper coordination. Their fortification was also occupied by the Normans (Malam 22). Therefore, the Anglo-Saxon army was lured to the campaign, where it could not hide. Defenseless and disunited, it was soon defeated by William’s soldiers.

Thus, it is possible to define three main errors of Harold’s warfare: first of all, he did not manage to strengthen his army significantly during its passage to the battle place; besides, he did not manage to support the troops’ morale and provide the warriors’ unity, which led to badly coordinated actions at the battlefield; finally, the counter-attack, poorly thought-out and spontaneous, left the troops without any defense facing well-armed William’s army. It would be more reasonable to keep close to the fortification, as the troops did not have superiority; perhaps, involving more archers together with keeping the defensive attitude would be more reasonable for Harold’s army, as this would allow keeping the distant, protected position.

It is rather difficult to assume that, after the battle, the English lands were able to resist William’s conquest. Theoretically, it was possible right after the struggle, when his troops had serious losses and were having rest. However, after the English army was defeated, and Harold was killed, the English had no strength to struggle. One by one, the representatives of the English top conformed to William.

They also could hardly resist, taking into account that William received the reinforcement coming across the English Channel. One of the slight, but probable opportunities to get rid of William’s invasion was during the time of the northern revolts. It took William much effort to come to the North every time and suppress the revolts. If the revolts took place throughout the English land, this could unsettle William’s force.

Chambers, Robert. The Book of Days, a Miscellany of Popular Antiquities in Connection with the Calendar, Including Anecdote, Biography, & History, Curiosities of Literature and Oddities of Human Life and Character . London; Edinburgh: W. & R. Chambers Ltd., 1906. Print.

Creasy, Edward S. The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World; from Marathon to Waterloo . New York, Harper, 1863. Print.

Malam, John. The Battle of Hastings . Slough: Cherrytree, 2007. Print.

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IvyPanda. (2021, December 19). Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings. https://ivypanda.com/essays/anglo-saxon-britain-the-battle-of-hastings/

"Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings." IvyPanda , 19 Dec. 2021, ivypanda.com/essays/anglo-saxon-britain-the-battle-of-hastings/.

IvyPanda . (2021) 'Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings'. 19 December.

IvyPanda . 2021. "Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings." December 19, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/anglo-saxon-britain-the-battle-of-hastings/.

1. IvyPanda . "Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings." December 19, 2021. https://ivypanda.com/essays/anglo-saxon-britain-the-battle-of-hastings/.

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Exemplar essay analysis: Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?

Exemplar essay analysis: Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?

A really useful introduction to essay writing for key stage 3 students in the context of the Norman Conquest. An example essay (on ‘Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?’) is provided, and students are tasked with marking it. Using the hamburger analogy, they look for successful topic sentences, 'meaty' fillings and good concluding explanations. They also have the opportunity to identify weaker points and improve them.

Extract from the essay

The Battle of Hastings took place in 1066 because King Edward had died leaving the English throne without an heir. Harold Godwinson seized the throne but he had two rivals, Harald Hardrada and William of Normandy. William eventually won the battle and the throne of England, and this piece of writing explains why.

One reason that William won was because he was better prepared for the battle than Harold. He had over two weeks to get ready after landing in Pevensey Bay. His men were well fed and rested. Harold, on the other hand, had just fought Harald Hardrada at Stamford Bridge and had to march back down south to fight William. Some of his army had been killed, others were injured, and they were all tired from the long march.

Another major reason that William won the battle was because his army was better than Harold’s. Lots of Harold’s men were just farmers, but all the Norman soldiers had good weapons. This meant that William was in a strong position at the start of the battle.

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Exemplar essay analysis: why did William win the Battle of Hastings? Why did William win the Battle of Hastings

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essay about the battle of hastings

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Ancient Origins

The Impact of the Battle of Hastings on British History (Video)

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The  Battle of Hastings  in 1066 stands as a watershed moment in British history, reshaping the trajectory of the nation for centuries to come. Prior to this pivotal clash, England was a patchwork of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, each with its own distinct identity and rulers. The Norman invasion, spearheaded by  William the Conqueror , shattered this fragmented landscape, thrusting England into a new era of foreign rule and continental influence.

  • A Red Dawn Rises - The Battle of Hastings, 1066
  • The Dramatic History of the Normans: A Tale of Medieval Conquest

William's claim to the English throne ignited the conflict, driven by his conviction in his rightful succession and backed by papal support. The battle itself, while brief, was fiercely contested, with William's cunning strategy eventually overcoming the stalwart Anglo-Saxon shield wall.  King Harold II's demise  on the battlefield sealed England's fate, as William seized the crown and marched triumphantly to London.

The aftermath of Hastings reverberated throughout Britain, heralding profound changes in governance, society, and culture. William's consolidation of power saw the introduction of feudalism, a restructuring of land ownership, and the infusion of Norman customs and language into English society. Moreover, England became more closely intertwined with continental Europe, laying the groundwork for future conflicts and alliances that would shape the course of European history.

The  Norman Conquest  was not merely a military conquest; it was a seismic event that reshaped the political and cultural landscape of Britain, leaving an indelible mark on its history and identity.

Top image:   Norman Victory: An Iconic Scene from the Battle of Hastings. Source:  Mr. Bolota /Adobe Stock

By  Robbie Mitchell

Robbie Mitchell's picture

I’m a graduate of History and Literature from The University of Manchester in England and a total history geek. Since a young age, I’ve been obsessed with history. The weirder the better. I spend my days working as a freelance... Read More

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The Battle Of Hastings (Essay Sample) 2023

The battle of hastings.

In 1066 October 14th the battle of hastings was fought  between an English army under the leadership of Anglo Saxon king Harold and the Norman French army of the duke of Normandy,William.starting the  Norman conquest of England, it took about eleven kilometer northwest of hasting, close to the present day town-battle .the Noman took home victory. The back ground of or what transpired to the battle was the death of the king Edward the confessor who was childless in the year 1066.it is because of this death that several people came to claim the throne. Harald claimed the throne and shortly he was given the crown after the death of Edward. This did not last for long as herald was overturned by his brother; William. This essay seeks to describe how the event in the battle began and how the battle of hasting is still recalled

Duke, of Normandy, Harold Godwinson, and earl of Wessex plus there army fought at a place called hasting. This battle did not take long because after 9 hour the battle was over. All this was to claim the throne of England. Unknown Numbers of men were killed in the battle but at the end William killed Harold and won the war. This enabled him take the throne of England. The battle of hasting was won by William because of various reasons, one, William had belter skills at that war this is seen when Harold put his powerful army on a hill but William was full of enough power and determination to kill and finish the war. William managed to strengthen his army by persuading the strong French noble to fight for him during battle as he promised them that he will give the land if hewins the war.This gave William a breakthrough to his battle.While Harold was busy in the battle with his enemy Harald Hardrada, William was successfully preparing his army for war and forced Harold into it hence managing to clinch the victory. At the battle William assures his army that he is ok by removing the helmet. This gave strength to the army. Harold made a mistake by following the army of William at the time they started evacuating. William used this opportunity to finish most of the soldiers and since he had directed that arrows should be focused above the shield, they got an advantage to kill some of the soldiers. Harold did not allow his soldier to at least take some rest after the war but instead he went to war directly. The battle of hasting turned to a horrible event since men lost their lives in the process. The Victory goes to the William side because William Had a well-established strategy of winning. The winds changed the direction allowing William to fully prepare the army. Harold is disadvantaged in this process because he was not lucky enough. All this happened due to strategy of winning and using Harold’s mistakes and weakness to win. Although Harold took professional soldiers to the war but William had a power army armored with horses and strong rods which acted as an advantage to William.Due to all this preparation and advantages of the wind and tricks, William managed to put an arrow through Harold’s eye and gave him the victory. William claimed the throne and established his rule in the England.

In conclusion the battle of hasting is a battle that has seen fights arise due to the death of the king.as a result many claimed the throne which later emerged to a war. Harold took the throne but was later overturned by his brother William. William strategies his tactics in the battle and finally he claimed the thrown after a big preparation of the battle. The battle of Hastings was mainly on the throne and to have power over England.

essay about the battle of hastings

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May 10, 2024

essay about the battle of hastings

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  1. The Battle Of Hastings: Duke Of Normandy, Earl Of Wessex, King Of

    essay about the battle of hastings

  2. The Battle of Hastings Handout

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  3. The Battle of Hastings Facts, Worksheets, Context, Causes, Harolds Death

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  4. Battle of Hastings Year 7

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  5. The Battle of Hastings 1066

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  1. The Battle Of Hastings #history #hastingsbattle #shorts

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  3. Battle of Hastings, Was here or near? Powder Mill Lane, Battle, Hastings, 2024

  4. Battle of Hastings, Was here or near? Powder Mill Lane, Battle, Hastings, 2024

  5. Battle of Hastings, Was here or near? Powder Mill Lane, Battle, Hastings, 2024

  6. Battle of Hastings, Was here or near? Powder Mill Lane, Battle, Hastings, 2024

COMMENTS

  1. Battle of Hastings

    Battle of Hastings, battle on October 14, 1066, that ended in the defeat of Harold II of England by William, duke of Normandy, and established the Normans as the rulers of England. Edward the Confessor and Duke William of Normandy, from the Bayeux Tapestry, embroidery, 11th century, located at the Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux, Bayeux, France.

  2. Battle of Hastings: Facts, Date & William the Conqueror

    Detail from the Bayeux Tapestry. (Culture Club/Getty Images) At the Battle of Hastings on October 14, 1066, King Harold II of England was defeated by the invading Norman forces of William the ...

  3. The Battle of Hastings

    The events of the battle. The Battle of Hastings began at 9am on 14 October 1066. Harold's army was lined up at the top of Senlac Hill, forming a shield wall facing down against William's army.

  4. Battle of Hastings

    The Battle of Hastings was fought on 14 October 1066 between the Norman-French army of William, the Duke of Normandy, and an English army under the Anglo-Saxon King Harold Godwinson, beginning the Norman Conquest of England.It took place approximately 7 mi (11 km) northwest of Hastings, close to the present-day town of Battle, East Sussex, and was a decisive Norman victory.

  5. Battle of Hastings

    The Battle of Hastings in south-east England on 14 October 1066 saw the defeat of the Anglo- Saxon king Harold II (r. Jan-Oct 1066) by the invading Norman army led by William, Duke of Normandy (reigned from 1035). After a day of heavy fighting, the Norman cavalry eventually proved more effective than the Anglo-Saxon infantry.

  6. How did William the Conqueror and the Normans win at the Battle of

    The background to Hastings was the death of Edward the Confessor, king of England from 1042-1066. He died without an heir, and this, as usual in the Middle Ages, led to a succession crisis. There were two main contenders for the crown of England; Harold Godwinson, a member of one of the most powerful Anglo-Saxon families and Duke William of Normandy, the future William the Conqueror.

  7. Battle Analysis of Hastings (1066)

    The Battle of Hastings. The Battle of Hastings occurred on 14 October 1066 approximately 7 miles northwest of the town of Hastings on Senlac Hill, England. The battle was fought between the Anglo- Saxon King Harold Godwinson against Duke William of Normandy. This battle showed the correct use of planning a defensive position based on terrain.

  8. Anglo-Saxon Britain: The Battle of Hastings Essay

    Besides, the event of Hastings was rather swift: on October 11, Harold's troops were in London; in two days, William's scouts found Anglo-Saxon army; and, finally, October 14, a dynamic one-day battle took place. Thus, it is difficult to talk about any preliminary maneuver, possible for Harold. Only the battle itself can be argued in terms ...

  9. The Battle Of Hastings Essay

    Next William, Duke of Normandy invaded England and defeated Harold Godwineson at the Battle of Hastings. This essay is on why William won this crucial battle. When Harold Godwineson took the English throne he had to weigh up the two threats from both the North …show more content…. Harold Godwineson then sent his men off to fight William's ...

  10. Essay analysis: Battle of Hastings

    The Battle of Hastings took place in 1066 because King Edward had died leaving the English throne without an heir. Harold Godwinson seized the throne but he had two rivals, Harald Hardrada and William of Normandy. William eventually won the battle and the throne of England, and this piece of writing explains why.

  11. The Battle of Hastings, 14th October 1066

    Some historians believe that Harold's leadership and tactics caused the English defeat at the Battle of Hastings. Harold used the strategy of the shield wall. At this point in history, shield walls were a traditional warfare method. The Normans were highly skilled and well-prepared for a shield wall. William developed new and innovative methods ...

  12. Why did William win at the Battle of Hastings?

    The battle was fought from sunrise to sunset. The death of Harold II towards the end of the day played a large part in the Norman victory at Hastings but what role did luck, morale and military ...

  13. The Battle of Hastings

    On the 14th of October 1066, Duke William of Normandy defeated King Harold at the Battle of Hastings. His win could be summed up by the fact that William was a better leader. Other factors that contributed to William's victory include: William was better prepared, the English army was severely weakened as Harold had just fought off an ...

  14. Exemplar essay analysis: why did William win the Battle of Hastings

    Exemplar essay analysis: why did William win the Battle of Hastings? Why did William win the Battle of Hastings? The Battle of Hastings took place in 1066 because King Edward had died leaving the English throne without an heir. Harold Godwinson seized the throne but he had two rivals, Harald Hardrada and William of Normandy.

  15. A Analytical Review Of The Battle Of Hastings History Essay

    In October 14, 1066, the tragic Battle of Hastings took place. It was fought between the Norman Army of Duke William II of Normandy and the English army of King Harold II. The battle took place at Senlac Hill, about 6 miles northwest of Hastings. Harold II was killed during the battle; historians predict or believe that he was shot through the ...

  16. The Impact of the Battle of Hastings on British History (Video)

    The Battle of Hastings in 1066 stands as a watershed moment in British history, reshaping the trajectory of the nation for centuries to come. Prior to this pivotal clash, England was a patchwork of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, each with its own distinct identity and rulers. The Norman invasion, spearheaded by William the Conqueror, shattered this fragmented landscape, thrusting England into a new era ...

  17. The Battle Of Hastings Essay

    William the Conqueror won the Battle of Hastings-1066 The Battle of Hastings, was the turning point for the English Civilization. In this battle, William the Conqueror, the Duke of Normandy defeats Harold the Saxon. With the defeat of Harold the Saxon, William, Duke of Normandy, was able to ascend to the English throne.

  18. The Battle of Hastings: Sources and Interpretations

    The Battle of Hastings Stephen Morillo, 1999, 227 pages This is a book of essays and frankly I found it less than ideal personally. Some of the essays are very old and scholarship has moved on since they were written. ... The Battle of Hastings (Brown) 1980 This essay was written by a historian happy to credit the Normans with some positives ...

  19. Battle Of Hastings Essay

    Battle Of Hastings Dbq The Battle of Hastings happened on the 14th of October 1066 in East Sussex - which is outside of Hastings. The battle was between Harold Godwinson and William, duke of Normandy. There are three main reasons why William won the Battle of Hastings; this is because William had a 'head start' and he also has cavalry.

  20. PDF "The Battle of Hastings" James Harvey Robinson (1904) Medieval

    The Battle of Hastings, 1066. The courageous leaders mutually prepared for battle, each according to his national custom. The English, as we have heard, passed the night without sleep, in drinking and singing, and in the morning proceeded without delay against the enemy. All on foot, armed with battle-axes, and covering themselves in front by ...

  21. The Battle Of Hastings Essay Sample 202

    The Battle of Hastings. In 1066 October 14th the battle of hastings was fought between an English army under the leadership of Anglo Saxon king Harold and the Norman French army of the duke of Normandy,William.starting the Norman conquest of England, it took about eleven kilometer northwest of hasting, close to the present day town-battle .the ...

  22. The Battle Of Hastings Essay.pdf

    1. The Battle Of Hastings Essay Writing an essay on the Battle of Hastings can be both challenging and rewarding. The difficulty lies not only in the extensive historical research required but also in the need to present a cohesive and engaging narrative.

  23. The Battle Of Hastings Essay

    2. Battle Of Hastings Dbq The Battle of Hastings happened on the 14th of October 1066 in East Sussex - which is outside of Hastings. The battle was between Harold Godwinson and William, duke of Normandy. There are three main reasons why William won the Battle of Hastings; this is because William had a 'head start' and he also has cavalry.

  24. The Voice Coach Battle game on Sandbox

    The Sandbox, a decentralised gaming platform and a subsidiary of Animoca Brands, has announced its partnership with the Virtual Brand Group (VBG), a metaverse pioneer known for building immersive experiences, virtual commerce and digital fashion, and their collaborator ITV Studios, to launch The Voice Coach Battle, a Web3 gaming experience based on ITV Studios' The Voice TV format with 155 ...